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The Ubyssey Sep 14, 1976

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 CUPE walkout threatens campus
The Canadian Union of Public
Employees local 116, representing
UBC's 1,500 support staff, voted
Sunday ph per cent in favor of
striking against the university
administration.
A strike could come as early as
Sunday.
CUPE members staff vital
services such as physical plant,
food services, UBC hospitals and
student residences.
Local 116 president Ken Andrews
said Monday job security and
money are the two main issues in
dispute.
CUPE's last contract expired
March 13 and the union and the
administration have been
negotiating all summer to reach an
agreement on a new one.
Andrews said CUPE is seeking a
wage increase of 12 per cent or $120
a month, whichever is greatest, for
all members except 100 maintenance tradesmen.
The plumbers, electricians,
gardeners, carpenters and others
in this group have traditionally
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LIX, No. 1       VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 1976
228-2301
received 90 per cent as much as off-
campus, tradesman and Andrews
said CUPE wants to stick with this
arrangement.
The university is offering an
increase of eight per cent of the
total pay package in the last
contract, claiming its financial
situation and the federal Anti-
Inflation Board regulations rule
out a higher increase.
CUPE and administration
negotiators meet Tuesday with a
provincial mediator to try to
resolve the dispute and the CUPE
executive meet Thursday to decide
whether to serve 72-hour strike
notice.
In talks during the summer,
provincial mediator J. E.
Waterston failed to bring the two
sides together. Waterston adjourned talks July 22.
Andrews said CUPE wants a
contract which will protect union
members against being laid off
because of university budget
constraints or technological
change.
"We don't want to sit around and
watch our jobs being eroded by
budget restrictions," he said.
The union also wants to keep the
university from bringing contractors onto the campus to do
work normally handled by CUPE
members.
Andrews said he is optimistic the
union and the administration can
come to an agreement and avoid a
strike.
"We are making headway. If the
university wants a settlement then
so do we, but we intend to take a
strong position.
"We enjoy the contract as it
stands now."
He said negotiations will
probably boil down to the wage
issue and other monetary issues
such as sick time, vacation pay and
working hours.
The administration is also
negotiating with the Office and
Technical Employees Union,
representing Alma Mater Society
clerical staff and others. The
OTEU contract expired March 31.
The last time there was a strike
at UBC was December, 1975 when
the Association of University and
College Employees, representing
library and clerical workers on
campus, set up picket lines at the
entrances to the university.
Rents zoom up,
few vacancies
QUARTERBACK   ON   THE   RUN,  Greg  Gardiner   (14)   of   UBC -doug field photo
Thunderbirds takes off Saturday with University of Alberta Golden       quarter  to lead  UBC  to 20-13 victory at Thunderbird Stadium.
Bear defenders in hot pursuit. Gardiner came off bench late in second        (Stories, another picture, page 19).
Board dumps Hispanic studies head
ByBILLTIELEMAN
The head of UBC's Hispanic and
Italian studies department has
been dismissed, but neither the
administration* nor his colleagues
will say exactly why.
Harold Livermore's administrative appointment as
department head was terminated
at a Sept. 7 board of governors
meeting, UBC information officer
Al Hunter said Monday.
Hunter said the board's action
does not affect Livermore's
academic standing as a professor
at UBC.
Livermore had been department
head since 1967, Hunter said.
Board chairman Thomas Dohm
said Monday Livermore's
dismissal was based on Livermore's inability to handle the
administrative end of the position.
Dohm said in an interview the
board decision "in no way cast a
reflection on Livermore's ability
as a professor."
Pat Chubb, chairwoman of the
board's staff committee, said
Monday the decision to dismiss
Livermore was made over a period
of several months, during which
the board reviewed various
correspondence   regarding
Livermore's handling of the
department.
Chubb refused to name sources
of the correspondence or specific
charges.
Chubb said the staff committee
members, Sadie Boyles, George
Hermanson, Ben Trevino, UBC
chancellor   Donovan   Miller   and
university president Doug Kenny,
studied the Livermore case and
reported their findings to the full
board.
Chubb said the issue was brought
to a vote at the Sept. 7 board
meeting and the decision to
dismiss Livermore was approved.
Livermore refused to comment on
why the board had dismissed him.
Kenny refused to comment on
the Livermore case, directing all
inquiries to the arts dean, Robert
Will. Will also refused to comment
on Livermore's dismissal or on the
condition of the Hispanic and
Italian studies department.
Seepage 7: PROFS
Head starts term by leaving
UBC's creative writing department has a new head . . . but he
won't be around this year.
Douglass Bankson, the department's new head, will be on sab-
bit tical for the first year of his new
job.
Bankson, who was a member of
the committee which chose the
department head until he became a
candidate himself, said Monday
his sabbatical was granted well
before he was considered as
department head.
"The leave was planned for a
long time," he said "I originally
had no plans to be head."
Bankson said the committee had
difficulty selecting a replacement
for former head Robert Harlow.
He said the committee wanted a
Canadian for the position, and
"approached everyone in Canada
who was likely to be a head, people
who were both writers and
academics.
"We approached people such as
Margaret Laurence, who declined
to be considered.
"If people are getting by free
lancing,, they don't want to take on
another load," Bankson said.
Bankson is an American citizen,
but has had landed immigrant
status in Canada for 11 years.
Peter Remnant, assistant dean
of arts and head of the selection
committee, said  Bankson's sab
batical was "a nuisance but not a
big problem."
"Ii we had decided on someone
from outside the department, and
they had said they could come in a
year, we would still accept them."
Bankson joined the department
in 1965 as a visiting professor and
was asked to stay. He was
previously playright in residence
at the University of Montana and
has been acting head of UBC's
department twice, once in 1967-68
and again in 1970-71.
Department member Jake
Zilber will be acting head this year.
Zilber, Bankson said, is an original
member of the department.
Looking for a nice, clean,
spacious and inexpensive place off-
campus to live in this year?
If you haven't found one yet, you
may be in deep trouble.
However, if you want to live on-
campus in one of UBC's three
residences, cheer up, because
there are still a few vacancies left.
Dave Johnson, co-ordinator for
the administration-run UBC off-
campus housing office, estimates
between 500 and 1,000 people have
not yet found a place to live.
"The need for housing is worse
this year than for the 1975-76 year,"
Johnson said Monday. "The flow
has tapered off somewhat, but the
worst rush occurred about three
weeks ago."
Johnson said a combination of
factors has produced the poor
housing situation. "The first
reason for the off-campus housing
shortage is a greater number of
people who are looking for less
accommodation than was
available last year," he said.
"Next, the price for suites and
private accommodation has
skyrocketed. Basement suites
show the highest increase; about 30
to 40 per cent." He said the
average one bedroom basement
suite costs $200 to $250 per month.
"Although other types of accommodation have been restricted
to the 10.6 per cent increase in rent,
only an extremely limited number
of room and board and
housekeeping suites are
available," he said.
Johnson said people living near
UBC have responded better to the
call for student housing than in
previous years but there is only so
much accommodation  available.
"In previous years a landlord
would telephone the office and
state he had accommodation
available and set the rent price,"
he said. "I'd talk to the person and
say, 'Hey, these people are only
students. They can't afford that
rent price.' In turn, he'd say:
"Well, what can they afford?' We'd
talk a little and finally reach a
reasonable price."
However, Johnson said this year
people are setting a fixed rent and
are refusing to budge. "It's really
terrible," he said. "There's just no
use in even trying to talk to those
people."
Johnson warned students against
attempting to go to a commercial
rental agency.
"It's nothing but a disgusting ripoff," he said. "These people and
their companies were run out of
Vancouver-some time ago but they
have only moved to Burnaby where
there's no by-law to protect people
looking for a place to live."
Johnson said people looking for
off-campus housing can only
continue to keep looking and
checking and be patient.
The picture is brighter for those
people who have waited in line for
residence in Place Vanier, Totem
Park and Walter Gage residences.
See page 7: EMPTY Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 14, 1976
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THE       UBYSSEY
Page 3
Loan money available-Hender
By LEN MACKAVE
Are student blues getting you
down?
Have you been shuffled from
department to department and
heard rumours that no money is
available?
Are you still waiting for your
forms to come back from Victoria
where judgment has been passed?
Good news may be only a few
days away, Byron Hender, director
of student awards, said Monday.
Hender estimated that the
provincial government has.
allocated more than $30 million for
students in need of aid, and there
are also fewer applicants than last
year.
"The maximum amount given
out this year will be $3,300, as was
the case last year," Hender said.
"The first $600 will be in the form
of student loan and any additional
monies awarded will be in the form
of a loan or a grant ratio, about 50-
50."
Hender said application
processing has gone reasonably
well this year and some changes
made  by   the   government   in
UBC ski cabin
ordered closed
by inspectors
By DEB van der GRACHT
Depite $55,000 worth of
renovations to UBC's ski cabin at
Whistler Mountain since 1975, the
cabin has been closed for failing to
meet fire standards.
Byron Tung, assistant building
inspector for the Whistler area,
says the cabin needs a fire alarm
system, better ventilation and
natural lighting, less crowding in
the dorms, handrails on the stairs,
and a bathtub.
The cabin was closed Aug. 17.
"It's incredibly ridiculous,"
Tung told The Ubyssey Friday.
"If there was ever a fire, there'd
be all those people running around
in the dark unable to find the way
out."
Ski club officials estimate it will
cost an additional $5,000 to meet
the fire standards with a proposed
reopening in early October.
Herb Dhaliwal, finance director
for the student administrative
council (SAC), said that while the
renovations done so far have been
good, the fire alarm system should
have gone in first.
"Priorities were wrong,"
Dhaliwal said. "We recommend
that no one stay there until the
cabin is fixed."
Jim Murray, Whistler area
building inspector, said Monday
somebody should have asked about
the fire priorities for the cabin.
"What I'm worried about is
someone being asphyxiated,
burned or crumpled in there. I'm
worried about the things that keep
people alive."
The ski club began borrowing
money from the Alma Mater
Society last year to upgrade the
cabin which was built in 1965, said
club membership chairman Ken
Goodwin.
"It was built in seven weeks with
volunteer labor, and in some
places, it shows. We've done a lot
workon that cabin."
The ski club took control of the
cabin from the Varsity Outdoors
Club in 1974.
With a $55,000 loan from the
AMS, the club put in a septic tank
system, running water, plumbing
and electric heating. Although the
cabin has showers, Tung said a
bathtub is also required under the
National Building Code.
Tung also said the cabin has been
overcrowded in the past and should
legally sleep only 55 people a night.
In addition to the crowds, other fire
hazards include no exit signs and
lack of windows, he said.
criteria haven't caused any snags
yet.
"The changes made were only
small ones, nothing major," he
said. "The system is more complicated and will take a little bit
longer, but in the long run will
prove its worth."
Hender said the,process of appeals is longer than last year and
the B.C. Student Loan Appeals
committee is meeting early -next
month.
"The committee includes two
representatives of the British
Columbia Students' Federation so
I'm sure all appeals will be han
dled fairly with the student in
mind."
Hender said some additional
changes are for the advantage of
the student to reflect the realities
of the students and their
possessions.
"In the past, the student was
expected to make a contribution if
he had worked that summer," he
said. "If someone really tried to
look for work and wasn't able to
find any, naturally it is impossible
for him to contribute.
"It's the student who hasn't
really looked for work or hasn't
made a reasonable effort as far as
registering with Manpower who
will find the criteria a little more
defined this year."
He said students must realize
that there isn't a bottomless well
full of money waiting to be taken
and spent.
"Limited money is available and
only a basic allowance will be paid
out," he said.
"By a limited basic allowance
we mean approximately $275 a
month in addition to fees and
books. Many students don't really
realize how much is available,"
Hender said.
"UBC    usually    takes    ap
proximately 50 per cent of the
funds allocated. This year that
would be close to $15 million."
Hender also said university
applicants for bursaries and
scholarships will probably have to
wait until September or October
before they receive any funds.
"The process of notification is
unusually slow this year," he said.
More than 4,400 applications have
already been processed while the
backlog is about 800 to 900, Hender
said.
Applications for financial aid
will be accepted until the fourth
week of classes.
REPORTER WALKER ... only woman in vacated office
— matt king photo
SAC expels women's office from SUB
By HEATHER WALKER
UBC's women's office no longer
exists.
The student administrative
council — the body responsible for
managing SUB and allocating
space in the building — closed the
office, located in SUB 230 since
1971, after members of the student
representative .assembly failed to
overrule the SAC's June 29 motion
to evict the women's office staff.
Dave Van Blarcom, Alma Mater
Society president, charged Monday that the SAC evicted the staff
from the office before finding a
new use for the space.
"That was the stupidest thing
they could ever do, to kick them out
with nobody to replace them," Van
Blarcom said.
But the office will not be empty
for long, Van Blarcom said. The
SAC and SRA will use it as a
workroom where they will keep
their files and work on projects, he
said.
Van Blarcom said the SAC
evicted the group because the
Women' Office did not constitute a
club, as groups requesting space in
SUB are required to do under the
AMS constitution.
The SRA, the political half of the
AMS and made up of undergraduate society members and
student representatives to the
senate and the board of governors,
has the power to overrule any
decision of the SAC, Van Blarcom
said.
"We had a motion to overrule in
this case, but it failed by a vote of
four to four," Van Blarcom said.
"In fact, I'm not even sure if it
was legal. The quorum for an SRA
meeting in the summer is 11, and
there were only eight members
present."
Van Blarcom said the decision to
evict the women's office, should
never have taken place during the
summer when so few of the people
affected by the decision were
present.
"The SAC might be forgiven for
this because most of them are new
and they may be naive. The SRA
you can't forgive because they've
been around the AMS for a long
time.
Brent Tynan, director of services
for the SAC, said he felt the SAC
had "made every effort to sit down
with women's office representatives and explain the reasons for
constituting as an AMS club like
everyone else who uses the
building.
"They refused to say why not,
and   they   just   screamed   and
laughed at us when we tried to
explain."
But Nicola Sumner, a former
member of the women's office,
said the group tried to explain why
they could not become a club, and
were met by continued requests to
repeat their explanations.
"The office has always been a
special organization of the AMS,
and as it operated as a service
organization offering counselling
and information, could not be
considered a club.
"They kept telling us 'you gotta
become a club', with a president
and secretary, and a constitution,
and we kept telling them that we
couldn't because that's not what
we're about, Sumner said.
"Women'sliberationisnota club."
She said after the group had been
ordered to leave the office, they
received a letter from the SAC
stating they could apply for space
in SUB.
"We decided we could hardly go
back to the people who kicked us
out and beg for more space," she
said.
"If they had ever been serious
about offering us space, they could
have done so at the beginning."
Tynan said the SAC had offered
the group relocation in a smaller
See page 7: HACK
Parlor opens tonight
Pizza and beer will replace
hamburgers and milk every night
in the SUB cafeteria snack bar
beginning today at 7 p.m.
The new SUB pizza parlor will
offer beer, wine, cider and pop
over the counter from 7 p.m. to
midnight Monday to Thursday and
7 p.m. to 12:30 a.m. Friday and
Saturday.
A night at the parlor will be
cheap, said Dennis Zomar, head of
SUB food services. Generally, our
prices are 26 to 46 per cent lower
than a comparable pizza place in
the city, he said.
A 16-inch pizza will cost about
$4.50 at the SUB parlor compared
to $6 for a 14-inch pizza from a local
restaurant.
Booze prices will be identical to
Pit charges: 60 cents for bottled
beer, $1.25 for imported, 85 cents
for B.C. cider, $1.85 to $3.20 per
bottle for seven Canadian wines
and $3.45 to $4.40 per bottle for
three imported wines.
"The concept of our pizza parlor
is to offer good food and drink to
the students at a time and in an
atmosphere not offered before,"
Zomar said. The parlor will
provide an alternative to the Pit,
which is generally packed, he said.
The parlor operations will be
managed by Marvin Woolley who
will head a part-time staff of about
30 people. They will be paid the
same as food service employees
who now earn between $3.50 and
$4 an hour.
Woolley said he has filled most of
the positions but is still accepting
applications. He is available in the
food services office area, room 105
B.
Woolley estimated the parlor will
use 78 tables with seating capacity
for 400. The parlor will be self-
serve with staff members on hand
to clear tables and gather bottles.
Pit tokens will be honored.
There will be no delivery to
residences until business warrants
it, perhaps after Christmas; Zomar
said.
As in the Pit, there are rules for
the parlor. Patrons must be 19 or
older, a UBC student or member of
staff or faculty and must order
pizza with their beverage.
"We con't want to become
another pub," said Zomar.
Professional cook Givilym
Smith, formerly of Gastown's Old
Spaghetti Factory, will produce all
16 pizza selections himself
depending on the flow of business,
Zomar said.
Brent Tynan, Alma Mater
Society director of services, said
the parlor's budget will be $10,000
for the first year, of which about
$1,500 was spent on decor, coordinated uniforms and
tablecloths. After 7 p.m. the decor
will obscure the fact that the space
is really a snack bar, he said.
Zomar and food services director
Robert Bailey presented the
original idea of a licensed pizza
parlor a year ago. The administration gave the go-ahead
last April. Page 4
THE
UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 14, 1976
Hello, sailor
Hello, sailor. New on campus?
In that case, this is for you. Without further ado, The
Ubyssey presents its annual unsolicited list of ideas for what
to do and what not to do at UBC. Now that you're here:
• Do get involved with something besides your classes
if you want to remain sane past November. Join a club —
it's clubs day soon and most clubs will have some sort
of display in SUB. For events and meeting times, watch Hot
Flashes and Tween Classes in this here paper. And if you
have ambitions of being a junior bureaucrat, or just want to
learn something about how the Alma Mater Society works,
committees need volunteers.
• Don't settle for courses you don't want to take. If
you were told during registration that certain courses were
full, go talk to the prof who teaches the course. Smile. Be
enthusiastic. Provided the prof isn't an asshole, there's
always room for one more.
• Do take advantage of recreational facilities out here
— after all, you're in the process of paying for the super
duper (so they claim) covered pool that's supposed to be
being built now. Recreation UBC, which has cost $5 in the
past/is free this year.
• Don't eat on campus unless it's at the faculty club.
If you can't get it together to bring a lunch, then fast. It's
healthier than UBC cafeteria food.
Do return those library books on time. You could be
stuck writing a last-minute essay sometime this year, minus
the one book that could help you. Do unto other, and alt
that.
e But don't pay library fines without arguing. If you
end up with huge fines, you can try and negotiate with the
library at the end of the year. There is an appeal procedure.
• Don't give up on housing. Keep checking the
off-campus housing people in SUB. And if you're in a ratty
place now, you'll have some chance of finding a better place
next term.
e Don't wander mechanically over to the UBC
bookstore and blindly buy all those outrageously expensive
texts profs say you need. Lots of them are in the library,
and provided you don't leave it to the last moment you can
put a hold on the books you need if they're not in.
e Do check out the local second-hand bookstores.
Although profs will tell you you absolutely must have
-particular editions of books, that's usually just because
they're lazy and want everyone to have books with the same
page numbers. But get other editions from second-hand
stores — it's much cheaper than the bookstore out here.
Look at the bulletin boards around campus for people who
want to sell their old texts, and go to some of the
second-hand places on West Tenth or Broadway. There's a
good one at Tenth and Trimble.
e Do give a lot of second thoughts to those 8:30
classes. Is it really worth getting up that early?
e Don't take essay deadlines too seriously. They can
almost always be extended — just go to your prof before the
deadline arrives and plead. Be a suck.
• Don't get too upset if you get a ticket from UBC's
pretend police — the quasi cops. But don't let too many pile
up. You might get stuck paying the shot before you register
next year, or your marks might be withheld, or worst of all,
the bums will tow your car away one day when you're not
looking.
• Do ask the government for money. Just about
everyone who applies for loans gets lucky.
• Do, even if you ignore everything else we've
suggested, visit The Ubyssey at noon this Friday. As our
special way of saying hello, we'll have stocked our fridge
with lots of little brown bottles filled with that amber
liquid. Keep reading us if you want more details.
THE UBYSSEY
SEPTEMBER 14, 1976
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and not of the AMS
or the university administration. Member, Canadian University
Press.'The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary
and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located in room
241K of the Student Union Building. Editorial departments,
228-2301; Sports, 228-2305; Advertising, 228-3977.
Co-Editors: Sue Vohanka, Ralph Maurer
Sure ain't no time to fool around today with the funny stuff. These
worked their butts off: Maureen Suzanne, Ted Davis, Heather Walker,
Chris Gainor, Bill Tieleman, Len MacKave, Deb van der Gracht, Doug
Field, Matt King, Tom Barnes, John Cartwright, Charlie Micallef, Steve
Howard, Mark Sasges, Greg Strong, Jock Finlayson, Jean Randall, Ralptt
Maurer and Sue Vohanka.
These eminences showed us how: Berton Woodward, Kini McDonald,
Ryon Guedes, Doug Rushton, Mike and Marise Sasges, Gary Coull, Vaughn
Palmer and that's all.
COURSE   CARDS
POR   AU.
COURSES
V
COURSE   CARDS
POR   AU.
t-THt UuBvS'^r'	
Letters
Ignorant
pomp
This letter is an open letter to
administration president Doug
Kenny. Copies have been sent to
senate and the dean of women.
This year's spring graduation
ceremonies lacked none of the
usual attempt at "pomp and circumstance" customarily
associated with occasions 6i that
nature at UBC. It is doubtful that
either graduates or guests present
had cause for complaint — with
one major exception: your concluding speech.
As president of the university
you are no doubt aware that a large
percentage of students (graduate,
as well as undergraduate) fall into
the 30 to 50 age group.
It would seem logical to assume
that these individuals are no longer
"supported by their parents" but
— if at all — by a spouse. In many
cases, they are no longer "going
out into the world" for the first
time (as your remarks further
suggested), but have taken that
step before.
It is the considered opinion of
this group of students that the
prevalent official attitude
regarding their status (lack of
recognition of either their specific
problems and needs, and the
frequent doubt voiced as to their
academic sincerity) was reflected
in your speech, which seemed to be
entirely directed at the 22-year-old
(and single) BA candidate.
Blithely ignoring the many grey
heads and other indications of
maturity in the line of graduates
which had filed past you for more
than an hour, you addressed
yourself to a maximum of two-
thirds of the graduates only — at
best, a most unrealistic attitude.
May we respectfully suggest that
the fact we are no longer living in
the late 1950's be recognized
generally, and the further fact that
the older graduate is not a
negligible factor at UBC be given
more specific attention — at least
once a year.
Class of '76
Good God
As Almighty God, I greet you and
over 300 editors and publishers in
this country and abroad, The
tentacles of religion are enveloping
Christians all over the English-
speaking world.
My Son and I have driven a
wedge into religion — religion is
now divided! Death will tell Us
when to leave and the hearts of
editors will no more grieve.
Down through the centuries My
Son and I have come with a
thunderous roar to stand upon the
pinnacle of religion, which has
opened the door to God and His
beloved Son. Would to grace the
newspapers would open the door
that leads straight to My Heart!
Hearts move in unison when they
adhere to a divine grace that shows
the way to mercy. My Son and I
will not cast out strangers who
sincerely believe that I Am the One
God above all.
With love and understanding, I
close this letter of benevolent
grace as I remain truthfully your
fascinating living God. My Holy
Name will never adorn paper,
simply because My Name is void of
form. My humble Son will sign this
blessed letter to preserve faith.
Prayerfully yours,
Eugene Changey
P.S. This notation was written in
1976. The letters are well over 10
years old. Our mailing list was
limited to about 300 editors. Today,
Our mailing list has almost 3,000
editors and publishers.
The Ubyssey welcomes letters
from all readers.
Letters should be signed and
typed.
Pen names will be used when the
writer's real name is also included
for our information in the letter or
when valid reasons for anonymity
are given.
Although an effort is made to
publish all letters received, The
Ubyssey reserves the right to edit
letters for reasons of brevity,
legality, grammar or taste.
Letters should be addressed to
the paper care of campus mail or
dropped off at The Ubyssey office,
SUB 241-K. Tuesday, September 14, 1976
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 5
Private Pit birthday bash
surprises hacks not guests
By CHRIS GAINOR
It was Saturday, May 29, and Brent Tynan
threw a birthday party for himself.
Tynan, who is director of services for the
Alma Mater Society, has been unable to
forget the party for reasons other than the
obvious. Neither have his colleagues on the
AMS executive, who didn't even attend the
soiree.
Why, you ask? Well, the party occurred in
the Pit, complete with an unscheduled disco
and with more than 100 of Tynan's friends in
attendance.
At a stormy meeting of the Student Administration Commission June 1, the
arrangements of the party were tossed
about. A SAC motion of confidence in Tynan
was tabled and has not yet been dealt with.
A commission set up by the Student
Representative Assembly June 9 criticized
Tynan for "an abuse of privilege". The
three-member commission also criticized
AMS president Dave Van Blarcom for his
actions in the affair and made a set of
recommendations designed to prevent
future abuses.
The affair has created an atmosphere of
suspicion in the AMS executive, a condition
which has been exacerbated by the actions
of Tynan and the SAC in the removal of the
women's office from its former quarters in
SUB.
But what did happen on May 29? the
following is the commission's account which
was leaked to The Ubyssey. The commission
consisted of chairman Dave Theessen, arts
senator , Bill Broddy, and Dave Jiles, all
SRA members. Tynan refused to submit to
formal questioning, but met with two
commission members.
"Approximately three weeks before the
event, Brent Tynan approached Tor
Svancoe (the Pit manager) with the
proposal to have a disco in the Pit on the
night of May 29, 1976. As it would clearly
point out the abuse of executive privilege,
the commission sought to determine the
manner of the approach.
"According to Brent, he 'suggested the
idea.' According to (SUB manager) Bern
Grady, Brent 'informed the Pit manager of
the disco night.' Arrangements were then
made for the disco night by Brent and Tor.
"The purpose of the disco night was to
enable Brent Tynan and approximately 100-
130 of his friends to celebrate Brent's birthday, as well as the birthday of one of his
acquaintances. Most of these guests were to
be UBC students.
"The cost of the disco ($30), was paid for
by Brent. In a disco situation, no seating is
lost as the tables are just crowded together
on the upper level of the Pit to clear the
dance floor.
"Approximately three days before the
event, Ellen Paul, (then) SRA secretary-
treasurer, supposedly was made aware
through informal discussions with Pit
workers of the coming disco.
"She immediately approached Bern
executive and SAC members, Dave Van
Blarcom was made aware of the situation.
This resulted in his contacting Brent by
telephone on the Thursday prior to the
Saturday disco. Dave took the position that
this was a serious breach of acumen (sic)
and also felt it was his duty as president of
the SRA to approach Brent.
"He took the view that he would have the
final say as to whether or not the disco could
proceed. In this telephone conversation, he
informed Brent that Brent would either
have to call off the disco or that Dave would
ask for Brent's resignation.
"After further conversation, agreement
was reached that if a majority of SAC
members could be contacted, and they gave
their approval to the disco going ahead,
Dave would allow the disco to take place and
AMS president
Dave Van Blarcom terms Tynan:
"A case of somebody being
an inexperienced public servant.
He has a corporate view of the AMS
and not a public servant's view."
Grady who then investigated the matter.
"Upon investigation, Bern found that no
formal arrangements (re SAC approval)
had been made for a disco in the Pit that
night, informed various SAC members of
the situation, and advised Brent that this
was outside the normal procedure.
"Through consultation with other SRA
would not insist on a resignation.
"This was done by Brent via telephone
and reported back to Dave Van Blarcom.
The disco night took place with a full house
but reportedly no lineup at the door. Approximately 100-110 of Brent's friends attended. No unusual rowdyism or trouble was
experienced."
THE PIT .. . before Tynan takeover
TYNAN . .. abused power
The commission said Tynan's actions
"constituted an unauthorized use of the
student union building." It also accused Van
Blarcom of an abuse of privilege for his
action of requesting Tynan's resignation,
which it called "a clear attempt to exert
undue influence on the other SRA appointees
by virtue of his office (as president)."
In addition, the commission recommended a twice-yearly review of SRA appointees. All SAC members, including the
director of services and director of finance,
are appointed by the SRA on the recommendation of a committee. The commission
also suggested that a code of conduct be
drawn up for all SAC and SRA members.
Just how serious was Tvnans
misdemeanor? "What a student can't do, we
can't do," said external affairs officer Moe
Sihota. "He broke that rule. It was an abuse
of power and he knew it."
Van Blarcom called Tynan's actions, "a
case of somebody being an inexperienced
public servant. He has a corporate view of
the AMS and not a public servant's view."
Brent Tynan described it this way: "To
most people it seemed to be the wrong thing
to do. But the only thing people could
criticize me for is not using a regular CITR
disc jockey.
"The only thing I did that was slightly
irregular was that I planned it. Less than
half the people there were my friends.
"Think of all the times people put two
tables together. I just did it on a grander
scale," explained Tynan. "I believe that the
whole thing was blown out of proportion. A
lot of people got uptight, so I am wrong. I
would deny that I abused my privileges."
But the director of services was somewhat
penitent. "I'm a reformed man after this
episode," he said. "I won't do anything like
that again unless it's thoroughly checked,
out."
The commission's charge against Van
Blarcom was called a "typical political
stunt" by Sihota. "That charge disturbed
me the most," he said. "I don't think (Van
Blarcom) abused his privileges."
Said Van Blarcom: "Any SRA member
can ask for the resignation of an SAC
member or bring a motion to that effect to
the SRA."
Tynan said he is "really glad Van Blarcom phoned and told me what what was
going on."
He also attacked the commission: "I think
they were doing it to prove a point. As an
official commission, it had sour overtones,"
Tynan said.
He refused to meet formally with the
commission because he had already been
"royally roasted over the coals for an hour"
at the June 1 SAC meeting, he said.
Some executive members are angry over
SAC's initial handling of the women's office
eviction. Tynan prepared a secret report on
the position of the Women's Office in SIJB
based on interviews with members of the
women's office collective.
"It was confidential because SAC should
make an intelligent decision," said Tynan.
"SAC looks at things from an administrative viewpoint. There were no
political or philosophical considerations."
Although the SRA did endorse SAC's
decision to move the collective out of its
room, several SRA members intend to bring
the decision back for reconsideration this
fall.
Like the women's office, the problem of
Brent Tynan's birthday party may reappear
in SAC and SRA as the return of students
rejuvenates the political atmosphere around
the AMS chambers. Page 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 14, 1976
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11 >i.m.-6 p.m. Tuesday, September 14, 1976
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 7
Despite wait list
Empty res rooms remain
From page 1
Mary Flores, assignment coordinator for the UBC housing
office, said there is no on campus
housing shortage.
"There are a good number of
rooms available, but they don't
seem to be wanted," she said.
"There were well over 8,000
applications received by us this
year for only 3,400 single student
vacancies   available,"   she   said.
"We had a waiting list of approximately 4100."
There were 1,847 male single
rooms available but only 1,199
women's single rooms. In addition,
accommodation for 453 men and
439 women in double rooms were
open, Flores said.
She said 79 per cent of last year's
residence students re-applied for
housing this year and only 65 per
cent of these were accepted with
over 1,000 cancellations.
Hack hits office
From page 3
office, but had received no reply.
Tynan,  who  compiled  a   confidential report on the women's
Profs silent
on dismissal
From page 1
Livermore directed all questions
involving his dismissal to associate
arts dean Peter Remnant, who
declined to coment on the matter.
Among members of the Hispanic
and Italian studies department the
reaction to Livermore's dismissal
was the same. Said assistant
professor Derek Carr: "This is not
a matter I'm prepared to say
anything about."
Similar coments were given by
other members of the department.
When contacted Friday some
members were unaware that
Livermore had been dismissed.
Other members said to direct
inquiries to Remnant, who eventually issued a no-comment reply.
Acting department head Karl
Kobbervig had nothing to say
about Livermore's dismissal.
The dismissal of a department
head is rare at UBC.
office, said the SAC felt the office
took up too much space for the size
of its active membership.
"Why, they have over five times
as much space as the ski club,
which is the largest club on
campus," he said.
The women's office report was
labelled "confidential" so the SAC
could "look at it objectively,"
Tynan said.
He admitted he made the report
without the knowledge of the
women's office, and collected some
of the information for it in a two-
hour conversation with Sumner
about the office.
"If I'd asked them I wouldn't
have gotten any information,"
Tynan said. "I wanted facts when
it was formed, how often it was
used, how many people used it."
Tynan said his information indicated interest in the office had
declined in the last few years,
although it had started out as an
effective lobbying group and had
been responsible for the current
women's studies program at UBC.
He said several suggestions for
use of the space, including partitioning it to provide more office
space for other clubs, were considered before the SAC decided on
the present plan of using it as a
workroom for the SRA and SAC.
"Approximately 33 per cent of
vacancies taken were cancelled
and are still open or have been reassigned to designated people on
the waiting list," Flores said.
"As of this moment, there are 20
single rooms available for women
in Totem Park and eight single
rooms in Place Vanier. There's
also six double rooms in Place
Vanier and one double in Totem
Park open, all for women."
She said there are no men's
singles available yet in either
residence but cancellations are
expected. Only one double for men
in Place Vanier and 10 doubles in
Totem Park are open.
Applications are still available
for these last remaining rooms and
they may be picked up in the
housing office, she said.
Auditions for the Theatre Department's
Production of
THE BOYS FROM SYRACUSE
by Rodgers and Hart
to be presented November 3-13
Directed by John Brockington
will be held on
TUESDAY, September 14- 12:30 p.m.-2:00 p.m.
x   WEDNESDAY, September 15- 12:30 p.m.-2:00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m.-10:00 p.m.
THURSDAY, September 16- 12:30 p.m.-2:00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m.-10:00 p.m.
FRIDAY, September 17- 12:30 p.m.-2:00 p.m.
in Room 112 of the Frederic Wood Theatre Building
Auditions Open To All UBC Students, Faculty and Staff
(Please bring a piece of music for the audition
r
AMS SPECIAL EVENTS PRESENTS
*p-
TVdcomc Soc&
'Donee SxtnowaycutfO,
Wednesday Sept. 15th SUB BALLROOM
Thursday Sept. 16th SUB BALLROOM
PARTY ROOM
205/207
Friday Sept. 17th SUB BALLROOM
PARTY ROOM
Live Band
Live Band
Live band
Disco
Live Band
Live Band
TIME 830
ADMISSION FREE
i
(MUST SHOW VALID AMS CARD)
J Page 8
THE
UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 14, 1976
National Student day
Nov. 9 protests planned
OTTAWA (CUP) — Student
councils across Canada plan to
demonstrate their opposition to
increasing financial barriers in
post-secondary education on
National Student Day, to be held
Nov. 9.
National and regional committees will co-ordinate local
campus actions dealing with
government cutbacks in higher
education funding, tuition fee
hikes, regressive student aid
programs and high student
unemployment rates.
National Student Day was
proposed at the National Union of
Students annual meeting in Winnipeg last May, and was subsequently adopted by most
regional and provincial student
organizations.
The Nov. 9 activities will be coordinated mainly by individual
student unions, and could range
from information campaigns to
educational seminars to class
boycotts. The political content will
be determined by the provincial
situation, or "social surrounding,"
as suggested in the NUS resolution.
The responsibility of keeping
NSD content along national themes
while stressing regional problems
falls to both national and provincial co-ordinating committees. The
Federation of Alberta Students, the
Ontario Federation of Students, the
B.C. Students'Federation and NUS
have all met at least once over the
summer to plan their strategies.
Little activity, at least on the
regional level, has begun in the
Atlantic region, organized under
the Atlantic Federation of
Students, but a national coordinating committee meeting in
early August mentioned reports of
"campus planning at several New
Brunswick institutions."
Saskatchewan will attempt to
recreate a provincial student
federation while organizing NSD,
the national co-ordinators
reported, but little organizational
activity has been done to date.
Campuses in Manitoba have
varying degrees of enthusiasm, but
two institutions have formed
committees.
Efforts by NUS officials to work
with L'Association des Etudients
du Quebec (ANEQ) continue to
meet little response, the August
meeting revealed.
The strategy set by the regions
seems to reflect the original NUS
concern that NSD be a "grassroots" effort.
For example, BCSF rejected the
idea of a demonstration at the
provincial legislature, and will
initiate actions at the campus level
stressing the themes of severe
unemployment, threatened tuition
hikes and current cutbacks. FAS
member campuses appear to favor
a day of meetings, while promoting
the provincial concern of student
aid through a proposed newspaper.
OFS held a province-wide
strategy workshop in early August,
but otherwise has concentrated on
local work in the campus and
community.
Publicity for the day is to be
handled by all three levels of
organization. Plans call for introductory posters and leaflets and
a "declaration of 1976 NSD concerns" from NUS, which with the
provinces will also produce
pamphlets dealing with national
issues.
Both will release periodic
leaflets and posters on the issues,
while local campuses will publish
leaflets   with    "national    and
provincial input" and be solely
responsible for publicizing events
and recruiting help.
These plans in some ways answer the concern expressed by
NUS executive secretary Dan
O'Connor when he noted at the
committee meeting that there had
been "an absence of extensive coordination at either the provincial
or national levels."
Although the co-ordinators
agreed NSD must be "a day unlike
others on campus," what constitutes the minimum activity to
meet this requirement has been
left to the individual campuses to
decide.
Develop your
READING POTENTIAL
The University of British Columbia offers Reading Improvement
Programs for people in the community and for secondary, college
and University students. Classes begin the week of September 25,
1976, and participants have the option of taking classes during
afternoons, evenings or Saturday mornings. For a detailed
brochure and registration form, call 228-2181, local 245.
Centre for Continuing Education
University of British Columbia
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Offer expires September 30th.
Breakfast served 7-10.30 a.m. Tuesday, September 14, 1976
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 9
Summer of 76 — news and less news
Briefly, here's what happened at
UBC while you were away for the
alleged summer.
• UBC administration president
Doug Kenny was married in early
June to UBC librarian Margaret
Little, in a private ceremony at
Kenny's Point Grey home.
But the new Mrs. Kenny remains
a mystery. She told The Ubyssey
Monday the details of the marriage
are "a private matter" and
repeated attempts failed to turn up
even Mrs. Kenny's age or length of
her tenure at Main library, where
she headed the preparation section
of the cataloguing division.
One sourse in the library said
Mrs. Kenny worked there for more
than twenty years. She is ho longer
working.
• An RCMP investigation has
resulted in the recovery of $4,000
worth of books stolen from UBC
libraries over a period of three
years.
Brian Charles Dobson, 2546 West
Third, was charged with theft and
possession of stolen goods in excess
of $200.
Dobson graduated from UBC in
1974 with a bachelor's degree in
architecture.
He was released on his own
recognizance Monday after a brief
hearing in provincial court. The
trial is set for Oct. 25 at 10 a.m.
* UBC's student-run CITR Radio
will soon be able to reach up to
200,000 homes in the Vancouver
area by linking up to the
cablevision network.
On July 22 the Canadian Radio-
Television Commission approved
Canadian Wirevision's application
to carry CJTR on its FM cable
service.
Before broadcasting can begin,
CITR must receive approval from
the Department of Communication
for the high frequency transmission link which will carry the
broadcast from the top of Gage
Towers to the Canadian Wirevision
office on Cambie, CITR president
Richard Saxton said Monday. This
link should take four to six weeks to
Profs' pay packets grow
UBC faculty have ratified by
more than 90 per cent a 3.16 per
cent salary increase over one year
coupled with an award of $1,050
across-the-board, faculty
association president Leslie
Crouch said Monday.
The faculty agreement for 1976-
77 was settled by arbitration and
became effective July 1, Crouch
said.
Ontario fights essay banks
TORONTO (CUP) — Even
though essay banks — distributors
of pirate essays to university
students — may not yet be considered illegal, two Ontario
universities are acting to make it
more difficult for the students who
purchase the services.
The governing council at the
University of Toronto voted in
March to take action against the
essay banks if a highly-paid legal
firm they have hired can find any
legal basis to do so. The council is
lobbying the provincial government to prevent the companies
from operating.
But the University of Waterloo
faculty council was. told recently
that term paper services "do
operate within the law," and, while
legal action should be considered,
there are many ways to discourage
students from using the expensive
and "extensive" services.
Following the University of
Toronto, the Waterloo council
voted to declare that "it is the right
of instructors to orally question
any student on the student's understanding of the material submitted in any written work before
arriving at a final grade for that
work."
The U of T's harsher method of
control, set up by a working group
of plagiarism, (an academic
discipline code) makes the use of
pirate essays illegal with panalties
including expulsion for their use.
The U of T working group has
recommended that teaching staff
made a concerted effort to prevent
plagiarism by increasing personal
contact with the students and avoid
stereotyping of assignments.
A small amount was set aside for
merit and adjustment of inequities,
he said. This year's contract also
included improved study leave
provisions.
Faculty have also negotiated a
10.7 per cent salary increase on a
second one year contract beginning July 1, 1977, Crouch said.
But the proposed increase is now
under scrutiny by the federal Anti-
Inflation Board, he said.
Negotiations began in June and
ended in late July.
Most faculty members are not
happy with the proposed contract,
but they decided there was little
alternative under the terms of the
anti-inflation regulations, he said.
UBC's full professors now get an
average of $35,308 compared to
$33,209 last year. Associate
professors make $27,154 on the
average, up from $25,305 last year.
If the 10.7 per cent figure is
approved by the AIB in the '77-'78
contract full professors will
average $39,086 and associate
professors $30,059.
PANGO PANGO (UNS) -
Newshounds in this tiny island
kingdom ran amuck with the
return of the island's rag and
repository of truth, the Daily Blah.
The Blah's return is not to be
confused with that of its nemesis,
sporific press.
instaU, he said, and the broadcasts
might begin by early November.
Saxton said the cost of expanding
from the station's present AM
service is $8,000 to $10,000. He
hopes to get funding from the Alma
Mater Society, the university
administration, and the UBC
alumni association.
He said the station will offer
editorials on topical subjects,
interviews with campus personalities, live coverage of UBC
Thunderbirds hockey games, and
public service announcements.
Music will include classical, jazz,
progressive rock, and pop, he said.
• UBC wheeled and dealed and
was given all the audio-visual and
print materials from Habitat, the
United Nations Conference on
Human Settlements.
A new UBC Centre for Human
Settlements will keep the
materials in the Woodward Instructional Resources Centre
where they should be ready for
lending to the public by October.
Caveat *ty& *i¥eand
FOR NEW ft USED
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* TEXTBOOKS
* PAPERBACKS
* REVIEW NOTES
,9f1 MONARCH   NOTES
* SCHAUMS OUTLINES
* COLES  NOTES
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THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 14, 1976
The ABCs of UBC: An
A
D
Administration — The body made up of
well-paid backroom boys which will run
your life while you are at UBC. This cosy
group will decide how much your food will
cost, how much your rent will be (if you live
in residence), what courses you can take
and where you can't park (almost
everywhere). While mumbling progressive
catch words these mandarins will try their
best to retain the comfy status quo at the
university. But don't underestimate them,
they hold all the cards.
Alma Mater Society — The body which is
supposed to represent UBC students and
bring their concerns before the nasty administration. Unfortunately, once elected,
AMS hacks tend to become bureaucrats too
concerned with hauling the student society
out of debt to change the university. Current
hacks hope the new AMS constitution will
allow the student society to become more
politically involved, but we shall see.
Dope — The opiate of the masses but
second on the list behind the amber liquid
for most UBC students.
Deli — The one in the SUB basement has
created a whole new kind of fare: natural
junk food. Dried up buns and greasy salami
are the norm there, but hell, some
romantics like pretending they're in the
Venice McDonald's.
Grass —Oncefound in abundance all over
campus, this plant is fast being covered with
concrete and blacktop as university administrators try to make UBC the Los
Angeles of the north. So far, they've got as
far as Pittsburgh.
E
B
Education department — Perhaps the
most ignored department in the provincial
government, now run by a political transvestite ( a Liberal in Socred clothing) who
graduated from UBC and has distinguished
himself here by his research into the effects
of marijuana on the sperm production of
rats. Pat McGeer has turned most of attention to his portfolio as president of the
Insurance Corporation of B.C. so far but God
help us when he turns his attention to post-
secondary education.,
Backrooms — Where administration and
faculty types make most of their decisions
about how they will run the university. The
backrooms at UBC are the breeding grounds
for things called committees whose
deliberations are secret and who give birth,
after an indefinite gestation, to "the confidential report."
Board of governors — A body which
rubber stamps the decisions made in the
backrooms. Although in theory an independent body, the board seldom questions
administration decisions. To witness the
ultimate in tokenism try attending one of the
"open" board meetings where members
approve a stack of routine documents before
your eyes and then kick you out so they can
go into closed session and discuss all the
really important things. To witness the
ultimate in bootlicking, watch student board
reps Basil Peters and Rick Murray, decked
out in three-piece suits and patent leather
shoes, play "the responsible student" at one
of these meetings.
F
Fraternities — Fellowship organizations
comprised of an endangered species — the
"frat rats", members of which have
managed to continue acting as they did in
their 1950s heyday despite massive social
changes among other groups. UBC frat rats
are concentrated in the "golly, gosh ghetto"
just east of Wesbrook Place and south of
University Blvd. Like their spiritual
brothers, the engineers, they do nice things
for charity.
G
C
Classes — These force your professors to
interrupt their research and make them
come out of hiding long enough to send a few
incoherent words of "wisdom" your way.
Gears — Otherwise known as engineers,
assholes and a number of other pejorative
labels not fit for a family newspaper like this
one. Commonly travelling in herds and
distinguished by their red jackets, gears
find enjoyment in breaking things, drinking
beer and talking about women to fight the
loneliness which accompanies their obnoxious natures.
H
Housing — For students it usually consists
of a basement grotto with "no visitors after
10 p.m." For the lucky few there are the
administration-run residences which offer
segregated living. Due to the administration's ban on male-female
cohabitation you either stay celibate or
become sneaky. Don't say you don't learn
anything here.
Hiring — After a few classes you'll realize
those professors droning away at the front of
the room weren't hired for their teaching
ability. Unlike elementary and secondary
schools, which demand teaching degrees,
UBC demands professors have their names
in the right scholastic journals before being
hired, and little else.
I
Illiteracy — A phenomenon among
graduating high school students which has
attracted much attention recently. The UBC
administration responded to this off-campus
publicity by promising to bring in an entrance exam to screen out the illiterates —
although it was this university's education
faculty which turned out the schoolteachers
who taught the illiterates how not to read
and write.
J
Junk food — Served daily at UBC food
services outlets around campus, disguised
as nutrition. Food services provides
business for the stomach pumps at UBC's
Wesbrook Hospital.
K
Kenny — Or Doug the Thug as he is more
commonly known. Kenny is the big cheese of
the administration (i.e. president) and boss
to a quartet of vice-presidents who keep
UBC's wheels well greased.
L
Library — Where millions of musty tomes
await the eager eyes of students hungry for
knowledge and where staff toil ceaselessly
to make sure said tomes are in their proper
places. The last place on campus where
Ubyssey staffers, and others interested in
neglecting learning in favor of education,
are found.
M
Mindlessness — An affliction common in
the offices of the Alma Mater Society, the
home of student politicos who hang around
because they know their jobs will look great
on a future resume.
N
Every thii
with rabi
Story by:
Chris
Mar
Graphics b
Daw
JUNK FOOD . .. business for stomach pumps
Noon — At UBC noon means 12:30 p.m.
PROFESSORS .. . omnip<
^ Tuesday, September 14, 1976
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 11
*w collegiate dictionary
/ from admin to zoo
s and vd in between
''V'Wi)
POOL ... finished when you graduate
iinor
4ree
7ilkinson
0
Overcrowding — Found in many UBC
classrooms and lecture halls where students
often need binoculars to see the prof and a
megaphone to ask questions.
P
Pool — Gigantic hole at the south end of
SUB producing all sorts of little holes in
students' wallets this fall. The hole is due to
become a $4.7 million covered swimming
pool shortly after we all graduate. For those
who have never been to UBC, the hole
replaces, a grassy knoll and a beautiful
grove of poplars where students used to sit,
talk and enjoy life.
Professor — That being which will
mumble at you day after day from his or her
lectern, spewing forth a product known as
knowledge. Professors are supposedly
omnipotent and omniscient, but don't be
impressed. Under all that academic
arrogance there has been known to lie a
decent human being. However, this trend
has gone somewhat out of fashion since The
Sixties.
0
Questions — Welcome or unwelcome in
classes depending on the personality of the
professor. Questions directed at the administration are usually unwelcome. It
prefers to communicate with packaged
statements.
R
• and omniscient?
Rabies — A disease you are likely to get if
bitten by an engineer. Get your shots now
and avoid the rush during Engineering
Week.
Red Rag — A sexist, racist rag produced
by the gears to display their puerile mentality to the campus. In one of his finest
hours, Doug the Thug condemned the
publication because it is degrading to
women. It was also once the subject of an
inspired satire alleged to have been
produced by The Ubyssey (this was never
confirmed) turning the "Red" Rag into a
Marxist-Leninist paper.
relations rag of the UBC administration,
acting as a mouthpiece for the president's
office. Fond of describing the university in
glowing terms, UBC Reports never tries to
rock the boat. This is in contrast to its
competitor, The Ubyssey, where readers
often get seasick.
s
V
Senate — Body made up of mindless
academics and a few token students which
formalizes decisions made in the
backrooms. The senate works in concert
with the board of governors. Debates have
been known to go on for 10 years before a
"decision" is produced.
Sex — A practice not condoned by the
university administration but apparently
engaged in by a number of members of the
campus community.
Venereal Disease — The lifeblood of the
student health clinic in Wesbrook building.
Vote — Something which students usually
avoid doing when election time rolls around.
Students will be faced with a number of
elections this fall so get ready for a shower
of propaganda.
w
T
Tenure— Once UBC professors get tenure
here it is almost impossible to get rid of
them, so there is an involved procedure for
granting it. Unfortunately the factor important to students, teaching ability, is
virtually ignored.
Women — The subject of several administration committees which dole out
funds to ensure equality of pay among
equally qualified faculty members while
women clerical workers are held to wages
lower than those of men doing similar work.
Work — What Ubyssey staffers do
ceaselessly to produce the best student
newspaper west of Blanca three times a
week. What profs (See P) with tenure (See
T) don't have to do.
u
X
Universities' Council — The body that acts
as a go-between for the education department and B.C.'s three public universities.
The council takes millions of dollars of loot
from provincial coffers and dishes it out to
each university, where the final disposition
of funds is left to the administrators.
The Ubyssey — That sterling publication
nicknamed the Daily Truth which attempts
to publish in between drunken orgies by the
staff. Run by crazy people with no respect
for anything who would all sell their
grandmothers and a dozen puppies down the
river for a good story, it is hated by many on
campus. The Ubyssey always needs
reporters, photographers and anyone
willing to toil without rest for truth, justice
and the Canadian way.
UBC Reports — Nicknamed PR Reports,
this alleged newspaper is actually the public
Xenophobia — A nice term for racism.
Y
Yellow Fever — Ailment" contracted by
exposure to SUB cafeteria milkshakes.
z
Zoo — Another name for Walter Gage
residence.
THE UBYSSEY ... no respect Pdge 12
THE
UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 14, 1976
Logging threatens Natives
under Ontario paper pact
DRYDEN (CUP) — The
livelihoods of 12,000 Native people
in 30 communities may be wiped
out if the Ontario government
allows the Reed Paper Company to
log 26,000 square miles of timber on
Indian land in Northwestern Ontario.
Confidential documents show the
government and Reed are
preparing to sign an agreement
approving logging operations in
the Treaty Nine area, adjacent to
the town of Dryden.
Dryden Paper, a wholly-owned
Reed subsidiary, is responsible for
dumping 31,000 pounds of mercury
into the English-Wabigoon river
system causing the nerve-crippling
Minimata disease among the
population of the Whitedog and
Grassy Narrows Indian reserves.
Theclosure of the river system has
virtually destroyed their
livelihoods. And while the company has stopped the pollution
under government order it has not
paid compensation to the victims.
Under Treaty Nine, signed by the
federal government and Native
people in 1905, the land is
guaranteed to the Cree and
Ojibway nations who use it to hunt,
fish and trap.
While Reed executives claim the
company won't log the entire area
in one operation, plans include the
construction of a giant pulp mill
which will require logs from the
entire area to run at capacity.
Native spokespeople reject
Reed's proposed reforestation
program pointing out the soils in
the area are either sandy or
shallow or clay-like. Logging in the
clay soil area will result in a rise in
the water table turning the area
into a swamp where seedlings
would be drowned. Once the sandy
soil is stripped of trees, erosion will
leave nothing but bare rock, according to Native researchers.
While Treaty Nine leaders had
been seeking assurances from the
government that it was not involved in negotiations with Reed,
an August letter from the Ontario
minister of natural resources to the
Canadian Association in Support of
Native Peoples stated Indians will
have "every opportunity to make
their views known."
Native spokesman Leo Bernier
said in the letter that agreement
with Reed is still in the negotiating
stage.
"The intent of the agreement is
to provide for a period of two or
three years during which time both
the company and the government
could carry out detailed inventories, investigations and
studies to determine whether in
fact a pulp mill should be build,"
Bernier said in the letter.
"Part of the process would involve the holding of public
meetings and each interested
parties (sic) could make
presentation (sic) or raise
questions."
Meanwhile organized labor has
thrown its support behind the
natives. The Canadian Paper-
workers Union said in July it is
opposed to any extension of cutting
rights for Reed until there is full
disclosure of further planned
development in the area.
And in a letter to the provincial
government, Ontario Federation of
Labor president David Archer said
he was appalled to learn the
government would allow such
development.
Reed Paper is owned by Reed
International Ltd., a British-based
company  with  holdings  in   88
countries, including Rhodesia and
South Africa. In 1974 sales were
over $300 million and the company
hopes to reach the $1 billion mark
by 1980, when it expects its giant
new mill to be in operation.
Reed Paper's profits have exceeded $77 million over the last five
years, ranking it in the top eight
forest companies in Canada.
Improve your
WRITING SKILLS
The University of British Columbia offers a Writing Improvement
Program for people in the community and secondary, college and
university students. Classes begin the week of September 25,
1976 and meet during the evening. For a detailed brochure and
registration form, call 228-2181, local 245.
Centre for Continuing Education
University of British Columbia
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
WHEN YOU COMIN' BACK
RED RYDER?
By Mark Medotf
SEPTEMBER 17-25
(Previews Sept. 15 & 16)
8:00 p.m.
Directed by Stanley Weese
Setting by Douglas Higgins
STUDENT SEASON TICKETS (4 Plays for $6)
AVAILABLE FOR ALL PERFORMANCES
Sept. 15-25
Nov. 3-13
Jan 12-22
March 2-12
BOX OFFICE
WHEN YOU COMIN' BACK RED RYDER? by Medoff
THE BOYS FROM SYRACUSE by Rodgers and Hart
A COLLIER'S FRIDAY NIGHT by D. H. Lawrence
THE REVENGER'S TRAGEDY by Tourneur
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE"
Support Your Campus Theatre
ROOM 207
The First Canadian Bank
Bank of Montreal
WELCOME TO UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
The two "Campus Branches" of the Bank of Montreal take great pleasure
in welcoming new and returning students to U.B.C.
We figure it this way: if we can be of help to you while you're a student, you'll stick with us after
graduation—when we can be of even greater assistance.
So, come see us for advice on handling money. We can show you a few things that Economics 201 doesn't cover:
how to save with a True Savings Account, how to cheque with a True Chequing Account, how to budget to make the most
of your money, how to avoid running short. And we can discuss loans too.
There's a Bank of Montreal nearby. Drop in, anytime. We want you to get your money's worth.
Start with
the bank
you'll stay with.
STUDENT UNION BUILDING BRANCH - STUART CLARK, MANAGER
ADMINISTRATION BUILDING BRANCH - GEORGE PEIRS0N, MANAGER Tuesday, September 14, 1976
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 13
But students earn less
Manpower says jobs not down
Canada Manpower reported
Monday there was little or no
decrease in the employment rate
for students in B.C. this summer
but students ended up making less
money for the same amount of
work.
Helen Vanwel, spokeswoman for
Canada Manpower, said the
summer employment situation this
lyear was no worse than last year,
but the average wage dropped to $3
from $4 an hour.
Vanwell said the statistics "don't
really give a true over-all picture"
because students found jobs on
their own or didn't register with
Manpower.
Total registration in 1975 was
50,469 and dropped 7.94 per cent in
1976 to 46,460, she said.
"These are only the number of
students who actually came into
offices across B.C. and filled out
the forms."
In some cases students
registered at two different offices,
she said.
Total placement in 1976 was
down 11.15 percent from the 17,943
students Manpower placed in jobs
across B.C. in 1975.
"We haven't received the federal
government placement figures
yet; these are only the provincial
totals, but it is approximately the
same as last year," she said.
"Concentration of jobs in B.C.
was highest in the Lower Mainland
as expected but there were no
areas of B.C. that reported a
higher concentration of jobs this
year," she said.
Vanwel said students did well
this summer considering the
drastic cut in federal programs
and Opportunities For Youth
grants were cut completely from
the federal government budget.
"Across Canada a program to
create jobs totalling $24 million
was instituted covering eight
federal departments and contained
17 various programs," Vanwel
said. "Approximately 10 to 12 per
cent of these jobs were located in
B.C., so that's another 1,000 jobs
that helped students find work this
summer."
Vanwel said most offices in June
reported very few registered
university students.
"It would seem that university
students found work easily and
very quickly which would account
for the poor registration early in
summer," she said "However, we
did have our hands full with
younger high-school students and
recent grads of high school."
Canada Manpower has a total of
33 offices in B.C., 20 of which
operate in the summer exclusively
for students trying to find work.
The other 13 offices were converted
to help students find employment.
One third of Canada's profs unionized
OTTAWA (CUP) — Almost a
third of Canada's 25,000 university
faculty have organized themselves
into 16 certified bargaining units,
more than triple the number of
units in existence two years ago.
At the closing session of the
Canadian Association of University Teachers (CAUT) annual
meeting here May 11-13, collective
bargaining committee chairman
Roland Penner predicted 50 per
cent of Canada's faculty would be
certified 'or in the process of
certification' within a year.
Five faculty associations are
presently in the process pending
decisions by various provincial
labor boards.
The CAUT delegates pointed to
Referendum soon
for SUB vendors
The Student Administrative
Commission will hold a general
referendum in the last week of
September to decide whether
vendors will again be allowed to
sell their crafts inside SUB.
Brent Tynan, Alma Mater
Society services director, said
Friday if the referendum fails, the
vendors will be banned from both
the main concourse of SUB and
from the SUB grounds.
The AMS directly controls SUB,
Tynan said, and through an unwritten agreement with the
university administration controls
the grounds as well.
Fifteen per cent of the student
must vote for the referendum to be
valid and two-thirds must vote in
favor for it to pass.
Tynan said he is working on
plans to regulate the vendors if the
referendum passes.
The AMS could build portable
booths which would blend with the
decor of the building, leave enough
space for club booths and satisfy
fire safety rules.
A schedule could be set up for
renting the booths. They would
rent for about $2 a day.
AMS council, now defunct,
evicted the vendors from SUB last
November after a close vote. A
complaint from the AMS bookstore
that the vendors were taking away
its business prompted the vote.
On the recommendation of the
SUB management committee the
AMS voted to evict the vendors.
The upcoming referendum is the
result of several petitions circulated by the vendors.   -
BLACK & LEE
TUX SHOP
NOW AT
1110 Seymour St.
688-2481
three main reasons for the faculty
organization push:
• government cutbacks in
university funding which threaten
to eliminate jobs;
• uncertainty surrounding
upcoming revisions in the Fiscal
Arrangements Act which is indirectly responsible for federal
funding of universities, and
• student demographic trends
which predict decreased
enrolment in the 1980's.
Delegates were told that administration's "knives will be out"
and that they should organize to
brace for inevitable confrontations
over the need not only to expand
programs but to simply maintain
existing ones.
Charging that "higher education
in Canada is the least planned of
activities," newly-elected CAUT
president Jill Vickers argued
collective bargaining units will
protect academic standards while
providing needed job security.
She said student-teacher ratios
have increased out of bounds, with
the only limits being the size of the
room.
Dismissing the contention that as
student enrolment declines so
should the number of teachers,
Vickers said once the ratio gets
smaller the quality of education
will meet necessary standards.
Also at issue is the possibility of
administrations replacing full-
time   staff   with   cheaper,   less-
qualified sessional and part-time
instructors.
In the last year the CAUT
executive has been stepping up
efforts to provide its 18,000
members with money and
resources in bids for certification.
Besides input from CAUT workers
a collective bargaining handbook
and clause finder guide have been
published and $15,645 has been
given to five locals.
However, CAUT has yet to
decide whether to create a strike
fund or affiliate with the trade
union movement.
There is question whether CAUT.
should endorse strikes — and, if a
fund was created, it is uncertain
who should pay since some of the
bargaining units do not have strike
rights.
And in a brief submitted to the
collective bargaining caucus,
Penner dismissed trade union
affiliation at present because
"union constitutions such as that of
the Canadian Labor Congress are,
in part, antithetical to our notions
of academic freedom and the
rather more decentralized
structure of a professional
organization such as CAUT."
UNIVERSITY
CREDIT
UNION
NOW LOCATED
IN THE
UNIVERSITY
VILLAGE
2150 W. PARKWAY
UPSTAIRS
NEW HOURS
Tuesdays to
Thursdays 10:30-4:30
Friday 10:30-6:00
Saturday     8:00-12 Noon
224-6322
We Have The
Best Bar
In Town
TheRK Men's Bar
& Ladies' Beauty Bar
His and Her Specialist
APPOINTMENT
SERVICE
731-4191
3644 WEST
4th AVE.
AT ALMA
'We had mostly university
students and graduates staffing
our offices this summer and that
helped ease the summer unemployment program somewhat,"
Vanwel said. Canada Manpower
also helped students interested in
finding jobs with courses about job-
hunting.
Big or Small Jobs
ALSO GARAGES
BASEMENTS
& YARDS
732-9898
1 CLEAN-UP
AJ°K 0P6/J
&<jr£&Rj6, <3h»/CT o*,°e^d. c)/*3cK£
E>oTT|eD   do/e^Sea ate\&np ftp*
ii/iocfi  To *ft«*e  19 r*t> a*o oj&fc.	
AMS ART GALLERY
PROGRAMMES COMMITTEE
Needs Members to Participate in
Gallery Administration
Contact:
Jean-Francois Guimond    263-4150
Maureen Maitland     684-2079
Gail Sonne    224-4631
CLUBS PAY - CLUBS DAY - CLUBS DAY - CLUBS DAY - CLUBS DAY
clubs day sept. 23
DEADLINE
SEPT. 17th
FOR THE RETURN OF CLUBS
DAY FORMS
PICK UP YOUR FORM TODAY
At A.M.S. Business Off ice
All Clubs Welcome to Attend!
CLUBS DAY - CLUBS DAY - CLUBS DAY - CLUBS DAY - CLUBS DAY
Have you ever considered
being a Senator?
The Students Representative Assembly is looking for
someone like you to appoint to the University Senate. If
you are interested, give your name and resume to your
Representative, or to myself. The two appointments
involved will be made Oct. 5th.
BILL BRODDY
Interim Secretary Treasurer
Sub 250 - 228-2050 Page 14
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 14, 1976
Then apologizes in pique
SFU pays to train Lewis
The student union at Simon
Fraser University has spent $497
first to re-educate David Lewis and
then to offer him an apology.
The former federal NDP leader
accepted a summer job teaching
there despite a five-year censure
and boycott imposed on the
university by the Canadian
Association of University Teachers
after firing of eight professors in
1969.
Lewis' first lecture, July 6, was
disrupted by members of the
Committee to Re-educate David
Lewis who were protesting his
decision to teach. Committee
spokesman Tom Conroy's
challenge to debate the issue was
flatly refused by Lewis.
Grapes of wrath, take 20
NEW YORK (LNS/CUP) — The
United Farm Workers Union
(UFW) is reinstituting a nationwide consumer boycott of non-
UFW California table grapes.
The action comes in the wake of
the grape industry's continued
efforts to destroy union
representation rights guaranteed
under the 1975 California
Agriculture Labor Relations Act.
California grape growers were
instrumental in halting the historic
union representation elections
among California farmworkers
which began in September, 1975.
By February, 1976, grower
pressure had put a stop to the
elections.
At that time, the UFW had won
the right to represent 33,000
workers out of 45,000 who voted.
Public pressure has since forced
the state to resume the elections,
which are expected to begin in
September. But growers still
refuse to negotiate with farmworkers, and continue to fire and
blacklist hundreds of workers who
support the UFW.
Only three large grape growers
out of more than one hundred
currently provide decent conditions for their workers. All three
are under UFW contract.
Workers in grape vineyards
without UFW contracts continue to
be exposed to unsanitary conditions, pesticides, child labour
and labour contractor abuse.
The student union supported the
re-education committee and
fundedit to the tune of $407.
Then, in mid-July, student Derek
Webb approached the council
saying he had the signatures of 40
people to form a Committee to
Apologize to David Lewis.
The council rejected his request
for up to $400, and a week later
reversed its decision on the
grounds that it should fund any
committee organized by students.
The council funded a $90 one-half
page ad in the student newspaper,
The Peak.
The ad offered an apology to
Lewis for "harassment initiated by
a vocal minority."
"We feel we represent the
majority in condemning this ill-
mannered action," it read.
Mechanics strike closes SFU
Seventy-one mechanical workers
at Simon Fraser University continued to picket Monday, the sixth
day of their strike against the
university administration.
And 660 other unionized SFU
employees were refusing to cross
the picket lines, disrupting
university services.
University food services are
completely closed down as the
Culinary and Beverage Dispensers
Union stayed off the job in support
of the mechanical workers.
And supervisory personnel are
keeping the library open despite
the absence  of library workers
belonging to the Association of
University and College Employees, who are honoring the
picket lines.
The SFU used bookstore, cinema
and student society general office
also remain closed.
The university has agreed to pay
the mechanical workers" a 10 per
cent wage increase in a one-year
contract but it has refused to grant
the unions a shorter work week.
Some SFU students are backing
the striking unions. The Student
Strike Support committee has
called a meeting for Wednesday.
Roots for the Country. The Hiking Root with its soft
padded collar. The Country Root, calfskin leather lined
and the water resistant Portage Root. All top grain
Canadian leather and very, very comfortable. Get back
to your Roots, with a pair of ours.
Roots
VANCOUVER - 766 Robson St. (across from Eaton's) 689-9916
i VICTOR IA - 1202 Wharf St. (across from Bastion Square) 383-4811
u
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.-.    ^^^jR-alte: Tuesday, September 14, 1976
THE        UBYSSEY
Page 15
YIN YANG
Rubber Stamp
Decorate your books, correspondence etc. Hi-quality rubber mounting. Mea
sures   %"    x
Only
$3.95.  STAMPART,   P.O.
Box    4767,    Vancouver
^
—maureen suzanne photo
FOOL BUS, NOT SCHOOL BUS brought troupe of travelling mimics, jugglers, tight-rope walkers and
fire-eaters to perform in front of SUB Monday. Vaudeville Comedia D'Arye member Stephanie
Alle demonstrates umbrella-holding beside bus. Group has toured in U.S. and Canada for three months.
Interior ed under SFU
Winegard submits report
By CHRIS GAINOR
A one-man commission into
education in B.C.'s non-
metropolitan areas has recommended the establishment of a
four-campus institution in the
interior which would operate as
part of Simon Fraser University
until it becomes independent in
19P0.
But education minister Pat
McGeer said Friday he will not
make a final decision on the future
of university education in the interior until he has heard from the
communities involved, the
Universities Council of B.C. and
SFU.
Thecommission, set up May 5 by
McGeer, was headed by William
Winegard, former administration
president of Guelph University in
Ontario. The commission was
charged with making a blueprint
for education in B.C.'s interior and
a decision about Notre Dame
University in Nelson.
It's report, released Friday,
recommends the establishment of
a new University College of Simon
Fraser University, with campuses
in Prince George, Kamloops,
Kelowna and Nelson, with a
headquarters in Vernon.
Although it would be part of SFU,
the college would receive separate
funding from the universities
council, which divides funds
between the province's three
public universities. SFU should
decide whether or not to accept the
proposal by December, the report
states.
In a statement released Monday,
the B.C. Students' Federation
supported the report, although it
called for a stronger student and
community role in the new institution's decision-making.
Students enrolled at NDU last year
should be allowed to complete their
degrees in Nelson, it adds.
Faculty and staff at NDU should
be absorbed by Selkirk College in
Castlegar and by the new institution, the Winegard report
says, or be given the option to
retire early at full pension.
A decision on the report will end
a lengthy controversy over the
future of NDU which has troubled
McGeer and former NDP
education minister Eileen Dailly.
The commission held a series of
12 public hearings last June
throughout B.C., including a lively
meeting in Nelson attended by
about 1,000 people.
Dailly's decision last November
to make NDU part of a four-
campus institution which would
become B.C.'s fourth public
university was suspended when the
Socreds came to power a month
later.
If SFU rejects the report's main
recommendation, the proposed
institution should be established on
an independent basis, the report
says.
But the report says it should be
part of SFU because SFU is best
suited to the task and there are
many disadvantages to an independent institution.
"The degree would have to gain
credibility at the same time as the
institution was acting as a credit
bank to clear up the backlog of
credits held by various people from
different institutions," the report
says.
"Another problem would be the
increased lead time necessary to
establish a totally new institution.
Furthermore, the large cost of
establishing a full-fledged
university at this time could prove
unfortunate for the post-secondary
system of British Columbia.
"Although the new unit will be
part of Simon Fraser University, it
should be given a considerable
degree of autonomy. In many ways
it should be treated as an affiliated
college but subject to the
regulations of the senate and the
university.
Faculty would be hired by SFU,
the report suggests, and three or
four people from outside
metropolitan areas should be
added to SFU's board of governors.
Also recommended is an advisory council for the institution
which would consist of eight to 10
members from non-metropolitan
areas.
The BCSF statement said two of
the new members of SFU's board
should be students. It also
disagreed with the prediction that
enrolment drops in the 1980s mean
that it should not be independent
until 1990. Increased accessibility
will mean a rising enrolment, the
statement says.
The estimated annual cost of the
institution is $7.1 million and the
initial capital costs of $8.5 million
should be spread over five years,
the report recommends.
VANCOUVER RESOURCES BOARD
DO YOU HAVE
ROOM
FOR ONE MORE?
Foster homes are needed in Vancouver for children of all ages.
An information meeting for prospective foster parents will be
held:
7:30 P.M. Thursday, September 16
at
Marpole-Oakridge Office
No. 270-1200 West 73rd Avenue
For more information, please call Vancouver Resources Board
733-8111
Specials
SEE OUR WINDOW DISPLAY
UNIVERSITY PHARMACY
CHARGEX
WELCOME
5754 UNIVERSITY BOULEVARD
224-3202 FREE DELIVERY
B.C. TEL.
B.C. HYDRO
COLLECTIONS Page 16
THE        UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 14, 1976
PLC plans anti-Trident
protest in Wash. Sunday
Pacific Life Community
members are planning a
demonstration Sunday to follow up
the one held Aug. 8 at the Trident
nuclear submarine base in Bangor,
Wash., at which ,11 people were
arrested.
Members of the community,
whose aim is to halt the spread of
nuclear arms through non-violent
protest, cut through the fence
surrounding the base and marched
through with their symbolic
'Trident Monster'.
For this action three women
were convicted of trespass and
destruction of government
property and received 30-day jail
sentences.
Judge Donald Voohees, who
sentenced the three, warned the
group against further civil
disobedience.
"This is not a punishment for
you, it is a deterrent for those who
would follow," he said.
The other eight arrested, including the group's leader, Jim
Douglass, go to trial Nov. 4.
On Sunday the'protesters, who
expect to be arrested again, intend
to show that threats of such punishment will not deter them, Douglass
said Friday.
Following a non-violence
training session in the morning in
Kitsap State Park the protesters
will   drive   to   the  Trident   base
Stench
unnerves
new Tory
LONDON, Ont. (CUP) — Young
Tory and University of Western
Ontario student councillor Larry
Haskell got the shock of his pinstriped life recently when he attended the fourth annual meeting
of the Ontario Federation of
Students.
According to Haskell's report on
the four-day conference,
distributed at a Western students'
council meeting, the highlight of
the OFS meeting was not the
debate on policies to guide the
federation's activities next year,
but the participants themselves.
"Blue jeans, jean jackets, bare
feet, bra-less women, unusually
long and scruffy hair, unkempt
beards, sandals, homosexuals,
tennis shoes, and references to
worker-student solidarity" seemed
strangely commonplace to
Haskell.
He was also distressed on the
final day of the conference when he
suspected "half of those present
did not seem to have changed
clothes since the previous day,"
while unspecified "odours made it
apparent that few had bathed
either."
But poor personal hygience
wasn't the only, area in which
Haskell found fault with the Ontario student movement.
According to his report, OFS
members "are even worse at
policy formulation than are
student Tories" and were "totally
uninterested in procedure."
It wasn't that Haskell was unfamiliar with the issues being
discussed. "The issues being
talked about were basically the
same as are discussed at meetings
of student Tories." The difference,
he grasped, was that "some of the
underlying assumptions were
radically different."
"For example, free tuition was
assumed necessary, and present
federal and provincial policies with
respect to post-secondary
education were believed to be
'hopelessly regressive' " which,
according to Haskell, "seems
ludicrous."
where they plan to again cut a hole
in the fence and enter the base.
As well as Sunday's demonstration, the community has
planned a 30-day fast, scheduled to
end Nov. 1, the day before the
U.S. presidential election.
Douglass and a few other
members intend to conduct their
fast in Washington, D.C, where
they hope to speak with Jimmy
Carter and president Gerald Ford,
while the rest of the community
will fast in their own towns.
The Community is hoping for
support from the Alma Mater
Society which co-sponsored last
year's Trident week of concern.
AMS president Dave van
Blarcom said Friday that while
there many be some opposition
from the 'hawks' on council,
notably the science and
engineering reps, the community
will probably receive some money
from the AMS.
The AMS may also sponsor
another rally or day of protest, said:
van Blarcom, or bring in some
speakers to talk about Trident and
nuclear warfare.
He said the Student Represen
tative Assembly will probably
debate supporting the Community
at its Sept. 22 meeting.
Anyone who wishes to participate in Sunday's protest or who
would like to know more about the
Community and its plans should
contact Jim Douglass at 526-4329.
PAULA
ROSS
DANCE CLASSES
FALL 76
REGISTER NOW
FOR DAY AND EVENING
CLASSES AND WORKSHOPS
IN
BALLET, CONTEMPORARY
AND JAZZ *
MONDAY THRU SATURDAY    §
3488 W. Broadway       |
Information & Brochure J
732-9513 §
PRINT SPECIAL
39*
JUMBO GLOSSY PRINTS
FROM SLIDES
(126& 35 m/mONLY)
EXPIRES OCT. 2nd
CAMERAS LTD.
4538 W. 10th Ave.
U.B.C. Gates 224-5858
ARTS ONE
is a 9 unit liberal arts programme for 1st year students. It satisfies
the English 100 requirement and counts as two additional first
year courses. Readings are drawn from a variety of fields and
organized around a theme. The choice of themes this year is
"World Views" or "Self & Society". The emphasis is on small
groups. Places are still open.
Enquire 228-3430 or Arts One Bldg., just west of Education
Building.
PIZZA PARLOUR
MAIN FLOOR — SOUTH END — STUDENT UNION BLDG.
TUESDAY, SEPT. 14
8:00 p.m.— 12:30 p.m.
16 VARIETIES OF PIZZA
8"$1.35-$2.15   —   12"$2.35-$3.35   —   16" $3.80-$4.80
EXTRA TOPPINGS 8" + 30c - 12" + 50c - 16" + 70c
REGULAR HOURS OF OPERATION
TUESDAY-FRIDAY
SATURDAYS
HAPPY HOUR FRIDAY
FAMILY HOUR SATURDAY
8 p.m.-12:30 a.m. NIGHTLY
7 p.m.-12:30 a.m. NIGHTLY
8-9:00 p.m.
7-8:00 p.m.
LICENSED PREMISES
WE DO NOT DELIVER AT THIS TIME Tuesday, September 14, .1976
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 17
FEATURING
DELICIOUS AND
AUTHENTIC
CHINESE FOOD
at the
AUDITORIUM
SNACK BAR
Monday — Friday
11am-2pm
(forks available)
DECORA TE WITH PRINTS*
grin bin;
3209 W. Broadway
738-2311
(opposite Super-Valu)
Art Reproductions
Art Nouveau
Largest Selection
of Posters in B.C.
Photo Blowups
from Negs & Prints
Jokes ■ Gifts, etc.
DECORA TE WITH POSTERS}
U.S. study shows
TN[ debunked
MICHIGAN (ENS/CUP) — A
University of Michigan research
team has completed what appears
to be the first bio-chemical
evaluation of Transcendental
Meditation.
As reported in Science
Magazine, the researcher
measured blood levels of a
chemical which is known to increase greatly in people who are
under stress.
The researchers found that the
level of this stress chemical was
very low in experienced
meditators during their meditation
periods.
But, they found the same low
levels of the chemical in the blood
of a control group of volunteers
while they were simply resting.
Their conclusion is that Transcendental Meditation does not
induce a unique state of consciousness, biochemically
speaking, but is simply another
resting state.
UNISEX HAIRSTYLES
FOR APPOINTMENT
224-1922
224-9116
5784 University (Next to Bank of Commerce)
— doug field photo
CONTEMPLATING   BUSY   FINGERS
singer Craig Elder entertains audience
under clock tower. Unlike chimes in
tower, Elder's music was live act
prerecorded.
Herbie Wilson and his
grandmother have one
thing in common.
(They both save 20% when they
fly with Pacific Western Airlines.)
Herbie qualifies for Pacific Western Airlines' Youth Fares.
His favourite older person qualifies for our Senior
Citizen Discount. What it means is a full one-fifth off the cost of
flying from anywhere to anywhere on Pacific Western's routes
in Alberta, British Columbia and the Northwest Territories.
It's one of the great deals of the ages.
PROFIC
UJESTERH
We're whhyouall the way.
See your travel agent or Pacific We'stern Airlines for details and reservations,
U.B.C.
One hou»
'mmmiiiaB"
THI MOST I. D»V ClfA.I.O
FALL
DRYCLEANING
SALE
MONEY SAVING
DRYCLEANING COUPONS
2146 WESTERN PARKWAY
UNIVERSITY  VILLAGE
228-9414
Slacks - Sweaters
Skirts
250 OFF
(Our Regular Price)
EXPIRES
OCT. 31, 1976
Present Coupon with Garments
Slacks - Sweaters
Skirts
250 OFF
(Our Regular Price)
EXPIRES
OCT, 31 , 1976
Present Coupon with Garments
Suits
500 OFF
(Our Regular Price)
'mminiiins:      «p.rEs
...... ,.-;..„..,.: I       OCT. 31,1976
Present Coupon with Garments
Dresses
500 OFF
(Our Regular Price)
"mminuine;     expires
....... J7„ .„..,.. j      OCT.31, 1976
Present Coupon with Garments
Coats
500 OFF
(Our Regular Price)
mmimf
expires
OCT. 31, 1976
Present Coupon with Garments
ALL HOUSEHOLD ITEMS
20f0 OFF
Blankets - Drapes
Sleeping Bags
wiiijiiis:
EXPIRES
OCT. 31, 1976
SAVE - SAVE • SAVE Page 18
THE        UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 14, 1976
Hot flashes,
'Tween €lasses
This is The Ubyssey's notice
page.
It's the page with the Hot
Flashes and'Tween Classes, and it
is almost always on the third last
page of each issue.
Hot F lashes are short stories on'
upcoming or ongoing events that
are free or very cheap, and which
are of interest to most students. If
you are planning something that
meets those criteria, give us the
information on a piece of paper; if
we agree, a Hot Flash will appear.
Anyone can put a 'Tween,
Classes notice in the paper.
They're free; all you have to do to
get one in is come into The
Ubyssey office, SUB 241K, and
fill out a form.
Deadlines are noon the day
before we publish.
Museum
Already bored with classes,
profs, texts, etc?
UBC's new Museum of
Anthropology has attracted many
visitors since it opened in June.
The museum "has an excellent
collection of northwest coast
Indian art as well as artifacts from
the Asian and classical worlds.
Located on Northwest Marine
Hot flashes
Drive, the museum is open from
noon fo 5 p.m. Wednesday to
Sunday and from noon to 9 p.m.
Tuesday. Admission is 75 cents
with a student card but Tuesdays
it's free.
Nigh noon
Lest any confusion arise, noon,
in Hot Flashes and'Tween Classes
language, actually means 12:30
p.m.
The reason for this is that
classes, etc. at UBC run from the
half hour to the half hour, and the
noon-hour starts half an hour late.
But we still call it noon.
Rhodes
Chalk up another dubious
breakthrough for women.
The famed, or notorious,
depending on your interest in
history, Rhodes Scholarships will
be open to women for the first
time this year.
Since they were established in
1904 under the will of the man
who symbolizes the "white man's
burden" in black Africa the
prestigious scholarships have
ignored the abilities of slightly
over half the world's people. The
obvious parallels have been drawn.
Eleven scholarships will be
awarded to Canadians this fall for
'Tween classes
TODAY
DHARMA STUDY GROUP
Talk by Lodro Dorse, 8:30 p.m.,
Dharma Centre at 2865 West
Fourth.
KUNG FU CLUB
Demonstration,
Room.
noon,   SUB    Party
YOUNG SOCIALISTS
Former    political    prisoners    from
Chile speak, noon, SUB 205.
WEDNESDAY
NEWMAN CLUB
General   luncheon   meeting,   ru
St. Mark's Newman room.
BOWLING LEAGUE
Organizational    meeting,   noon,
106.
THURSDAY
CHINESE CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Sing and talk, noon, SUB 205.
GAY PEOPLE
Organizational meeting, noon, SUB
211.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Orientation      night,      7:30      p.m.,
International   House upper  lounge.
YOUNG   SOCIALISTS
Luis Fornazzari speaks about freeing
Chilean political prisoners, 8 p.m.,
Vanguard Forum, 1208 Granville.
WOMEN'S ATHLETICS
First dryland training session for
men's and women's ski teams, 5:30
to 7:30 p.m., Gym E at the Winter
Sports Centre.
CYCLE TEAM
Organizational meeting, noon. War
Memorial Gym 211.
THE BROCK HALL COLLECTION
PURCHASING COMMITTEE
NEEDS MEMBERS WHO MUST
HAVE A GOOD BACKGROUND KNOWLEDGE
IN CONTEMPORARY CANADIAN ART
Contact:
Jean-Francois Guimond    263-4150
Maureen Maitland     684-2079
Gail Stone    224-4631
study at Oxford University for up
to three years with 3,000 pounds
sterling (about $5,250 this week)
per year.
Canadians, preferably in third
or fourth year university, who are
unmarried and aged 18 to 24 are
eligible. Applications, available in
the registrar's office, may be made
until Oct. 25.
Libraries
Have  you   been  searching for
that elusive book 15 Ways To Oil.
Your   Pogo   Stick   for   the   last
dozen  years  in the UBC  library
system?
Well, your troubles will be over
if you take one of the great
library tours offered this week at
U.B.C.
The tours start at 10:30 a.m.
and noon at Main Library and 11
a.m. and 1 p.m. at Sedgewick
Library. An 8-minute audio-visual
show. Introduction to the
Libraries, will be shown at 11:20
a.m. and 1:20 p.m. at Sedgewick.
Law
This fall the Vancouver
People's Law School is offering a
wide-range of free law classes.
Topics include separation and
divorce, common-law marriages.
Wills and estates and environmental
law.
For additional information
contact the Vancouver People's
Law School at 681-7532 for their
booklet.
PANGO PANGO (UNS) —
Hundreds of screaming blorgs,
mice and bi-sexual rats invaded
this tiny island kingdom today in a
futile attempt to steal the succulent
lotus flowers enjoyed by the
natives. "Let them eat books!"
shrieked the royal retainers,
hurling the invaders into the sea.
Call
BRENT LEANEY
our man on campus
REDUCED PRICES
Financing O.A.C.l
For U.B.C. Students & Staff
New Chevettes
write your own
deal.
1974 Nova6-std.
4 dr. gold white
walls. 14,000 miles
1 of a kind.
1974-TR 6 Roadster
Gold-AM FM 24,000
mint condition.
1974 Vega HB-white
std. 22,000 miles
a very clean car.
1975 Dodge Monaco
X-RCMP 50,000 miles
make me a crazy
offer.
New Vegas
write your own
deal.
DICK IRWIN
CHEVROLET 0LDSM0BILE LTD.
FlEA MARKET ? ?
SWAP MEET ? ?
WHERE: Grass field behind SUB parking lot.
WHEN:    Thursday, Sept. 16, 9 a.m. - 6 p.m.
WHO:      All students interested in selling, buying,
or swapping personal goods.
HOW:       Just bring whatever you have, set up
shop and .. . Voila!
No Registration Required,
No Fees.
[SPEC/AL FEATURE: j
j The AMS will be disposing at rock bottom prices    |
Jold chairs and other goodies from the PIT and SUB.!
This is your big chance to get rid of all your old stuff and pick up a terrific buy!!
LET'S GET TOGETHER ON THURSDAY
THIS ACTIVITY IS SPONSORED BY THE AMS SPECIAL EVENTS COMMITTEE
Only CP Rail ferries have
to Nanaimo.
Sail from downtown Vancouver to
downtown Nanaimo aboard a Princess
ferry. Just pick a convenient time from
three sailings a day, any day of the week.
Then call and let us know you're coming.
On board you'll enjoy excellent
dining, a spacious lounge and
spectacular Gulf Islands' scenery from
the observation decks.
Leave
Vancouver
4:00 a.m.
Noon
8:00 p.m.
Arrive
Nanaimo
6:30 a.m.
2:30 p.m.
10:30 p.m.
Leave
Nanaimo
8:00 a.m.
4:00 p.m.
Midnight
Arrive
Vancouver
10:30 a.m.
6:30 p.m.
2:30 a.m.
Call 665-3142 for guaranteed sail-away service.
When we sail, you sail.
CPRail
l<
CANDIA
pizza factory
4510 W. 10th Ave.
228-9512 I    or    | 228-95131
FAST FREE DELIVERY
Open 7 Days A Week, 4 p.m.-2 a.m.
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES:   Campus - 3 lines, 1 day $1.50; additional lines 35c.
Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional lines
50c. Additional days $2,25 and 45c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications Off ice, Room 241, S.U.B., UBC, Vancouver.
5 — Coming Events
MUSICIANS
Join  the  West  Point Grey
Community Centre Concert Band
Wed. evenings, 7:30 p.m.
LORD BYNG SCHOOL
3939 W. 16th
Phone 224-1710 for further
information
RUMMAGE SALE and Bake Sale, 1855
Vine Street, Vancouver, Friday, Sept.
17 from 3 p.m. to 9 p.m.; Saturday,
Sept. 18 from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sponsored by False Creek Housing Co-op.
PAPPAS ANNUAL Used Fur Sale. 150
genuine fur coats and jackets, $25 to
$50. One day only. Sat., Sept. 18,
10 a.m., 459 Hamilton Street, Vancouver, B.C. 681-6840.
10 — For Sale — Commercial
USED TEXTBOOKS
Hummingbird  Books
873-3191
748 EAST BROADWAY
Vancouver, B.C.
LARGEST SELECTION of Prints and
Posters in B.C. at the Grin Bin, 3209
West Broadway, 738-2311 (opposite
Super Val»).
11 — For Sale — Private
FOR SALE — Large study desk and
lamp, $50.00.  688-4307.
'67 AUSTIN 1100, radio, c.t., clean,
rebuilt "74, good transport. $450.00.
980-9082, 6-8 p.m .
HIKING BOOTS — (medium weight),
Meindl "Mont Blanc", sz. 39 (5%),
near new, $60 o.b.o. 325-7350.
1973 HONDA 500, oblique/4-cylinder,
mint shape, saddle bags, wind
screen, headers, crash bar and more.
Asking $1400. Days 682-7841(49),
Evenings   926-7915.   R.   Hepple.
15 — Found
20 — Housing
TWO FEMALES need third to share
three-bedroom m/flh. off Victoria
Dr. $120 p/m incl. utilities. Phone
Connie, 254-5254.
25 — Instruction
35 - Lost
60 — Rides
65 — Scandals
70 — Services
PIANO TUNING — Special rates for
UBC students. Phone Dallas Hinton,
266-8123 anytime.
99— Miscellaneous
TRAVELLING  OVERSEAS
ON   A
SHOESTRING   BUDGET 9
Then attend a special travel evening
sponsored by the Canadian Youth Hostels Association to be held at the
Vancouver Youth Hostel, foot of Discover Street, on Wednesday, September 15th at 8:00 p.m.
Advice will be given on most aspects
of low budget travel and free check
lists will be available to all potential
travellers.
No  Admission Charge
Bring Your Friends & Questions
Canadian   Youth   Hostels   Association,
1406  West   Broadway,   Vancouver,   B.C.
738-3128.
ir=if=ir=ir=Jr=Jr=Jr=ip=ir=^t=ir=
USE
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED
TO SELL - BUY
INFORM
!S
urz^^irr^^rarSIrH Tuesday, September 14, 1976
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 19
Back-up QB leads Birds to win
By TOM BARNES
The Thunderbird football team
opened its home season with a 20-13
victory Saturday over the University   of Alberta Golden Bears.
For the second straight week it
was back-up quarterback Greg
Gardiner coming in to lead the way
for the 'Birds.
Gardiner came in for stater Dan
Smith with just under five minutes
left in the first half when the score
was tied 3-3. He executed the triple
option veer offense well to move
the 'Birds up field and capped off
the drive with a 27 yard run into the
endzone. Gray Metz was good on
the covert to make the score 10-3.
The Bears came right back with
a drive of their own. The UBC
secondary seemed to have some
trouble   picking   up   the   backs
spon ts
coming out of play action passes.
Joe Poplawski pulled the Bears to
within four points with a field goal
on the last play of the half.
ALBERTA'S KERRY O'CONNOR CARRIES BALL..
— doug field photo
Dalton Smarsh (25), Brian Towne (34) block '
Shrum Bowl issue keeps
coach from savoring victory
By TOM BARNES
Frank Smith's first win of the
football season was barely 10
minutes behind him when the issue
of the Shrum Bowl was raised.
The reinstatement of the Shrum
Bowl, awarded vin the past to the
winner of a game between Simon
Fraser University and UBC, has
been an issue since last spring.
The background is simple.
SFU has just gone though two
rather mediocre seasons. SFU,
with a football budget of $90,000,
more than three times that of UBC,
was assumed to play better football than UBC. This was true until
recently.
Last year UBC started to win and
started to attract attention and
publicity in sectors that had Once
been the sole area of SFU.
s^V responded with a challenge,
using American rules, on the Astro
turf of Empire stadium.
UBC said no thanks, citing a
Canada West University Athletic
Association ban of play with SFU
until SFU follows Canadian
recruiting practices.
SFU replied with thinly veiled
catcalls of "chicken". On Saturday, Smith replied.
"When I came here I said my
goal was to create a team that was
competitive in the WIFL. We've
done that," Smith told the post-
game news conference.
It was left for someone else to
point out the announced intention
of the SFU program 10 years ago —
to be the first Canadian university
to win the Rose Bowl — has fallen
by the wayside.
"Look, our open date is Oct. 2
this year. The week before we play
Calgary (one of two rated above
UBC), they play Chico, (a small
California school that offers no
scholarships).
"The week after, we play
Saskatchewan (the other team
ranked ahead of UBC) and they
play another small non-scholarship
school.
"Even so they can stand to loose
both those games, but if they beat
us their season is made," Smith
said.
"If we lose to both Saskatchewan
and Calgary it could cost us first
place, no matter how we do against
SFU."
On Oct. 2 the Birds will play
Western Washington State, a
strong team from the Evergreen
conference, which happens to offer
scholarships.
That way the Birds can play
football, and not have to get
themselves into a childish
argument about what system is
better.
Smith feels it would be good for
SFU and UBC for the Shrum Bowl
to be brought back, but not until he
is ready.
Time is on his side, he feels, and
he wants at least two more years so
he can have a team he has
recruited and developed.
In the meantime, Smith is not
entirely convinced that scholarships and out-of-province
recruiting, both banned by the
Canadian Intercollegiate Athletic
Union and employed by SFU are
needed to make for a good football
team.
He noted that 19 players on the
UBC team were offered financial
aid by SFU.
In the meantime, while the two
coaching staffs trade shots through
the press, a few questions should
be answered.
First, why is the athletic
program at SFU heavily subsidized by the provincial government, while the programs at the
University of Victoria and UBC
don't receive a cent?
Second, why is the provincial
government helping to pay for the
recruiting and education of out-of-
province and out-of-country
athletes at SFU?
When these questions are considered it must be remembered
that UVic and UBC are members
of the Canada West Conference in a
number of sports, while for the
most part SFU plays exhibition
games against whatever competition it can scrape up.
UBC BOWLING LEAGUE
Organizational Meeting
Wed., Sept. 15,12:30     Buch 106
Bowling Commences
Mon., Sept. 20
Sub Lanes
NEW BOWLERS WELCOME
We are a "handicap" league
For further information
call Walter 228-8225
Alberta opened the scoring in the
second half with a 58 yard pass-
and-run play to running back
Dalton Smarsh late in the third
quarter. Nobddy in the UBC
secondary picked him up as he
came out of the backfield.
Taking over on his own 25 after
the kickoff, Gardiner engineered
his second touchdown drive of the
day to put UBC in front for good.
He repeatedly found receivers
Shaun McGuiness and Tom
Reimer open in the middle. Gardiner capped off the drive with a
one-yard plunge for his second
touchdown of the game. Metz again
converted to make the score 17-13.
Metz rounded out the score with
a 25-yard field goal.
Going into the game it was felt
that the difference between the
team might be the Bears' tough
defence. In fact, it was the 'Birds
defence that was the deciding
factor.
Alberta's strong running game,
led by Dalton Smarsh and Kerry
O'Connor, was never able to get
un tracked.
It is on defense where most of the
changes have been made for the
'Birds, especially in the secondary.
For the most part the new men
played well, though there was a
lack of consistent tackling by the
safety and halfhacks.
The biggest surprise for
defensive coach Bob Laycoe was
that his charges played so well.
Throughout the second half the
Bears were kept bottled up in their
own end. Laycoe felt Arnie Francis
had played well but also commended Al Cave — Cave was
coverted to livebacker from offensive line this year and was
called on to replace Mike McKay-
Dunn at middle linebacker late in
the first half.
"The Bears ran at Cave for the
entire second half and got
nowhere," Laycoe said.
UBC head coach Frank Smith
was not quite as satisfied with the
performance of his offensive unit.
"We didn't move the ball consistently throughout the game. Not
anywhere near our performance of
last year," said Smith.
Smith said part of the problem is
that the players are a little tight.
Last year almost every offensive
record in school history was
smashed, and for the first time in
decades a UBC team finds itself in
the position of having to live up to
expectations.
Last the week the 'Birds opened
their season in Saskatoon with a
game against the University of
Saskatchewan Huskies. That time
the 'Birds were down 20-3 in the
fourth quarter when Gardiner went
in. He brought them back to within
one point, scoring two touchdowns
on one yard plunges. But the
Huskies held on for a 21-20 win.
Frank Smith is naturally pleased
with the performance of Gardiner.
He feels one of the reasons for his
success is his ability to run the
triple option. This is a dramatic
change from Dan Smith's
traditional drop back style of play
and it is very hard for a defense to
adjust to the sudden change in
style.
In the other Western Intercollegiate Football League
game last week the University of
Calgary Dinosaurs scored a single
on the last play of the game to nip
the University of Manitoba
Huskies 14-13.
On Saturday the Dinosaurs won
their second straight by dumping
the Huskies 29-16.
Most observers feel the WIFL is
going to have the most balanced
year in its history this season.
Calgary is favoured for first place
but not by much. Saskatchewan
and UBC are given the edge over
Alberta and Manitoba for second
and third, but there is little to
choose between any of the teams. A
5-3 record should be good enough to
ensure a playoff position.
WIFL standings:
W L Pts. F.
Calgary 2   0   4   43
Sask. 1   1   2   36
UBC 1   1   2   40
Manitoba 0   1   0   13
Alberta 0   1   0   13
A.
29
49
34
14
20
rTHE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA^
WOMENS ATHLETICS J
Sports offered and team try-out dates for the 1976-77 season.
Badminton
Wed., Sept. 15th, 6:30 p.m. Gym A
Basketball
Tues., Wed., Memorial Gym
Sept. 14th & 15th, 4:30 p.m.
Bowling
T.B.A. check at the Athletic
Office Room 208 Memorial Gym
Curling
Wed., Oct. 13th, 5:00 p.m.
Fencing
Mon. Sept. 20th, 7:30 p.m.
Field Hockey
Sept. 14th & 17th, 4:00 p.m.
Sept. 16, 12:30
Golf
check at Athletic Office
Gymnastics
Tues., Sept. 14th, 4:00 p.m.
Skiing
Thurs., Sept. 16th, 5:30 p.m.
Soccer
Tues., Sept. 14th, 12:30 p.m.
Squash
Tues., Sept. 21st, 5:45 p.m.
Swimming & Diving
Tues., Sept. 14th, 12:30 p.m.
Tennis
Thurs., Sept. 16th, 4:30 p.m.
Track & Field
Tues., Sept. 21, 5:30 p.m.
Volleyball
Tues., Sept. 21, 7:30 p.m.
Winter Sports Centre
Gym E
Warren & McGregor
Fields
Gym G
Gym E
Memorial Gym
Winter Sports Centre
Room 32
Thunderbird Park
Courts (south campus)
Armoury
Memorial Gym
_fEver/one is welcome to come and try-out. These teams are
I open to all women students on campus. Take advantage of the
^^opportunity and participate. Page 20
THE        UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 14, 1976
o&6 sound's  Stereo
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99
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138 802 BEETHOVEN: Symphony
No. 3 EROICA Karajan, Berlin
Philharmonic.
138 907 J S BACK TOCCATA &
FUGUE IN O MINOR* Prelude &
Fugue in D Fantasia & Fugue in
G minor. Trio Sonata No. 2, K.
Richter.
138 921 TCHAIKOVSKY: Symphony
No. 6 PATHETOUE, Karajan.
Berlin Philharmonic.
138 924 BRAHMS: Symphony No.
1, Karajan, Berlin Philharmonic,
138 927 BRAHMS: Symphony No.
4, Karajan, Berlin Philharmonic.
139 00* MOZART: Elne kleine
Nachtmusik, Divertimento No.
15 K 287, Karajan, Berlin
Philharmonic.
139  010 RAVEL: Bolero
MUSSORGSKY: Pictures at an
Exhibition, (Orchestrated by
Ravel), Karajan, Berlin
Philharmonic.
139 029 TCHAIKOVSKY: 1812
OVERTURE Romeo S Juliet,
Marche slave, Karajan, Berlin
Philharmonic, Don Cossacks.
139 030 TCHAIKOVSKY: Nutcracker Suite, Serenade for
Strings, Karajan, Berlin
Philharmonic.
139 300 BEETHOVEN: The 3
POPULAR PIANO SONATAS, No.
14 Moonlight, No. 8 Pathetique,
No.  23  Appassionato,   Kempff.
2530 027 J STRAUSS: TALES FROM
THE   VIENNA  WOODS,   Vienna
■ Blood, Morning Papers Waltzes,
Hunting Thunder & Lightning,
Pizzicato, Polkas, Egyptian &
Persian Marches, Karajan, Berlin
Philharmonic.
2530 038 DEBUSSY: Nuages Fetes
Sirenes FLAVEL: Daphnis &
Chloe Suite No. 2, Paven, Abbado Boston Symphony.
2530 102 HOLST THE PLANETS.
Steinberg, Boston Symphony.
2430 142 BEETHOVEN: Symphony
No. 6 PASTORAL Boehm,
Vienna Philharmonic.
2530 147 BEETHOVEN: Archduke
Trio, Szeryng, Forrnier, Kempff.
2530   144   ROSSINI   OVERTURES:
William    Tell,    Thieving   Magpie,
Barber of Seville, Silken Ladder,
Italian    Girl    in    Algeirs,    Ser-
miramide,     Karajan,     Berlin
Philharmonic.
2530 195 TCHAKOVSKY: Swan
Lake Highlights, Sleeping Beauty
Highlights, Karajan, Berlin
Philharmonic.
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DEBUSSY: Choldrens Corner
Images Books  1 and 2.
2530 211 VIVALDI: The Complete
Mandolin & Lute Concertos
Yepes T & S Ochi, Kuentz
Chamber Orchestra.
2530 243 GRIEG: Peer Gynt Suites
No. 1 & 2, 3 Orchestral Pieces
from Sigurd Jorsalfer, Karajan,
Berlin Philharmonic.
2530 259 BRAHMS: Piano Concerto
No. 2 Gileis, Berlin Philharmonic, Jochum.
2530 291 CHOPIN: The 24 Eludes
Op 10 S Op 25, Pollini.
2530 296 VIVALDI: The iSeasons,
Karajan,   Berlin   Philharmonics.
2530 357 MOZART: Jupiter
Symphony SCHUBERT: Unfinished Symphony, Jochum,
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2530 359 MENDELSSOHN: Violin
Concerto in E minor.
TCHAIKOVSKY: Violin Concerto,
Milstein, Vienna Philharmonics,
Abbado.
2530 402 R STRAUSS: ALSO
SPRACH ZARATHUSTRA, Theme
from 2001, A Space Odyssey,
Karajan,    Berlin    Philharmonic.
2530 406 BEETHOVEN: Piano
Sonatas No. 6 & 23, Appassionato, Gilels.
2530 414 BEETHOVEN OVERTURES: Cariolin, Ruinsof Athens,
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Karajan,    Berlin    Philharmonic.
2530 416 MENDELSSOHN: Italian S
Reformation Symphonies,
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2530 438 BEETHOVEN: Piano
Concerto No. 5, Emperor
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2530 440 HAYDN: 2 String
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2530 441 USTZ: 6 Hungarian
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19, Original piano versions,
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2530 505 ENGLISH MUSK FOR
ORCHESTRA VAUGHAN
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Ascending & other works by
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2530   516    BEETHOVEN:    Sym
phonies No. 5. Carolos Kleiber,
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2530 525 HAYDN: Symphony No.
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104, London,   jochum,   London
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2530 530 MARTHA ARGERKH
PLAY OMOPIN: Sonatas No. 2 in
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Spianato & Grande Pobnaise Op
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2530 548 MOZART: Concertos for
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Elvira Madigan Gulda, Vienna
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2530550 CHOPM: 24 Preludes Op
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2530 552 SIBELIUS: Violin Concerto, BEETHOVEN: The 2
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2530 586 BRAHMS: Variations on a
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2530 591 HAYDN: Symphonies No.
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2530 592 BRAHMS: Violin Concerto, Milstein, Vienna
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2530 597 BERLIOZ; SYMPHONIE
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2530 619 SAINT-SAENS: Symphony
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2530 628 HAYDN: Symphony No.
94 Surprise, Symphony No. 101
Clock, Jochum, London
Philharmonic.
2530 635 STRAVR4SKY: Le Sacre
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Abbado, London Symphony.
2530 642 MOZART: Concerto tor
Piano & Orchestra No. 25 & 27,
Gulda, Vienna Philharmonic,
Abbado.
2530 645 BEETHOVEN: Piano
Sonatas No. 30 S 31, Pollini.
2530 677 TCHAIKOVSKY: Piano
Concerto No. 1, Berman, Berlin
Philharmonic, Karajan.
2530 678 PROKAFIEV: Piano
Sonatas No. 8 RACHMANINOV:
6 Moments Musicaux,  Berman.
SEE IT ALL IN ONE PLACE!
556 Seymour Downtown

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