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The Ubyssey Mar 26, 2015

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Array MARCH26,2015 | VOLUMEXCVI | ISSUEXLIX
NOT FEBRUARY 11 SINCE1918
CULT!
PRISM
PRIZE
SPORTS
NORDIC
SKI TEAM
(s> // Page 2
imam
EVENTS        II THISWEEK, CHECK!
THURSDAY  ' 26
UBC
STORM THE WALL AFTER-PARTY
3:30 P.M.® THE PIT PUB
Celebrate the crowning achievement of your UBC career—getting over the
wall — by enjoying some beverages and live music with your comrades-inarms and fellow UBC students. Free
FRIDAY ' 27
March 27th 8pm Koerner Plaza
t> mcEikaihvd
Featuring NomNom. Luc Briede-Cooper and G-silent from UBC EDM
^®"RpvRA
?|UTOVrt@UBC
UBC BIKE RAVE
8:00 P.M. @ KOERNERPLAZA
Go for a loud, and adventurous ride around campus on your decked out
scooter, skateboard, or bicyclette. Best decorated ride gets a free ticket to
Block Party. Glowsticks, energy drinks and spinnin' local DJs on site. Free
SATURDAY ' 27
EARTH HOUR UBC
7:30-9:30 P.M. ©ABDUL LADHA
Celebrate Earth Hour with Common Energy UBC and live, candlelit music
and dance performances by local talent and baked goods courtesy of
Sprouts. Free
ON
THE
COVER
The persistence shown by these
athletes was remarkable. - Cherihan
Hassun
Want to see your events listed here?
Email your events listings to
ourcampus@ubyssey.ca.
<*w
UBYSSE
\JTHE
Y
MARCH 26, 2015 | VOLUMEXCVI | ISSUEXLIX
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I,
OUR CAMPUS //
ONEONONE^
ITHTHEPEO
I'MWAWflM
_EANDBUILDINGSTHAT
=HOTO AU^EN ERHARCTT/THE UBYSSEY
University architect Gerry McGeough is striving to make buildings on campus more community-oriented.
UBC s campus is Gerry McGeoughs canvas
AlexLenz
Contributor
It's been said that architecture is
a form of art that we can't ignore.
The buildings that we inhabit and
the structure of our communities
undoubtedly influence the ways
in which we interact, learn and
live. This can certainly be said for
UBC's campus, which, despite being seemingly ridden with endless
construction, is a hidden Mecca
for strategic design and community planning that aims to unite
students and faculty alike.
[Buildings] need to
have a looseness
so that they can
evolve over time, and
really support the
changing needs of that
community"
Gerry McGeough
University Architect and
Director of Planning and Design
Although you may not recognize him by name, if you've ever
stepped foot on any of UBC's three
campuses, you've taken in the art
of Gerry McGeough. As UBC's
chief architect and Director of
Planning and Design, McGeough
has spearheaded the vision behind
UBC's structural design and community planning.
Originally from Calgary, McGeough began studying architecture at McGill University after
he was inspired by the historical
complexities embedded within
the architecture ofthe European
cities he visited while travelling
through Europe when he was 18
years old. Upon completion of his
undergraduate degree, McGeough
worked in Montreal for numerous
years, focusing on inner-city developments. McGeough ended up
completing his master's degree at
Columbia University, in the School
of Architecture and Planning and
real estate development.
"I've moved from seeing buildings as sort of being objects, that
are things, to them really being
these vessels that need to nurture
the community. They need to have
a looseness so that they can evolve
over time and really support the
changing needs of that community. So what I like in architecture
is that it's very generous in its
nature," says McGeough.
Eventually, Gerry ended up in
Vancouver, where he worked with
the city of Vancouver planning
department for 15 years. His work
with the city consisted of neighbourhood revitalization, particularly in the Downtown Eastside, as
well as in Gastown, Yaletown and
Chinatown.
Throughout his time working at
UBC, McGeough has sought to design a community-oriented campus
that "celebrates the users within
them." Buildings such as the Beaty
Biodiversity Museum, the Earth
and Ocean Science Building and
the new bookstore are all examples of the way in which this goal
is accomplished. With large, open
spaces and plenty of windows,
these buildings were designed to
invite outsiders inside, creating
accessibility to the resources within these buildings.
"It's more about showcasingthe
people versus the building — rather
than saying, 'look at me I'm a
cool-looking building.' It's trying to
revitalize the heart ofthe campus
into a place that you really want to
hang out in versus just coming and
doing your studies."
The architecture on UBC's
campus has been designed with
specific ideologies in mind, which
are reflected through various
structural channels. "There was
some reflection on campus planning about a year and a half ago,
and there was a distinct shift to
look more to vision based planning
and design versus issues based
... that's about getting all the key
people in the community to think
about what we would like, what are
our needs and wants and aspirations, and what does that look
like. We use that to draw decision
making on how we plan and design
our places."
McGeough has focused his
urban design on campus to
reflect the values that UBC has
retained throughout its strong
history. One of said values is what
McGeough calls the "pioneering spirit" of UBC. This value is
channeled through architecture
in the form of student involvement in the planning and design
of new buildings. The new SUB,
for example, was fully funded
by the AMS, allowing students
greater autonomy over the spaces
they inhabit.
Suffice it to say, UBC is a
massive campus, and managing
the space is a feat to be proud of.
With creativity and intelligence,
McGeough has managed to turn
campus land into something
meaningful, from which our entire
community can benefit. Xi
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EDITOR VERONIKA BONDARENKO
RSDAY, MARC
LIQUOR LAWS »
Mahony and Sons will not apply for extended patio hours
=HOTOKOSTAPRODANOVICffHE UBYSSEY
Even though Vancouver laws now permit some bar patios to be open until 1a.m., Mahony and Sons will not be applying for the extension.
Olivia Law
News Producer
A law permitting bar patios to stay
open until 1 a.m. will not mean good
news for those who like to frequent
Mahony and Sons.
Restaurants in Vancouver can
now apply to have extended patio
hours to 1 a.m. from April 1 this
year. Following the 2014 pilot policy
of extending hours from 11 p.m.
to midnight, eligible active patios
can apply for this extension, just as
long as they can meet the criteria.
Businesses are required to have up-
to-date insurance, no outstanding
fees and no noise-related complaints
on file in the past 12 months.
On campus, the new policy could
only affect one establishment —
Mahony and Sons, who will not
be taking advantage ofthe new
extended policies. Currently open
until 1 a.m. on Friday and Saturday,
the pub has their patio area closed
off from midnight. Assistant Man
ager Michelle Hebert emphasized
the importance of strong relations
with the community for everybody's
interests.
"I'm not too worried about
noise because we're not too close
to residents," said Hebert. "We're
mostly in a public area; we've never
had any complaints in the past, but
we're always really respectful of our
neighbours."
Students are generally in favour
of extended patio hours in Vancouver, though there are conflicting
opinions on whether the changes
will make them spend more money.
Second-year political science major Jessie Stirlingbelieves it would
be a smart decision for Mahony's to
extend their patio hours.
"If Mahoney's extended their
hours, I could definitely see myself
sitting out longer and spending a
little bit more money," she said.
Fourth-year biochemistry major
Zander Laurie is keen for the extended opening hours, but does not
think it would help establishments
make more money.
"It's a great way to spend your
night outside on a patio having some
drinks with friends. I don't see why
extending it would be a problem,"
he said. "Spend more money? No, I
think I'd probably spend the same
amount of money, I'd just enjoy my
night more out on the patio than
inside."
Hebert acknowledged that the
extended hours would be beneficial
to Mahony and Sons' intake, but
also said that there has never been
any issues with asking customers
to come inside at the end of patio
hours. As such, they will not be
applying for extended patio hours at
this time.
"We have great relationships in
the community and with our neighbours and feel this is not in our best
interest at this time," said Hebert.
"Our current hours of operation
seem to work very well and are adequate to serve our business needs
in this location and community." Xi
\ The Ubyssey Publications Society
n'NERALMEETI
WHEN
MARCH 27, ir
WHERE — —
SUBCOUNCILCHAMBERS
AT THE AGM, EDITORIAL CANDIDATES WILL BE INTERVIEWED FOR THE
FOLLOWING YEAR'S POSITIONS. VOTING WILL TAKE PLACE FROM MARCH
30 TO APRIL 3. STAFF CAN VOTE AT THE FOLLOWING TIMES:
MONDAY 10 AM - 12 PM, A PM - 5 PM
TUESDAY 10 AM - 12:20 PM, 2 PM - 5 PM
WEDNESDAY 11 AM - 5 PM
THURSDAY 10 AM - 12:20 PM, 2 PM - 5 PM
FRIDAY 11 AM - 5 PM
POSITIONS WILL BE ANNOUNCED AT 5:30 PM IN THE UBYSSEY OFFICE - SUB ROOM 1A. NEWS    I   THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2015
REMEMBERING
LAUREN
WILMOT
BY LARA STEVENS
I met Lauren at the kind of impromptu party that tends to spring up in
the common rooms of first-year dorms at the beginning of September.
That night, we played sociables with new friends, climbed the trees
behind Cariboo and went to a bonfire on Wreck Beach, after which Laur
beat me up the Wreck Beach stairs. It was well over a month, a month
of walking to Fresh Slice for pesto pizza on Toonie Tuesdays, watching
new episodes of The Walking Dead together every week and pre-gaming
for parties in my room, before I found out that Laur had been diagnosed
with a rare form of cancer known as atypical choroid plexus papilloma
just a week before turning 17, about a year before I met her.
In the discussion of people living with illness, it has become cliche to
talk about how they carried on, unwavering, in the face of their disease; but in talking about Laur I would be doing her a disservice not to
mention how she retained a rare and outstanding bravery throughout
the time that I knew her. The way in which she handled her illness was a
testament not just to her remarkable resilience, but also to her empathy
for others in that she never wanted to play the martyr or belittle anyone
else's problems in light of her own. She constantly surpassed our conceptions of her limitations with few people even realizing that she was sick,
largely, I believe, because she never saw herself as limited. I can count on
one hand the amount of times I saw her complain about her disease.
One of these times, which I hope Laur wouldn't mind me sharing, I
remember vividly. It was after walking home to our residence back from
Koerner's. The four residents ofthe Tnunderdome (our nickname for
our dorm), Laur, Alanna, Kayla and myself, met in Cariboo first year, and
lived together through first and second year. We are tight-knit beyond
description, and this night out was just a repeat of countless nights spent
together. We all went into our separate rooms when we got back, but
when I headed to shower I heard muffled crying noises coming from
Laur's room. I hesitated at the door, not sure whether the kinder thing
was to go in and comfort her or let her be alone to release her frustration.
THE WAY IN WHICH SHE
HANDLED HER ILLNESS
WAS A TESTAMENT NOT
JUST TO HER REMARKABLE
RESILIENCE, BUT ALSO
TO HER EMPATHY FOR
OTHERS IN THAT SHE
NEVER WANTED TO
PLAY THE MARTYR OR
BELITTLE ANYONE ELSE'S
PROBLEMS IN LIGHT OF
HER OWN. THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2015    |    NEWS
PHOTOS PROVIDED BY STEVENS AND CLOSE FRIENDS
LAUR WAS NOT HER
ILLNESS, BUT A GIRL
BURSTING WITH LIFE AND
VITALITY, THIS KIND OF
EXTRAORDINARY RADIANCE
I HAVE YET TO SEE
MATCHED.
After a good minute or two of internal debate, I finally slipped inside
and went to go sit with her on her bed. She had been slower walking back
from the bar than us, as the disease had recently begun to affect her mobility, leaving her with drop-foot and a noticeable limp that made keeping
up with us difficult. We continually let her know that she was in no way
inconveniencing us when we matched our pace to hers, but to Laur, highly competitive and a former athlete used to dominating the volleyball
court and conquering mountaintops, her impediment was unconscionably frustrating. She cried, and as she cried she looked at me and told me
she was tired, tired of being sick, tired of hospitals and endless talk of
cancer, and this is when I learned what heartbreak really feels like.
Now, Alanna and Kayla came to sit on Laur's bed too and we studiously avoided the topic of her disease and the tear tracks on her cheeks,
filling the air with chatter to restore normalcy because that's what
family, even a created one, does: give you a life raft ofthe mundane to
cling to when everything else is shot to hell. We tried to help give Laur as
normal of a college experience as we could, and in return she gave us her
friendship and trust. I'd say we got the better end ofthe bargain.
So yes, Laur was brave and kind and all of those wonderful things
you're supposed to say about people who have died, but she was a real
person too. I can't help but run over and over all ofthe little things I
know about her, hoarding these little things because they're what I have
to connect me to her. These at one time insignificant details that, when
pieced together make up my memory of Laur, are what linger. They're
what I'll remember instead of any narrative centred on illness. One thing
I never want to do is make Laur more of an inspiration than a person. I
am trying to remember Laur as a real girl, my friend, and not a paragon
of virtue.
So some things I loved about Lauren, in no particular order: Laur was
an awful singer, like actually tone deaf and yet, I'll always remember
her belting out Bohemian Rhapsody with me in first year and insisting I
keep the radio on until it was over on our way back from the first of many
midnight Denny's runs — on which she would invariably eat twice as
much as me even though I had a good foot on her. She was the only one in
our house who could open tight jars and deal with bugs, which she joked
made her the dad of the house. She could pull absolutely disgusting faces
when she wanted to, which she did often, and in highly inappropriate
circumstances. She could drop in marine life facts into virtually any conversation. She was beautiful but she didn't care. She had a weird fixation
with climbing trees.
Laur was not her illness, but a girl bursting with life and vitality, this
kind of extraordinary radiance I have yet to see matched. We lived with
her and yet, in all honesty, it was easy to forget she was sick because no
one who ever met Laur could ever associate her with anything other than
boundless optimism and compassion, and could never describe her as
anything other than brilliantly alive.
It's not fair, of course, that she got 20 years when she should have had
far more, but death, and I guess by extension life too, is not in the business of pi ay ing fair. I have to remind myself of this when I am tempted
to dwell on the outrageous injustice dealt to Laur's friends and family
because she is no longer around. I am so, so grateful for the time with
her that I got, but I can't help but wish all of our plans about what to do
when we are real grown-ups, all four of us together, were still possible —
because they're not, or at least not possible in the way we imagined them.
In our house we are missing a piece that is precious and irreplaceable.
Laur had this incredibly annoying habit of calling me by boys' names.
Her favourites: "Larry," which makes me sound like an obese plumber,
and sometimes "Lars," which sounds like some B-grade action movie
hitman. It used to drive me insane. Now I think I would give anything to
hear her call me that again. I miss her almost as much as I love her.
In honour of Lauren's memory, her family and friends are establishing a
scholastic award for a UBC Commerce student. Xi NEWS    I    THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2015
SUSTAINABILITY »
DEFICIT »
UBC approves eight new Master's of
Engineering specializations for 2016
The Engineers are looking to build a sustainable future using their master's degree programs.
Olivia Law
News Producer
With over 500 courses at undergraduate and graduate levels and
more than 40 degree programs
allowing students to focus on
sustainability and the environment, UBC is widely known as a
sustainability-based campus.
The two most recent Senate
meetings have seen developments in this area. Eight new
Master's of Engineering programs, focused on leadership,
CONFLICT »
sustainability and industry and a
Master of Health Leadership and
Policy in Seniors Care have all
been approved for January 2016.
Elizabeth Croft, professor and
associate dean of education and
professional development is focused on the training of industry
professionals in the stream of
sustainability.
"It's very important for all
engineering professionals now
to be designing and building
in a sustainable matter," said
Croft. "The easy way to look at
=ILE PHOTO CARTER BRUNDAGEffHE UBYSSEY
that is 'People, Place and Profit,'
so it's the social impact, it's the
environmental impact, as well as
the economic impact of anything
that we go forward with in the
society."
Engineering professor Tamara
Etmannski is aware ofthe increasing demand for sustainability-based courses.
"It's almost de facto that
they're all sustainability related,
because that's the way things are
going," she said. "Our mandate
was to create programs that are
relevant, that are needed and
sought after by industries today."
With more and more competition in the job market, professional education is becoming a
valued attribute. UBC is focusing
on a combination of business
leadership and technical industry, which Croft believes is a
distinctive tool.
"I did a fairly extensive survey
of what was available to professionals out in the educational market
place," Croft said. "There are many
Engineering management programs
available, but there aren't these sort
of unique pieces where you can take
that leadership foundation and combine it with a sustainable technical
speciality across an industry value
chain."
The eight new courses have been
vetted and examined by industry professionals, as the aim is to
keep the department as relevant
as possible.
"Instead of going back and doing
a very generic MBA, where they're
learning about, perhaps, accounting
and finance in a very generic sense,
they can choose to do a professional
masters degree in this form," said
Etmannski. "They need a broad
understanding ofthe whole industry, the whole value chain ofthe
industry."
Some ofthe new master's programs are developing from current
courses offered at UBC, so the
department is confident that they
will attract substantial numbers
of students.
"I hope that the programs will
bring an added boost to the graduate
education that we have at UBC,"
said Croft. "It will add a great deal
to our university community to have
people that have the industry background participate with our other
students and really add a different
dimension to our student body."
Many students unaware as BDS vote continues
=ILE PHOTO KOSTA PRODANOVICffHE UBYSSEY
The BDS referendum is creating dialogue on campus
Danni Shanel
StaffWriter
With the ballot for the BDS referendum — which asks the AMS
to divest from companies supporting Israeli Military action in
Gaza and the West Bank — now
open to voters, a portion of the
student population is gearing up
to make their opinions heard.
That said, the majority of
students surveyed simply did not
know the BDS referendum was
taking place.
The AMS referendum on BDS,
which stands for Boycott, Divest
and Sanctions, was put forth by
Solidarity for Palestinian Human
Rights (SPHR). Earlier this
month, the group gathered 1000
signatures to bring a referendum
to the AMS, asking students to
support AMS divestment of UBC
funds from companies supporting Israeli military action in
Gaza.
The AMS later disendorsed
the referendum, urging student
to vote 'any way but yes' on the
basis that such a referendum
would be divisive and ultimately
detrimental to the student body.
Fourth-year commerce student
Tony Han doesn't think he'll vote
in the upcoming referendum.
"I don't think I have enough
information to make a decision,"
Han said.
Han also said that although he
knows what the BDS movement
stands for, he doesn't feel as
though he's informed enough to
take a stance.
"I don't know everything
about the conflicts, so I can't
comment further on it," said
Han. "I don't want to agree to
something just because many
people told me it's the right way."
Although the majority of
students surveyed who were not
involved with either SPHR or
Hillel had little or no opinion,
some showed interest not in the
cause behind the referendum, but
in its effect on the UBC community. Second-year Arts student
Jason Zhang said that he thought
this type of motion would, if
passed, create a strong divide
between students with differing
political opinions.
"I think it's perfectly acceptable for students to hold political opinions," said Zhang, who
plans to vote in the referendum.
"However, I don't think ... that it
is the AMS' business to organize
an event that has to do with such
a divisive issue, and one that can
obviously stir up vitriol among
the student body."
Zhang said that he would
rather see the AMS focus on
UBC-specific issues such as the
transition to the new SUB.
"Obviously that doesn't mean
that they cannot address multiple issues at once, but I would
imagine that they have more of
a mandate to deal with issues
closer to home," said Zhang.
Voting on the referendum is
open until March 27. Xi
AMS
businesses
incur $250,000
deficit due to
SUB delays
=HOTO CHERIHAN HASSUN/THE UBYSSEY
AMS businesses have racked up a large deficit
this year.
Moira Warburton
Contributor
The AMS businesses will rack up
an additional $250,000 in deficit
this year.
Although the original deficit
was announced at $532,000, the
AMS announced that this number
increased to $250,000 more than
originally forecasted.
The information was announced
at the Business and Administration
Governance Board (BAGB) meeting
on March 19. The committee is responsible for overseeing businesses
that are under the AMS's jurisdiction, such as Pie R Squared and the
Gallery Lounge.
According to AMS VP Finance
Mateusz Miadlikowski, the two
main sources ofthe increased deficit were a decline in revenue and
increased labour costs after construction ofthe new SUB stretched
out for almost a year longer than
expected.
"The revenues are down due
to construction. There are additional costs due to the delay,"
said Miadlikowski.
Miadlikowski also said that the
delay associated with the new SUB
opening cost the society an additional $10,000.
"Labour levels were re-forecasted using [year-to-date] numbers
and actuals from the previous
year," said Miadlikowski. "What
was not factored in were increases
in staffing levels as a result ofthe
anticipated opening ofthe Nest."
Some of these increases included preparing for the opening as
well as staffing new businesses
while the ones in the old SUB
remained open. The extra deficit
incurred through labour-related
costs amounts to approximately
$240,000.
"Unforeseen HR issues, including maternity leave coverage,
extended illnesses, retirements
resulted in additional costs,"
said Miadlikowski.
He also noted that such a large
deficit was caused by the extra
costs associated with preparing for
the opening ofthe new building
while keeping the old one open
rather than mismanagement
of funds.
"As a forecast for the year, it is
important to note that these numbers may change once actuals have
been received," said Miadlikowski.
"Historically, actuals are usually
better than budgeted."
A motion informing Councillors
ofthe change in the projected contribution from the AMS businesses
was scheduled for the AMS Council
meeting on March 25. Xi II Culture I
JENICA MONTGOMERY
THEATRE»
Pi Theatre brings back Blasted, famously criticized as "a disgusting feast of filth"
Reem Yousif
Contributor
Pi Theatre offers an unusual
encounter between a vulnerable woman, tabloid writer
and a soldier in their new
production Blasted.
From April 10-25, Pi Theatre
will feature the Not Safe for
Work (NSFW) production of
Sarah Kane's Blasted — where
perversion and violence come
to bloom.
This marks only the second
performance of Blasted in
Canadian history; the first took
place in 1995 at the Royal Court
Theatre in London.
The Daily Mail famously criticized the play as "a disgusting
feast of filth," but UBC alumna
Cherise Clarke intends to rise
to the challenge and show how
this production is as much about
gender as it is about power.
Clarke plays Kate, a timid, yet
caring woman who delves into
a convoluted world of rape, war
and love.
"Even though [Kate] definitely
starts out the underdog," said
Clarke. "By the end, she gains
strength through what she goes
through."
Clarke has starred in roles ranging from Rita in the one-woman
show Tiny Apocalypse to Laura
in The Glass Menagerie, Clarke
has acted both empowered and
vulnerable, still holding true to
her feminist roots.
An idea came up in rehearsal
about how both genders arbitrarily define heavy concepts
like "harassment" and "rape."
While one crew member might
consider a scene to be a slight
assault, Clarke sees it as "a brutal
violation," which reflects the
reactions of western society on
these issues.
Culture
Vulture
Intercultural Fair
March 27
12 p.m. - 5 p.m.
UBC's Intercultural Alliance
is presenting their fair that
will bring together UBC and
Vancouver based organizations. There will be 11 campus clubs that showcase the
diverse cultures that can be
found at UBC. There will also
be food, traditional dress and
dances and musical performances throughout the day.
Tickets are available
online or in person. For more
information search UBCIA
Intercultural Fair 2015 on
Facebook. Xi
=HOTO COURTESYTIM MATHESOK
This is the second time this particular script has been produced. The first was by UBC Theatre.
Clarke reassured that the audience won't be "preached at" in the
form of a play. "The writing's too
good for that," she said. "Ultimately, it's about power."
One prevalent theme throughout the play is that of war — as
it's symbolized by the role ofthe
soldier.
"I want to be careful," said
Clarke. "But warfare is a male-cen
tric phenomenon. Patriarchy is
about hierarchy and domination
and I'm no longer naive enough
to think that if women ran the
world everything would be better
necessarily, it would be different
probably. The fact is it tends to be
men who go to war, it tends to be
men who are leaders of state ... so
when were talking about warfare,
we're talking about men."
In spite of all the controversial themes, love is interwoven
throughout Blasted. Clarke said
every character displays vulnerability regardless of gender.
Blasted will be playing April
10-25 at Granville Island's Performance Works. More information and tickets are available
online. Xi
Musical Theatre Troupe
takes audiences back to
the 1950s with Happy Days
Ifni'i T litsiltAWT  *   ,. * *      *
Kari Lindberg
Contributor
UBC Musical Theatre Troupe's
newest production will flash audiences back to the 1950s with Happy
Days.
Happy Days was a television
show that aired in the 1970s and was
later adapted for Broadway in the
1990s. The plot is centred around
the character Fonzie, played by Max
Buchner, the stereotypical 1950s'
biker. Together he and his friends
have to figure out how to save their
favourite hangout spot: Arnold's
Malt Shop.
Happy Days, accordingto Raven
Nyman, co-vice president of UBC
Musical Theatre Troupe, has "got
those rock vibes, there are a lot
of poodle skirts, a lot of silly kind
of romantic stuff that goes on.
Thrown in the mix are bursts of
musical songs and various love
triangles. Ultimately, though it's a
coming of age story."
Happy Days is not only a relat-
able tale of teenagers figuring out
what it means to grow up, but it's a
very versatile and dynamic musical
with the variety of roles it provides.
However, there are still challenges in taking an established musical
and adapting it for a university
production. One ofthe biggest
problems that arose was the issue
of casting.
"In a university setting it is hard
to get a lot of boys who are interested in singing and dancing," said
Nyman. However, UBC Musical
Theatre Troupe was up for the challenge, casting women in male roles.
"That was one ofthe adjustments
we had to make, working with the
girls and adjusting the roles for
their voices and ranges. It is a lot of
gender bending but that was also the
fun of it," said Nyman.
Gender bending aside, perhaps
the biggest difference between the
UBC Musical Theatre Troupe's production and the original Happy Days
musical is the diversity represented.
The original TV show and Broadway production was a predominately white cast, sticking to a truer
representation of a small town near
Milwaukee, Wisconsin (where the
show was originally set). Being
racially faithful to the play, however,
was never a concern for the UBC
Musical Theatre Troupe.
"For us [racial diversity] has
never been a problem because no
one in our club has to really worry
about that. We don't cast based on
what's been done," said Nyman.
The dedication and passion of
the UBC Musical Theatre Troupe
is the beating heart of this musical
production.
"Everyone's really focused and
has been putting in a lot of effort,"
said Buchner. When asked about the
best part ofthe production process
Buchner replied: "Getting to spend
so much time with such a dedicated and passionfate] cast, crew and
director."
Happy Days will be showing
March 26-28 in the SUB Ballroom. Xi
Public Open House - April 8
University Boulevard Precinct Planning
UBC is updating plans for the University Boulevard Precinct. In February 2015,
we gathered feedback from the University community on how to complete the
precinct vision. This feedback, in combination with further design analysis was
used to develop draft planning and design concepts for the precinct
Please join us at a public open house to review the emerging planning and design concepts for the precinct.
Place: Main Concourse, Student Union Building (SUB), 6138 Student Union Boulevard
Date: Wednesday, April 8, 2015     Time: 11:00am - 2:00pm        Refreshments will be se
erved.
Can't attend in person? Online consultation
will run from April 7 -19. Visit planning.ubc.ca
to learn more
For additional information on the project, contact:
Aviva Savelson, Senior Manager, Consultation,
Campus + Community Planning
at aviva.savelson@ubc.ca or 604-822-9984
This notice contains important information which may affect you. Please ask someone to translate it for you.
itba£&-ir«s#fm, mm&mmfo.
oi »*it sma °ia ^ sit gae ss^ soi si^m^.
a place of mind
campus+community planning 8    |    CULTURE    |    THURSDAY, MARCH 26,2015
MUSIC »
Alumna and director nominated for Prism Prize award
Lawrence Neal Garcia
StaffWriter
From Mike Nichols' The Graduate all the way to Wes Anderson's
Rushmore, water imagery has
persisted as cinematic shorthand
for alienation and isolation, so
much so that it's almost become
cliche. But in the music video for
Kandle's "Not Up to Me," which
has been nominated for a Prism
Prize for Best Canadian music
video, director and former UBC
student Natalie Rae Robisonuses
that same imagery to explore
a much less discussed topic:
women's mental health issues.
"I think it's rare that a song
really speaks pretty openly and
honestly about women's mental
health issues and it's something
that I think a lot of girls struggle
with at various points in their
lives," said Robison, who has
known the artist, Kandle, since
before they had each pursued
their respective careers. "A lot
of times in high school and when
you're young, you deal with body
issues, confidence and depression
... and it's something that both
Kandle and I had dealt with. So
I really wanted to do something
that was going to illustrate the
lyrics."
Running just under five minutes, the video depicts a young
girl (played by Haley McPherson)
battling depression and gradually
being overtaken by her emotions.
It's filled with surreal, oneiric
imagery, and culminates in an
underwater sequence where the
girl is submerged, drowning, and
her friend (played by Kandle)
needs to pull her out. It's simultaneously beautiful and haunting, an effect that Robison said
was very much intentional given
the story at hand.
"It's sensitive subject matter
obviously, so I think that it's a
little bit easier to speak to [these
issues] in terms of metaphors
and ones that people will want
to watch and see," said Robison,
who noted that having the video
appeal to a mainstream audience
while still making it a powerful
experience was a balancing act.
When asked what it was like
shooting "Not Up to Me," Robison recalled the unique sensation
of having the chaos of a normal
film set drowned out underwater.
"As stressed out as your little
heart may be ... nobody's going
to hear anything, and it's totally
quiet. It actually puts everyone
[on set] in this interesting state
[where] you have to end up figuring out ways of communicating."
Despite growing up on film
sets, Robison hadn't always
planned to become a director. It
was only after experimenting in
photojournalism and writing that
she eventually came back to film.
Since graduating with a communications degree, Robison has
worked with artists like Serena
Ryder, Tegan and Sara and Gold
& Youth; and although she has
been up for other awards before
— previous MMVA nods and a
Juno nomination for "Not Up to
Me" — she said that as a director,
getting nominated for a Prism
Prize is a different experience.
"[The Prism Prize jury has]
PHOTOCOURTESF NATALIE ROBISON
Natalie Robison was nominated for a Prism Prize for "Not Up to Me
done such a good job with cur-
ating music videos that speak to
the directors, as opposed to ...
other kinds of awards that are
more speaking to the artists,"
said Robison. "It's just amazing
to be nominated ... because I feel
it merits more for the video and
more for the director than anything else."
But even beyond the recognition, Robison is looking forward
to the opportunities that come
with it, especially ones that allow
her to engage with issues that
she's passionate about. Even now,
she has just finished directing a
PSA for UN Women promoting
female leadership, which is to
be part of a global initiative that
launches later this month.
Prism Prize winners will be
announced on March 29. Xi
LEADERSHIP »
Student heads north to participate in Global Vision s Arctic Youth Ambassador Forum
=HOTO CHERIHAN HASSUN/THE UBYSSEY
Mila Huebsch hopes to bring awareness and understanding of Canada's North back from her trip.
Serena Chao
Contributor
With the majority ofthe Canadian population residing near
the United States border, one
doesn't always think about how
different the lifestyles are for
those in the North.
Mila Huebsch, a 20-year old
student, has been selected to be
one out of 25 youth leaders to
represent Southern Canada and
their respective communities at
the Arctic Youth Ambassador
Forum in Iqaluit, Nunavut. From
March 19-22 Huebsch will be
discussing solutions to some of
the challenges that the North
faces such as food security,
health care, the environment
and education.
"I'm really looking forward to
experiencing the culture of Canada's North," said Huebsch. "As
an earth sciences student, I hope
to learn more about how climate
change is effecting Northerners,
and find opportunities to share
knowledge in Vancouver when I
return home."
Huebsch, originally from
Calgary, is currently in her
third year studying geology. In
addition to her role with Global
Vision, she is involved with the
G.M. Dawson Club and UBC's
geology club — where she is currently running for the position
of president.
She first heard about Global
Vision's initiatives through one
of her good friends; she attended
one of Global Vision's economic
roundtables in Calgary, which
helped her start her involvement
with Global Vision. "You have
to do that as a stepping stone
towards doing any of their other
missions and projects," said
Huebsch. "Going to the roundt-
able is like your interview to get
to know you."
To attend the forum, Huebsch
is responsible for raising $2,100,
half of the costs associated with
the trip, through corporate and
community sponsorships. Global
Vision covers the other half of
the expenses. Huebsch was able
to acquire funds from Westjet to
cover flights to Ottawa, where
the other participants will gather
before heading up to Iqaluit,
and from her father's company,
which matches company donations in a one-to-one ratio to
charitable organizations.
Huebsch is hoping to bring
back awareness and knowledge
about some of the issues in the
North including sustainability and how the differences in
culture affect the approaches to
finding solutions. She is keen on
using social media as a tool to
make new connections with the
youth in the North and involve
them in creating conversations to
share their stories.
A key part of her experience is
to identify areas for collaboration
between organizations, educational institutions and businesses
in Vancouver with the Northern
communities.
This summer, Huebsch is
hoping to attend the National Youth Ambassador Caucus
(NYAC), also organized by Global
Vision. This is in celebration
ofthe 50th anniversary ofthe
National Flag of Canada and to
continue to brainstorm ideas for
issues of national importance.
Additionally, she wants to be
part ofthe Parks Canada Youth
Ambassador Program. Xi // Opinions
LAST WORDS »
LLUSTRATIONJULIANYUfTHE UBYSSEY
The delays with the new SUB have taken their toll on the AMS'bank account.
LAST WORDS//
AMS BUSINESSES ARE
BLEEDING THE BANK
Surprise, surprise — the AMS
businesses are running up a large
deficit this year. Although we all
knew that this was coming, learning about $250K in additional expenditures always makes you want
to twist your neck sideways and
ask, "just where is it all going?"
Of course, this question is not
entirely unanswerable. With the
additional expenses associated
with keeping the old SUB open for
nine months longer than anticipated, it's hardly surprising that
the costs of keeping them running
is higher this year. The loss in
revenue is justified, in a sense, as
the businesses provide a service to
students that cannot be measured
solely by monetary profit.
All that said, the large amount
of deficit alarms us. We hope it's
a transition year problem, as VP
Finance Mateusz Miadlikowski
claims it is, rather than a bad trend
that will continue once the new
SUB opens. Time will tell whether
this is actually the case, but it's
clear that someone needs to keep
a steady eye on those businesses
over the next year.
BDS BEWILDERMENT
(AND PORK PRODUCTS)
After one of our writers tried
to survey average students on
how they were going to vote in
the BDS referendum, one thing
because clear as day: a large
portion of students either feel
that they know very little about
Middle Eastern politics or have
not heard about the referendum
at all.
As with any election or referendum, it is especially important
to inform yourself about all sides
ofthe proposition prior to voting.
Regardless of how you choose
to vote, it is essential to read
up on both BDS itself and the
historical context of Israel and
Palestine and come to a decision
based on an understanding of the
situation. We truly hope that the
students who vote in the referendum this week have done so.
(As a side note, we noticed
that a few AMS executives had
the bright idea to put ham or
pepperoni on a large portion of
the pizzas at the student forum
on BDS. Think that over again
and realize why it might not have
been the best choice, guys.)
LATE-NIGHT PATIOS NOT
ALL THAT EXCITING
With new provincial liquor laws,
alcohol-serving venues are — after
applying for permission — allowed
to keep their patios open until 1:00
a.m. While some people seem to
be treating this like the Second
Coming, we don't see how it's that
big of a deal.
Only one pub on campus —
Mahony and Sons — is even
able to take advantage ofthe
extended hours, and they've decided against it. Even if they did,
though, how many people will it
really affect? With Vancouver's
weather being as it is, for eight
months ofthe year relatively
small numbers of people even
use patios. Sure, it would be nice
to stay outside until 1 a.m. on
a warm summer night, but is it
really that big of a deal to have
to move indoors at the stroke of
midnight?
Either way, it doesn't look like
this change is going to be affecting
anywhere on campus directly. But
at least you'll be able commute
off campus to sit outside for an
extra hour on Friday and Saturday
nights. Xi
With clenched teeth, voting to boycott the occupation
ARNO ROSENFELD
Letter
I am tired of this wretched
debate.
I am tired of hearing so much
about how Israel is a liberal
democracy and so little about the
four million Palestinians living
under military occupation.
I am tired of hearing so much
about how the Palestinians have
a right to fight for justice and
so little about why that often
looks like Palestinian terrorists
butchering Jewish children and
Palestinian politicians rejecting
peace offers.
But I am also tired of being
used. For me, being pro-Israeli
and pro-Palestinian is not a
slogan that Hillel International
or the Centre for Israel and
Jewish Affairs can rely on me
trotting out to defeat divestment.
Yes, sometimes BDS is hate, but
that is no excuse for supposedly
pro-Israel groups to block every
substantive attempt at undoing
the Israeli occupation.
"A clash between right claims
can be resolved in one of two
manners," Amos Oz has said of
the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.
"There's the Shakespeare tradition of resolving a tragedy with
the stage hewed with dead bodies and justice of sorts prevails.
But there is also the Chekhov
tradition. In the conclusion ofthe
tragedy by Chekhov, everyone
is disappointed, disillusioned,
embittered, heartbroken, but
alive. And my colleagues and I
have been working, trying... not
to find the sentimental happy
ending, a brotherly love, a sudden
honeymoon to the Israeli-Palestinian tragedy, but a Chekhovian
ending, which means clenched
teeth compromise."
Setting the ideologies aside,
voting either way in this week's
AMS referendum forces us to
make a heartbreaking compromise between two absolutes. The
referendum's sponsors want
to add our school to the list of
supporters for the toxic BDS
movement's unproductive and
unjust demand of an Arab state in
Israel. But the referendum's language simply calls for boycotting
"companies that support Israeli
war crimes, illegal occupation
and the oppression of Palestinians." Rejecting this referendum
gives undue credence to the
notion that protecting the Jewish
state means equating a boycott
ofthe occupation with a boycott
of Israel.
I, along with many Jewish
Zionists, including Peter Bein-
art and prominent Israelis like
Oz, Gershom Gorenberg, David
Grossman and A.B. Yehoshua,
firmly reject BDS but support
boycotting the Israeli occupation.
I would prefer a broader resolution that recognized the two-
state solution and also targeted
companies supporting Lebanon,
Jordan and Syria's oppression of
their Palestinian residents. But,
as Oz said, waiting for perfection
dooms Israelis and Palestinians
to endless conflict. As a Jewish
UBC student this is fundamentally a question about where I
want my tuition going; Palestinian solidarity activists aren't the
only ones who want a boycott of
companies enabling and profiting
from the Israeli occupation.
With clenched teeth, I am
voting yes.
Arno Rosenfeld is a third-year
political science major and former
Ubyssey editor. Xi
ADVICE »
Ask Natalie: On dealing with bad
grades and parental expectations
"Dear Natalie,
My grades aren't doing as well
this semester and my parents
are pissed. But I'm passing my
classes. How do I make them see
I'm getting a lot out ofthe university experience even if my grades
aren't as good as they should be?
Experiencing Vni"
Dear Experiencing Uni,
It is a commonly held belief of
many that university is about experiences and trying new things,
which is great and leads to some
great adventures, but is, frankly,
wrong.
First and foremost, university is
about getting a degree. Yes maybe
you came here for the parties, the
sports team or the fantastic student
newspaper, but you wouldn't have
any of those things if you weren't
at least on your way to getting
a degree.
I'm not saying extra-curricular
activities are bad, because I don't
think that — I write for a student
paper — and in fact, many activities
are extremely valuable when combined with your degree. Being a part
of student government, an executive
in a club or running events are all
great things to put on your resume.
But I get the feeling the kind of
extra-curriculars you're talking
about shouldn't be put on a resume.
Parties, spontaneous adventures,
and goals of drinking a beer from
every bar in Vancouver are great,
but when you miss a midterm,
throw together a paper worth 40%
of your grade at 4:00 a.m., or sleep
through an entire day of classes (for
the third time this week) you have
to take a step back.
Your parents are right to be
pissed. You just admitted you could
be getting better grades. University
is expensive and when it comes
down to it you're paying for a degree
and not the experience.
Need advice? Write to Natalie at
asknatalie@ubyssey.ca. 13
BDS and the merits of abstention
ADAM WAITZER
Letter
In recent weeks, BDS has been the
talk of campus; bulletin boards
carpeted with posters both 'yes'
and 'no', The Ubyssey is awash
with opinion pieces, and a conflicted AMS taking a bizarre 'any
way but yes' stance. Even Justin
Trudeau dropped by to weigh in on
the matter.
The BDS referendum is a complex and highly contentious issue
that has left many students divided,
distressed and confused. As a
half-Israeli Jew in support of a two-
state solution, I am dissatisfied with
and morally opposed to the Israeli
government's policies of late. The
Israeli occupation of Palestine is an
inexcusable affront to international
law and needs to end tomorrow.
That being said, I am left wondering whether the BDS movement
is a viable means of protest.
On one hand, the stark power
imbalance between Israel, the
UN-designated occupying power
and Palestine begs the question
of whether Palestine can work
towards sovereignty through any
non-violent measures apart from
BDS.
Worryingly built on a campaign
promise of no Palestinian state
under his watch — as well as racist,
fear stoking remarks — Netanyahu's
recent election victory bodes ill for
the peace process. Under his leadership, the Likud party is poised
to form a right wing, nationalist
coalition that will continue to receive firm support from the Harper
government. Rising sentiment that
Palestinians are up against the
wall (quite literally) leads to BDS
growing more appealing by the day
— and understandably so.
On the other hand, however, I
highly doubt that the implementation of BDS will result in a clean,
workable outcome. In fact, BDS may
stand to harm Palestinian interests.
Take, for example, the recent
closure of a West Bank SodaS-
tream plant. Faced with mounting
pressure from the BDS movement,
SodaStream, an Israeli company,
relocated out ofthe West Bank. As
of last year, SodaStream employed
500 Palestinians, 450 Israeli Arabs
and 350 Israeli Jews. These lost jobs
— which, by the way, paid wages far
higher than the West Bank average
— hurt an already ailing Palestinian
economy.
Or, consider the impact of BDS
on the Israeli academic sphere.
Apart from being global leaders
in research and innovation, most
Israeli universities are hotbeds of
political activism. With the exception of Bar-Ilan University, most
Israeli academics vocally oppose
the Israeli occupation. As funding
decreases, these voices will fade
from Israeli political discourse and
public opinion will move further to
the right.
Although I by no means equate
all anti-Israel sentiment with
anti-Semitism, I believe that on
our campus, BDS will shut down
dialogue and polarize the student
body. While 'dialogue' maybe a
nebulous and unsatisfying solution
for despairing Palestinian students,
open discussion and mutual respect
are absolutely imperative for long
run progress. BDS offers complex
issues a reductive treatment of moral blacks and whites that threatens
efforts at reconciliation.
At the end ofthe day, I am dubious about the effects of BDS and
I hesitate to support a one-sided
approach to a two-state solution.
All the same, I am dismayed by the
'yes' and 'no' binary, where 'no' is in
many ways a vote of confidence for
the Israeli government. In her recent letter, Audrey Abergel argued
against abstention from the BDS
referendum. I disagree. While I in
no way endorse voting 'yes', I see
merit in abstaining on principle. Xi 10    I   SPORTS   I    THURSDAY, MARCH 26,2015
NORDIC SKIING »
Nordic skiers wrap up final season as varsity team
Sports review means the group will be demoted to competitive club status beginning next year
The team couldn't afford to goto Nationals last year, but received money from UBC to attend this year.
Natalie Morris
StaffWriter
The Nordic skiers came home
from nationals this week, bringing to an end their season and last
year as a varsity team.
The Canadian College and
University National Championship (CCUNC) for Nordic Skiing
was held last week in Thunder
Bay, Ontario. The team faced unusually warm weather all winter
which made practice and local
races more difficult than previous
years, but was greeted by Thunder Bay's low temperatures and
snow — a welcome sight so late in
the season.
UBC's team, which had done
well in more local races, found
themselves in heavy snow and
heavier competition. "It was
awesome to compete against the
fastest cross country skiers in
Canada," said second year Hannah Xavier. "There was definitely
a lot more pressure to do well, but
we got out there and did the best
we could."
Lakehead and Laval Universities continued their dominance
over nationals, leading nearly all
ofthe races. UBC was one ofthe
few western universities competing in Thunder Bay.
Kirsty Bock, a third-year
student, placed in top 20 for the
women's 5km Freestyle as well
as top 10 along with Xavier in the
Women's Free Sprint Relay. Alistair Hardy-Poirier, a graduating
Thunderbird, was within the top
20 in the Men's 10km Free Style
race, and together with teammate Daniel Moore, placed 11th
in the Men's Relay for 26th in the
aggregate standings.
"I did surprisingly well [in the
10km] considering the amount
of skiing I've had this year," said
Hardy-Poirier. "I knew it was
going well on my second 5km lap
when I was keeping up and passing
with the people who were starting
their first lap. I was stoked with
my race and ... worked hard to
keep myself maxed out throughout
the race."
Nationals was Hardy-Poirier's
last big event with the team and he
said he would miss the team but
was "sure we'll be seeing lots of
each other around in one way or
another."
This year was Xavier's first time
competing on a Canadian scale. "I
haven't been to nationals before so
this was a totally new experience,"
she said. "There was a lot more
competition at nationals than in
any ofthe B.C. races.... That being
said, we raced really well considering the amount of time we have
spent on the snow this year."
Xavier hopes to be able to be
able to go to nationals next year
as a competitive club. The team's
status, whether varsity or competitive, has little to do with the
their dynamic, she said. "We love
this sport and the competition and
that's what matters."
However, she expressed concern over the team's future as a
competitive club. "There is a little
uncertainty about whether or
not we will be able to compete at
nationals in the [upcoming] years,"
said Xavier. "We would definitely
like to go, but it all depends on the
location and what we can afford
=ILE PHOTO JOSH CURRANfTHE UBYSSEY
as a competitive club." The team
was not able to attend nationals
in Corner Brook, NL last year due
to cost and location, but received
enough support from UBC to fly to
Thunder Bay this year.
"I'm happy for the support UBC
has provided but sad they aren't
going to be providing the same
level of support in the future," said
Hardy-Poirier, adding that "all
alumni donation calls will be left
unanswered by me."
The team made sure that The
Ubyssey included a thank-you for
their host, Betty Carpick. "She
took us into her home and the
whole neighbourhood in Thunder
Bay helped feed us and make sure
we were well taken care of. [We]
want to thank her for her generosity and incredible cooking," said
Xavier. Xi
MENTAL HEALTH »
Mental Health Awareness Club
defeating depression with activity
Club hosts 5k run, yoga and fair to raise money to fight mental illness
PHOTO JACK HAUENfTHE UBYSSEY
The MHAC is acting as the Vancouver
host for the Defeat Depression campaign.
Ciaran Dougherty
Copy Editor
The Mental Health Awareness
Club (MHAC) is hosting a day of
activity on campus this Sunday
as part ofthe Defeat Depression
campaign. Acting as the Vancouver host for the movement; the
drive is organized on a national level by the Mood Disorder
Society of Canada. The event will
consist of a yoga warm up, a run/
walk, slacklining, painting and a
wellness fair.
The campaign aims to raise
money through fundraising for
the run/walk to contribute to
local and nationwide initiatives.
"As a host we get to receive 75
per cent of all the funds raised
for our own community initiatives and the other 25 per cent
goes towards the Mood Disorder Society and their national
campaign," said Ameera Ladak,
president ofthe MHAC.
"We hit $7,500 and ... that was
our soft target. Our end goal is
$10,000, now that we've hit our
main target we are pushing for 10
now, but we're really happy that
we just hit $7,500."
The organizers wanted to plan
an event that would promote important values. "We chose to go
with a walk and run because we
really want to emphasize physical and mental well-being as a
part of a holistic look at mental
health," said Ladak.
The event is not, however, all
about the run/walk. There will
be other attractions, courtesy of
the MHAC, to help raise awareness. "There will also be yoga
and painting, so we'll have canvases that people can take part
in the big campus project where
they'll have the word 'Depression' and they can splash paint on
it," said Sarah Louadi, a member
ofthe event team.
"We wanted to spice it up a
little."
Another important feature
will be the wellness fair, which
will feature different wellness
groups around campus, so if
attendees aren't running or walking, they can still be involved
with the event.
The team running this event
consists of over 30 people — the
MHAC created a sub-committee and several different teams
had to work together to produce
what is sure to be an excellent
event. There are already over 150
people registered to run, and at
least 24 teams are entering.
The event will run Sunday,
March 29 from 10 a.m. - 2 p.m.
at Harry Warren Field. For more
information and the full schedule,
check out UBC's blog post about it
at bit.do/MHAC. Xi
Women's Golf
Battle at Primm
March 23-24
1. University of British Columbia (587)
T2 Stephanie Wong (142)
T2Kat Kennedy (142)
TO Barbara Neto-Bradley (151)
T18 Winnie Hyun (154)
T36 Reagan Wilson (163)
2. Wayland Baptist University (597)
4 Marina Gallegos (144)
T7 Natalie Ugalde (147)
T10 Hannah Duvall (150)
T39Kodee Rhodes (164)
T42 Ashley Zang (165)
Men's Golf
Battle at Primm
March 23-24
2. CSU-San Marcos (856)
T13 Dylan Healey (214)
T20 Scott Shefflette (216)
T26 Ryan Odom (218)
T26 Thomas Masters (218)
T51AaronBronis(226)
3. University of British Columbia (857)
T6 Conner Kozak (212)
T6 Jack Wood (212)
T26 Nate Ollis (218)
T32 Trent Abraham (219) THURSDAY, MARCH 26,2015    I    SPORTS    I   11
STORM
THE WALL
L DAY H
PHOTOS
CHERIHAN
HASSUN
Student tickets only $12 per
show, or $29 for all 3 shows!
radius
at the
Telus Studio Theatre
The city's top vocal and instrumental ensembles weave
elements of medieval courtly entertainment, into playful
concerts that explore the full spectrum of sound.
The Nu:BC Collective
Thu April 9 2015 at 7:30pm
Turning Point Ensemble
Fri April 17 2015 at 7:30pm & Sun April 19 2015 at 2:30pm
musica intima
Fri April 24 2015 at 7:30pm & Sat April 25 2015 at 2:30pm
Telus Studio Theatre Chan Centre at UBC
Tickets and info at chancentre.com/radius
I
a place of mind
I mua:i
a intima
TURNING P^\m
ENSEMBLE
Nu:BC 12    I    GAMES    I    THURSDAY, MARCH 26,2015
IwM ■• *"'-■ - y«5ff§^ ;yfc.
ike a demure damsel hiding behind herfan.
PHOTO VICKY HUANG/THE UBYSSEY
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5-Swiss peaks
9- Psalms interjection
14-Up good
15-Gone by
16- Banishment
17-Gal Fri.
18- Silver, away!
19-French school
20-Simmer
21- Occurring at irregular intervals
23-Mata	
24-Slangy denia
25-PIN reguester
26-Suit makers
29- First name in spydom
33- Respiration disorder
36- the season...
37-Western Indians
38-Martini's partner
39-Explosive sound
40-Trap
41-Capricorn's anima
42-Block up
43- Like stomach secretions
44-Other, in Oaxaca
45-Controversia
47- Heston'sorg.
49- Brooks, filmaker responsible for "Blazing Saddles"
50-Arguing
54-Mountain chain
58-Drink to excess
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MAR 23 ANSWERS
3
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MAR 23 ANSWERS
59- a million
60- French summers
61-Teheran's country
62- Inclines
63- Mozart's" kleine Nacht-
musik"
64-Writer Sarah Jewett
65-Sadsong
66- Some DVD players
67-Tidy, without fault
DOWN
1-Secret supply
2-Plantain lily
3- Big name at Indy
4- In spite of
5
1
8
9
7
3
2
4
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9
5
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6
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6
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9
COURTESYKRAZYDAD.COM
5- Loss of voice
6-Secular
7- Hallucinatory
8-Greek portico
9- Now you	
10- Pope's power
11- Large cat
12- breve
13-Back part of the foot
22- Backtalk
27-Parisian pa
28-Tear
30-Somewhat
31-Actress Hatcher
32-Just !
33-Jason's ship
34-Smoke deposit
35- Nicholas II was the last Russian
one
39-Holegoa
40-Biol., e.g.
42-Bargain
43-Books of maps
46-Sister of Venus
48-Wash lightly
51- Baseball manager Joe
52- Bucky Beaver's toothpaste
53- Principle
54-Chilled
55- Dedicated to the Love
56-Back
57-Sly look
"Our only limitations are those
which we set up in our own minds,
or permit others to establish for us"
Elizabeth Arden: Self-Made Maven
In a time when women dare not wear make-up or run their own businesses, Elizabeth daringly
did both. She was not a trained chemist, yet she pioneered the concept of scientifically
formulating cosmetics. She was not a business graduate, yet she created a global empire.
Curiosity and drive were her teachers; the world, her classroom.
We think Elizabeth would have simply adored AU, giving people all over the world the chance
to make their mark, on their terms, in their time. Beautiful.
V
open, online, everywher
Learn more at business.athabascau.ca

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