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The Ubyssey Jan 4, 1966

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Array Look, look
it's snowing
No scene from Napoleon's retreat
from Moscow, this
is the 10:30 a.m.
crowd heading toward Brock for
some hot coffee, or
- reluctantly - off
into the white wilderness for a class.
The white stuff
came with the holidays, and according to the weatherman will be here
for quite a while
-dennis  gans  photo
We are
the
THS U8YSSEY
gretest
Vol.   XLVIII, No. 31
VANCOUVER,  B.C., TUESDAY,  JANUARY 4,  1966 «^Egs»4
CA  4-3916
Healy announces
changes in Arts
Programs  altered
in  final  two  years
By ANGUS RICKER
Arts Dean Dennis Healy
arts faculty which radically
fourth year students.
Healy made the announcement in December after recommendations' from Arts professors had been screened and
drawn up. by an advisory
board.
Changes include:
• The present B.A. majors
program of two nine unit
majors in third and fourth
years will be abolished.
• In its place the Arts faculty will offer one 15 unit
major in a 60 unit B.A. program.
• The present B.A. honors
program will be retained as
well as the requirement of six
units of courses outside the
student's field of specialization.
The new program will ibegin
September, 1966.
Changes in first and second
year arts programs can be ex-
has announced changes in the
affect programs of third and
pected to be announced by
March 1, 1966 according to
Healy.
In an interview Healy outlined the reasons for the
changes.
"Students and faculty are
dissatisfied with the present
program of two nine unit
majors. It offers no depth,
sense of accomplishment or
even modest competency in a
given field of study.
"Further, a majors program
student is often poorly equipped to continue into graduate
studies," Healy said.
Healy said that the new program would identify the student as the responsibility of
the department in which he
majors. He hoped that departments would be able to devote
more attention to the individual student.
Not based on D & D report
—powell  hargrave  photo
ADMIRABLE SOUTHAM TROPHY admires itself in belabel-
led hotel mirror during Canadian University Press conference at Calgary. The Ubyssey won the award for overall excellence for a record fifth consecutive year. (See
also pages 3 and 5).
Healy stressed the fact the
changes were not administrative rearrangements but academic ones.
"The responsibility for a
student's program is now on
the faculty and the students
where it belongs," he said.
Healy further stated that
these reforms were not based
on the Discipline and Discovery (D and D) report.
The D and D report formulated in spring 1965 by a group
of arts professors recommended a polarization of large and
small classes and seminar
groups and such things as
weekly essays from first year
English students.
(Continued' on Page 2)
See:  HEALY
DEAN HEALY
. . . academic changes
Scienceman
is Rhodes
winner
Fourth year science student
Ian Clark 19, has won a 1966
Rhodes- Scholarship.
The scholarship, one of 11
awarded in Canada, will enable Clark to study at Oxford
for two or three years. It is
valued at $2,700 a year.
In addition Clark has won
a UBC science award in 1964
and   a   scholarship   from   the
Canadian   Society   of  Geophy-
sicists.
Clark is a member of the
Thunderbird Cricket team and
plays intramural basketball.
A native of Northern Ireland,
Clark has lived in Vancouver
since he was one year old.
He will study for his masters
degree in physics and chemistry at Oxford. Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 4,  1966
WILL THE NEW YOU SHINE BRIGHT IN 66?
By STUART GRAY
So your're a new you this
year, huh.
Join the club.
When Jan. 1 came, you
had analyzed, disected, and
purged yourself until all
your faults were tied up in a
neat little bundle to be placed
in the garbage with the empty
bottles.
From this soul searching
the new you emerged radiant
with well scrubbed virtues.
You were never going to
run  short of cigarettes,   bor
row from friends, forget to
pay your bills, or call down
Bob   Dylan.
Your alarm clock would
never be cursed again. And
mainly, you were really,
really, absolutely and completely, going to study.
Not a miss a lecture.
Smile at your profs.
Concentrate.
The new you would bounce
back to classes brimming with
invincible intelligence, trembling with desire to churn
through   the   four   remaining
months, to triumphantly, finish, dripping with incredible
marks.
Then came Monday.
First you didn't hear the
alarm, hut that wasn't so bad
really, because it was the first
day of classes and by now
getting up before ten had become absurd.
Filled with remorse you
rushed out into the snow with
your best shoes, came right
back, found your snow boots
still wet from Sunday, put
them on anyway, tramped five
blocks to the busstop, and missed one.
You arrived in time for a
cup of coffee before your second lecture, reflecting that
you didn't want to get your
first  lecture  results  anyway.
Along came a friend and
you remembered you left your
books on the bus so you borrowed one from  him.
The second lecture wasn't
too bad except the prof was
a bit cranky and he kept looking at you when you yawned.
But by  this time  you re
membered what and where
your next lecture was, it was
too late to barge in, so you
went for another coffee.
What but some more friends
along with news of an after-
exam-results blast and could
you come.
Sorry, you explained, you
had to study tonight because
studying was so important in
the few months remaining,
and where was the party?
After all, there's always
next year.
■ni^^w, * ^*
;;Vv- ;*?v*» "X\jr; '•":"
WE'RE HAVING A BALL, yell a group of black and blue sciencemen throwing snowballs from the roof of the physics
building at noon Monday. Just another round in the huge EUS-SUS continuous snowball fight scheduled to continue
until the snow is gone.
—dermis gang photo.
THE SLIPPERY, UNSANDED sidewalks mean Jack Frost and
Old Man Winter have, for the time being won the annual
race with the little elves from Buildings and Grounds.
Santa Claus, who lends his elves to B and G for winter
every year was unavailable for comment on this, the
elves' first loss.
SECOND  TIME
New English head
is from Manitoba
UBC has found an English department head at the
University of Manitoba for the second time.
Geoffrey Hugh Durrant, 52,
head of the English department at Manitoba and former
Dean of Arts at University of
Natal in South Africa has been
appointed to head UBC's largest department starting July
1, 1966.
The 7,000-student department and its 130 faculty members have been headless since
former head Roy Daniells was
appointed University Professor
of English Language and Literature in June.
Daniells also came to UBC
from the English Dept. at
University of Manitoba.
Durrant served in South
Africa during World War Two.
He was active in South African
radio, journalism and education
until 1961 when he left for
political reasons.
HEALY
(Continued from page 1)
The new reforms were
drawn up by an advisory board
which consisted of one delegate from each department in
the arts faculty. The board's
recommendations were ratified by a meeting of the entire
faculty.
The changes are to be implemented starting Sept. 1, 1966.
At that time students beginning fourth year arts will be
required to select one major
field of study. Possible exceptions will be worked out with
a faculty advisor.
The City of Calgary
offers
Career Opportunities
in
SOCIAL WORK, RECREATION, PLANNING, ENGINEERING,
PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING, DENTAL HYGIENE
AND PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION
Application" forms can be obtained from the Office of
Student Services, where recruitment officers will interview candidates on January  11th and  12th,  1966.
TROIS RIVIERES — (PUQ)
what has an IQ of 168? Quebec
City.
BEAVER  LUMBER
COMPANY LIMITED
R. LLOYD MARTIN
Beaver Lumber Company Limited announces the appointment of R. Lloyd
Martin to the newly-created position
of Marketing Manager. He will be
located at the Company's Head
Office in Winnipeg.
A native of Vancouver, Mr. Martin
graduated in Commerce from The
University of British Columbia. He
took post-graduate work at the University of California, and was
awarded the degree of Master of
Business Administration.
Beaver Lumber retails a comprehensive range of building supplies
through 284 stores from Quebec to
British Columbia. The Company also
markets a complete selection of
homes, vacation homes, farm buildings,  and  utility  buildings.
WINRAM INSURANCE LIMITED
SPECIALIZING IN REDUCING
SURCHARGED AUTO PREMIUMS
RE 1-5328 1678 West Broadway
DALHOUSIE  UNIVERSITY
HALIFAX, CANADA
GRADUATE STUDENT AWARDS
Phyiical Sciences
Biological Sciences
Social Sciences
Oceanography
Medical Science*
Humanities
fo,
The Faculty of Graduate Studies invites applications by March IS
Dalhousie Graduate Awards, Dalhousie Research Fellowships and
Dalhousie Post-doctotal Fellowships in the Sciences, and by May 1 for
Visiting Fellowships for Terminating Graduate Students and new Ph.D.'s
in the Humanities and Social Sciences.
* $3,000.00   Honours   Graduate   Entrance   Scholarships    (12    month
period.
* Up to $2,400.00 for Master's Students. (12 month period).
* Dalhousie   Centennial   Fellowships  of   $3,600.00   for   Post-Masters
candidates in all fields.
* Up to $4,000.00 for continuing Ph.D. Students.
Up to  $5,000.00 for Visiting Fellowships in the Humanities.
* $6,000.00 for Postdoctroal Fellows in the Sciences.
* $7,000.00 for Research Associateships.
* Travel Allowances for Canadian Students.
* Research   Allowances for  Postdoctoral  Fellows.
The Dalhousie Graduate Awards, the Dalhousie Research Fellowships,
the Visiting Fellowships for Terminating Graduate Students and new
Ph.D.'s in the Humanities and Social Sciences, and the Dalhousie Postdoctoral Fellowships are open to Graduates of any recognized university
in any Degree Program for which facilities are available, and are awarded
on the basis of academic standing. Additional special awards are open
to Canadians only.
Application forms and further information may be obtained from the
Dean of Graduate Studies, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia. Tuesday,  January  4,   1966
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 3
«WO' ^f'*^ •
T|
H     .-% »,     mm**
*****        »&*
fc#r-^|j|
—norm  betts photo
BUT I THOUGHT SNOW   just fell straight down.  Traffic
signs as well as other campus landmarks succumbed to
the   goddam   white   stuff   while   we   were  away   for
Christmas.
NEVER A DOUBT
Ubyssey records
record fifth win
The Ubyssey has made
Bladen backs
doubled fees,
belatedly
Dean Vincent Bladen thinks
the commission he headed on
higher education should have
recommended university fees
be doubled rather than frozen
at present levels.
• •     *
Bladen told a University of
Toronto alumni dinner in Peterborough, Ont., Dec. 1 that
the commission lacked the
courage   of   its   convictions.
"I think we made a mistake,"
he said.
• •     •
He said the commission's report should have urged more
aid for needy students rather
than abolition of fee increases.
Bladen said the commission
underestimated the rising cost
of higher education.
• •     •
Originally,   the   commission
estimated that total spending
on higher education in Canada
would increase from $57 million in 1965 to $2,032 million
in 1975.
Bladen said the $2,500 million would have been a more
accurate figure.
it five straight.
Fourteen staffers braved
wind, mountain and snow to
attend the 28th Canadian University Press conference at
Calgary after Christmas and
came back with the Southam
Trophy for general excellence
in student newspapers.
It is the fifth consecutive
year the paper has won the
award — a record in the 17-
year history of file competition.
The trophy is awarded annually among student newspapers publishing more often
than weekly.
Runners-up in the competition were the Toronto Varsity
and the Gateway of the University of Alberta at Edmonton.
The competition was judged
on papers chosen from those
published in the two weeks
prior to Oct. 30.
In addition to the Southam
Trophy, Ubyssey editor Tom
Wayman accepted the Bracken
Trophy  for  editorial  writing.
Canada's greatest student
newspaper placed second in
the features and cartoon competitions and third in news
photography.
The McMaster Silhouette
won the Jacques Bureau
trophy for the best weekly
paper.
More than 150 delegates
from 36 student newspapers
attended the conference at the
University of Alberta at Calgary from Dec. 27 to 30.
Vic College students
withhold fee increase
Protesters
ignore
fee fines
By DAN MULLEN
Ubyssey Ass't Newis Editor
Victoria College students are
paying their second term fees
— almost.
In protest against a $56 fee
increase imposed by their
Board of Governors, 1,516 of
Victoria College's 2,973 students signed pledges to pay
their fees minus the increase.
Many students who paid fees
Monday did so without including the extra $56, according to
Victoria AMS president Paul
Williamson.
This came in the face of $10
fines to be levied against students who have not paid their
fees in full by Friday.
Purpose of withholding the
fee increase is to draw the attention of the provincial government to the need for increased operating grants, Williamson said Monday.
"Tuition levels depend on
the amount of such grants,"
he said.
Williamson said the Victoria
College AMS has no intention
of becoming embroiled with its
Board of Governors.
"Our action is designed
solely to awake the provincial
government to the need for
higher operating grants," he
said.
He said he received almost
unanimous support from 27
other delegations to the Canadian Union of Students conference at Banff during the
Christmas holidays.
"We had hoped to receive
promises to help us pay the
$15,000 necessary to meet the
$10 fines if they are ultimately
enforced," he said.
Williamson said none of the
universities promised to raise
funds for this purpose.
"But they gave us moral
support, and we're happy to
have that," he said.
—powell  harKrave photo
THE COLD AND SNOW isn't good for cars either. The guy
who owns this one must be an old crank to let pretty
Denise Sexton, Home Ec I, slave away at starting his beast.
Start digging deep
for   second   term   fees
Dig we must for second term fees are due on the 14th.
If you don't want to stand out in the rain and snow
you can mail a certified cheque to the accounting office. If
your fees are not paid by the deadline you will automatically be expelled from UBC. It will cost you $10 extra to
be reinstated.
If you have a government loan you will have to get
another form from the bank and get it validated at the
registrar's office. There will be no extention of the deadline for anyone.
There is also a box in the registrar's office in which
you may place your cheques. But whether you use the
box or the mail you will get no receipt until February.
To get one immediately you must wait in line.
—powell hargrave photo
A LOT OF THE WORK of the 28th National Conference of Canadian University Press
was done late at night in the hotel rooms of delegates. A lot of the non-work of the
conference   was carried on  in the delegate's rooms as well. mumsn
Published Tuesday, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C. Editorial opinions
expressed are those of the editor and not necessarily those of the AMS
or the University. Editorial office, CA 4-3916. Advertising office, CA 4-3242,
Loc. 26. Member Canadian University Prese. Founding member, Pacific
Student Press. Authorized as second-class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa,  and for payment of postage in cash.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence and editorial writing.
TUESDAY, JANUARY 4,  1966
"This year it is awful."
—Vancouver Sun editorial on The Ubyssey, Nov. 28, 1965
We ARE great
We're great.
What's more, we're great again.
We've been great for the fifth straight year now,
and that sets a new record for Canadian University
Press.
Which means we're even great at being great.
Now if all this looks like we're putting out the
Narcissistic Daily, there's something in that. 'Cause we
believe from sad experience that if we don't point out
how great we are occasionally, nobody else is going to.
Which would be a shame, since we're so great.
You better believe it.
Actually, the fact that when you read The Ubyssey
you read Canada's best overall news stories and editorials and features and cartoons and photographs
should give you cause to rejoice.
For about $1.20 a year, you get 72 issues of nothing
but the best. And that's cheap at twice the price.
So today we're singing the praises of those unsung
heroes who put out Canada's Greatest.
From the dauntless word-wielders around Ron Riter
and George Reamsbottom's newsdesk, from the hovering horde around Al Donald and Danny Stoffman's city
desk, from the high-domed thinkers in John Kelsey's
Page Friday office, from the dank depths of Norm Betts'
darkroom, and from the somnambulistic aura of the
editor's office comes the result of a lot of sweat you read
three times a week.
We're putting their names in big type below, because they come down to North Brock basement and
sweat for love, not money.
Love of each other, sometimes, but mostly love
of that special brand of journalism known as college
newspapering.
For some reason, they like to work, two, four, or
forty hours a week giving you The Ubyssey.
Maybe they like to work for such intangibles as a
good job well done, or maybe they like working for
such tangibles as this weekend's Victory Party.
Or maybe, they just like being great.
Tom Wayman
Ron Riter
Al Donald
Dan Mullen
Danny Stoffman
Mike Bolton
Norm Betts
Doug Halverson
Stu Gray
Musa Lincke
Joan Godsell
Moralman
Vivian Gigun
Shiela Dobson
Steve Brown
Claudia Gwinn
Pat Hrushowy
Anne Balf
Jack Khoury
Derick Blackie
Teri Brown
Gus Ricker
Al Francis
Joan Fogarty
Carol Anne Baker
Pat Horrobin
Bruce Benton
Sue Gransby
EDITORS:
George Reamsbottom
Robbi West
Richard Blair
John Kelsey
Don Hull
Ed Clark
Ian Cameron
REPORTERS:
Peggy Stein
Kris Emmott
Taj a Bhavan
Kathy Hyde
Kim Richards
Rochelle Morinis
Rosemary Hyman
Bill McLaughlin
Craig Tapping
Fearon Whitney
Terry Brooks
Jack Emberly
Mike Kvenich
Ann Ratel
Gordie Taylor
Robert Banno
Bill Graf
Brent Cromie
Paul Terry
Karen Wetmore
Leigh Brousson
PHOTOGRAPHERS:
Kurt Hilger Dennis Gans
Powell Hargraves Don Kydd
Val Zuker Joe Varesi
"Hello . . . UBC Buildings and Grounds department?
We understand you're pretty good at snow removal .
LETTERS TO  THE   EDITOR
UBC sidewalks still   slippery
Editor,  The  Ubyssey. Sir:
I am horrified and outraged
at the slippery condition of
our campus sidewalks.
Not only are they a hazzard
to our pedestrian traffic, but
also they present an inconvenience to students trying to
catch that first ten minutes of
class.
Walking from the Music
Building to the East Mall Annex in the seven minutes allotted for travel is difficult
enough in clear weather.
But in this condition it is
impossible.  Could the  Build-
IN  THE EAR
ings and Grounds department,
or somebody possibly find a
little sand or a few men with
shovels?
DISGUSTED STUDENT
Music I
•      •      •
CHALLENGE
Editor,  The  Ubyssey, Sir:
The ubiquitous, strong, glorious, colorful, and omnitri-
umphant RED MASS hereby
challenge any and all other
faculties on the Red Campus,
to a Snow Sculpturing Contest on the lawn in front of
the Library this Thursday at
Noon.
The judging will be carried
out by a fully genuine democratic process which will uphold the spirit of our vast
and wonderful land.
Any faculty not attending
will be considered apathetic
and subject to the scorn of
all those who have rubric visions of a more inspirational,
eminent, magnificent, vigorous, rubicund, and illustrious
UBC.
Turn up and show your red-
blooded spirit. Tuum Est.
DON B. 67 ALLEN,
EUS Vice-President,
BY IAN CAMERON
Buses begin to bug Ian
Jeff Wall
Arnold Saba
CARTOONISTS
John Faulkes
As anyone who has been
following this column for any
length of time will know, I
don't like buses.
As of  yesterday,  however,
I have changed my mind. Instead of disliking them, I now
abhor them. I also wish to express disapproval of the whey-
faced poltroons who arrange
the bus schedules in this city.
On Sunday,
I was informed by my local radio station that UBC
was closed to
all those with-
out     snow
tires   or
chains, and that special buses
would be laid on to take students to campus.
Secure in my knowledge
that the UBC express bus
leaves 41st and West Blvd. at
7:39, I arrived there at 7:30
and joined the small throng.
At 7:35 my feet started to get
cold. At 7:43 the bus arrived,
and kept on going. Full.
The next three buses were
Not In Service. Then there
were two 41st buses with a
total of eight passengers.
Then two more Not In Service, a Hastings and Main
(lost) one more 41st (two passengers) and three more Not
In Service.
Then came another UBC
Special. A hoarse cheer rang
out. It passed by. Full. I tried
to grab the cheering hoarse,
but some idiot beat me to it.
By this time it was 8:00,
and my feet were numb. The
next three buses were Not
In Service. Two more 41st,
both with three people. The
crowd has grown to 70 people by this time, and no one
was very happy.
Four more buses came by,
all Not In Service. Then an
empty Dunbar, and a Blan-
shard (lost) and two more Not
In Service. -
Finally, at 8:10, a bus came.
We clawed, kicked, scratched and bit to get on. I asked
for change for a quarter.
The driver informed me
that I should go to the back
of the line if I didn't have the
correct change. Knowing full
well what that would mean,
I gave up the extra five cents
and took my 10 square inches
of floor.
We arrived at 8:40.
As a result, I have some
things to say to the people
who planned this fiasco.
Look, you small minded,
f u zj z - brained, cud-chewing
clots.
You people don't seem to
realize how many students
there are out here.
Tomorrow, get the finger out
of wherever it is you keep it
and use it to count on.
You should then discover
that there are 7,000 students
wishing to get here no later
than  8:15.
Many of these will want to
ride your off-cream with
green stripe racers.
In view of this, you should
consider putting some of those
Not In Service vehicles into
service. ,
You moronic slobs. Tuesday, January 4,  1966
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
SOME SHAFTS
SOME BUILDING
Canadian University Press active
RYERSONIAN editor L. B.
Coates leaves CUP plenary
session after his paper was
suspended for one year
from the organization.
Student newspapers at the
2 8th Canadian University
Press Conference Dec. 27 to
30 suspended one paper, accepted two others, and took a
close look at the role of the
student press.
• •     •
Tha conference, held at the
University of Alberta at Calgary, brought together 125
delegates from the 27 member papers and the nine associate members.
One of the members, The
Ryersonian, a student staffed
publication of the Board of
Governors of the Ryerson
Polytechnic Institute, came
under immediate fire from
other papers because the institute's administration had
the power of veto over material' published.
• •     *
All other member papers
are published, without faculty
or administration interference,
by the student unions of the
universities.
The managing editor of The
Ryersonian, however, is a faculty member who has complete   powers   of   censorship
over    all   material   entering
the paper.
The findings of a CUP investigation commission conducted in December stated:
"The fact that a faculty member can veto a decision of the
student editor, no matter on
what grounds, is a violation
of the Charter of the student
press in Canada."
•      •      •
The charter states "In no
case shall a representative of
the institution, whether a
board or faculty advisor have
the power of censorship or
the power to set editorial
policies."
At the final plenary session
of the conference The Ryersonian was suspended from
CUP membership for one year
by a unanimous vote.
The conference investigated
the firing of Carillon editor
John  Conway  Oct.   15.
Conway was dismissed by
the University of Saskatchewan <Regina) student council
after council charged he had
not given full news coverage
to campus events.
Conway    also    refused    to
powell hargrave photos
UBYSSEY EDITOR WAYMAN tries to make point during extra business session while
chairman Peter Calamai (right) holds forth. McGill Daily Worker editor Patrick Mc-
Fadden (standing) looks on.
print tobacco, liquor, or military advertisements or any
advertisement "psychologically designed to mislead."
A CUP investigation committee, however, upheld Conway's right to an independent
editorial policy. And as a result of the report the conference initiated an investigation commission which could
be called at any time or place
to investigate violation of the
Student  Press  Charter.
The commission, if called,
would consist of a CUP representative, an editorial board
member from a nearby student paper, and a professional
newspaper man.
•     •      •
The examination of the relationship between student
newspaper and council called
for a closer look at the role
of the student press.
The conference passed a
motion defining one of the
roles in these words:
"That one of the major
roles of the student press is
to act as an agent of social
change.
"That it continually strive
to emphasize the rights and
responsibilities of the student
citizen.
4'And that it use its freedom from commercial control
to debate and examine issues
that are left untouched by
the senior press."
On a different level, The
Ubyssey initiated a new trophy, donated by the Victoria
Press, will be given annually
to the best newspaper supplement section.
*      •      •
CUP also set up a competition for the best news story
of the year.
At the final plenary session
The Ubyssey's nomination of
Val Warren, ex-publisher of
the Vancouver Times as CUP
honorary president went down
to defeat and CBC newsman
and commentator Laurier LaPierre was elected unanimously.
The Peak, Simon Fraser
student newspaper, took a step
up when it was accepted as
a full CUP member.
Also elected was the Eastern Ontario Institute of Technology paper, The Scribe.
JUBILANT UBYSSEY STAFFERS dance hora after conference, celebrating record-winning
streak for over-all excellence among Canadian university newspapers publishing
more often than once a week.
BUSY RESEARCHING an editorial during pause in conference is Ubyssey editor Wayman, winner of Bracken Trophy
for best editorials among Canadian student newspapers. Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 4,  1966
German Academic Exchange
offers scholarships
The German Academic Exchange is again offering a
scholarship to graduate and undergraduate students for
the  1966-1967 term.
The scholarship is tenable at any university in Ger-,
many. It provides tuition, a generous living allowance,
return travel fare from Canada, and other benefits.
Applicants must have above average marks and a
good command of German.
The closing date for application is Jan. 11. Candidates
should apply to the World University Service Office,
Brock Extension 257.
More information is available from the office or from
Dave Hoye,  224-1648.
CONGRATULATIONS
to
The UBYSSEY'S
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
and his
Editorial Staff
for again winning
The Southam Trophy
(For Canada's Best University Newspaper)
—Ubyssey's Advertising Sales Representatives
UBC students
slip and slither
Ninety percent show up
for opening classes
By DOUG HALVERSON
UBC students slipped and slithered into second term
Monday.
Despite the weather's attempt to keep them from classes
ninety per cent of the students showed up according to
Information  Services Director Ralph Daly
Most leave cars at home
"Most students took the bus
in reply to the university's
radio request", said Daly.
Only about a third of the normal number of cars came on
campus.
Parking lots are 75 per cent
cleared says Supervisor of
Buildings and Grounds Tom
Tom Hughs.
He said fifty men worked
overnight with hired equipment to prepare the campus
for opening.
"We hired four michigans,
two plow trucks, one grader
and three garden tractors with
plow attachments and 50 men
to takbe the snow away.
"We rented all the equipment ahead-of-time to make
this year's cleanup easier than
last,"  Hughes said.
Sunday's snow made it a lot
harder," he said. "We had
planned to have the sidewalks
and steps cleared but had to
reclear the parking lots instead. We hope to have the
walks clear for Tuesday."
Traffic Director Sir Ouvry
Roberts reported only six cars
have bogged down in the campus snow. Two tow trucks are
on call to cart floundering cars
away.
Snow equipment a must
"Only one of the stuck cars
did not have snow tires or
chains," he said, "The owner
was told that if he brought his
car back on campus without
snow equipment it would be
impounded."
"I'm very pleased with the
co-operation everyone has given including the students,
their chains and the work
crew," said Roberts.
Bus service has been increased. Six instead of the regular two buses ran from
Forty-first.
Simon Fraser Academy Traffic Supervisor Fred Hope said
the road to SF1A is bare.
"The    government    cleared
Gaglardi Way (SFA's access
route) and we have our own
plows and blowers going in
the parking lots," he said.
SFA   has - no   sidewalks   to
attract snow.
Come Again
Imperial Tobacco has been
nice enough to supply free
cigarettes for students' functions around campus.
Lower Mall, where 3,000
were distributed at the residence Christmas dinner, reports no new-found cases of
cancer.
College
Students
Faculty
Members
College
Libraries
SUBSCRIBE
NOW
AT
HALF
PRICE
Printed in
BOSTON
LOS ANGELES
LONDON
Clip this advertisement and return it
with your check or money order to:
The Christian Science Monitor
One Norway St., Boston, Mass. 021 IS
Q   1   YEAR  $12 □  6   mos.
D COLLEGE STUDENT
Q FACULTY MEMBER
DR.  JOHN   FAIRBANK
Director, East Asian Research Center, Harvard University
"The Modern Transformation of China
and its Significance for the West'
ul
A Special Events, Dept. of Asian Studies, and
Koerner Foundation presentation.
AUDITORIUM    -    12:30    -    WED., JAN. 5     -    FREE
Whatever became of:
Jack T. Ripper,
CLASS OF '52?
Those of us in his year will not readily
forget old Jack the Rip, as he was
affectionately known, or forget his skill
with a scalpel in extra-mural biology
sessions. A life-long anti-anti-vivisec-
tionist, Jack had a brief fling as a
professional pallbearer but was let out
for appearing too happy during the
ceremonies. Always something of a
cut-up, Jack has turned to the stage
where his natural talents are being
given full range in a series of plays
based on the "Grand Guignol". We
understand that, due to a series of
unfortunate incidents, there are several
female roles now open.
Whatever you want to become, you'll
find the way ahead smoothed by steady
saving at the Bank of Montreal.
Bank of Montreal
THE BANK THAT VALUES STUDENTS' ACCOUNTS
Your Campus Branch:
The Administration Building:      G. F. PEIRSON, Manager Tuesday,  January 4,   1966
THE
UBYSSEY
Page  7
—powell  hargrave  photo
THE WESTERN CAUCUS OF Canada's college newspapers here schemes for control
of the 28th National Canadian University Press conference in Calgary. The clean-
living Westerners won out in the end over the finks from the East and elected Don
Sellars, the editor of The Gateway, the paper of the University of Alberta in Edmonton, president of CUP.
Student earnings show
21  percent can pay
Only 21 per cent of UBC
students earned enough last
summer to afford to return to
university.
A report released by the
Student Services office in December said 19.4 per cent of
the male and 1.6 per cent of
the female undergraduate students had an income sufficient to finance an academic
year.
The report assumed an "ex
penditure of $1,400 is the
minimum for an academic session and no expenditure during the summer months."
The figures excluded first-
year students.
However, the report also
estimated that UBC's 16,510
students earned $13,415,222
during the summer.
The average earnings of
UBC students in the summer
of 1965 were $1,088 for men
Give UNAN cash
and enjoy it
This week students can give their cash to UNAN -—
and enjoy it
Painless   extraction   is   the  :	
motto as World University Service raises funds for a student
health clinic at the University
of Nicaragua.
WUS* has planned a week of
varied events to start the year
off right and pull in the money.
Tuesday noon there is a coffee party in Brock. Guests include the WUS executive, exchange students from several
countries, foreign commissioners and consuls.
A "slushbowl" game between Frosh and Engineers
will take over the stadium
Wednesday noon.
This is a variation of broom-
ball played on skis. A half-
time obstacle race through fish
nets and car tires highlights
the revelry.
Also Wednesday noon in
Brock is Profile '66, a prediction of international events in
1966.
Speakers will be Dr. K. J.
Holsti of the Political Science
Department; Gary Mullens, a
student just back from India,
and Dr. John Conway of the
History Department. A question period will follow.
and $654 for women. Frosh
earnings were about $300
lower.
Engineering students made
the highest wages, averaging
$1,361 for the summer. Music
students (male) were the poorest, averaging  $908.
Total s u mm e r earnings
showed an average increase
over last year of $60 for men
and $157 for women.
Increases by faculties show
Pharmacy and Engineering as
the top two.
These figures are calculated from the registration cards
filled in by students.
The earnings are the students own estimates and reflect only gross earnings, with
out allowing for summer expenses.
KEEP INFORMED
About Recent Developments in the
PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF CHINA
Subscribe to:
PEKING REVIEW
A weekly magazine of Chinese news and views air-mailed
to subscribers all over the world.
Single    10 cents       1 year  $4.00
2 years $6.00      3 years   $8.00
CHINA PICTORIAL
A large, comprehensive illustrated magazine published
monthly. Introduces the reader to the achievements made
in China's socialist construction, the life of her various
nationalities, and her beautiful landscapes an drich, time-
honoured culture.
Single   30 cents       1 year   $3.00
2 years  $4.50      3 years   $6.00
CHINA RECONSTRUCTS
Monthly magazine on the economic, social and cultural
developments in China today.
Single   30 cents       1 year  $3.00
2 years        $4.50      3 years  __. $6.00
GIFT OFFER:
A 1966 calendar with exquisite reproductions of Chinese
paintings for every subscriber enrolled before January
31, 1966.
Catalogue upon Request
Send your Order and make cheques payable to:
CHINA ARTS & GRAFTS
33 East Hastings St.,
Vancouver 4, B.C.
Subscribe to:
Products Exclusively from the People's Republic of China
SEEK GLORY?
The Ubyssey
seeks staff
If you can put words together to form sentences, Canada's greatest student newspaper  can use you.
The Ubyssey, winner of the  __—________^__
Southam Trophy for a record
five  consecutive   years,  wants   1/Dv.     TO    Gf/VG
students   who   can,   or   think
maybe   perhaps  they   can,   re-   fflJriQf'Ql     Ph O C
port, type, take photographs,
drink beer, draw pictures,
write headlines, do layout or
sharpen pencils.
Ubyssey staffers have the opportunity this term to try out
for editorial board positions
for next year.
In addition, several metropolitan newspapers hire Ubyssey staffers during the summer.
Last year 17 pubsters worked
on The Sun, three on the Province and two with Canadian
Press.
Students interested in working for the paper can come
down to The Ubyssey newsroom in north Brock Basement.
Pierre Burton calls The Ubyssey the "greatest unofficial
school of journalism in the
world."
There will also foe a meeting for new staff members
Thursday noon in The Ubyssey
office.
UBC has begun a Ph.D.
program in mineral engineering.
Mineral engineering department head Charles Emery said the program is designed to meet a growing
shortage of mining technicians and keep the Canadian
mining industry in world
competition.
Graduation —  What Then?
A   challenging   profession?
A role in rehabilitation?
The Canadian Association of Occupational Therapists offers an accelerated course in Occupational Therapy
to candidates of advanced educational standing. For full information
including bursaries —
Enquire:
Miss  Muriel F. Driver, O.T.Reg.,
Director,
School   of   Occupational   Therapy,
166 University Ave.,
Kingston, Ontario.
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
Applications For Travel Grants
Organizations requiring travel grants early next term
are requested to submit written applications as soon
as possible to the AMS Treasurer, Box 53, Brock Hall.
Applications forms may be obtained from the AMS
receptionist.
GRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS
The J. W. McConnell
Memorial Fellowships
for Graduate Study
 at McGill University
Value $3,000 average per annum
(Depending on need, fees, travel expenses,
etc.)
Fields Any department in the Humanities, Social,
of Study Biological or Physical Sciences offering
Graduate programmes leading to the
Master or the Ph.D. degrees.
Tenure Tenable from 1 to 5 years (inclusive)
Purpose To enable outstanding students to undertake
Graduate Studies, with the ultimate aim of
strengthening teaching and research in
Canadian universities.
Eligibility       Awards will be made to University Graduates
who are Canadian citizens, or who intend
to become Canadian citizens and to remain
in Canada.
Application
Deadline 1 February.	
Application Forms and more detailed
information may readily be obtained by
writing to the Associate Dean, Facuhy of
Graduate Studies and Research, McGill
 University, Montreal 2, Que., Canada. Page  8
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 4,  1966
'TWEEN CLASSES
East Asia expert here
John Fairbank discusses
"The study of East Asia" today at 4:30 p.m. in Bu. 203.
All interested students are invited.
• •      •
SPECIAL  EVENTS
John Fairbank, director of
East Asian Research Institute
at Harvard University, speaks
on "the modern" transformation of China and its significance for the west" Wednesday noon in the auditorium.
Admission free.
• •      •
WUS
SHARE coffee party a t
noon today in Brock Hall.
Admission free.
CURLING
Any mixed rinks wishing
to go to Victoria Jan. 15-16
please sign the list at the rink.
• •      •
CONSERVATIVES
General meeting with Stan
McKelvey talking on "Techniques of a campaign." Wednesday noon in Bu. 214.
• •      •
ONTOLOGICAL SOCIETY
Bill Bahan talks on "I can't
give you anything but love."
Wednesday noon, Bu. 22.
• •      •
DELTA  SIGMA  PI
Nominations for the women's Honorary Society close
Wed., January 5th at 4:00 p.m.
Applications should be submitted to Box 31, Brock Hall,
UBC.
~-    Gnup ruffs
Thunderbird football czar
Frank Gnup will preside at a
meeting for veteran and prospective gridiron heroes at
noon Thursday in room 213,
Memorial Gym. Anyone interested in gridiron glory may
attend.
Nicaragua needs
healthy boost
What is UNAN?
UNAN is the University of Nicaragua, and the object
of this week's share campaign.
The   central    American
republic has a population of only
one and a half million and
there are only 2,597 students
at the university.
And UNAN's facilities are
painfully inadequate.
This is why UBC's World
University Service is devoting
its SHARE campaign to raise
funds for a student health service clinic at UNAN.
Objective of the campaign
is $15,000.
Dr. Carlos Bernheim, president of UNAN, says the clinic
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CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, $.75—3 days, $2.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Publications Office: Brock Hall, Ext. 26. 224-3242
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost & Found
BUSINESS SERVICES
FOUND ADS inserted free. Publications office, Brock Hall. Local 26,
224-3242.
11    Typewriters & Repairs
Special Notices
13
WHY PAY high auto insurance
rates? If you are over 20 and have
a good driving history you qualify
for our good driving rates. Phone
Ted  Elliott,  224-6707.
ARE YOU CONSIDERING JOINING
an automobile cjub? A membership makes a practical gift. No
minimum, age with Dominion. Representative, will meet you any-
where.     Phone   224-3613.	
DANCE TO THE CHESSMEN SAT.,
Jan. Wh, in Brock Hall, starting
at 9 p.m. Don't miss the term's
first   really big  dance.
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE
Ubyssey from best Canadian College newspaper east of Rockies.
The  Varsity   (Deanna).
DON'T SHARE — LET THE NICA-
RAGUANS  starve,   illiterately.
SHIRLY SAYS THERE IS NO
substitute for sex.
Transportation
14
WANTED: ONE DRIVER FOR
West Van carpool, for second
term. Taylor Way area. Phone
WA   2-7661.
DRIVER NEEDED FOR CAR POOL
—25th and Granville area. Call
Charlie,   733-2222.
42
GOOD CLEAN TYPEWRITERS, $20
up. Also Typewriter repairs at
60 percent savings. Poison Typewriters, 2140 W. 4th. Phone RE
1-8322. 	
Typing
43
PROFESSIONAL TYPING, ARDALE
GRIFFITHS LIMITED, 70th and
Granville, Phone 263-4530.	
TYPING-TERM PAPERS, ESSAYS,
theses. Prompt, accurate service;
reasonable rates. Mrs. More, RE
1-7496.
Help Wanted
51
BABYSITTER FOR TUESDAY,
Thursday and Saturday morning,
S7.50 per week or in  exchange for
room and board.    RE 6-4613.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
"VOX AMPLIFIERS, CLASSICAL
Guitars, Gretch & Guild & La-
bella Nylon Strings. Ward Music
Ltd. 412 West Hastings MU 2-
5288.
Rooms
81
STUDENT (MALE), FURNISHED
single room, kitchen privileges,
frig; 1 block to shops and buses.
Vacant    now,    non-smoker.      RE-
3-8778.
Room 8c Board
82
"is an urgent necessity. This
laboratory will have an important place in the work of caring for our students' health."
The clinic will aslo help the
medical   students   at   UNAN.
The SHARE campaign at
UBC is one of many at universities across Canada.
UNAN is raising the remainder of the $143,000 it needs
for new facilities from the
people of Nicaragua.
Our Client Seeks Two Personable
Young Men Who Are Interested
In Considering A
MARKETING CAREER
in the City of Vancouver
During the past five years our client has provided
employment opportunities for several young men with a
University background. Today these men are earning
$8,000 to $20,000 in permanent careers with a well-
known Canadian Company.
Those selected will receive an initial monthly income
of $400 to $600 plus car allowance, with increases after
six months. Successful applicants will be eligible for a
complete range of group benefits. A training program
leading to a career with management opportunities is
made available to those selected.
Write full details of your background and tell us
why we should grant you an interview.
Winspear, Higgins, Stevenson and Doane,
Chartered Accountants,
1505 Robson Street,
VANCOUVER 5, B.C.
ROOM AND BOARD AVAILABLE
immediately, $75.00 per mo. RE
6-4613.
the
$£ay
GEORGIA AT GRANVILLE
Invites you to consider an executive career in retail merchandising.
Our Training Programme offers a challenging and thorough framework
in which you can make rapid advancement tuned to your personal drive
and ability.
A career with "The Bay" can lead you uto any of the major cities
between Victoria and Montreal. As a merchandise executive you could
be sent on buying trips to markets in North America, Europe and Asia.
Retail Merchandising will enable you to use your abilities to manage
people, to judge demands of customers, to administer the operations
of a department, to be creative and imaginative; it will challenge your
initiative and- drive in the ever changing world of retailing.
Graduates in
Commerce,  Business Administration  or   Arts
are eligible fior our Training Programme of:
• Initial rotation   programme showing you the major sales supporting
departments such as Advertising and Display.
• 2 year course in merchandising which supplements on-the-job training.
• Training under an experienced Department Manager in Sales Management, Buying and Department Administration.
Make an appointment now with your Placement Officer to see our
Representatives for full details or come in and see us in the store. Our
Personnel Office is located on the 5th floor.
Interviews will be
conducted on Campus
January 10th and 11th

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