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The Ubyssey Jan 9, 2012

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Array  21 Page 2101.09.2012
What's on
This week, may we suggest..
All President's Dinner: 5:30-8:30pm @ SUB Ballroom
This annual hack schmooze-fest is invitation only. If you're a real student
leader, you can get some free appetizers, an absurd amount of wine and
some good of self congratulation. Try again next year
TUE
MOA»
MOA curator tours: 1-2pm @
MOA
This is the first of a weekly
Tuesday event in which you
can learn about different collections from the Museum of
Anthropology's curators. Come
learn why they're interesting.
WED
CLUBS»
Talk for the UBC Stamp and
Coin Club: 12-1 @ SUB 205
This talk, titled "The rise, fall,
resurrection and final disappearance of Napoleon Bonaparte as
recorded on French currency."
concerns dictators and their appearance on currency.
UBC Slam Open Mic: 7:30-
9:30pm @ Simply French Cafe
A night of poetry and performance for anybody who wants
to participate. And for those who
don't, just come enjoy the show.
ARTS WEEK »
Arts Mardi Gras: 8pm @ SUB
Ballroom
Wrap up Arts Week with a big
sloppy SUB party. The 2011
Ubyssey would make some stupid joke about Arts degrees here,
but we're better than that now...
and most of us now have Arts
degrees.
Got an event you'd like to see on this page? Send your event
and your best pitch to printeditor@ubyssey.ca.
THEUBYSSEY
January 9,2012, Volume XCIII, Issue XXVII
EDITORIAL
Coordinating Editor
Justin McElroy
coordinating@u bysseyca
Managing Editor, Print
Jonny Wakefield
orinteditor@ubys:eyca
Managing Editor, Web
Arshy Mann
webeditor@ubysseyca
News Editors
Kalyeena Makortoff
& Micki Cowan
news@u bysseyca
Art Director
Geoff Lister
a rt@u bysseyca
Culture Editor   4
Ginny Monaco
culture@u bysseyca
Senior Culture Writers
Taylor Loren &
Will Johnson   1
tlo re n@u bysseyca
wjohnson@u bysseyca
Sports Editor
Drake Fenton
sports@u bysseyca
Features Editor
Brian Piatt
featu res@u bysseyca
Copy Editor
Karina Palmitesta
copy@ubysseyca
Video Editor
David Marino
video@u bysseyca
Business Manager
Fernie Pereira
ousiness@u bysseyca
Ad Sales
Ben Chen
advertising@u bysseyca
Senior Web Writer Accounts
Andrew Bates S[fat Hasan
abates@ubysseyca a ceo unts@u bysseyca
Graphics Assistant
Indiana Joel
ijoel@u bysseyca
Webmaster
Jeff Blake
webmaster@u bysseyca
STAFF
Andrew Hood, Bryce Warnes,
Catherine Guan, David Elop,
Jon Chiang Josh Curran, Wil
McDonald, Tara Martellaro,
Virginie Menard,Scott
MacDonald, Anna Zoria,
Peter Wojnar, Tanner Bokor,
Dominic Lai, Mark-Andre
Gessaroli, Natalya Kautz, Ka
un, RJ Reid
CONTACT
Business Office: Room 23
Editorial Office: Room 24
Student Union Building
6138 Student Union Blvd
Vancouver, BCV6T1Z1
tel: 604.822.2301
web: www.ubyssey.ca
feedback@ubyssey.ca
Print Advertising:
604.822.1654
Business Office:
604.822.6681
advertising
©ubyssey.ca
LEGAL
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Letters to the editor must be under 300 wc :   :,,t:-:t - Judeyour
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Our Campus
One on one with
the people who
make UBC
>3
Ken Savage:
spider freedom
fighter
Spencer Toffoli
Contributor
To some students, Dr Ken Savage
is simply known as "the spider
guy." Savage has become well-
known in the department of zoology for ordering live spiders via
FedEx and lettingthem roam free
in his office.
As we spoke, he had two different spiders happily living on and
around his desk, basically unrestricted except by some hanging
sheets of plastic surrounding the
wooden frames built for them to
spin their webs. The larger ofthe
two seemed unhindered bythe
fact that it was missing a couple
of legs, and was busily spinning a
web around its lunch, one ofthe
mealworms Savage feeds them.
Despite his comfort with having
them in close proximity, Savage is
less interested in the spiders themselves than in their webs. Savage is
a biomechanics researcher, study-
ingthe mechanics of biological
systems, specifically spiderwebs:
how they are built, the patterns
they come in and the strength of
the different types of spider silk.
Although there has been considerable interest in the potential
commercial applications of replicating spider silk's combination
of strength and flexibility (among
other qualities), Savage's research
is purely for the sake of scientific
knowledge. "We're pretty much
doing some straightforward purely
science-type questions."
Savage never actually planned
CHRIS BORCHERT^HE UBYSSEY
Savage is in some ways partnered with this spider, which produces the webs he studies.
to become "the spider guy" He
said he basically fell into biomechanics in university and has always been guided by his curiosity.
"Itwas totally accidental. I
always had a curiosity for the way
things worked. [Biomechanical
research] is the sort of place
where you can just ask the basic
questions."
It's not surprising, then, that
buildingthe gadgets used to test
spider silk is Savage's favourite
part of the job. He uses tools in his
lab to make measurement instruments which would otherwise
cost "an enormous amount of
money."
One ofthe most difficult things,
Savage said, is actually acquiring
the spiders. Colleagues in warmer
climates used to pick them up for
Savage if they had the chance.
Most of his current specimens are
ofthe common garden variety,
except they are from the tropics, and thus larger. Luckily, he
has managed to find a reptile and
invertebrate dealer in Florida who
will catch them, package them in
small plastic containers (which
look suspiciously like take-out
sauce containers), and then send
them to him via FedEx, which he
said "is actually one ofthe carriers which deals with this sort of
thing."
Because of their short lifespans,
Savage doesn't get too attached to
the spiders. He has dozens more
in his lab, and describes himself as
"more of a dog person."
Outside ofthe lab, Savage is
BC born and bred. He grew up in
Hope and later studied at UBC,
where he has remained except
for a two-year post doc at the
University of Bath in the UK. As
for hobbies, Savage enjoys skiing,
snowboarding and hockey when
he gets the chance.
"I'm pretty Canadian that way.
If it's on snow or ice, I can at least
get by." 13
Become a
Parliamentary Guide
Give guided tours
of Parliament
Apply online!
Deadline: Friday, January 13,2012
www.parl.gc.ca/guides » 41 News oi.o9.2oi2
CRIME »
Student found murdered in Huatulco, Mexico
UBC withholds whether Ximena Osegueda's travel was connected to her studies
Micki Cowan
News Editor
The recent murder of a UBC PhD
student in Mexico has saddened the
university community and shown
the more dangerous side of traveling
abroad.
UBC student Ximena Osegueda
was working on her thesis in
Hispanic studies. She went missing on December 14 in Huatulco,
Mexico, accordingto CTV.
She was found next to another
body, identified as Alejandro
Honorio Santamaria. Both victims
were stabbed in the neck and set
on fire, accordingto Manuel de
Jesus Lopez, an attorney general in
Oaxaca.
What happened to
Ximena is a great tragedy and a huge loss...
She will be very much
missed in the department here at UBC.
Jon Beasley-Murray,
Osegueda's UBC advisor
It has not been confirmed
whether Osegueda was in Mexico
for UBC-related business.
Police say there is evidence of
criminal operations in that area.
Janet Teasdale, senior director of
Student Development at UBC, said
that all students who travel as part
of UBC programs or research are
informed about safety risks in the
country they are visiting.
"Every student at UBC is asked to
register themselves when they are
going abroad.
"As part of that registry, if it is a
country of risk, they're informed
about the kind of risks they can experience and are prepared for those
risks," she said.
Accordingto Canada's
Department of Foreign Affairs
and International Trade (DFAIT),
Mexico is currently only a level-two
risk country on a scale of one to four,
and visitors are instructed to exercise a high degree of caution.
Teasdale said there have not
been a lot of issues with students
traveling in Mexico aside from a
few illnesses, and no other issues of
similar proportions.
"It's a terrible shock for everybody on campus to have something
so tragic happen to a student who
was here," said director of UBC
Public Affairs Lucie McNeill.
McNeill said UBC is working to
give support to students and faculty
connected to Osegueda.
"Counseling services have been
available to people should they
request it, or any group on campus
who is looking to organize some
kind of a memorial or who feel they
want a place to gather to remember
her...the university would support
that."
SCREENSHOT/WORDPRESS.COM
While Osegueda was a UBC PhD student, the university has not confirmed whether she was in Mexico for university-related studies
Teasdale said the the university
undergoes a certain protocol when
dealing with a tragedy.
"[The protocol] includes everything from the considerations ofthe
individual student—for example,
their student record, their financial
debt to the university, all of those
aspects you can imagine—right
through to the level ofthe department and the level ofthe university
in the ways in which we can support
students who maybe impacted or
deeply affected bythe incident," she
said.
Osegueda's advisor at UBC
was assistant professor Jon
Beasley-Murray.
In an interview with CTV,
Beasley-Murray said, "What happened to Ximena is a great tragedy
and a huge loss...She will be very
much missed in the department
here at UBC." 13
CAMPUSPLANNING »
Student rep takes seat on DPB
AMS upset over lack of input in shortlist process
Kalyeena Makortoff
News Editor
The board in charge of approving development projects in UBC's
seven residential neighbourhoods
appointed a new student representative last month. But the AMS is
upset that they weren't properly
consulted in the selection process.
Third-year master of architecture student Ellen Wardell was
selected to serve as the student
representative for the Development
Permit Board (DPB) by Campus
and Community Planning (CCP),
and was officially appointed by the
Board of Governors on December
1,2011. While the selection process
stipulates AMS participation in the
shortlisting of candidates, AMS VP
Academic Matt Parson said he didn't
have any hand in choosing Wardell.
"Not to take anything away from
the successful candidate who got selected, but the process itself was not
what the AMS had hoped for and I
hope that for the next time that the
student rep ofthe board gets selected, that the proper procedure that
was agreed upon in the inception
of this position is carried through,"
said Parson.
Parson said that the AMS found
out about the position re-opening
through an advertisement in The
Ubyssey. He was later told that the
AMS would be involved in the shortlist process, but said the selection
went through without AMS input.
CCP director Joe Stott said that
because only four reasonable applicants came forward, the AMS would
have been involved in trimming
the selection down by one application. Furthermore, the manager
of development services for CCP,
Karen Russell, said she tried to
contact the AMS, but Parson didn't
return their emails or phone calls.
"I've gone through my email
archive," said Parson, "and I don't
have any record of CCP contacting
me. All I had was a generic email
blast-out for a call for submissions
for the position." As for the missed
phone calls, Parson said he couldn't
speak to that.
It was the AMS that originally
pushed for the creation ofthe student position in 2007, five years
after the board was created.
Stott said it wasn't quite clear
why students wanted a seat on the
DPB, which does not deal with development policy.
"There was quite a bit of debate
about this three years ago when the
students asked to have a seat on the
board...What kind of voice do the
students need on a technical analysis of a building? Sure, as I say, she
can bring that perspective, but it's
PETER WOJNARPHOTOmE UBYSSEY
not like it's political when it gets to
the development permit board. It's a
technical analysis," said Stott.
"I should remind everybody that
the Advisory Planning Committee
for the neighbourhood plan included student representation..That's
where the policy is sorted out."
For her part, Wardell said she is
open to bringing student development concerns to the table. "I'm still
getting accustomed to what exactly
my job will be...[but] I would love
to get in touch with the AMS and
meet with them. And if they would
want me to come to consultation
meetings...I'd be really interested
to get some direct feedback from
them," said Wardell.
"I didn't realize they hadn't had
the proper hand in my selection."
Wardell holds two bachelor's
degrees in community planning and
physical geography with a focus
on climatology and hydrology. She
plans to serve on the DPB for a year
and a half. 13
RESEARCH »
UBC receieves $250,000 grant
for dairy industry research
Veronika Bondarenko
Contributor
It's an early morning in Agassiz,
BC. The sun bakes the earth, and
a faint wind carries the hot smell
of hay and cattle over the valley.
Tucked away in the small Fraser
Valley community of Agassiz is the
UBC Dairy Education and Research
Centre, who recently received a
$250,000 donation from the Bank of
Montreal to continue their research
on the dairy industry.
Housing over 500 cattle on 155
hectares of land, the centre, which
is part of UBC's Faculty of Land
and Food Systems, is tne largest
dairy cattle research facility in
Canada. Accordingto faculty member Dan Weary, they will be using
the grant money "to craft a vision
for dairying suitable for the coming
decades."
"We have had students work and
study at the Dairy Centre from over
30 countries over the past decade,"
said centre operations manager
Nelson Dinn.
"Working at the DERC is very
hands-on," said Katy Proudfoot, a
PhD student who is currently both
living and working at the centre.
"You quickly become engrossed
in the day-to-day workings of a
dairy farm, as you simultaneously
run research projects and complete
farm chores as payment for your
housing on the farm."
The centre's three main research
areas include animal welfare,
animal reproduction and nutrient
recovery. "Through these research
focus areas, our research teams
provide science-based results to
questions on dairy operations," said
Dinn. "Ultimately, these results give
COURTESY UBC DAIRY EDUCATION
dairy producers the necessary tools
to make the best decisions for his/
her cattle and the ways in which
they are managed."
The centre hopes to be able to
apply new research in a way that
maximizes cow health, welfare
and production. "To date, almost
no research has addressed this gap
between science and practice," said
Weary.
"Our proposed focus will be
developing and testing the efficacy
of different extension methods for
practices related to lameness, heifer
rearing and other issues in cattle
welfare."
The Bank of Montreal announced
its commitment in mid-December.
"We appreciate the research that
is being done at the centre," said
Bank of Montreal financial group
representative Laurie Grant.
"They are good clientele that we
would like to support."
Dinn said the money will help
establish additional classroom
space, a move that will allow
more graduate students to join the
centre's ever-expanding research
team, and hopes it will "provide a
critical link with UBC's Point Grey
campus." 13 »
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AWESOME.
ALBERTINA WONG/THE UBYSSEY
The Last Word
Parting shots and snap judgments on today's issues
Uncritical boosterism is at odds
with real student leadership
Next weekend, the Student
Leadership Conference takes place.
It's an annual event where over 1000
students come together to attend a
series of workshops and speeches,
most of them by other students. The
idea is to develop their potential,
meet other student leaders and so on.
The current promotion for the
conference is a campaign called
"UBC is Awesome." On the posters and in the video, things listed
as "awesome" include "places to
nap" (which means 100 per cent of
park benches could be classified as
"awesome"), "trees, trees, trees!" (of
which UBC has cut down many acres
in the last 30 years) and "the T-Birds"
(which, based on attendance rates,
students find much less awesome
than most universities in Canada).
But we digress. The point is, the
Student Leadership Conference is
about helping students network, be
inspired and learn how to be better
leaders. It shouldn't be about promoting the alleged awesomeness of UBC.
In reality, any effective student
leader will find things lacking on
campus, and work hard with all
groups to find a solution. Insipid,
uncritical boosterism under the
pretense of leadership is many things
(among them, hilarious), but definitely not awesome.
You really didit this time.
BeanStream
Since the end of December, over
500 students have been accidentally charged a total of $2.1 million
in tuition and housing fees. So far,
UBC has done a commendable job in
responding quickly and making sure
the affected students are compensated and looked after.
Mistakes happen, of course, and
we can only imagine the panic that
must have set in when university
administrators realized what had
occurred.
But we also can't help but think
that this was somewhat inevitable.
The third-party company that
processed the transactions is called
BeanStream. BEANSTREAM.
Seriously, can we talk about this
name for a bit? It sounds like the
worst ofthe 90s tech bubble startups. It sounds like a hipster coffee
house where creative writing students play bongo drums on open
mic nights.
Actually, it sounds like one of
the AMS businesses in the new
SUB: "Want to grab a burger at the
Flipside?" "Dude, let's go to Boom!
Pizza or the BeanStream instead.
And then we'll head down to the
skatepark and play some Pogs."
Alright, we know, don't judge a
book by its cover. But if a company
can't come up with a better name
than that for itself, we say don't
trust it with millions and millions
of dollars of our money.
Giddy up, it's election season
Over the next three weeks, this
paper will be filled with information about ambitious young keeners
working to out-campaign each
other and, if tradition holds, engaging in various shenanigans to win
their race.
We speak, of course, about the
AMS elections. Your student union
is electing new people to run everything (nominations close this
week), and it seems everyyear
some giant scandal happens. In
2009, the winner ofthe presidential
race was disqualified by Elections
Administrator (EA) Sarina Rehal,
then undisqualified by the Student
Court. In 2010, hundreds of votes
were fraudulently cast by a computer program, which EA Isabel
Ferreras didn't realize until two
weeks after the election took place;
a couple ofthe races had their results changed afterward.
And in 2011, Bijan Ahmadian
(2010 president) and Jeremy
McElroy (2011 president) engaged
in a nasty, anonymous and slanderous battle, which resulted in plenty
of outrage and exactly zero candidates being disqualified by EA Erik
McKinnon.
The EA has the job of making
sure the election is fair and runs
smoothly. They've failed at their
job pretty much every year since
2007. This year's EA is Carolee
Changfoot, and we sincerely wish
her the best of luck in her job.
Because if history is any indication,
she's goingto need it.
U-Pass follies continue
TransLink has longbeen unhappy
with aspects ofthe U-Pass program. In particular, they were well
aware ofthe tricks students pulled
to wiggle out of paying for their
passes, which are already much
cheaper than the monthly passes
most Vancouverites have to buy.
There were two common ways
students took advantage ofthe
U-Pass program.
The first was to "lose" their pass,
give it to a friend and then pay
the relatively small replacement
fee. The second was to sign up for
courses, get their U-Pass and then
drop all ofthe courses but keep the
pass.
Switching to a monthly system
will mostly stop both of these problems, as our news story in this issue
outlines.
But what still amazes us is that
after all of this work to stop U-Pass
corruption, TransLink still shoots
itself in the foot on the basic stuff.
Namely, each monthly U-Pass is
only barely distinguishable from
the previous month's: the only
change is a new month's name,
printed in black font on a dark blue
background. Sometimes the colour
ofthe "U" is different.
In other words, it's not hard to
get away with using an expired
U-Pass.
We're not complaining too much,
having often been too poor to afford summer bus passes ourselves.
But considering all the work that's
been done to switch over to a
monthly pass system, it makes us
skeptical that TransLink is ever goingto get this program right. 13
A proposal from
Ronnie Two Shoes
Letters
Editor's Note: This is a real letter.
I was wondering ifyou might possibly have need for the use of a
75-foot wooden boat this summer?
It has room for 21 people at most,
and comes with two heads and one
galley. We could put a big barbecue
on the stern deck for grilling steaks
and seafood.
Not for me to say, but perhaps it
could be used by students to stay on
somewhere. Maybe as abase camp
for research up the coast or on the
Charlottes.
Now suppose you had a group of
students who wanted to go up and
study swamps in the Charlottes.
Well, you'd be in luck because I
happen to have one up there which
they would be welcome to use
(as long as they don't leave candy
wrappers and such). It is 160 acres
and half of it is swampy, and it can't
be reached by road; one would have
to walk for maybe two-thirds of a
mile to get in. I bought it because
it was cheap due to the swampland, but ifyou people had some
agriculture/permaculture students
perhaps they might have some idea
what could be planted there or
alternately what natural stuff could
be harvested. There are also trees
but to tell the truth I've never been
much on cutting down trees.
"Hmm..." you say, sippingyour
coffee and digging in to your second donut. "This guy sounds genuine. Wonder how much...?"
Cheap. Most boats that size are
going to provide a cook and charge
a fortune. Not Ronnie Two Shoes,
though. Ronnie will get the boat to
where you want to go and leave you
there in peace until you want to go
home. So, let's say $400 a day plus
you pay the expenses. That's the
good news. The not-so-good news
is this is an older navy boat (wooden, no guns) so you won't exactly
be staying in Buckingham palace.
Perfectly adequate though.
Or...some beautiful blue eyed
blond girl with literally scores of
friends sees this ad and goes home.
"Daddio," she says, turning on
the searchlights, "I've had this
wonderful idea! I'd like to host the
Brynn Beta Alpha Girls Society at
our private island this summer and
there's this funky old boat for rent
which would be just perrrrfect!"
"No problem," he smiles fondly,
writing a cheque for 100 grand,
"Take this for the boat and catering (funnily enough, my sister does
catering) and be back in time for
school."
Or you may have some ideas of
your own. As long as it's legal you
can count on Ronnie.
Here's how I see it: You decide
to go to the Charlottes and study
on my land. The boat gets taken to
Queen Charlotte City and docked
there, which gives you a place to
stay and access to the restaurants
and stores ofthe town. You or I
provide a van to take you to and
from the property (about 20 miles).
That's it. The students go up there,
do their study, have a hell of a good
time and come back ready for university in the fall.
This isn't a polished sales pitch,
just something I thought you might
be interested in doing which would
benefit you and benefit me. We're
talking responsible students here
who can look after themselves.
Sincerely,
Ronnie Two Shoes
Ifyou would like to respond to
Ronnie Two Shoes's offer, email
feedback@ubyssey.ca and we'll put
you in touch. The Ubyssey accepts
no liability for anything that may
happens ifyou say yes to this.
Why the damn bus
door won't open
Perspectives
» Jacob Bayless
Have you ever noticed that sometimes the doors on the bus just
won't open, no matter how hard
you push? And then the bus starts
to pull away and you have to yell
out, "Back door!" to everyone's
annoyance.
Other times, the doors simply
refuse to close even when nobody's
touching them, and then the bus
has to wait and once again, everyone's annoyed.
Why does this always seem to
happen? Chances are, you or your
transit-riding comrades are using
the doors the wrong way without
even knowing it.
Many people don't realize that
most ofthe new fleet of buses are
equipped with motion sensors, not
touch sensors. This is mostly due
to misleading signage. The stickers
still say "Place hand here" or even
"touch here to open," but doing so
will often fail to open the door. The
correct technique is instead to wait
until the green light turns on, and
then sweep your hand in front of
the panel, like some kind of slow-
motion slap. Then the pneumatic
hiss tells you you're good to go.
It's a somewhat counterintuitive change from the old push-bar
system, and it has the unfortunate
side-effect that anybody's backpack
can also trigger the sensor by accident. On a crowded bus, this can
lead to long delays-especially when
the perpetrator isn't aware ofthe
problem.
So why doesn't it always work
when you just push? If your hand
is already in front ofthe sensor
by the time the green light turns
on, it won't detect any movement;
no matter how hard you push, the
doors won't open.
Hopefully, enough people will
find this little note helpful that it
will cut a few minutes from everybody's commute and avoid frustration. 13
—Jacob Bayless is a fifth-year engineering physics student. Scene»
Pictures and words on your university experience
01.09.2012 | 11
STUDENTBODY»
Detoxing and the
post-holiday slump
A simple diet and workout are
key to beating January malaise
Happy
Healthy
Homy
RaevenGeist-
Deschamps
The Christmas holidays had me
relaxed to the point of being unable
to communicate. Returning to the
written word is a bittersweet venture out from the layers and layers
of beautiful fat-laden meals and
all-encompassing couch sessions.
I had forgotten that returning
to the homeland meant a few IVs
of red wine, platters full of venison and all the types of raw sheep
cheese, blue cheese and Brillant-
Savarin a woman could ever hope
to put on a piece of toast. I saw this
woman in a Montreal restaurant,
under an exclamation of frizzy hair
and behind thick round glasses,
suck the meat off a chicken carcass. It was visceral.
And it seems that it's only in the
pit of -20 degree weather that eating bone marrow with sea salt on
toast feels completely justifiable.
That, combined with the lethargy
of not moving much beyond the
path from my bed to the couch and
multiple nights of 12 hour sleeps,
have me completely recovered for
this term.
So recovered that I was blissfully unaware classes started on the
4th until the 5th.
Nonetheless, we're all back.
We're ready for some more of that
sweet, sweet academia. We have
apocalyptic resolutions, perhaps
to go forth and set the world afire.
But to even attempt these major
changes, we'll have to cleanse the
holiday sluggishness from our
systems.
Ifyou are a yoga practitioner
or even just someone who likes to
stretch, add twists to your personal
practice. By allowing the breath
to open the entirety ofthe spine,
twists can increase body temperature and massage your organs, particularly your liver.
A way to stimulate your digestive system, accordingto Suzanne
Menard, a yoga teacher at Studios
Lyne St-Roche in Montreal, is
through a dynamic halasana series
(plow pose). It is a simple vin-
yasa to be repeated a few times
in which, on the inhale, you roll
back into plow and on the exhale,
you roll the length ofyour spine
forward and into any forward bend
ofyour choosing, whether it be a
badokonasana (bound ankle pose)
or paschimottanasana (forward
fold). However, any way you'd like
to get your sweat on is a great way
to get back in gear.
In terms of whatyou put inyour
bellies, Leentje Deleuil, a nutritionist with the Desrosiers Clinic
(also in my homeland), proposes
a diet heavy on dark greens and
eliminating, if only for four to six
weeks, eggs, milk and wheat products (including processed foods).
Your body will feel lighter and
your skin will clear up.
In the midst and bliss ofyour
return, may you find the motions
to feed your body what it needs!
Happy 2012! Go forth and conquer.
CROSSTOWN SHOWDOWN »
ERIC INASnHE UBYSSEY
SFU and UBC players entangle in the first game of a two-game exhibition series last weekend. Dubbed the inaugural "University Classic," it
marks the only time this year that UBC wilfface SFU, who play in the BC Intercollegiate Hockey League (BCIHL), a division which includes
Trinity Western University and Okanagan College. With the Clan winning the first game 3-1 and UBC responding with a 3-1 victory of their
own on Saturday the Classic was decided in a shootout, with SFU prevailing in the fourth round. Pick up Thursday's issue of The Ubyssey
for full details.
Corrections
»1
• In the January 4 edition of The
Ubyssey the feature "Knocked
Out" ran in print without a byline. It
was written by Kaan Eraslan. The
Ubyssey regrets the error.
• In the December 5.2011 issue of
The Ubyssey the article "Research
no longer reguired for tenure at
UBC" reported that this was the
first time that tenure was provided
to teaching positions. The new
professor in teaching rank has
no link to tenure. Instructors have
been able to get tenure when they
are promoted to senior instructor,
which has been taking place at
UBC for over 20 years. However,
the rank of professor of teaching is
new at UBC. The Ubyssey regrets
the error.
• In the January 4.2012 issue of
The Ubyssey the article "Arts in
Brief" incorrectly referred to Gene
Ramsbottom's "Out For Lunch"
concert series as "Out to Lunch."
While the UBC School of Music occasionally participates in the concerts, the initiative was created by
sessional instructor Ramsbottom
without funding from the university. The concerts are held inside the
VAG and are free to its members.
The Ubyssey regrets the error.
CALL   FOR   NOMINATIONS
UBYSSEY
BOARD OF
DIRECTORS
Deadline is January 13th, 2012. Nomination
forms are available at SUB 23. This is not an
editorial position. Members of The Ubyssey's
Board of Directors are responsible for
overseeing the finances ofthe newspaper.
Responsibilities include attending a monthly
board meeting, tending to business as it arises,
and overseeing personal projects.
Get to the Point!
NOW
SERVING
BRUNCH
SAT & SUN, 11AM - 3PM
HOURS:
11:00am - io:oopm M, T, W, Sun
ii:ooam - 11:00pm Th, F, Sat
www.food.ubc.ca
the
point
grill
Building #4  2205 Lower Mall
(Marine Drive Residence) 121 Games 101.og.2012
Crossword
Sudoku (Intermediate)
Across
1- A dish with many ingredients
5-Attack a fly
9-Disconcert
14- Ripped
15-Mata
16-Rate "
17-Support beam
18-Extend
20-Flirt
22- Brit, lexicon
23- Bottom of the barrel
24- Mex. miss
26- Heroic adventure tale
28- Temerity
32- Pertaining to the mind
36-Be in debt
37- Praying figure
39- Bring out
40-Makes lace
42- Clogs, e.g.
44- Complacent
45- Betelgeuse's constellation
47- Angry
49- 401(10 alternative
50-Pay as due
52- Having three feet
54- Islamic call to prayer
56-Split
57- "The Clan of the Cave
Bear" author
60- Chatter
62- Resounds
66-Seaplane
69-As to
70-Curt
71- Kiln for drying hops
72- Approached
73-Handle
74-Gusto
75- Break, card game
Down
1- Auricular
2- Timber wolf
1
2
3
4
S
6
7
"
1
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10
11
12
13
14
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19
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,s
Puzzles provided by BestCrosswords.com. Used with permission.
3-Oil-rich nation
4-Attack
5-Breaks
6- Move from side to side
7- Golden Fleece ship
8-Wearies
9- Prince Valiant's son
10- Barren area
11- End in (draw)
12- Dimensions
13-Makes a row?
19- According to the Bible,
he was the first man
21- Cube creator Rubik
25- Japanese beer brand
27- "Fancy that!"
28- Chopper topper
29-Alert
30-Take hold
31-Nasal grunt
33-Bombastic
34- Legend maker
35- Juridical
38-Eye drops
41- Member of a lay society
43-Short dagger
46- Pince-	
48- Heroic
51- Sturdy wool fiber
53-Morals
55- Influential person
57-PM times
58- Peter Fonda title role
59- Bronte heroine
61-Male swine
63-Son of Judah
64- Humorist Bombeck
65-Leak slowly
67-"The Matrix" hero
68- Faulkner's" _ Lay Dying"
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©2012 KrazyDad.com
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Now hiring I It's cold outside
The Ubyssey, UBC's student newspaper, is looking for a Webmaster
to oversee technical maintenance
and development of its website.
Working under the Managing Editor, Web, the Webmaster must be
able to fix issues with the website
as they arise, and be available
to add, delete and modify blogs,
plugins and other additions.
A successful candidate will be
extremely proficient with HTML,
CSS and the WordPress platform,
able to build a WordPress theme
from scratch, understand PHP
and make programmatic modifications, comfortable with using a
hosting backend such as Cpanel,
know FTP, and understand javascript and jQuery
The Webmaster will be paid
$600 monthly during the winter
semester, and will be paid on
retainer during the summer
semester. To apply, send a cover
letter and resume tofeedback®
ubyssey.ca. The hired candidate
will be trained by the current
Webmaster, and must be a current UBC student.
DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSIONS:
5PM, JANUARY 23
But it's Vancouver, so things aren't even snowy
or nice looking. It's just rainy all the time and it
destroys your shoes. Know where it's warm?
A UBYSSEYSTAFF MEETING! TUESDAYS @ 12, SUB 24
Club event?
Early exam?
Studying late?
Stay on campus!
Commuter
Student
HOStel  RESIDENCE
■        WWW* EM:H
housing ||
BOOK ONLINE
STUDENT HOUSING AND HOSPITALITY SERVICES
MM PA
Master of Management
& Professional Accounting
• Designed primarily for non-business undergraduates
• For careers in Management, Finance and Accounting
• Extremely high co-op and permanent placement
To learn more about the MMPA Program, attend our information session:
Thursday, January 12 2012 11:00 am - 1:00 pm
Room 191, Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, ) 961 East Mall, University of British Columbia
www.utoronto.ca/mmpa

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