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The Ubyssey 1991-11-26

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 THEUBSSSEY
1
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Founded in 1918
Vancouver, B.C., Tuesday, November 26,1991
Vol 74, No 23
Making other people's decisions
Adult guardianship still influenced by 100 year-old standards
An estimated 11,000
people in BC live without
rights to their own person
and/or affairs.
by Sharon Lindores
There is no requirement in
legislation to determine the extent
to which an adult requires someone to take over her or his life
decisions.
A group of concerned citizens,
organized The Project to Review
Adult Guardianship (Guardianship Committee), to redefine political and social objectives, and to
develop and reform legislation regarding substitute decision making for adults.
One of the recommendations
of the project is that "legislation
must be developed which will permit an adult to appoint arepresen-
tative to manage their finances or
their personal care if the adult
becomes incapable of making these
decisions."
This legislation affects everybody. At some point in your life you
will know someone who could be
deemed incompetent. You yourself
have the -potential to grow old and
should have the right to decide
who should handle your affairs.
Rob Gordon, professor of
criminology at Simon Fraser University is a member ofthe Guardianship Committee and sits on the
eight-person government advisory
committee, which will create the
final recommendations to go before legislature.
Gordon would like to see representative agreements required
by the government when an individual reaches the age of 19.
Gordon said that BC laws regarding adult guardianship date
back to the 1890s.
"Now the first major reconstruction is underway since the
last period of reform, which was in
1897."
"The paternal property act,
public trustee and the new mental
health act that were passed between 1962 and 1964 underlie the
model, philosophy, principle, and
language ofthe 1897 old lunacy act
and the 1890 imperial lunacy act.
They tried to modernize the total
effect, however there was not massive change of the function," said
Gordon.
"For the past 900 years segregation has been used to classify
people medically. Prior to the 19th
century, people were known as village idiots. They did not stigmatize, until treatment modes and
institutions started to put people
into boxes."
Gordon said, "The laws are
stigmatizing, depowering, ineffective, insensitive, and insulting. It
is time for change both politically
and legally."
Today the philosophy of
graduating competency is gaining
popularity. The laws regarding
adult guardianship, Gordon believes, must reflect this new trend
in thought.
Presently, two forms of adult
guardianship exist: committeeship
Legislation for adult guardianship Involve* everyone. One day, you will grow old too. These Issues will
directly affect elderly people, people with a mental Illness, a mental handicap, a degenerative Illness such
as Alzheimer's Disease, AIDS, Parkinson's Disease, Huntington's Chorea, Multiple Sclerosis, a head injury
or stroke, and people with a severe physical handicap.
gives representation of an alleged
incompetent individual to another
individual and the office of the
public trustee serves as an official
stand-in for someone who does not
have legal status.
An individual is deemed to be
either competent or incompetent.
"An individual can be examined by two physicians and declared incompetent on a medical
certificate. This then goes to the
office of the public trustee, who
will take control ofthe individual's
property and financial affairs until they think it is time to let go. It
is an effective loss of liberty and it
is unconstitutional," said Gordon.
A study of applications for private committeeship made to the
BC Supreme Court, covering the
period 1966-87 concluded that
statutory reform is critical. Most
individuals never received the
documents related to incompetency, were not advised that a
hearing was taking place, were not
present or represented at the
hearing. Medical evidence was
vague and hearings usually lasted
less than five minutes.
Gordon said, "Guardianship
is a loss of liberty whichever way
you slice it. Procedures have to
conform to the Canadian Charter
of Rights and Freedoms [which
they do not at the present time].
This means concern with due process issues."
The Guardianship Committee
seeks to open up the legislation to
make it more flexible and receptive to individuals needs and concerns.
The Project to Review Adult
Guardianship was created in 1989,
and has been working with a broad
group of people, including those
affected by the proposed legislation, to work towards reform ofthe
adult guardianship laws in BC. Last
Tuesday, 600 people attended a
conference put on by the Guardianship Committee to discuss the
proposed ideas.
The committee involves over
2,000 people around the province
and works in tandem with the government Interministry Committee
on Issues Affecting Dependent
Adults.
"I have always hoped
young people would take
up the cause. People
university age are involved. Four out of 100
are affected, three out
of 100 are never diagnosed."
Gordon said BC is "light-years
ahead of the other provinces with
our proposals. The joint government committee will now review
the framework and recent comments and attempt to work through
each component of the proposed
new system with a view to implementation.
"We must consider
affordability, keep the project
within constitutionality, with an
effective connection between each
component, co-ordination of existing services and creation of new
services and producing the necessary legislation." Gordon said the
earliest possible date for the legislation to be passed would be the
end of next year, or probably the
spring of 1993.
SCHIZOPHRENIA
Pat Louis has been participating in the Guardianship Committee since its inception. She has
a son with schizophrenia and she
spoke at the conference on behalf
of BC Friends of Schizophrenics.
Gordon said it would be -possible to incorporate young adults
in areas where there is a significant overlap with the mental
health act review. The adult
guardianship proposal could benefit the schizophrenic society.
Louis is skeptical. "I wish everything good for what you stand
for, but what we want is early
intervention. This condition has
deprived so many young people.
"My son sat on a wall at Commercial and Tenth for three
months. He was dirty and had no
money or place to sleep. Food and
money were given to him by the
neighbourhood. He would not ask
for help and would refuse it. He
wouldn't come home. I used to
visit him once a week on the wall.
"Young people from Safeway
would feed him. People phoned
mental health and they said they
couldn't interfere because he
makes sense. My son has an IQ of
140, he can fool people really well
for about half an hour. Eventually
he was sent to the VGH. But it was
terrible for me driving by to a
meeting I would see him on the
wall motionless. What in the name
of god was I to do—no-one would
help."
The causes of schizophrenia
are unknown. The most common
ages of onset for men are the late
teens and early twenties and about
five years later for women. The
average schizophrenic has a perfectly ordinary childhood.
"About one-third of patients
have one or two episodes and recover—no-one knows why. Another
third have recurring episodes
throughout life, but with relatively
good recovery between. The remainder have an ongoing illness,"
said Louis.
"I want compulsory early intervention and assessment. Most
doctors recommend four to six
weeks on medication to get results.
Early intervention could prevent
further deterioration.
"Self neglect shouldbe grounds
for committal. Deterioration is allowed to go too far before compulsory intervention.
"There is a whole section of
youth not being cared for. All ofthe
services are hopelessly overloaded.
These people have great potential
to make contributions in life. They
should have a right to receive
treatment rather than to refuse it.
A lot of people don't accept the
illness. They refuse to take medication, which can have horrible
side effects. However they can be
helped," Louis said.
Literature said schizophrenia
afflicts approximately one person
in every 100.
"I have always hoped young
people would take up the cause.
People university age are involved.
Four out of 100 are affected, three
out of 100 are never diagnosed."
One out often schizophrenics
commit suicide.
"I would like to see young
people put massive pressure on
the government for more research
into the cause and development of
medication."
Louis recited her favourite
quote. "When we consider the impact of schizophrenia on the present
generation (there are about 40
million schizophrenics in the
world), we can conclude that no
war in history has produced so
many victims, wounded so many
people. No earthquake has exacted
so high a toll; no other condition
that we know of has deprived so
many young people ofthe promise
of life."—Silvano Arieti, professor
of Clinical Psychiatry, New York
Medical College.
HEAD INJURIES
Eric Laity, the president of
the BC Head Injury Association,
has a son who is a client of the
Public Trustee. Ross, was hit
crossing the street and suffered a
closed head injury. "My son did not
recover, he survived. He cannot
read or write, or walk indepen-
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2/THE UBYSSEY
November 26,1991 NEWS
Critics aim at Perry
The UBC Dance Club stepped up to compete Saturday night at SUB
Ballroom with everyone coming up a winner.
MA CHIA-NIEN PHOTO
by Rick Hiebert
Advanced education critics in
BC are starting to look critically
at Dr. Tom Perry's lack of action
as education minister.
Both the Liberal and Social
Credit critics say the new NDP
government has so many problems to fix in the post-secondary
educational system that they
should start now.
"The government is starting
out being too careful. They are
deathly afraid of making mistakes
and that means that they may be
too reluctant to start working on
the system. If nothing happens,
issues and students will fall
through the cracks ofthe system,"
David Mitchell, the new opposition advanced education critic,
said.
"I fear they want to study
things to death. There are immediate reforms that can be done
and opportunties that can be lost
through inaction," Mitchell said.
Perry, who was appointed
NDP advanced education minister earlier this month, had been
NDP health critic in the last
shadow cabinet. He has been
keeping a low profile and the
government has said nothing regarding its educational promises
in the October election, including
a one-year freeze on tuition fees.
MacBlo pulls out and shakes finger
by Charlie Gillis
Macmillan Bloedel, Ltd.
(MB) may withdraw its membership from Forintek Canada
in 1993, but Forintek officials
are doing everything in their
power to prevent the pullout.
Forintek, a non-profit research corporation, recently
finished construction of a $19
million research facility at the
south end of campus.
The organization depends
on federal and provincial grants
for 75 per cent of its operating
budget. The remaining 25 per
cent consists of subscription
fees from companies such as
MB. In return for that money,
Forintek sends the results and
conclusions of their research to
the companies to help modernize their operations. But
MB's vice president in charge
of Research and Development,
Otto Forgacs, said Forintek
may not be able to supply his
company with information
valuable enough to make its
membership worthwhile.
"We've had to do a lot of
soul-searching as to whether
or not Forintek can meet our
current research requirements," he said.
Forgacs added that
Forintek's past management
tended to focus on the needs of
small lumber producers rather
than large ones like MB.
"Governments tend to be
turned on by small industry,"
he said. "I suppose it is up to
the current management now
to indicate they can provide
information which will benefit
larger companies."
Bob Stephens, Forintek's
vice president of Business Development, said, "As far as we're
concerned, MacBlo has given
us 12 months' termination notice. That means we have 12
months to develop a better
working relationship with
them."
Stepihens also said public
knowledge of MB's reconsideration may create the false
impression that Forintek is
inefficient. He said Macmillan
Bloedel has "the longest record
of research and development in
the industry," and the
company's pullout could cause
anxiety among Forintek's government subsidizers.
"Obviously you understand
the delicacy of the situation,"
he added.
Another Forintek official,
who wished not to be named,
ventured alternative explanations for the notice of termination. "[MB] has their own research wing," she said, "and
they may figure they're competing with their own department by remaining members of
Forintek. Besides, times are
tough and they could be taking
a hard look at the bottom line.
In such situations, research is
often first to get cut back."
According to Tom Manness,
a UBC forestry professor, the
misunderstanding may benefit
Forintek as an organization.
"Perhaps Macmillan
Bloedel's announcement has
opened their eyes," he said. "A
lot could probably be improved
at Forintek, but I would hate to
see it done away with completely."
Campus Xanadu no place for students
by Charlie Gillis
A suspended wooden
walkway leads to the entrance
of Forintek Canada's new
Western Laboratory at UBC.
The drawbridge is only fitting.
After all, the huge facility,
with its columns, high ceilings,
and oriental rugs, seems more
like a palace than it does a
research lab.
Last year, Forintek moved
its western headquarters from
Marine Drive to its new site on
East Mall, next to Thunderbird
Stadium.
There the corporation built
an office and industrial structure almost entirely of wood, to
the tune of about $19 million.
The provincial and federal governments provided 90 per cent
of the funding, while private
wood products producers supplied the remaining ten per
cent.
According to the designers, the
building proves that commercial
and industrial buildings can be
made from lumber.
Currently, lumber producers
supply only ten percent of the industrial building market.
But some students and faculty members have been wondering why private corporations like
Forintek have any business on
UBC's campus at all. Aside from a
few 'adjunct' professorships and
occasional joint research projects,
there is little liaison between
Forintek and the faculty of forestry.
Forintek supplies information
only to its paying corporate subscribers, and a Forintek marketing official said the company's library is closed to UBC faculty and
students.
According to Grant Betz,
project manager of the new facility, Forintek's right to lease campus land was part of a deal be
tween the corporation and the provincial government, with the approval of UBC president David
Strangway.
"Forintek was a non-profit organization looking for inexpensive
land," Betz said, "so the provincial
government granted the long-term
lease as part of its contribution to
the completion of the project."
The "project" is, by most standards, impressive. In the octagonal reception area, four-by-six
beams support a pine ceiling and a
giant skylight. The building houses
wood treating and panelling pilot
plants, lumber drying and sawing
facilities, and a show-case wood
engineering shop, complete with
computer terminals among the
lumber and machinery.
For the visitor, much of the
panorama must be viewed from
behind glass, in the presence of a
company representative. An
elaborate electronic security system protects the information li
brary and central offices.
If it weren't for all the wood,
one would almost expect to see
Captain Picard,
Not many UBC students
have seen Forintek from the inside, despite the company marketing rep's insistence that "the
corporation does have a good relationship with UBC's faculty of
forestry."
However, UBC forestry professor Tom Manness said greater
communication between
Forintek and the university coul d
benefit both bodies.
"I think it can be very constructive for them to be [on campus]," he said. "BC could be number one in the world in forest
products research. Perhaps a
more healthy cooperation between Forintek and UBC could
finally put us in that position."
Mitchell, MLA for West
Vancouver-Garibaldi, is also party
House Leader. He taught history
at UBC and SFU in the '70s and
early '80s, and has written two
books on provincial politics.
Mitchell says he wanted to be
named opposition critic for advanced education.
"I feel very strongly about
education," he said. "We have to
take a comprehensive overview of
the whole system, universities,
colleges, technical institutes, everything. We need to co-ordinate
our resources to ensure that BC's
students have the ability to study
in BC."
Mitchell said he would try to
be a positive critic who would work
"constructively."
"I'm going to hold Perry to his
promises," he said. "One of my
priorities is to ensure that our
new government commits adequate resources to post-secondary education."
He fears that with talk of a
rumoured Royal Commission on
post-secondary education in BC,
that the NDP is preparing to stall
on reforms.
"If this is an excuse to put off
what we need to do today, we don't
need a Royal Commission. We
have good ideas in the universities and good ideas in the advanced
education ministry, so there are
things the NDP can start on now,"
Mitchell said.
The Social Credit caucus
named veteran Fraser Valley
MLA Peter Dueck their spokesperson on advanced education,
health and seniors on November
19. Dueck, who preceded Perry as
advanced education minister and
is also a former health minister,
expects that the new government
will continue expanding the post-
secondary educational system.
"Perry should continue with
several of the initiatives that the
last government brought forward—the two new BC universities, college expansion programs
and a second technical trades center," Dueck said.
"I have confidence that the
new government will not radically
change from our way of doing
things, but from hearing them
talk, I would be very surprised if
they did not speed up the process
of fixing the problems that the
system has."
Brad Lavigne, chair of the
Canadian Federation of Students—BC, hopes the new critics
will be political allies of the student movement.
"We want Mitchell to help
hold Perry and his government to
their word. Promises like an immediate tuition freeze and fund-
ingincreasesbroughtstudents out
in droves to vote for the NDP,"
Lavigne said. "Any help we can
get to keep the NDP honest will be
useful."
"Students are telling me that
if the NDP doesn't keep to its
word, they are going to start
working against the government.
There's a lot of frustration with
the system's problems out there,"
Lavigne said. "If the NDP goes
back on their promises to students, it would be criminal."
"We need to have
symapthizers in the legislature,
even if they have to come from the
opposition benches."
November 26,1991
THE UBYSSEY/3 (f,
fr
^
Feeling alone
in this
universe?
Trade your
solipsism
for
hyper-realism
at SUB 24IK,
where a night
with
The Ubyssey
will make you
feel like a brain
in a vat.
^
&
ATTENTION ALL GRADUATING
STUDENTS!
Wednesday, November 27 at 12:30pm is the last day for your reps for Grad Class
Council to show up if they want to claim a rebate of $4.00 per graduating students.
This is FREE money! If your constituency is listed below, please encourage your
council to find the required number of reps.
Architecture
1
Arts
4
Commerce
2
Dentistry
1
Education
3
Forestry
1
Medicine
1
Music
1
Social Work
1
If you have any questions, have your rep contact Caireen Hanert,
Grad Class President, at 822-2361 or leave a message in SUB 246.
George Morfitt. FCA, Auditor General of British Columbia
Watchdog of the public purse. The man our
provincial government is accountable to on all fiscal
expenditures.
His clients are B.C.'s taxpayers. His job is to make
certain the province's $13 billion budget is spent
economically and efficiently.
The responsibility is enormous. But George excels
at turning challenging assignments into successful and
rewarding opportunities.
He has worked in many areas of business finance,
which led to his previous position as Vice-President and
Chief Financial Officer of The Diamond Group of Companies. He's been Chairman ofthe University
of British Columbia's Board of Governors and
the Universities Council of B.C. A municipal
alderman. President of the Institute of Chartered
Accountants of B.C. And inductee to the province's Sports
Hall of Fame.
George's CA has opened many of those doors.
"You can use the discipline, training and approach gained
from your professional designation to take leadership
roles throughout the fabric of Canadian society'
George Morfitt, CAand public watchdog.
If you're looking for a career with multiple
opportunities, write the Institute of Chartered
Accountants of B.C.
Our standards are higher.
Institute of Chartered Accountants of British Columbia
1133 Melville Street, Vancouver, B.C. V6E 4E5
Telephone: (604)681-3264 Toll-free 1-800-663-2677
George Morfitt's CA
mtrarWd him to
3riTili[t]irafiS
Guardianship.
continued from page 1
read or write, or walk independently, his prospects for competitive work are very slim."
Ross, 22, has lived away from
home for three years. He has relocated three times and is presently
looking for a fourth home. He nee ds
help with food preparation, housekeeping and other aspects of every
day life.
"In the absence of an alternative he was appointed to the office
of the public trustee when he became an adult. Four individuals
have managed his financial affairs
[in three years], he has not met one
of them. Unfortunately he falls
between two slats, the official basis of financial responsibility and
that of personal needs."
Laity compared the scenario
with thatof putting outfires, rather
than preventing them. "The whole
effect of the adult guardianship
[proposal] is a responsible, total
caring model to address their own
needs.
"Despite [Ross's] quest for independence he needs support and
advocacy. He is a vulnerable adult,
potentially another victim and
needs advice," said Laity.
"These concerns are not
unique in the head injury community. Head injuries are escalating
to epidemic proportions. The community estimates 6,000 people a
year suffer from head injuries in
BC."
Laity said minor and/or closed
head injuries may occur from a
fall, trip or accident. Since they are
not apparent on x-rays, scans or
tests, individuals must be aware of
a problem to seek help. A change in
behaviour and or actions can be
symptomatic of a head injury.
The structure of
committeeship and the public
trustee can be problematic.
"The person stepping in is not
necessarily the most appropriate.
Mismanagement, abuse, and neglect are not in the interest ofthe
individual. There is system abuse,
sometimes people fall through
cracks. Even governments leave
voids. It is no longer tolerable in
society.
"Itis well deserved change that
we are looking for. As president of
the BC Head Injury Association, I
endorse the report prepared by the
Guardianship Committee," said
Laity.
"It is an attempt to focus and
bring together flaws and hopefully
to structure an advocacy network.
There is a need for involvement,
for an individual's own choice and
risk-taking. It demonstrates the
basic need to recognize individual
wants, likes, needs, and choice."
Columbia
4/THE UBYSSEY
November 26,1991 ■JiW'MWW""
. Vt  ■
Native students' organization forms
by Dawn Buie
WINNIPEG (CUP) — Aboriginal
students who are forming a national organization say a November meeting ofthe Canadian Federation of Students taught them
exactly what not to do.
"[Attending] helped us immensely because we could see
where there were obvious flaws,"
said John Francis, an aboriginal
representative from the University of Manitoba.
The National Aboriginal Students' Council (NASC) will maintain ties with Canada's largest
student lobby group, he said. But
aboriginal students have needs
that CFS members cannot meet,
he added.
"I know that we as a minority
group won't suffer a lot from not
being a part of CFS," he said. "We
could even add to CFS if they were
willing to listen."
NASC has backing from the
Assembly of First Nations, the
Native Council of Canada, and the
Metis National Council.
Francis said NASC will be
tackling issues such as the distribution of federal funding to individual bands or tribal associations,
the exclusion of non-status Indians
and Metis from funding for post-
secondary education, and the
amount of federal fundi ng allocated
for status Indians.
A 1990 attempt to organize a
national aboriginal students' organization was stopped when the
Department of Indian Affairs
would only commit to funding a
conference for status Indians.
Melody Jonnie, CFS Native
students representative, said the
exclusion of non-status Indians and
Metis from the conference created
tension between conference organizers.
"We let government politics
divide a viable national student's
movement," she said.
CFS chair Kelly Lamrock said
he thinks the new organization is
"fantastic."
"I think CFS on the whole has
been very quick in responding to
native issues in the past, but there's
always room to improve."
Francis said he thinks structural problems prevent CFS from
implementing changes.
Aboriginal students have a
sub-group within CFS with a small
budget. But according to Jonnie,
CFS has diminished the effectiveness of the constituency group by
cutting their budget from $13,000
to $7,800.
"CFS says it wants greater
Native representation but not all
native students go to CFS member
schools," Jonnie said. "The cut to
our budget means less native students will be able to come to the
next conference."
Lamrock said the budget had
to be cut because CFS had overestimated membership revenues.
Despite the problems with
CFS, Jonnie said she remains optimistic about the new organization.
"With the 500 years of resistance idea we're getting a feeling
of rebirth," she said. "I don't want
to be cynical, I want to be part of a
process of change."
McGill administration opposes
separate sexual assault policy
MONTREAL (CUP) — Women at
McGill University are pushing for
a special policy on sexual assault,
but the administration says the
existing assault policy is sufficient.
"We consider sexual assault
to be a part of assault in general,"
said Irwin Gopnik, dean of students. "This has worked in cases
we've already dealt with of a sexual
nature."
But some women on campus
disagree.
"It is insulting to equate being
raped with being punched in the
face," said Sylvia Di Iorio, of the
McGill Sexual Assault Centre.
"McGill's assault policy does not
address the trauma and impact of
rape."
The Centre is trying to convince McGill to adopt a policy
specifically for sexual assault. Di
Iorio would also like to see sexual
harassment included.
When a student files a sexual
harassment complaint, one of four
assessors — chosen by the princi-
Safety: American universities
to compile, release crime stats
OTTAWA (CUP) — American
students have the right to know
campus crime statistics, but Canadian students do not.
In January 1992, a United
States law will force all publicly-
funded colleges and universities to
make statistics available.
The Student Right to Know
and Campus Security Act states
that college and university applicants and their parents should
have access to the statistics of institutions and their security -policies and procedures. Incidents of
rape, robbery, aggravated assault,
burglary and motor vehicle theft
will be tracked and reported.
Canadian students should
have the same right, said Melanie
Ash, assistant coordinator of the
Carleton University Foot Patrol.
"Students have the right to
know about these crimes so that
they can take precautions. If students are aware of the amount of
crimes on campus then they will
not be wandering around with a
false sense of security."
Ash has submitted a copy of
the American act to Richard Allen,
Ontario's minister of colleges and
universities.
pal and approved by a committee
of students and faculty members
— is assigned to her case.
The assessor acts as a go-between for the complainant and the
accused. If the assessor decides
the case warrants action, it is
turned over to a disciplinary committee. If not, the file is closed.
According to Di Iorio, the
process causes problems for the
complainant.
"A woman must feel she is
believed in a case of sexual harassment," she said. "But the assessors
have to listen to both sides ofthe
story."
The university needs a comprehensive policy addressing
sexual assault and sexual harassment, she said. McGill is simply
not equipped to handle cases of
sexual assault, she added.
"I've heard of problems in the
assessment in cases of assault. The
assessors are not prepared to deal
with this., nor do they have a
guideline to follow."
Under the existing policy,
rather than taking cases of sexual
assault, assessors advise the complainant to lodge a criminal complaint with the -police.
Di Ioriosaidshe wants apolicy
that provides the harasser and the
complainant with separate representatives. But she said she doesn't
think the university will come
through.
"This system would mean
hiring trained people to handle the
cases, and I don't know if McGill is
willing to do that."
Gopnick said the university
will examine the centre's proposals. "If someone comes up with an
argument in favour of having a
separate assault policy the administration will listen. We're not
closed-minded about it."
HILLEL   HIGHLIGHTS
"The December Dilemma"
Rabbi Philip Bregman distinguishes
Chanukah from Christmas
Thursday Nov. 28th
12:30 pm at Hillel
HEBREW CLASS
Advanced on Wednesdays at 1:30 p.m.
Beginner on Thursdays at 12:30 p.m.
Hitters Famous
Hot Lunch
EVERY TUESDAY
12:30 -1:30 PM
GOOD LUCK TO ALL STUDENTS
WITH YOUR EXAMS!    SEE YOU
NEXT TERM FOR MORE LUNCHES
AND HILLEL PROGRAMMING!!!
JEWISH MYSTICISM
Wed. Nov. 27th 5:00 pm
Hillel House is located on the North side of SUB next to the parkade. Tel: 224-4748
AT JACK DANIEL'S DISTILLERY, we are
blessed with an unusual cave and special
ironfree water.
Not many distillers have a stream of
cavespring water that's flowing just
outside their door. But that's what we
possess right here in Jack Daniel's
Hollow. And we've used it to make
our Tennessee Whiskey since
1866. Just watching this old ~
stream meander along is a nice
way to pass idle moments.
Discovering how it flavours
Jack Daniel's, we believe, is the
nicest moment of all.
JACK DANIEL'S TENNESSEE WHISKEY
If you'd like a booklet about Jack Daniels Whiskey, write us here in Lynchburg, Tennessee, 37352 U.S.A.
Going Home For Christmas?
Take it easy...
Take the
Greyhound!
Greyhound offers frequent, convenient schedules
to destinations throughout B.C. and Canada.
Intercity express trips between major centres
feature shorter travel times, extra legroom, onboard movies and snacks!
Greyhound tickets are sold on campus at:
TRAVEL CUTS... SUB Lower Level
822-6890
C
BONUS:
A 20% Student Discount is available to
Kamloops, Kelowna, and Calgary
TRAVELCUTS
GoingYourWay!
Bretgvound
Upcoming Films:
Wednesday-Thursday (Nov ii &28)
7:00 BONNIE AND CLYDE
9:30 CASABLANCA
Friday-Sunday (Nov 29-Dec i)
7:00 DANCES WITH WOLVES
9:55 HOT SHOTS
Next Week:
DELIRIOUS AND BOYZ 'N THE HOOD
not
SCCIEIV
All Screenings are in the SUB Theatre
FRI-SUN SHOWS $3.00 WED-THURS SHOWS $2.5C
Call for 24 hour recorded info: 822-3697
November 26,1991
THE UBYSSEY/5 Walbran protesters
pressure the NDP
NEWS
by Mark Nielsen
An NDP government in
Victoria does not mean the fight
to save the Walbran Valley and
other old growth forests from being logged is over.
That was the message delivered at a rally to save the
Walbran—11,500 hectares on the
southwest tip of Vancouver Island—held Saturday on the steps
ofthe Vancouver Art Gallery.
Although the NDP is considered more repsonsive to environmental concerns than the
Socreds were, it is feared their
ties to organized labour, particularly the International
Woodworkers of America, could
limit the government's effectiveness.
And the Walbran Valley
could be the first testof the NDFs
commitment to preservation of
old growth forests, Julie March
of the Western Canada Wilderness Committee told a crowd of
about 75 onlookers.
"If they fail on this one, a
precedent will be set," she said.
March said the NDP should
at least comply with demands
for a two-year moratorium on
logging in the valley and put it in
place by spring, before the forest
companies can move in to log.
"It's time for responsible
government to give us what we
want-and it is time to give us a
two-year moratorium on the
Walbran Valley," she said.
As well as compromising
most ofthe old growth forest left
on Vancouver Island south ofPort
Alberni, March said logging
threatens the existence of the
Marble Murrelet.
The rally was organized by
the UBC Student Environment
Centre. SEC issue coordinator
Ken Wu said it was held to pressure the government into keeping its promises.
"During the election Mike
Harcourt promised to log around
contentious areas and if there is
a contentious  area, it's the
*
"-»--
Walbran," he said.
About a dozen protestors
have been arrested while attempting to stop forest company
Fletcher Ch allenge from building
roads into the valley for logging
trucks.
Wu said the Walbran is only
one of six valleys on the westcoast
of Vancouver Island that has not
been logged "until now."
"They're     not     actually
Mary Jean O'Donnell speaks to listening ears?
PAUL GORDON PHOTO
The University of British Columbia
ENGLISH COMPOSITION TEST
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 3, 1991
From 8:30 a.m. to 11:00 a.m.
ROOM ASSIGNMENTS
Report to the room according to your last name.  You must write in rooms assigned by the
Registrar. Take (JBC photo ID with you.  Dictionaries Permitted.
— —	
ROOM ASSIGNMENTS
Aaa-Azz*
OSBORNE GYM E
Miz-Mwa
BUCHANAN A204
Baa-Buz*
OSBORNE GYM B
Mwb-Nga
Family & Nutritional Sciences 60
Bva-Chu*
OSBORNE GYM A
Ngb-Olu
BUCHANAN A205
Chv-Fra*
WOODWARD 2
Olv-Pat
BUCHANAN D238
Fre-Gra*
WOODWARD 6
Pau-Poe
BUCHANAN D239
Grb-Haz
CHEMISTRY 150
Pof-Rak
BUCHANAN D339
Hba-Jan
ANGUS 104
Ral-Sam
CHEMISTRY 250
Jao-Kiv
ANGUS 110
San-Sha
CHEMISTRY 200
Kiw-Las
BUCHANAN A106
Shb-Sku
CHEMISTRY 300
Lat-Lee
GEOGRAPHY 100
Skv-Syb
BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 2000
Lef-Lie
BUCHANAN A104
Syc-Tat
BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 2449
Lif-Low
BUCHANAN A100
Tau-Uns
COMPUTER SCIENCE 200
Lox-Mah
HENNING 201
Unt-Wel
COMPUTER SCIENCE 201
Mai-May
BUCHANAN A102
Wem-Wit
GEOGRAPHY 200
Maz-McQ
BUCHANAN A202
Wiu-Zzz*
HEBB THEATRE
Mcr-Miy
BUCHANAN A203
* Important note: NEW
ROOM ASS1GHMENTS
STUDENTS IN ENGLISH 100 AND IN ARTS ONE: The ECT is the required Christmas examination
for students in English 100 and in Arts One at UBC. No fee required.
TEST FEE: Students in English 100 winter session do NOT need stickers. All other students writing
the test must purchase a $20.00 fee sticker from the Department of Finance, 3rd Floor, General
Services Administration Building.  Take UBC photo ID with you.
Reminder:     Read the (JBC Calendar to see what deadlines for completion apply for your faculty and
program. Deadlines vary.
clearcutting, but they're
roadbuilding so they are
clearcutting to gain access to the
trees," he said.
Wu said the rally was to
make the public aware of the
NDP's promises and to urge
members of the public to put
pressure on the government.
"It's not really for Mike
Harcourt," he said. "It's for the
public."
LAUREL BISCHOFF PHOTO
Ralliers carried signs with
such slogans as "Fletcher Challenge is clearcutting into our future" and "Cooperation instead
of competition."
Onlookers were urged to
write to Harcourt, minister of
forests Dan Miller, and the minister of environment John
Cashore.
Green Party spokes
attacks NDP policy
by Mark Nielsen
Environmental groups have
allied themselves with big business by supporting the New Democrats in the provincial election,
former BC Green Party leader
Stewart Parker said Saturday.
"We've seen since 1986, when
Mike Harcourt was elected leader
ofthe NDP that party was going to
sell us out," he told about 75 onlookers during a rally at the
Vancouver Art Gallery to save the
Walbran Valley from being logged.
Parker said the NDP is showing its true face by refusing to
commit to advocating Native self-
government and failing to keep
loggers out of the Carmanah and
Stein Valleys.
"I'm afraid I lack some of the
surprise that some ofthe environmental people have had [over the
NDPs positions]," Parker said.
The NDP is nothingmore than
what it pretended to be during the
election Parker said, "and what
they have pretended to be is a   ^
party to the right ofthe Liberals."
The answers to the serious
environmental questions will not
be found at a conference room table,
Parker added, because the amount J
that the earth's biosphere can
handle in terms of pollution can- *~
not be determined through negotiation.
He said fundamental changes
must be pursued.
"We don't have time to kill for
smallvictoriesandafewmoretrees      —
here or there," he said. "It's an all
out war for the survival of the    •"
planet."
Julie Marsh of the Western
Canada Wilderness Committee
agreed with Parker. She said more
must be done, but such divisive   —r-
talk is detrimental.
"We have to work together,"
she said. "There tends to be too
much infighting among environmental groups."
Stewart Parker.
LAUREL BISCHOFF PHOTO
6/THE UBYSSEY
November 26,1991 X
SPORTS
UBC women overcome Dinos
by Mark Nielsen
Like the night before, it wes a
matter of executing the little things
that kept the UBC Thunderbirds
in their Canada West women's
basketball game against the Lhi-
versity of Calgary Dinosaurs at
War Memorial Gym Saturday
night.
But it took one big shot, nam ely
a three-pointer from Thunderbird
guard Lisa Nickie with six seconds
left to play, to win the game 68-67.
"It's something I've always
dreamt of but never thought would
happened," said a smiling Nickie
as she stood outside the team loc ker
room with, fittingly, a basketball
in her hands.
The basket capped a ste.lar
weekend for Nickie, in her trird
year on the team, in which she
scored 20 jxrinte in each of UEC's
victories over the Dinosaurs this
weekend.
MA CHIA-NIEN PHOTO
Derek Christiensen puts same effort into a layup
during T-SIrd basketball play this weekend.
Waterpolo men win top spot
by Dianne Rudolf
The UBC men's waterpolo
team placed first and UBC women
settled for second in the Canadian
University Waterpolo Championships this weekend. The tournament was held at St. Jean Royal
Military College in Quebec; the
UBC men's teams competed
against the University of Calgary,
Hamilton, Memorial University
and CMR (Canadian Military College), while our women's team faced
Carleton, Queens and University
of Toronto.
The UBC men's team contributed two players to the All-star
team, Rick Robertson and Scott
Williams, while Darren McMillan
was voted MVP for the tournament.
After following a round-robin format for the tournament, UBC triumphed 19-15 over Calgary in the
finals. Men's coach Michel Roy was
awarded the Most Valuable Coach
ofthe tournament.
Entering the semi-finals in
third place, UBC women took
Queens, 8-4, but lost in the finals
to the quick University of Toronto
team, 2-10.
The women's All-star team
included two offensive giants from
UBC: ClaudiaLee and Clair Hagar.
Nancy Hill played a good defensive
game, while goalie Tara Campbell
was consistently strong.
Player Rhonda Vanderfluit
said of the women's coach, "Greg
Lee really motivated the team.
Michel Roy helped out also, but
Greg made us really want to win
and play well in the finals. He
brought the team together."
The other women's teams,
mostly weaker in comparison, are
university-funded. Although the
team has applied for varsity status, it has not been awarded the
UBC women's waterpolo team yet.
On Friday the Thunderbirds
overcame a 12-point halftime
deficit to defeat Calgary 83-75. In
both contests, however, Nickie said
the Thunderbirds were confident
of a victory.
"We knew [going into the
dressing room on Friday night] that
we couldbeat them," she said. "We
just had to get the close balls. We
had to get the rebounds, box out
and things like that."
Nickie said continuing to do
those things kept the Thunderbirds
in the game Saturday night.
"Even when we were down by
two, we knew there were still some
things we had to do," she said.
Nonetheless,the
Thunderbirds went into a mini-
slump when they could least afford to. Down 67-65 with 2:25 to go,
UBC failed to convert on five trips
on what was certainly their last
chance.
In keeping with the trend of
the weekend, it was a three-pointer
from Nickie that gave the
Thunderbirds the go-ahead basket with four minutes left on Friday night as well.
Following up on Nickle's Friday night performance were Carrie Car'.sen with 16 points and
Cheryl Klinton and Jenny Mann
with 14 points each.
Klinton was the only other
Thunderbird in double figures on
Saturday night when she also got
14 points, along with 16 rebounds.
Elissa Beckett, meanwhile, got
eight assists.
The women host their BC rival the University of Victoria Vikings at War Memorial this
weekend. Game times are 7:45pm
down the court before Nickie scored    Saturday and 4pm Sunday.
.And men play defense for win
by Charles Nho
The UBC Thunderbirds re ied
on blanketing defence to post their
first victory of the Canada West
basketball season Friday night
when they beat the University of
Calgary Dinosaurs 92-63 at War
Memorial Gym.
The T-Bird performance was
in marked contrast to the two defeats they absorbed against the
University of Saskatchewan Eus-
kies in Saskatoon last weekend
when they allowed an average 100
points each game.
The T-Birds forced the Dinos
to turn the ball over 30 times after
they threw a half-court press at
them early in the first half.
Coach Bruce Enns wanted his
team to pressure the Calgary ball-
handler as he crossed the ralf-
court because it seemed their
guards, usually Marc Dobell or Ian
Minnifee, picked up their dribble
to see what was forming on the
offensive half.
Immediately one or two UBC
defenders would crowd the man
with the ball making dribbling
impossible and passing very difficult.
The first half belonged to J.D.
Jackson who hit four three-pointers, pulled down several key rebounds and scored 26 points.
Pressure defence contributed
to many ofthe T-Birds getting easy
baskets butespecially Jackson who
found outlet passes from active
6'1" guard Roger Rai.
Jason Leslie also had a good
game. Named the UBC Player of
the game, he chipped in 15 points
and led the team with eight rebounds.
Calgary seemed bewildered by
a UBC defence that collapsed
around them as soon as they
crossed the time line. By the time
they moved the ball around and
set up for their shot, the shot-clock
would be running down, telling
them to hurry.
In the second half, UBC continued to pull away. Enns decided
to give J.D. Jackson an extended
rest and put in Paul Langley. He
responded with two quick baskets
en route to his 13 points.
Jackson finished with 33.
Calgary's speedy Ian Miniffee had
22 with 10 points coming from the
free throw line.
• Saturday's contest earned UBC
its second straight win over
Calgary 107-68. Brian Tait led all
scorers with 22 points and 8 assi sts.
JD Jackson scored 16, dished 10
times, and collected 7 rebounds.
COLLEGE/ UNIVERSITY  RING  WEEK
Free Insurance!
BIRD DROPPINGS
Dinos sweep volleyball
Both the men's and women's
volleyball teams came away from
the University of Calgary gym
without a win in two games apiece
over the weekend.
The Dinos, who won the UBC-
hosted Thunderball Tournament
earlier this year, swept the men 3-
0 on both nights (15-7,15-13,15-5
and 15-12,15-4,15-12) to maintain
a grip on first place in the Canada
West.
The Calgary women, meanwhile, defeated UBC 3-0 on Friday
night(15-7,15-13,15-5)and 3-1 on
Saturday (15-4,15-12,15-8).
Both teams are back on the
road thi s weekend when they travel
to the University of Victoria for a
two-game set.
Hockeybirds' skid continues
The UBC Thunderbirds'
Canada West hockey losing streak
was extended to six games with a
pair of losses to the University of
Saskatchewan Huskies in Saskatoon/this weekend.
The Huskies edged the
Thunderbirds 3-2 on Friday night
and then defeated them 6-2 on
Saturday.
Goalscorers for the
Thunderbirds where Charles
Copper with a goal each night while
while Dave Cannon and Gregg
Delcourt got singles.
The Thunderbirds host the
University of Calgary Dinosaurs
this Friday and Saturday at the
Winter Centre at 7:30pm.
Canada West hockey standings
W L T F A Pts
Regina 9 1 2 79 18 19
Alberta 8 1 2 52 33 17
Calgary 7 3 1 58 45 15
Lethbridge 6 5 1 49 52 13
Saskatchewan 6 6 0 52 48 12
Manitoba 4 8 0 40 49     8
Nov. 28 & 29,1991
10 am — 4 pm
At UBC Bookstore
UBC
Brandon
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6200 University Blvd TEL 822-2665 (UBC-BOOK)
J
November 26,1991
THE UBYSSEY/7 "TRAVELCUTS
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CHILDREN'S
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Featuring the antics of FOOLS
THEATRE, and with a special
appearance by Santa Claus
December 7,11 am- 2 pm   in
The Fireside Lounge.
(Lunch provided.)
For more information or to sign up call the Graduate Students'
Centre office at 822-3203
Students debate
proposal
Karlyn Koh's November 5th article presents a proposal that coul d
have devastating effects on thousands of UBC students; the UBC
residence administration is trying
to push through a proposition that
would guarantee housing for native Canadian students. If there
were enough housing to accommodate all applying now, this would
be a wonderful suggestion. As it
is, there are extensive waiting lists
for all ofthe campus residences.
Of particular interest is a statement given by Hao Li, a graduate
student from China, on the position of international students:
"they don't have friends and it's
really hard for them to start in a
new environment". I do not deny
that it would be difficult for some,
but only some, foreign students to
adjust to the university. However,
Li's sentiment could apply to any
new student coming to UBC. Had
I not been in residence in my first
year, I probably would not be
graduating from UBC this year.
Between severe homesickness,
unfamiliarity with the new environment, and enduring the consequences of at first choosing an
unsuited faculty, my residence
friends and advisors provided
much needed support. This possibly saved me from Prince Ruperf s
community college or permanent
fish plant employment. Residence
should be equally available to all.
The root of the conflict is that
there are not enough residence
complexes on campus to accommodate all applicants. Possible
reasons may include lack of funding and space. Yet, currently the
university has been selling off
endowment land to private developers for condominiums well beyond the means of the students
purse, such as those constructed on
16th and Wesbrook Mall. Perhaps
a portion of the profit from these
money-making schemes should go
towards new student residences.
Right now in a sense, student interests are being sold out with little
consideration for future growth of
the university.
Before proposals such as international priority are passed, we
need space for the people still
waiting. As the situation stands,
admittance to residence seems to
rely on luck ofthe draw and early
application. This is difficult for
those who do not get in, but currently the most fair solution, for
Canadian and international students.
Nicci Wingham
Arts 4
Subtle, isn't it?
In the November 19 edition
of the Ubyssey, a group calling
themselves Alliance for Life was
twice referred to as an "anti-choice
group" in an article headed "Bank
of Montreal funds anti-choice organization." By referring to Alliance for Life as anti-choice, the
(anonymous) author and the
Ubyssey have expressed an opinion on the abortion issue, in an
article that's supposed to be an
objective reporting of facts. (That
women should have the right to
choose appears to be the prevailing
opinion at the moment, but it is an
opinion nonetheless.) The Ubyssey
may not have written the article,
but it is guilty of allowing it to run
unchecked in the form that it did.
Much deeper than a mere confusion
of fact and opinion, however, is
that in expressing their opinion,
the author and the Ubyssey have
discredited a group of people whose
views happen to differ from their
own. That's the very essence of
propaganda. Subtle, isn't it? That's
why it's so dangerous. Ubyssey
editors, a word of caution. Maintain a clear distinction between
news and editorial opinion. Save
your opinions for the editorial
pages. If you don't, you will be
taking the first steps toward
turning the Ubyssey from a newspaper into a mouthpiece for whatever views and ideas that conveniently suit you.
Jason Wong
Science 4
What a whiner!
I am tired ofthe stereotyping of
Engineers. It is amazing how self-
proclaimed non-racist, open-
minded egalitarian individuals can
blindly pigeonhole all students in
a faculty as racist, misogynistic
drunkards. The only characteristic all engineering students hold in
common is their desire to become
engineers.
Susan Saatchi
Biology 4
Cowboys on trikes
This letter is in regard to the
subject of campus security or
"campus cowboys" as they are most
often referred by from UBC students. First of all, my concern
relates to the method in which
many of these "up and coming officers ofthe law" commute around
in while performing their duties.
The imitation police vehicles they
drive around in must cost a bundle
to up keep and maintain, not to
mention the hazards it has on the
environment. Second, the physical conditions of many of these "top
cops" are disastrous to say the least.
It seems as though they spend most
of their time in a donut shop rather
than patrolling the campus. Even
a person with intellect can surely
see that this is a problem. My
personal suggestion include: 1) allocate the funds from the parking
lots ($1.50 a day—$30 a month per
car) and parking tickets (heh! heh!)
to subsidize the purchase of bicycles. With these purchases, a
healthier lifestyle will, undoubtedly, be reinforced. In addition,
bicycles do not harm the environment and they are very versatile
so it will be easier to detect any
troubles. 2) before hiring, make
the applicants perform some kind
of physfcal fitness test— "healthy
workers are happy workers"—instead of hiring on the basis of how
many donuts one can consume. In
short, bicycle patrols have been
proven to be very effective by the
Vancouver and Delta Police Force;
therefore, it is in my opinion that
the UBC campus security should
take their example and prove to
us, UBC students, that they are
not a bunch of incompetent ex-
Jenny Craig dropouts, but rather
a group of hardworking, reliable,
conscientious "security guards".
Kenneth Kim
Physical Education 3
Horses are a
quick buck
I would like to comment on Lee
Toop's letter printed November 19.
I do not object to horse racing itself, but to the practice of running
them at two years of age. Toop,
implying that the owners treat
their horses very well, forgets to
mention that, as with any investment, the goal is
to see some financial returns—as
fast as possible. Although they may
never have a dramatic iry'ury, the
pounding on the young horses'
bodies often does a great deal of
irreparable damage, which results
in a quick end to their useful career
in any sport. Ask any veterinarian: horses from the racetrack are ~*
usually physically and/or mentally
unsound. Any respected
horseperson will tell you that a
horse should never be worked before age three if you still want to
ride it in ten, 20 or even more
years. One of my equine friends (an >
unraced Thoroughbred) competed
at Grand Prix jumping events at
age 23 and is still going strong. If
only the racing industry valued
long term performance as much as
a quick buck.
Louise Longridge
Science
Monica Dommel
Agriculture
Not much more of
a letter
As a graduated UBC engineering student, I have always marvelled at the irrelevant and inconsistent arguments put forward for
the condemnation of "my kind."
The letter by Gayle Mavor in the *
November 19 issue of The Ubyssey
was no exception!
She talks about her disgust at
therecentengineeringincident.To
that tune I agree. No one enjoys 4
having their car urinated on.
However, the methods she resorts 4
to, to make her points, makes her
letter laughable.
She recognizes that the culprits
are neither a majority nor a desired representative group for the
engineers. Yet, she criticizes the
president's office for not enforcing
measures against "the Engineers"
as a whole.
Gayle has reverted to the "Guilt-
By-Association" tactic, a tactic that
opens the University's only avenue
for punishment. However, urination on another's property falls
under both indecent exposure and
vandalism. So why were the police t
not alerted to the incident immediately? This deals with the culprits
directly and the "Guilt-By-Association" tactic is no longer necessary.
Also, Gayle cites some possible
reasons for "the Engineers'"
behaviour. She suggests that it is
because their parents are paying
for their education, or because it is
their first year away from home.
There is no connection between
engineers and these circumstances <
that does not apply to another
student body.
Finally, Gayle insinuates that
the troublemakers are always in
engineering. It seems to me that
the "Engineering Incidents" are not
the majority of the mayhem on
campus, just the most publicized,
as they are the only incidents that
can be attributed to a visible group.
If you remove all ofthe arguments I mentioned from Gayle's
letter, there is only her disgust of
the incident left. Not much of a
letter, don't you think?
Terence Aben
Graduate Studies
HOT FLASH
Volunteer Work!!
If you enjoy meeing the public
and would like a little retail
experience, our Canadian
Mental Health Association
Thrift Shops might be just the
place for you. Part-time Volunteer Clerks are urgently
needed at our Vancouver locations.
8/THE UBYSSEY
November 26,1991 OPINIONS
Observations by an undercover man
at the NDP'S swearing in ceremony
Sneaking into the NDFs
swearing in ceremony was not
anticipated to be difficult. Staying awake during the speeches
was expected to be much more of
a problem.
Right on the first account,
wrong on the latter. The ceremony was excellent. An extravaganza of entertainment
from the choir singing about
woodpeckers and change through
the occasionally humorous
speeches. The highly partisan
crowd laughed at all the right
places and, at times,   	
applauded even when it
was not called for.
The crowd? Yes, the
crowd was part ofthe show. Over
one thousand strong, political
animals all, the back-patters
were out in full force.
Finally, I thought, a chance
to answer that ageless question,
"How many backs does a back-
patter pat when a back-patter
does pat backs?"
I found, however, that my linguistic abilities were inadequate
to comprehend that question for
any length of time^ I resigned
myself (as did manyof the
Socreds) to sitting back and
watching. The followingare some
of my observations.
Mike Harcourt's first mistake
as (ah almost) Premier: Speaking too quickly'.'. during the
swearing-in ceremony. Lt.Gov.
David Lam began, "I, David
Lam,..." Premier Mike jumped
in, "I, Mike Harcourt," before the
Lt.-Gov. could put up his hand to
indicatethatitwasnotyet Mike's
turn to speak. Nobody laughed
except the soon-to-be-Premier
himself. We know that Premier
Mike can laugh at himself, but we
can only hope this is not an indication that his political success has
gone to his mouth.
Most compassionate minister:
He was there to ease the pai n ofhi s
father's death. Ofthe twelve men
(Premier Mike included) and seven
women sworn into cabinet, he was
the only one who needed to dab his
eyes witha hankerchief during the
ceremony. No contest. Dr. Tom
Perry.
Biggest farce: Ministers pledging allegiance to the Queen of
PERSPECTIVE
Canada (actually only the Queen
of an obscure country called England) when everyone knows that
the real King is alive and living in
exile in Los Angeles. That's Wayne
Gretzky, if you weren't sure.
Easiest minister to pick out in a
crowd of ministers: Moe Sihota.
Eighteen white folks (again, Premier Mikeincluded) and one brown
skinned minority. Even takinginto
account his diminutive stature, the
country's first Indo/Canadian
minister will be easy to spot. Of
course, if Emery Barnes was given
his rightful Cabinet position this
would all change. Why wasn't Mr.
Barnes given a Cabinet position?
Shortest minister: the giant
killing, Penny Priddy.
Tallest minister: head minister, Mike Harcourt. Yes, premier
Mike is the tallest. (The tallest
person was actually the mountie
who escorted David Lam on an d off
the stage, but he doesn't count.) It
makes one wonder about the psychological advantage of having a
Cabinet where all the members
are shorter than yourself. Perhaps this is the reason Emeiy
Barnes didn't get his Cabinet
spot: he is awfully tall.
Quickest oath signer: Darlene
Marzari. Maybe she can teach
this skill to Minister Anita wh3,
having the lengthiest portfolio
(at least by the criteria of computer screen space), will have
more than her fair share of documents to sign.
Best dressed minister, female:
Penny Priddy, in a black ard
yellow bunblebee outfit with a
    design expressing a
bold indication of Aa-
original congeniality.
Best dressed minister, male: Premier Mike, in a
dark blur, double-breasted suit.
Standard fare, indeed, but it fit
so well. (Once again, tV.e
impeccabley dressed mountie
who escorted Mr. Lam on and r ff
the stage may have over sha i-
owed Premier Mike but, once
again, he doesn't count).
Best story: lt.-gov. David Lam,
who felt it would be a "unique
experience to tell a story after a
swearing-in ceremony." A sto:-y
by Confucius, which is often the
case when David Lam tells a
story. A story with a moral, which
isalwaysthecase with Confucius.
Confucius say, "A government
must have the trust of the people:."
A moral only a Socred could fail
to understand.
Funniest joke: Although the re
were many jokes, none of them
are worth repeating. After all,
government is serious business.
San Khanna
Try On the Nike Air Pegasus
at Forerunners
YOUR RUNNING* WALKING-LIFESTYLE STORE
All UBC students, staff and faculty receive
10% off regular priced merchandise
3504 West 4th Avenue
Vancouver, B.C.  732-4535
The 432 iS SOrry        in the months and issues to come.
"•' I am the editor of the 432 and I
owe a few people an apology. In the
last issue of this term (5.05, November 21), I chose to print an
article that was as scatological as
it was heavy-handed. It was directed at "engineers," a fairly
-* general category of student, without specifically targeting any of
m the visible EUS exec with whom
the SUS has eiyoyed a long and
friendly rivalry and who generally
deal with vulgar teasing fairly well.
It was my decision that ultimately
^ hurt the feelings of some students
who never asked to participate in
*■ the whole EUS-SUS "war" light-
hearted as it maybe. Many of them
are friends of mine and it is for this
reason that I say I'm sorry.
I also owe an apology to a few
honest people in the SUS who
voiced their misgivings about the
». article before it ever saw print, and
who for their troubles were rewarded with my flippancy.
I owe an apology to the authors
of the article, who gave me every
chance to politely decline to pub-
■*      lish what started out mostly as a
^ crude private joke. The name and
picture that appear in the masthead were provided at my urging,
mainly so I could cover my ass. For
that, I'm at least guilty of being a
hypocrite.
r Finally, I owe an apology to the
people who have read and sup-
^ ported the 432 throughout this
term, seeing it through a few rocky
issues to the point where we could
justify expanding its size and distribution. Hopefully, the lesson of
my error will prove enlightening
Patrick Redding
Editor, the Science 432
Dear Grad
Students
Free Money!!
Dear Grad Students,
Td like to remind you that on
November 27,1991, at 12:30 pm, is
the last chance your constituent
representatives has to claim your
$4.00 rebate (per person). On this
date the Grad Class Council is
having a WINE AND CHEESE
and it is MANDATORY that each
graduating class has representation on this committee by November 27,1991 for them not to forfeit
their $4.00 rebate per grad student. ANY QUESTIONS? Call
Caireen at 822-2361, SUB Rm 246.
Adil Virani
Public Relations G.C.C.
Page number,
please
In a letter to The Ubyssey (Nov
19), Don Holmsten wrote, in part:
William Gairdner...explicitly
defines "real" Canadians as white,
Anglo-saxon Protestants in his
book The Trouble With Canada.
I read this book some months
ago and don't remember Gairdner's
writing anything ofthe sort. Curious, I decided to search the book
for the definition alluded to. But I
couldn't find it. I couldn't even find
a suggestion ofthe definition. Will
Mr. Holmsten please come up with
a page reference? (I may be wrong,
but somehow I don't think he can.)
Similarly, I have found no evidence, anywhere, of what
Holmsten called "The Reform
Party's sexist, racist, and anti-
working class politics." Holmsten
said that Preston Manning ir.ay
dress up these politics "in polite
code words." What wouldthese code
words be? How should they be deciphered?
Gairdner devoted much—but by
no means all—of his book critidz-
ing "top-down" big government,
which socialists of all parties sesm
to love. Also, the Reform Part}* is
less socialistic than any of the m ain
parties. It wants smaller government. In view of Holmsten's sta ted
affiliation with "International Socialists" I can easily believe thai; he
doesn't like either Gairdner's book
or the Reform Party. Nevertheless,
it seems to me that he shoald
criticize them fairly, and not attribute to them attitudes that they
do not express.
Robert R. Christian,
retired Mathematics
UBC Christian Clubs
Christmas Food Bank Drive
• November 25, 26, 27,
• 11:30am to 5:30 pm daily
• Inside CEME, Chemistry,
residences, & other buildings
• Collecting food cans and
money for the foodbank
• Please donate generously so
that the hungry may be fed
• Thanks for your support!
EfO&E
^fflERl
oepres
•oored        Oefcfc en//vene5
YOU TOO CAN BE CURED OF
THE WINTER BLAHS-
JUST COME TO THE ROXY
Raise money for your group! Hold a Roxy
fundraising party! Call the party hotline at 684-7699
• Wednesdays are student nights •
- Free admission with your student card •
(932 GRANVILLE -684-7699 )
Ubyssey Women's
Caucus
Meeting:
Thursday, November 28
12:30pm
Meet in SUB 241K
November 26,1991
THE UBYSSEY/9 Your word counts
This week many students will be evaluating
their professors. The Ubyssey would like to remind all that improvements have been made to
the evaluation process. The new recommendations were approved by the Senate September
11,1991.
Theoretically the evaluations we write should
have more power now but the motion for all
faculties and departments to print the results
was voted down. The Ubyssey suggests students
approach their reps, undergrad society, to make
the results public—the commerce and science
undergraduate societies already do for their faculties.
Put pressure on the Senate to make the
results public, and on the AMS, and its undergraduate societies, to organize and publish their
own teaching evaluations. But even now, your
input matters.
Teacher evaluations are one way students
can influence change in the educational system
we all are moving through.
Prepare your thoughts, complaints, and
praises before writing professor evaluations in
class so that your points will come across as
powerful, concise, and valid. If we all make an
effort to express ourselves our points will have
more impact on those who read the evaluations.
Many students feel entitled to voice their
dissatisfaction with ineffective teachers, but less
often is there the same obligation to support a
prof for good work. Profs who use different
teaching methods or challenge students should
be given credit; criticism should not be unfair nor
manipulated.
Here are a few things to think about:
Are your profs tough or challenging?
Do you feel comfortable approaching them?
Are their explanations clear or do they speak
in jargon?
Do they encourage or discourage questions?
Is the material up-to-date and do your profs
present more than one view?
Do you discuss class material outside the
classroom?
Would you recommend your prof? Why not
or why?
Remember: the results are not given to the
instructors until after they have submitted final
marks. Your evaluations will eventually change
how things are taught and the kind of courses
available at UBC.
the Ubyssey
November 26, 1991
The Ubyssey is published Tuesdays and Fridays by the
Alma Mater Society ofthe University of British Columbia.
Editorial opinions are those ofthe staff and not necessarily those of the university administration, or of the
sponsor. The editorial office is Room 241K of the
Student Union Building. Editorial Department, phone
822-2301; advertising, 822-3977; FAX 822-9279
The Ubyssey is a founding member of
Canadian University Press
Paula Wellings sings her favourite camp song: There Was A
Whole. Raul Peschiera swears he doesn't know any. "Well, I
only know how to toast marshmellows." Tanya Paz says, "I
dont' care about any tune, I got my armpits waxed this
morning." There was a Carla Maftechuk that swallowed a fly,
sings Paul Dayson-fifties crooner extraordinaire. Laurel
B ischoff and Chesterfield Martin Chester hum their own five
bars. Speaking of maggots, says Sharon Lindores. "Want
some for holidays?" she chortles. "Sports! Hahahaha." Mark
"the spark" Nielsen has quite a shake to go with the camp
songs. But the moral to the story, says Paul Gordon, is that
chocolate chip-rice krispie squares taste much, much better at
3am than after dinner. Dianne Rudolf toots a tango and hymns
for Charlie Gillis, who videotapes the whole current affair for
America's Most Wanted Funniest People-starring Rick
Hiebert. David Chivo auditions for a off-Cordova musical
with harmonica player Charles Nho. Music mixtress Sam
"the groover" Green orchestrates the production. "All I want
is aheadline, notyour life story," says Effie Pow, who prefers
Julie Andrews and The Sound of Music any day.
Editors
Paul Dayson  • Sharon Undores • Carta Maftechuk
Raul Paschlora  •  Bfto Pow
Photo Editor • Paul Gordon
DIFFERENTIAL   EQUATIONS    SHOJLP   WT   POSB ANY    PZOBLEM  OW^.   "
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Letters
Are you done
yet?
Frances Foran says
that "In a truly liberal society everyone has absolute
authority over issues which
pertain to no one but oneself; this does not include
the right you encroach upon
the same right of others. This
is said to be a fundamental
Right of Man." (Nov.5) Barbara Patterson makes a
similar statement in her letter. (Nov.8) The statements
are used to support a person's
right to have an abortion.
However, neither one ofthe
letters answered my question as to WHERE the right
comes from or WHY I should
believe that everyone has
this right or WHY I should
make sure that everyone
conforms to this belief?
Frances Foran mocks the
idea of a god, however, the
absence of god implies that
all of us are mere protoplasm,
only varying from the ground
we walk on in the quantities
and arrangement of the
constituent elements. This
would eliminate any meaning to life and any basis for
morality or rights.
I would also like to know
how this right applies to
abortion? An abortion does
pertain to more than one
person.
The need for someone to
perform the abortion, public
support and public funds
makes this isc-'.e affect everyone.
It is said that those who
oppose abortion should stop
imposing their morality on
The Ubyssey welcomes letters on any issue. Letters must be typed and are not to exceed 300 words in length. Content
which Is Juciged to be libelous, homophobic, sexist, racist or factually incorrect will not be published. Please be concise.
Letters may be edited for brevity, but it is standard Ubyssey policy not to edit letters for spelling or grammatical mistakes.
Please bring them, with identification, to SUB 241k. Letters must include name, faculty, and signature.
other people, therefore, what
makes it right for the pro-
choice movement to try and
change the beliefs of others
to gain support for allowing
abortions?
Actions can't be simply
judged by adherence to
rights, because our actions
always affect other people
and thus affecting their
rights. Asimple list of rights
can't resolve such conflicts,
there must be some fundamental values in order to
make moral judgements. If
there are no fundamental
values them one can't make
moral judgements and rights
are meaningless. Also, to
love doesnotmeantobebiind
to right and wrong: on the
contrary "Love does not delight in evil but rejoices with
the truth." (1. Corinthians
13:6)
David Voth
Engineering
Interested in
equality
Let it hereby be known
that the AMS Unity and
Equality committee has been
formally struck.
The goals ofthe committee are (1) to attempt to foster
a more pervasive spirit of
unity and equality on campus and (2) to investigate
cases where the rights of
UBC students have been
unjustly compromised.
Although still in its infancy, the committee has
been moving on issues such
as the recent "encounter"
between the Vancouver po
lice department and two
coloured UBC students. It is
cases such as these that the
Unity and Equality committee has been created to investigate and act upon.
The members ofthe committee would like to assemble a large, motivated
team to advise and assist us
in our efforts.
Chris Eisner
Arts AMS Rep
On behalf of the AMS
Unity and Equality
Committee
Thanks for the
penguin!
Re: The Dead Horsey letter
of November 19th, 1991.
We at the Arthur Dent
Association for Goofist and
Idiotist Observation
(A.D.A.G.I.O.) would like to
congratulate Ted Ing, Yuri
Fulmer, Mike Coury, Chung
Wong (already a noted subject), Tigger Johnson, Paul
Dayson, Sam Green, Don
Mah, Rick Hiebert, Sharon
Lindores, Paul Dayson (we
assume the other Paul
Dayson), Yggy King, Raul
Peschiera, Paul Gordon,
Dianne Rudolf, Carla
Maftechuk, Effie Pow,
Francis Foran, Paula
Wellings, Johanna Wickie,
Steve Chan, and Tanya Paz
on their sucessful mutilation
of Mr. Toop's letter. By
eliminating a mere two letters, they completely reversed the signification of
the clause, "the number of
injuries resulting in death
becomes insignificant," thus
rendering his entire para- *
graph incomprehensible.
Consequently, we would like
to extend to the entire staff
ofthe Ubyssey the 1991 Trophy for Outstanding Public v
Idiocy in Conduct
(T.O.P.I.C).
Thank you, once again,
for your support.
J.L. Toop
L.M.C.
Gemino
D.W.J.New   ,
D.R. McGee
M.E. Morse
J.M.F. Haeusser
Listen up!
A benefit concert for the
Downtown Eastside
Women's Centre will be held
at the UBC School of Music
Recital Hall on Saturday,
November 30, at 6:00p.m.
This Women's Centre is one
ofthe busiest in Vancouver,
seeing over 60 women a day.
They provide counselling
and referral services as well
as various programs such as
free pancake breakfast for
single moms and their kids.
So come on out to the concert! You'll see and hear
some wonderful performances by some of UBC's
most talented students.
Tickets are
obtained by donation at the
door. See you there!
Wendy Collins
AMS Music Rep.
10/THE UBYSSEY
November 26,1991 MetiotS
Racism on
Remembrance Day
Remembrance Day is over for
this year. Regrettably, racism lives
on in the land and within the
planners of the Ottawa Nov.ll
ceremonies.
During the organizational
phase of the event, the Native
Veterans Association of Canada
requested that it lay its wreaths
during the main part of the cenotaph ceremony at that time other
veterans' associations were laying
theirs. Native veterans were refused this request and instead took
the only opportunity available—
after the main ceremony and after
wreath-laying by the diplomatic
corps. Not the greatest injustice in
the world, perhaps, but an injustice
nevertheless.
Ovid Mercredi, one of the
wreath-layers for the Assembly of
First Nations, put it this way: "It
(continues to be) an indignity, a
put-down, but it is reminiscent of
the way our people were often
treated on the front lines during
the world wars, and afterwards
when our people re-entered civilian life."
I am angered that our Native
veterans have been treated in this
discriminatory manner. Many of
us are. We should not be content,
however, merely to distance ourselves from the ceremony-planners
by saying we would have done otherwise. Nor can we walk away
from the matter by saying that we
are against war and the recognition of war veterans.
We can make our feeling of outrage about discriminatory practices against Native veterans
known to our federal members of
parliament, to Veteran Affairs
[666-2091], and to the Native Veterans Association [c/o 255-3137].
Other discriminatory practices
include services not available to
native veterans, yet available to
non-Native veterans.
We can also actively participate in talks on the Canadian
Constitution when again they come
our way. Lest We Forget (or would
like to forget) that that avenue is
open to us, we should ask ourselves:
What reason is there for us not to
do so? The overall health of the
country, and the lives and dignity
of individual citizens should compel us to speak out on behalf of our
people of the First Nations. We
could point out the deep irony that
Native veterans fought on behalf
of freedom for all of us.
Politicians, bureaucrats and
ceremony planners can be moved
by a critical mass of public
opinion...especially if it's expressed. Wecouldmakenextyear's
cenotaph ceremony an especially
memorable one.
Sandra Bruneau
Faculty of Education
" 1991 Tallgraduation        ™
Lights of Learning 1(fceptwn
in front ofthe Main Library
at 5:00pm until5:45pm
'Thursday, 9{pvim6er 28th, 1991
•••••••••••••
•trgjfxs* •MUSIC»CSWPLS»
AMS will be collecting canned
goods ofthe Foodbank so come
prepared!
For more information call
Lisa Pullan 3-8768 or Catherine
\Newland 3-8771 ..
•CtirkirCtictfk-£ticCi*-k ^f/
UBC Entrepreneurial Association
PRESENTS
MICHAEL GERBER
Tuesday
December 3
4:00 PM
SUB Theatre
So. You think lhat you won't have to know how to run a business
when you graduate. If you want to be an engineer, a doctor, dentist,
musician, geographer, oceanographer, lawyer, accountant, actor,
artist, consultant, a farmer, or anything think again !
Michael Gerber will tell you why 80% of sm * businesses fail, and
what you can cio about it. You will learn aKJut the "Entrepreneurial
Myth", and how it will affect you when you pursue your career.
If you don't go then we wish you the best of luck. For those of you
who go, it will be the cheapest consulting advice you will ever
receive. Funny thing is, it will also be the best.
Bring a friend and come early. We've got free coffee, tea, and cookies
for you.
Tickets: AVAILABLE NOVEMBER 18 - 29
$5.00 AT SUB BOX OFFICE
Hours: MONDAY TO FRIDAY
9:30 AM TO 4:30 PM
There is a world of opportunity
Many public accounting firms will train you to be an accountant. At Ernst & Young this is just the beginning.
We offer challenge and the opportunity to develop as a business advisor. We offer training that
will open up a tremendous range of senior career opportunities within our firm, or in virtually any
area of business, in Canada and around the world. Talk to us about career opportunities with Ernst & Young.
=U Ernst &Young
CHARTERED ACCOU\TANTS
November 26,1991
THE UBYSSEY/11 HELPLINES:
Peer support line: 822-3700
Student counselling: 822-4326
Women Students Office: 822-2415
Student Health: 822-7011
Vancouver Crisis Line (24 hrs.):
733-7111
UCINAl
JALI-PDRNI. v
STUDENT NITES
every
Monday, Tuesday & Wednesday
15% Discount
on ail food items
Just show your student I.D.
1319 Robson St.
Vancouver BC
669-1319
m
Open Face Kitchen
Wood Burning
Ovens
Corner of Robson & Jervis
Shamir speaks on
the peace process
JELLO BIAFRA
The Force Behind the Dead Kennedys
by David Chlvo
BALTIMORE—Israeli prime
minister Yitzhak Shamir said to
the General Assembly of Jewish
Federations that he cannot allow
the occupied territories to be independent.
At a conference last Thursday
in Baltimore, Maryland, he spoke
instead of an autonomy plan first
offered at Camp David in 1979.
"At the Madrid Conference I
was the spokesman for the four
million people in Israel," Shamir
said, "here I was facing the Arabs
who have 12 million square kilometers of territory and a combined
population of 170 million.
"I came to Madrid seeking
peace because I believe that this is
the time when what was once considered impossible may be probable."
Shamir said his country has
always sought direct negotiations
with the Arabs in order to "tear
down the walls of hostility" between them.
When he discussed the status
ofthe occupied territories however,
Shamir's position had not changed.
"Israel must have peace, but
Israel must also have security.
Without security there will be disaster for our state."
Shamir said history proved
Israel's need to retain the occupied
territories. He claimed the Arab-
Israeli conflicts have been "wars of
survival."
"We are asked to give up territory from which wars of annihilation were launched against us. Israel hungers for peace, but we are
also accountable to our consciousness," he said.
Shamir said Arab autonomy
in the West Bank and Gaza Strip is
the only workable solution.
"There is simply no room for
two states in such a small area," he
said.
"Jerusalem is above any discussion or negotiation. It is now
and always will be our eternal
capital."
Despite his hard-line position,
Shamir called on the Arabs "to
come to make peace, not just get
concessions" at the next conference.
"There have been many positive developments in the world,
but not in our region. The "New
World Order* has not reached the
Middle East."
Jewish students attendingthe
Assembly had mixed reactions to
the speech. "We are asked to give
out our hand knowing that it may
be bitten, but perhaps this is better than not giving out our hand at
all," said one delegate from Ohio.
SPOKE
WORD
CANADA
TOUR OF
November 26,1991
7:30 pm
SUB Auditorium
University of British Columbia
Tickets available at AMS Box Office & at the door
$8.00 UBC students $10.00 general
For more information 822-6273
etinian design:  "For a free,  democratic and non-secular state."
Canada's #1 Candy Bar*
12/THE UBYSSEY
November 26,1991

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