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The Ubyssey Nov 8, 1985

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Baby war
By ERIKA SIMPSON
Use border war between Iran and
Iraq could escalate and precipitate
nuclear winter in Canada, according to UBC professor Thomas
Pefry,
"No food could be grown in
Canada and it would be well below
zero jh! year," said Perry, describing the possible results of a limited
nuclear war between the two countries.
The war between Iran and Iraq,
already the third bloodiest this century;, is often cited as one where
conventional conflict could become
nuclear.
Perry * a member of Physicians
for Social Responsibility, said even
a "baby" nuclear war could
precipitate "nuclear winter" and
many Canadians would die from
cold and starvation.
The first warnings about nuclear
winter came from reseachers Carl
Sagan and Richard Turco in 1983.
They predicted a rapid worldwide
drop in temperature and permanent
darkness after a general nuclear
war. Burning cities, exploding oil
wells and forest fires would throw
?«* ntoeh soot into the troposphere
most sunlight would be blocked and
a long-term "nuclear winter"
would result.
"There is enough hydrocarbon
material in Iran and Iraq to create a
lot of soot," according to UBC professor George Spiegelman, a
Science for Peace member. But
Spiegelman feels that although
there is a lot of burnable material,
such as oil, in the Middle East,
there is not enough to start a
worldwide nuclear winter. "The
bottom line is any time nuclear
weapons are going to be used, no
one has any idea what will
happen," he said.
Michael Wallace, a UBC Political
Science professor and specialist on
arms races and accidental nuclear
warfare, maintains a nuclear war in
Iran and Iraq is unlikely because the
countries do not possess nuclear
weapons. Nuclear warfare against
European and North American
cities would start fires leading to a
nuclear winter because they are based on flammable plastic materials
and are adjacent to forest.
"Nerffier Tehran nor Baghdad
are built on plastics or are surrounded by trees," he said. An exchange between China and India
could, perhaps, start a nuclear
winter but Wallace is most concerned a nuclear winter could result if
the Iraqian regime brings the superpowers into the conflict.
There have been over 100 wars
since 1945 — most of them in the
Third World. White attention is
focused on U.S.-Soviet relations,
the flashpoint could spark in the
Third World, say scientists.
Campuses research war
By JOHN GUSHUE
Science and Technology Writer
Canadian University Press
Although scientists on more than
30 campuses will receive research
funding from military sources this
year, few of them will readily admit
the destructive applications of their
work once it is finished. Rather,
they'll probably prefer to say their
funding was made available in the
interests of "basic research."
It's an argument that other scientists, like David Suzuki, have heard
all too often, and one they refuse to
accept.
"The vast majority of scientists
are in the business of building
weapons to kill people," says the
University of British Columbia
geneticist and host of CBC's The
Nature of Things. When he spoke
to an audience of 4,000 at the
University of Waterloo recently,
Suzuki questioned the motives of
the scientific establishment for accepting defence funds.
"Profit and destruction are too
much the driving forces of the
scientific community," he said.
Yet most defense contracts are
without any apparent malicious intent, and researchers claim their
work is far removed from the nuts
and bolts of the North American
military machine.
"The kind of work that is done
now is a long way from direct
defense application," says Peter
Brooks, of the Department of National Defense's research and
development branch.
Many peace activists are inclined
to agree with Brooks and other
DND representatives, but for very
different reasons.
"A lot of university research is
fairly basic and is not directly
related to a particular weapons
system," says Ernie Regehr,
research director of Project
Ploughshares, a national peace
organization. But "you have to
assume that research is combed and
examined for possible military application."
Regehr, co-author of Canada and
the Nuclear Arms Race and a
specialist in Canada's arms dealings, believes research done for one
purpose could be easily used by the
military for another. The competitive nature of research funding
has led the military "to more
urgently look for the military applications," he said.
"It's difficult to define research
in terms of its intended use," says
Don Bates, a member of the McGill
medicine  faculty and the McGill
study group for Peace and Disarmament. He says researchers
should bear in mind the ethical considerations and potential applications of their work.
Bates, also active in Physicians
for Social Responsibility, says the
federal government should be as
concerned about military research
as university scientists. "The
government ought to offer no
assistance for anyone seeking to
gain contracts," he said.
Bates said all research contracts,
military and otherwise, must be
unclassified and done under public
scrutiny. "There should be no
secret research on campus," he
said.
John Hepburn, a University of
Waterloo chemistry professor, says
most research is done openly, and
that it is "classified research (the
peace movement) wants to go
after."
However, Hepburn says, "that
information is almost impossible to
come by."
Although Prime Minister Brian
Mulroney has closed the door on
official federal participation in the
U.S.-sponsored Strategic Defence
Initiative, he has allowed Canadian
industries and researchers to compete for Star Wars contracts. Some
were relieved he at least decided
against full participation.
"I give Mulroney credit for not
taking it on full force," Suzuki
said. Hepburn, however, is doubtful
the decision will mean a significant
increase in military traffic in Canadian university laboratories.
"I'd be very surprised if there's a
lot of research going on on Canadian campuses," he said. "There's
no one art of science that we have a
lead on.
"It wouldn't surprise me a bit if
there were contracts here and there
but I would be very surprised if
there were large numbers of them."
Before Mulroney's decision was
announced, Hepburn was one of
600 faculty at U of W and at
Guelph to sign a petition condemning Canadian participation in Star
Wars.
An ad hoc committee of
representatives of the two universities told the parliamentary committee studying the issue on July 23
that the Star Wars proposal was not
technologically feasible nor morally
sound.
Petitions were also circulated at
the University of British Columbia,
University of Toronto, McGill
University, Universite du Quebec a
Montreal, and McMaster Univers-
ty, where a single petition gathered
605 signatures in three days.
Adam Hitchcock, a McMaster
chemistry professor, said faculty
"didn't want any part of Star Wars.
We want to express our abhorrence
of the programme." The petition
community, well-known for signing
extensive software contracts with
the military, should join the boycott
of Star Wars projects.
"If the computer science faculty
here is worth its salt, every member
will sign a petition," he said.
said Star Wars research would
escalate the arms race and the
U.S.-Soviet 1972 Anti-Ballistic
Missile Treaty.
Suzuki said it is vital for Canadian scientists to stay clear of Star
Wars contracts and other arms
research programmes. "Once the
research starts up," it's impossible
to stop," he said.
"There is nothing that will stop
it. It has a life of its own. It's too
powerful."
Suzuki said the microelectronics
"I would hope Canadian university scientists would be reluctant to
participate in Star Wars research,"
Star Wars critics say any participation will tighten the connections Canada has with the U.S.
military. Under the D.I.P. program
the government provides low interest loans as well as grants to
Canadian firms involved with the
military. Canada is also required to
buy one dollar of U.S. arms for
every dollar the U.S. Defence
See page 2: MILITARY
Disarmament issue
r -\ Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, November 8, 1985
Military research threatens integrity
From page 1
Department spends here.
Petition signers and others say
the forecasted economic spin-offs
for the civilian sector from Star
Wars research and development are
unfounded.
"It doesn't translate into jobs
and goodness for the private
sector," says Suzuki. "It translates
into building weapons of destruction.
"The military has lied through
their teeth about how all this will
work."
According to Reghr, five times as
many jobs could be created for
peaceful purposes for every one job
Star Wars funding would create.
Ahad Abdel-Assiz, as a graduate
student at Waterloo, studied
military research and development
on Canadian campuses, and found
that "the spinoffs benefitting the
civilian economy have been few and
far between."
In a report first released Nov.
1983, and revised later with
McMaster graduate student John
Bacher, Abdel-Assiz said the "postwar marriage of military, industry,
and research has not lead to basic
research and innovations."
Instead, he found that military
research "concentrated on the
details of singularly military devices
with no conceivable (useful) applications."
As well, university researchers
renting their expertise to the
military have contributed to arms
escalation and troubled international relations. "By bringing new
technologies and theoretical advances to the military strategists,
Military R&D defines, shapes, and
in essence determines the future of
international political relations,"
he said.
Ursula Franklin, a U of T
metallurgist and member of the
Science for Peace, a national
academic organization, says as
more researchers turn to the
military to finance their projects,
the academic integrity of the unver-
sity is diminished.
"The more military and military-
related work that is done, the more
internal censorship (there is," she
says. "The university should be an
open place were all ideas and
political (beliefs) are discussed.
"Knowledge is not political property."
Franklin does not agree with colleagues who say they depend  on
defence spending for their research.
"The scientist has the choice. The
choice may mean you won't get
research money, but you have a
choice," she says.
"The university is not there to
supply ideas to the government."
>
UBC
(EXCE ■ L- L-E-ND -« j-
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SHIRTS
(with AMS Student Card J
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Applications
are now
being accepted for
five (5) positions with the
STUDENT
ADMINISTRATIVE
COMMISSION
(SAC)
SAC is the 10 member body of the AMS
responsible for implementing policy set
forth by AMS Students' Council.
Applications  open   until Wed.,   Nov.   13,  4  p.m.
Application forms available/returned at SUB 238
i /i month filled with excitement and special
£>i evertts-frorh author visits to fashion shows.
X   %- from product days to our annual book sale!
Here are just a few items happening in Week'#!
featuring the NOVEMBER BOOK SALE and
PRODUCT DAYS!
NOVEMBER BOOK SALE » NOVEMBER M5
MON
TUES
WED
THURS
FRI
11*
VETERAN'S
DAY
UNIVERSITY
CLOSED
12
th
NOVEMBER
BOOK
SALE
'Arts and Graphics Dept. is
featuring HUNT, TENLINE,
CHRYSALIS Products.
Demonstrations on the ff.
medias: Pastels, pencils,
markers, carbothellos and
watercolours by local artists.
"1  Oth       NOVEMBER
I /% BOOK
^^ SALE
Autographing.
MICHAEL KLUCKNER
12:30-1:00 p.m. Will be signing copies of his book and
heritage prints from VANCOUVER The Way it Was.
"Local artists demonstrating contemporary and Japanese calligraphy,
watercolours and Japanese paper
carving.
t   JttU     NOVEMBER
1 A BOOK
■*■   * SALE
Autographing:
ROBERT BATEMAN
1:00-2:00 p.m. will be signing copies of The World of
Robert Bateman.
"Local artist demonstrating oils, pen
and ink made by TALENS, FABER-
CASTELL, SENNELIER.
15
th
NOVEMBER
BOOK
SALE
"Local  artists demonstrating
markers, fabric dye, and pencils made by
DIXON, PENTEL
and BEROL.
NOVEMBER
In our Book Sale this year the
emphasis is on first rate works
of literature. We have included:
• publishers' remainders and
special editions •"hurt" books
from some of the finest publishers, at reduced prices
•a large selection of children's
books SALE ENDS NOV. 15th.
ROBERT BATEMAN
will be signing copies of
THE WORLD OF
ROBERT BATEMAN
and
THE ROBERT BATEMAN
NATURALIST'S DIARY 1986
at
MMBOOKSTORE
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 14th
1:00-2:00 p.m. Friday, November 8, 1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
B.C. ministry sets up youth council
By STEPHEN WISENTHAL
B.C.'s minister responsible for
youth has established a youth council with representatives from
around the province to advise
himself and the cabinet on youth
issues.
Labor minister, Terry Segarty,
who is responsible for women and
youth, appointed the council's 12
young people who will hold their
first regular meeting Nov.  30 to
decide, among other things, how to
spend the $50,000 youth council
budget.
"We've got a direct pipeline into
the cabinet," said council vice-chair
Kevin Falcon who is also president
of the Vancouver Junior Chamber
of Commerce. He added Segarty
will pay attention to the council. "I
suspect he's quite serious."
Simon Seshadri, Alma Mater
Society   administration   director,
said he is concerned the AMS
wasn't consulted about the council.
"We represent 25,000 students;
how do they (the government) have
access to us?" he said. "I'd like to
talk to some of the UBC students
(on the committee) and find out
what the angle is."
Tom Ewasiuk, Simon Fraser
University external affairs officer,
said someone from the Canadian
Federation of Students should be
on the council.
"They (the government) know
we're (the CFS) out there but I
don't think they like organized people telling them what to do," he
said.
UBC student Russel Brown, a
youth council member, said, "I'm
not sure how they got my name,"
echoing comments by other council
members The Ubyssey talked to. He
said he was involved with the B.C.
SA expert says boycotts effect change
WINNIPEG (CUP)—A South
African economist says divestment
and boycotts of South African products are working.
"Disinvestment is forcing big
business to pressure the government
to start introducing meaningful
reforms," said Stephen Gelb,
economics lecturer at Johannesburg's Witwatersrand University. "The government has lost control of the situation and big
business is the real power."
Gelb said divestment is forcing
the business community in South
Africa to reconsider its support of
the government and its racist apartheid policy. He was in Winnipeg
on a recent speaking tour.
"Business interests are getting
more impatient with the government's attempts to control dissent,
and some businessmen have even
gone to Zambia to talk to representatives of the African National
Congress."
Gelb said the deteriorating
economy has hit blacks the hardest,
but this has increased dissent and
militancy, especially among trade
unions. Political activism by the
black unions has further weakened
the economy, he said.
"Trade unions have become
much more politically active in the
last year," Gelb said. "General
strikes like the one in Transvaal last
year have increased the pressure on
business. Business interests are very
worried now, and business leaders
are in turn increasing the pressure
on the government to change its
policies."
Gelb said the business community will no longer support suppression
of dissent because the backlash
among black workers will make it
even more difficult to get the
economy moving again.
"The 'Latin America' option of
increasing repression to stifle dissent is no longer acceptable to
business   interests,"    Gelb   said.
"The black trade unions and
foreign investors will no longer
stand for it."
Gelb said the economic crisis is
making it more difficult to stifle dissent in any case.
"The youths and students confronting the police in the townships
have a solid base of support from
the trade unions," Gelb said.
"Although most people are still
apathetic, the situation is improving, expecially among students,"
Gelb said. "There are about 1300
black students at Witwatersrand.
Whites are seeing their black fellow
students demonstrating and being
harassed by the police, so they're
starting to become more aware of
what's going on."
Gelb   said   even   the   Afrikaans
universities are starting to admit
black students.
Gelb said the political impact of
boycott campaigns is more important than their economic effects.
"Boycotts de-legitimise the
government and show activists in
South Africa that they have support
in the world," Gelb said. "Boycotts
also encourage disinvestment by
foreign companies because they get
bad press in their own countries."
Youth Parliament and helped
organize an International Year of
Youth conference for the federal
secretary of state.
He said the council members
have diverse opinions but "most of
them seem to be fairly apolitical."
Council member Laurie Lee, also
a UBC student, said, "I'm not exactly sure how my name came up.
"I feel that we will have a lot of
input into what the government will
be concerned with about youth,"
said Lee, who represents 100 Mile
House.
She said she wants to work on
university accessibility for students
facing a financial burden of $7 or 8
thousand for a year at university,
she said.
AMS external affairs coordinator
Duncan Stewart said the committee
members seem to be reasonably independent.
CFS Pacific region chair, who
has said the CFS should be
represented on the council, was
unavailable for comment.
A SMALL, OBSCURE colony of prehistoric quasi-human beings engage in ecstatic primal ritual.
V- not photo
CUE efficiency tests protest affects campus
By MARTIN WEST
The Canadian University
Employees Union's work to rule
campaign is in full swing this week,
although UBC administration officials are keeping mum on the effects it may be having on campus.
CUE president Kitty Byrne said
the work to rule campaign, which
precludes union employees from
doing any volunteer overtime, is being felt by the administration in
crucial areas.
"It's difficult to read the overall
effect of the campaign, but we
believe it's being felt most in the
finance and payroll departments,
as well as in the mail service on campus," Byrne said. "These are areas
Students demand deadline extensions
By WADE GEMMELL
A UBC group is asking students
to sign a petition asking the administration to change its policy of
assigning fails to students who do
not complete their courses.
Students for a Democratic University wants the administration to give
students who withdraw after the
course drop deadline an "n" indicating a course was not completed
instead of the current policy of
assigning an "f" on transcripts.
Alicia Borsallo SDU petition
organizer said the group has
gathered over 500 signatures so far
and hopes to gather 4,000 by the
end of the year.
Last year in a similar campaign
SDU collected about 3,600
signatures and presented the petition to senate which formed a committee to examine the current
policy.
Senate chair David Robitaille
said the committee has not made
any definite changes but may include recommendations for course
withdrawal in a report to senate. A
deadline for the report has not been
set.
The current policy requires
students to withdraw from courses
within the first two weeks of classes
for one and a half unit courses and
within three weeks for three unit
courses. SDU wants a return to the
old university policy where students
were allowed a four and six week
grace period in one and a half and
three unit courses, respectively, to
withdraw.
Late withdrawing students are
penalized with an "F" appearing
on their transcripts and receive no
course registration refund.
Borsallo said the group's petition
needs student support and the
course withdrawal problem is not
the only problem UBC students
face.
"We are loaded with regulations
that put undue pressure on us," she
said.
Sean Glace, arts 1, agrees with
the groups campaign.
"If you sign up for a course and
don't like it within a month it is im
possible to drop it and not receive a
fail," he said.
Alan Howie, arts 2, said, "The
transcript should read withdrawal
not fail."
Eileen Mackenzie disagreed with
SDU's proposed change, saying
"even if you extend the time given
to drop a course and pick up
another one you would be so far
behind it would be impossible to
catch up."
where people were being worked to
the limit as it was, and this campaign just pushes things over the
limit."
As well as refusing to work overtime, C.E.U. employees are doing
only work specifically outlined in
their contract. Byrne said in the
past, employees have been flexible
on how much overtime they work
and what duties they attended to,
but with this flexibility withdrawn,
departments were becoming
backlogged with work.
"The mailroom is a week behind
in some of its deliveries," Byrne
said. "And some departments are
having to use private courier services instead of campus facilities,
which is expensive for us all."
Byrne said a good example of
employees sticking "strictly to their
contract" is taking place in the
libraries where LA 1 clerks are only
shelving books and not doing any
reference work.
The discrepency between the
union and administration over using American based Ritchie Company to conduct efficiency tests on
employees has provoked other friction as well, Byrne said. "Three
, people have quit in payroll and
finance in the past few weeks
because they have found the Ritchie
situation intolerable. We've lost a
total of 35 years of experience here
and that's difficult to replace."
The CUE work to rule campaign
will continue until the services of
Ritchie are terminated at UBC, and
so far, the union has had no indication from the administration that
any change will take place. Bryne
said she has heard nothing from
new UBC president David Strangway although she hopes he will
make his position clear in the next
few days.
No administration officials
would offer any comments on the
situation.
Long-delayed lighting keeps UBC parking lot dark
The installation of lights in the
recently paved B-lot has once again
been delayed.
The lighting fixtures were to be
delivered to the site Nov. 7 but as of
press time Thursday the UBC
Physical Plant was still uncertain
about their arrival.
Bob Higgins, physical plant
construction superintendent said
once the fixtures are delivered it will
take two to three weeks to attach
them to anchor poles already in the
ground.
This would extend the project's
completion date past the most re
cent forecast of Nov. 21. The lights
were supposed to be ready by the
end of August.
Higgins said all he could do at the
moment was ask questions.
Leo Robitaille of the lighting
contracting firm Rickett-Sewell
Electric Ltd. would not give an arrival date for the materials.
Robitaille said he has been "hounding" the distributor, but "there is
only so much you can do over the
phone with those big Eastern companies." UBC's order was apparently "later going in."
"This job should have started
before it did," he said.
Bruce Gellatly, UBC financial
and administration vice-president
could not be reached for comment.
Sergeant Andy Lucko of the
university RCMP detachment said
although the number of crimes occurring in the parking lot is "not
any higher than usual," two to
three thefts are reported every day.
Vehicles in poorly-lit areas are
more frequently targets of crime,
and "no doubt the lights will help,"
he said. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, November 8, 1985
AMS art gallery shows its stuff
Crump's Realm create good vibrations
By SHERIDA LEVY
The AMS Art Gallery lies just
footsteps away from the entrance to
the Subway cafeteria, a hop, skip
and maybe a jump from the CUTS
travel office and even fewer steps
away from the TCU banking
machine. Yet judging from the lack
of worn spots on the carpet it appears that this is a room few folks
enter.
Until the end of this week a show
called Vibrational Realms by Lyle
Crump is featured. It's worth seeing
even though it doesn't vibrate quite
as much as the title suggests.
The show opens with a typed
manifesto in which the artist expresses verbally his approach to and
theory of artmaking. He claims to
work intuitively in order to make
his experience of the love in nature
visible. Although some of his earlier
works might support this claim, the
bulk of them seem to be at odds
with it.
The works First Time Near (1977)
and Storm Signal (1978), are the
most interesting because they are
somewhat more spontaneous and
painterly, and thus would relate
more logically to the stated theme.
The most interesting effects are
those created when acrylic paint is
used in thin washes like water-
colour.
However, his later works are not
as effective, partially because of
Crump's overuse of the horizontal,
and also because of some technical
imperfections.   For   example,   in
Sunset (1984) the superimposed
lines are not perfectly horizontal —
they slope down slightly to the right
and this seems to be out of place in
view of the painting's otherwise
perfect geometric layout.
As there is so much horizontality
and so little variation in the recent
works they are reminiscent of window blinds or Bridget Riley-
designed wallpaper. Without any
sign of the artist's hand the works
appear too processed to really exploit the possibilities of the paint
medium. Perhaps some of the more
rigid works would function better
as silkscreen prints.
Crump's more recent canvasses,
such as Tone and Ancient Memory
do indeed vibrate, but they do so in
a kinetic or mechanical way which
does not seem to relate to a personal
experience of love, or love in
Nature.
Help Feed the Vancouver Food Bank
Support the S.U.S.
CANNED FOOD DRIVE
NOV. 12-15
Deposit Canned Food in Food Drive
Boxes located in all major Science
Buildings & the Student Union Building
A Science Undergraduate Society Charity Drive
OPEN EARLY
OPEN LATE
* passport pictures
* specialty papers
* volume discounts
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M-Th8-9       Fri 8-6       Sat 9-6       Sun 11-6
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BOOKSTORE
OluC   wham/urn... {job aood sporttii Friday, November 8,1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Sax education a family matter
By CHRIS WONG
What would the world do
without families? There have been
some memorable ones: the Kennedy
family, the royal family, the Man-
son family, the Partridge family.
Need I say more? "W-E A-R-E
F-A-M-I-L-Y" was more than just
another inane disco tune. It finally
secured a place in the annals of pop
music history for a cherished and
respected institution.
With that in mind, The Ubyssey
sauntered off in pursuit of another
great family — the Saxophones:
baritone, tenor, alto and soprano.
We caught up with them in their
Greenwhich Village loft.
Tenor: Nice to meet you man, I'd
shake your hand if I had something
to shake it with.
Wong: No prob. Blow me an E
flat and I'll be happy. Could you
tell our readers all about your family?
Tenor: Aren't you getting a bit
personal right off the bat, fella?
Wong: My apologies. Let's start
over again. Why are you living in
the Village?
Baritone: No cockroaches.
Alto: It's trendy.
Soprano: Don't mind them.
They're just taking advantage of
your gullible writer's sensibilities.
We want to be near the jazz clubs.
Wong: Tell me about your family's connection to jazz.
Alto: Let me make this
understandable to your readers who
may be slightly ignorant about jazz.
Baritone: Don't you mean, let's
spell it out for those dumb clucks
who have Tina Turnerfied and
Bryan Adamfied that part of their
brains which defines musical tastes.
Alto: Yeah, something like that.
Anyways, in rock 'n' roll, guitar
players, more than anyone, seem to
convey the essence of that form of
music. When one thinks of rock,
images come to mind of Jimi Hen-
drix participating in the conjugal
act with his guitar, or of some other
long-haired freak doing the splits
on stage with six-stringed monster
in hand. When one hears the word
jazz, the common response is, "oh,
that's kind of boring!" or, "I
can't handle jazz; there are no
words; what does it all mean?" But
those slightly more informed think
of old movies with the lush sounds
of the saxophone in the
background. We're the jazz
stereotypes.
Soprano: Yeah, that's us. And
we're  not  just  in  movie  sound
tracks. Some of the most impassioned, fervid jazz musicians ever
such as Lester Young, Charlie
Parker, John Coltrane and Ornette
Coleman have played us.
Wong: You guys can't play
alone, right? Don't you need a
pianist, bassist and drummer to
back you up?
Tenor: Nah. We can go it alone.
Wong: No kidding, name a group
that does.
Soprano: Well, there's one called
the World Saxaphone Quartet.
They play all of us and two of our
cousins, the flute and the bass
clarinet.
Tenor: The WSQ evolved out of
the Black Artists Group in St.
Louis, an association of creative artists who gave audio-visual performances combining music, acting
and dance.
Alto: The quartet's music is a little like a stand-up comic's routine.
Parts of their music sound like
they've been worked out before
while other passages sound like
spontaneous creations. Jazz writer
Leonard Feather said what's truly
hip about the music is often you
can't tell what is written and what is
improvised.
Baritone: What you can tell is the
WORLD SAX QUARTET . . . BMWs of the musical traffic jam.
WSQ's sound does not pander to
commercial tastes, or even conservative jazz likes. The music is free
to roam and is not stuck in conventional ideas. Don't get me wrong.
The four musicians in the band
aren't insensitive clods who play
anything that pops into their heads.
They know how to separate the
BMW's from the Chevette's in the
musical traffic jam they create and
somehow give order to.
Wong: You saxaphones blow me
away. Where can I catch the World
Saxophone Quartet?
Tenor: The Pacific Jazjz and
Blues Festival is presenting the
WSQ Friday, Nov. 15 at the Robson Square Cinema. Call 734-2828
for info.
Alto: You're not writing pne of
those disgusting, sleazy, suck-up-
to-the-promoter previews, are you?
Wong: 30. That means the end.
So does this.
Gates of Brass open to question of motivation
By MICHAEL GROBERMAN
Why does a group called the International Christian Embassy
Jerusalem make a documentary
about the plight of the Soviet
Jewry? Why do they ignore the
persecution of Christian groups
within the Soviet Union? Why was
the Vancouver premiere of Gates of
Brass, Tuesday night at Robson
Square, so massively attended by
local members of the Christian Embassy with such a small representation from the Vancouver Jewish
Community? Why was Fraserview
Assembly reverend Bernice Gerard
the master of ceremonies while
rabbi Wilfred Solomon, a local
rabbi, sat in the middle of the audience and offered only a few words
at the end? While you ponder these
questions, try also to figure out
what on earth Tory MP David
Kilgour, Chairman of the Canadian
Parliamentary Group for Soviet
Jewry, a non-denominational
group, must feel travelling across
Canada with this group of
evangelicals who have taken up the
cause of Soviet Jews?
Perhaps this event does not
sound terribly odd, but it certainly
felt like the Twilight Zone.
An evangelical group, based in
Jerusalem, has poured a quarter
million dollars into a film which
they made at great personal risk —
visiting the Soviet Union and interviewing and filming Soviet Jews in
secret. These Jews tell shocking,
painful stories of the persecution
they have experienced and continue
to experience, including beatings
and imprisonments, solely because
they have applied for permission to
emigrate to Israel.
This film is slick and professional. Amazing interviews are accompanied by discussions with Ox
ford historian Martin Gilbert, who
offers important historical perspective to the issue of anti-semitism in
Russia and the Soviet Union.
Gates of Brass makes excessive
use of dramatizations, staged versions of atrocities which are said to
have actually occurred. These
vignettes, reminiscent of That's Incredible "re-creations", were
specially prepared to enrage the audience, and only cheapen the
documentary.
Producers Jay and Meridel Rawl-
ings spoke of their calling to help
the Jews return to Zion (Israel) as
this return is a precursor to the
Messiah's second coming. They
also spoke of their humanitarian
concern for these Jews, but the obvious questions of their choosing to
ignore the persecution of Christian
groups in the Soviet Union went
unaddressed.
Although the sincerity of these
producers and the evangelical audience  is  not  in     doubt,  their
patronizing attitude towards Soviet
Jews, and world Jewry in general, is
discomforting and confusing.
This is a slick film with an important message, but it feels as if this
group of Christians is pandering to
Jews and their causes out of some
sort of desperate urge to be accepted.
The Rawlings live in Jerusalem,
carry on about their many Jewish
friends, and pour thousands of
dollars into championing Jewish
causes. The audience stood for the
Israeli national anthem at the end
of the evening. This film is not to be
ridiculed. They have done a
valuable thing. But they seem rather
self-conscious, even embarassed
that they are not Jewish themselves,
or perhaps they have assumed
world guilt for historical Jewish
persecution. I cannot help but feel
that in bringing the call for help
from Soviet Jews to the worlrl, they
are also asking for some kind of acceptance for themselves.
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224-2441 Page 6
THE    U BYSS EY
THE   UBYSSEY
Paget
Rethinking November 11
By JAMES YOUNG
The unleashed power of the atom
has changed everything except our
ways of thinking. Thus we are drifting toward a catastrophe beyond
comparison. We shall require a
substantially new manner of thinking if mankind is to survive.
Albert Einstein, 1946
There's no such thing as a win-
nable war/It's a lie we don't believe
anymore.
Sting, 1985
Remembrance Day. The most important holiday in the year, yet you
wouldn't know it. A number of
older people gather downtown, for
an hour, and the rest of us celebrate
the   last   long   weekend   before
because of blocks toward thinking
about war in general and nuclear
war in particular.
For example, most Canadians are
now distanced from war through
time or space. Dependent on books,
film and television portrayals of
war, they often fail us, especially
films like Rambo, Commando or
Invasion U.S.A.
Better interpretations do exist.
Try John Hersey's Hiroshima or
the Diary of Anne Frank. Such interpretations, however, confront us
with the necessity of experiencing
pain.
Inferior representations deny the
suffering and death intrinsic to war;
instead they make it tidier and more
Christmas. An average response is
confusion, evidence that we are
"drifting toward a catastrophe
beyond comparison".
The main reason for our confusion is that the context in which
Remembrance Day began has
changed completely. The dropping
of the atomic bomb is not only the
most important event of World
War II, the decade, or the century;
the bomb is the most significant
event since the appearance of life on
earth as it signals the end of that
life.
We now have the equivalent of
one and one-quarter million
Hiroshimas waiting for us — that's
9,0<X) pounds of TNT for every person on the globe.
Our   confusion   is   furthered
palatable. Felt-covered plastic poppies look much nicer than if we
decided to wear pictures of young
men coughing their lungs out in a
gas attack. The crosses row on row
have a comforting symmetry compared to children lying burned and
dying in the ruins of Hiroshima.
Then there is the question of
whether Canadians think war exists
only in the past. Do we understand
the possibility of being cruelly
murdered in a nuclear attack today?
In past wars, whatever the awful
consequences, we could resort to
war to solve conflicts. But now, we
must abandon war, abandon it
quickly and in large numbers if any
of us are to survive. We must
change our ways of thinking.
The fundamental shift we must
make is from the paradigm of "win-
lose" to one of "win-win". We are
conditioned to see the world competitively, in terms of winners and
losers. According to the old belief
system, the only way I can get what
I need (e.g. food, a job, social
status) is by doing you out of what
(freestyle)
James Young is a Vancouver artist, peace activist and UBC staffer.
you need. The belief that there is
not enough to go around, whether
we are talking about physical or
psychological needs is ludicrous on
this very abundant and forgiving
planet.
With nuclear weapons the win-
lose paradigm no longer applies to
war in any way; they confront us
with the ultimate no-win situation.
We must turn that situation around
to see how easily life can be enriched on personal, communal and
global levels by resolving conflicts
in a mutually acceptable way.
The new paradigm depends on
compromise and flexibility, with
both parties accepting responsibility
for creating acceptable solutions.
This method rejects violence as a
method of conflict resolution.
Violence seems easy and quick, yet
the problems it leaves behind fester
for years and erupt again.
You don't have to be a visionary
leader like Gandi to begin practicing non-violence. When we begin to
adopt non-violence as a way of life,
we will witness remarkable
decreases in spouse-battering, child
abuse, rape and so on. And we
would see a concurrent decrease in
international tensions.
As we reject violence as our
preferred method of problem-
solving, we will also transform our
concept of the enemy, that which
we now perceive as sub-human.
War is caused by our fears and
limited identification: the nuclear
age requires us to see the interdependence of all people, of all
life forms.
We also need new heroes, to
facilitate problem-solving without
recourse to violence. So, instead of
Rambo, I choose Helen Caldicott;
instead   of   the   Reagans   or   the
Cooperating in space
By SHIRLEY FARLINGER
Carol Rosin is not your average
peace activist. With a background
in the management of an aerospace
company, Fairchild Industries,
earning $1,000 a day as a space
and defence consultant, Rosin left
her career to devote her time to
launch the Institute for Security and
Cooperation in Outer Space.
"I helped build the MX missile,"
said Rosin, "and I know that the
Strategic Defence Initiative will not
eliminate nuclear weapons. In fact,
the U.S. is already developing tactics and technology such as the B-l
penetrating bomber to evade SDI."
Rosin said SDI supports a first-
strike capability where new computer technology will further reduce
current response times.
Rosin said the United States and
the U.S.S.R. should cooperate in
space.
"They have the space platform
and we have the shuttle," she said.
"It's a natural combination."
Rosin said the superpowers are
cooperating in satellite search-and-
rescue operations. That cooperation has saved three hundred victims of air, sea and other disasters.
"If the militarization of space
goes forward it will close off space
to other developments," Rosin
said.
Canada's North Warning
System, for instance, would become
part of SDI, said Rosin.
Not many members of Congress
can be counted on to oppose U.S.
military expansion, said Rosin. The
Pentagon's lobbying and personal
phone calls from President Reagan
have enabled most military proposals to be pushed through.
"We are up against vested interests, the old military rhetoric,
and a religious fundamentalist
mind-set," said Rosin.
She said the peace movement
must present its ideas to people now
attracted to traditional forms of
protest.
"This is the only chance we will
ever have to put a lid on the space
weapons race."
Among the projects ISCOS is
suggesting are:
• Space probes to obtain information from the planets and other
solar systems;
• Solar powered energy research;
• Space laboratories and
hospitals to study the human aging
process, medicines and healing
techniques;
• Space habitats, farms and
schools;
• Transportation to space stations, tourism and space hotels and
• Moon and asteroid mining.
In space, there is also a job for
the garbage collectors. About
10-15,000 scraps are tracked every
day in space and an estimated
40,000 bits of junk are orbiting
uselessly.
Canada can take up the kind of
work that Rosin is advocating and
would be a good sponsor for the
ISCOS proposal for a Global Information Complex. This would
become the creative centre for space
information to assist the world with
problems of food, clothing, housing, energy, clean environment,
health, education and national
security.
The Canada Centre for Remote
Sensing currently provides information on crop inventory, forest and
wildlife management, sea-ice
surveying, mapping and mineral
and petroleum exploration. Our
own Radarsat satellite is planned
for a later 1980's launch and should
contribute to maintaining our Arctic sovereignty.
Many believe that time is running
out for the U.S. to disregard the
cooperative initiatives of the rest of
the world. ISCOS is affiliated with
50 groups in 130 countries. Rosin
hopes to make more political
leaders and scientists see SDI as a
bad dream.
HOVJREMtrA&ER... \
TWS ONE TURNS ONTVE. MR )
COMXTiOUER>UD THIS OKE j
DESTROYS TW£ WORLD.
Weinbergers let's have New
Zealand's David Lange.
Finally, we need to reconsider
our concept of patriotism. In World
War II, Canadians worked together
because they believed they had to
save their country from the threat
of fascist domination. The time has
come for Canadians to recognize
that peace is the most "patriotic"
issue, the desire to want one's
home, family and country to survive. Previous generations radically
altered their commitments to education, work and families to serve
their country; we must do likewise
to serve the planet. World War HI
is being decided now, between people who passionately desire peace
and those who believe we have
nuclear weapons in order not to use
them. The great maioritv look on
stupidly, or mumble that peace is a
good idea. But ideas require action
to make them a reality; it will be too
late to join the peace movement
after the first missile is launched.
Parts of the brave, new and improved world already exist, but the
future is light years away from being guaranteed. We are now engaged in a mad, mad race against the
mathematical probabilities of computer failure, human error or the
escalation of conflict in the third
world.
We are also struggling with
numbers. UBC's Students for Peace
and Mutual Disarmament has
about 75 members. This gives us far
less than one per cent of the student
body working for peace. You think
this number is going to transform
the military-industrial complexes of
the Warsaw Pact and N.A.T.O.?
The function of Remembrance
Day in the nuclear age is clear.
We must remember that
Hiroshima and Nagasaki are the
likely visualizations of our future.
Remembrance Day reminds each
one of us that we are responsible for
our planet, that we must change our
ways of thinking and acting if we
are to survive.
And while it is difficult to see the
light at the end of this long and difficult passage, we know that as we
solve this great problem, we shall be
pushing back the boundaries of
human endeavor, the quality of life
will improve throughout the world
and the species can begin to mature.
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By BOB DAWSON
The staff at the Canadian
Emergency Measures Organization
(EMO) deal with the unthinkable.
In cooperation with the department
of National Defence, they develop
civil defence plans — including how
to survive a nuclear war.
The EMO has a peppy new
brochure called Blueprint for Survival. Their earlier hits include Your
Basement Fallout Shelter, and
Basement Fallout Shelters for New
Homes.
Blueprint for Survival, the fourth
brochure of the EMO's survival
series, outlines 11 steps citizens can
follow to reduce chances of death in
the event of a nuclear war. Each
step has colorful illustrations and is
well numbered for easy reference.
As their standard of comparison the
authors use a five megaton
H-bomb, which, they admit,
"could substantially damage the
largest Canadian city." In terms of
destructive power, a five megaton
bomb is the same as exploding five
million tons of TNT, or the
equivalent of 250 Hiroshimas.
Steps one and two give the reader
some facts and effects of nuclear
explosions and radioactive fallout.
Blast effects of a nuclear explosion
would cause "light to moderate
damage to buildings 10 to 15 miles
distant. They could be occupied
during repairs." And initial radiation "is only dangerous within two
or three miles of the explosion."
The light and heat effects can cause
"sunburn types of burns up to 23
miles from the explosion."
"Sunburn"!??
The hazardous effects of radioactive fallout are strongly stressed but
fortunately, "by providing your
family and yourself with a fallout
shelter, you are unlikely to suffer
serious effects." However, the
EMO does suggest the possibility of
radiation illness and outlines some
possible symptoms (like death); but
they warn you not to be too concerned because "nausea and vomit-
ting may be caused by fright,
worry, pregnancy and other common conditions." Don't worry
about the nausea and vomiting,'it's
probably something you ate.
The Fallen Sky, compiled by the
Physicians for Social Responsibility, offers a different view regarding
Risks ©f accidental mocttap tifidocaust growing
By MICHAEL D. WALLACE
In the past few years, growing public awareness
of the planet-destroying consequences of nuclear
holocaust has forced most militarists to renounce
nuclear weapons as rational instruments of policy.
But at the very moment when the prospect of war
by design appears to be receding, the risk of war by
accident is growing*
Military professionals have tended to dismiss
fears of accidental war as unfounded, arguing that
the very complexity of contemporary nuclear command and control systems, replete with checks and
perspectives
Michael Wallace is a UBC political science professor who specializes in nuclear issues.
counter-checks, makes it unlikely that an accidental
use of nuclear weapons would occur.fjom a single
or even multiple failures in command or warning
systems. TL-**-'
But despite these elaborate precautions, a growing number of scientists, computer professionals,
and even defense analysts believe that the risk of
war by accident is increasing. They point to the narrowing of the strategic "window" resulting from
the deployment of fast-attack delivery systems.
Within 6 to 8 minutes of launch, Pershing II
missiles based in Europe would burst over Soviet
nerve centres, destroying installations and disrupting communications with an electromagnetic
pulse. Soviet missiles fired from submarines based
off the North American coast could inflict
equivalent damage to U.S. command, control and
communications capability in four to nine minutes.
Strategists argue that this provides a powerful incentive for premature strategic action in time of
serious crisis. They note that both sides have made
or are contemplating decisions which would override safety checks and controls during a crisis,
either by the early release of tactical nuclear
weapons to battlefields commanders> or by the
adoption of a "launch-omwaamng" policy.
Major-General Leonard Johnson, who retired
last year as the commandaut'erf the Canadian National Defense College, has stated that the current
NATO operational plans cleave no time for reflection and negotiation. Spiralihg tensions created
during a major international: crisis could create a
situation in which a false alarm might provoke
either side to fire its missiles in the belief that the
other side had fired or was about to do so.
The danger is not theoretical, but very real and
urgent. Data from NORAD show that false alarms
(technically, Missile Display Conferences) were occurring at a rate of about 20 per month as of July
19831, and have been increasing at a rate of about
32% a year since 1978. Almost certainly, then,
several false alarms are likely to occur during a
serious crisis lasting a week ox more.
No one knows for certain what would happen
then. It is known, however, that on at least-6 occasions since 1978 a false alarm triggered a strategic
alert in the absence of-any crisis. It is also known
that during past crises, erroneous intelligence
reports, faulty computer chips, and radar blips
caused by civilian aircraft, birds; or even the moon
have brought the system to Ihe threshold of a
nuclear strike. It is likely that any major, lengthy
false alarm occurring during sa serious crisis would
pose a grave risk of war by accident. %
Using NORAD data j on false alarms and the
launch sequence that would berfollowed during an
actual attack, my research collaborators and I have
calculated the probability that such a major false
alarm would occur during a hypothetical crisis
equal in length to the Cuban Missile Crisis of October, 1962. We find that there is a better than 50%
chance that a war-provoking false alarm would occur during such a crisis.
Our calculations underline with hard data and
quantitative precision what has been obvious tp
many experts for some time: the risk of accidental
war in the heat of superpower crisis is appallingly
high, greater than most people believe and far
greater than the officials on either side will admit
publicly.
The dissemination of data and calculations on
the risk of accidental war within the academic community has led to numerous informal exchanges
among scientists, coupled with a growing desire to
communicate their concerns to a broader audience,
prompting calls for a major international conference on the issue.
Thanks to funding provided by the Canadian Institute for International Peace and Security, a major conference focussing on the risk of accidental
war will be held here at the University of British
Columbia on May 26 through May 30. This con*
ference will provide opportunities for experts in this
area to identify the specific technologies and
policies which contribute most significantly to the
risk, and to formulate policy proposals to lessen
that risk. The public events associated with the conference will attempt to communicate accurate information on the issue to the media and the public at
large. Expert participants will include civilian
stategists, political scientists, and computer scientists from Harvard, Yale, Stanford, Zurich, Edinburgh, and the Brookings Institute, as well as
military officials from the United States, Canada,
and the Soviet Union.
the effects of a bomb with approximately the same yield. Blast effects, they say, would "damage all
frame buildings beyond repair" up
to a 15 miles radius. So much for
"substantial damage". PSR also
predicts far more serious thermal
effects than a Hawaiian tan: "up to
twenty-two miles from the surface
blast a person would have second
degree burns of all exposed skin,
and other easily inflammable
material in the environment would
ignite."
The EMO's Blueprint for Survival contains a lot of handy information that very few people probably know. For anyone interested
NATURAL TERRAIN
in nuclear warfare, this brochure is
a must. Did you know that the wailing tone of sirens for three to five
minutes duration means an attack
on North America has been
detected, not to be confused with
the short blasts of horns meaning
an explosion has already taken
place. Well, thanks to step three,
now you do.
There's even a section on how to
deal with anyone in your home
fallout center who becomes 'emotionally disturbed following a
nuclear disaster." The EMO says
group therapy and self-help
methods will help you understand
what is bothering the emotionally
troubled person; "they should be
kept in small groups, preferably
with persons whom they know and
encouraged to talk out their problem."
Blueprint for Survival's step five
lists the supplies that you and your
family will need for your two week
"holiday" in the fallout centre until
it is safe again to go outside. Apart,
from the food and water requirements, the recommended
recreational supplies in the fallout
shelter demonstrates the EMO's
outlook. As society is suffering
from the nuclear holocaust outside,
Blueprint for Survival advises you
to keep "checkers, playing cards,
knitting, hobby materials, and
plasticine" on hand to "occupy
your time." Imagine the homey
scene on day nine in the bomb
shelter: while Mom and Junior
busily work away on their stamp
collection, Dad tries to figure out
why Sis is emitting a radioactive red
glow.
Steps eight, nine and 10 are:
"Know Emergency Cleanliness",
"How to Dust Off Radioactive
Sand" and "Know Your Municipal
Plan". Mel Blaney of the Vancouver Emergency Program in city
hall explained Vancouver's plan.
Blaney said, "This department
will get the word from the feds and
we'll help in determining how
welfare, police, public utilities, fire
and other emergency services will
operate." But there are no set mass
evacuation   plans.   According   to
our   complex,   fool-proof   civil
defence plan.
EMO's strongest justification for
publishing Blueprint for Survival is
that the construction of a home
radioactive fallout centre can increase your chances of day to day
SMSl.
«
i&
IN YOUR CAR
Blaney, if Seattle and the Trident
submarine base were hit by nuclear
weapons, Vancouver's response-
"would depend on which way the
wind blew." So there you have it —
AT HOME
survival. On this point, the Physicians for Social Responsibility
agree: ''No one can be protected
from the initial radiation, heat and
blast of a nuclear weapon, but people can be sheltered against fallout.
It is against fallout, therefore, that
the civil defence program is
directed."
But these two groups fundamentally differ on what a fallout shelter
represents.
Essentially, the EMO believes
that with proper preparations your
chances of survival are increased.
But what happens when Mom and
Dad and the kids get bored of
plasticine and Scrabble? PSR
argues that even if you manage to
live two weeks in a shelter, the
worst is not over: "Many sheltered
survivors would be subject to acute
radiation sickness and to the long
term sornatic and genetic effects of
radiation. Sub-lethal irradiation
would increase the mortality from
pre-existing disease and from blast
injuries, burns, and infections."
The list goes on. Imagine the
widespread radiation of plants,
mammals, and birds.
We might ask ourselves: does surviving mean living? We have to
realize there are no winners the day!
after World War III.
Peace studies offered
OTTAWA (CUP) — A quick
glance through any university calendar will reveal an almost unlimited
number of courses about war.
The history department will include classes on World Wars I and
II, there is bound to be a political
science seminar in strategic studies,
and many economics courses include analyses of the economics of
war. Even the classics department
will offer classes on the ancient battles of the Greeks and the Romans.
But recently Canadian universities have begun to offer courses on
a much different topic — peace
studies. Two Canadian universities,
the University of New Brunswick
and Carleton University, now offer
graduate programmes in peace and
conflict studies. John Abbot College in Ste. Anne de Bellevue,
Quebec, became the first Canadian
college to offer a diploma in peace
studies with the launching of its
programme this fall.
Traditionally, academics have
believed thai by studying wars of
the past, conflicts can be avoided in
the future. The study of war in the
halls of higher learning has a long
history; from Clausewitz to
Machiavelli, the "art" of war has
graced classrooms for years.
A growing number of Canadian
academics now say this theory
hasn't worked. Peace studies programmes are an attempt to provide
a positive outlook on how to
achieve peace, both internationally
and on a personal level.
At John Abbott College, a peace
studies program teaches students
about all aspects of peace, from
domestic violence to international
relations. By taking eight of the 30
courses offered in the program, a
student   can   graduate   with   a
diploma in peace studies.
Alan Silverman, director of the
Peace Studies Program, says the
inter-disciplinary nature of the program is essential to the nature of
studying peace. "It's a new approach to peace studies," he says.
"Basically we're saying there's both
peace and violence in everything."
The program was started because
Silverman says "right now decisions
are made by a very small number of
people. We wanted to change
that." He believes the study of
peace deserves at least as much effort and debate as the study of war.
At Conrad Grebel College at the
University of Waterloo, the 10 year
old program is the oldest in
Canada. Students can take peace
and conflict studies as a major or a
minor in a regular or honours
bachelor program.
Tom Yoder Neufeld, a professor
teaching in the program says
it's essential to offer as many
courses as possible in the eight
departments participating in the
program. It's also important for
Yoder Neufeld to reach many
science students, who make up a
large percentage of the student
population at the University of
Waterloo.
"Their professional duties will
quickly put them at the centre of industry which is often concerned
with preparation for the arms
race," he said. "It's important to
help these students learn how to
evaluate the meaning of their
work."
Both Yoder Neufeld and Silverman are part of growing trends
toward studying peace with fervour
usually reserved for the study of
war. By preparing youth for peace,
they want to avoid the mistakes of
the past. Page 8
THE   UBYSSEY
Friday, November 8, 1985
Letters
Cycling — let there be light
"Get a light, pal!"
Having seen a couple of cyclists
strewn across the 10th Ave. bike
path due to the laziness of a few
turds who don't use lights when
riding, I'm a bit miffed.
Do you "nightriders" feel that
you have a right to endanger the
health of those who use the
bikepath at night? Frankly I
couldn't care less if you play
chicken with cars at night, but I'm
tired of having dark shapes bullet
past my left ear two seconds after
they first appear. In truth your
favorite trick is to wait until someone is passing another, and then
without a peep you materialize and
we all play that neat game called
"How many cyclists can you wrap
around an oak tree."
But perhaps I'm being too harsh.
After all there is that wonderful
sense of excitement and adventure
as you torpedo along; the wind
streaming past your brow, your
eyes piercing the inky blackness and
your heart pounding as you seek
out your next unsuspecting
victim(s).
From my perspective, however, if
you seek a challenge and spot of
adventure, why not try picking your
nose with a powersaw? I suspect it's
quite a feat, and it may even serve
to keep you off of the bike path for
a day or two.
Now don't get me wrong. I'm not
suggesting that every Tom, Dick
and Sherry should take a whole
half-hour to nip out and buy a
dynamo and light for their bike.
Heck, you could staple a handful of
fire flies to your forehead or better
yet, swallow a flashlight so that
your teeth glow. The important
thing is not how you do it, but that
you do it.
Garry Ullstrom
Commerce 4
Skeptics are doubtful
I was struck by the lack of intellectual options perceived by Kent
Moore in his letter of Nov. 1. He
asserts that because there is a lack
of relevant empirical data, nothing
is known or can be known about
the existence of God, or about the
other deep questions of human existence. Neither premise nor conclusion of this argument is true.
While empirical data are a good
source of evidence, they are not the
only source of evidence. Knowledge
can also be obtained by rational
analysis of concepts. Mathematical
Peruvian workers struggle,
for factory control
Dear Editor:
We ask your support for Peruvian workersj resisting occupation
of their factories by the Peruvian
military. The Social Democrat
president, Alan Garcia (elected in
July) promised to limit military
power. Aside from firing two
military commanders and bringing
to trial one lieutenant responsible
for the massacre of 60 peasants in
August, Garcia has not restricted
the military forces, which still control Peru's Southern Andean area,
where they have murdered dozens
of peasants since July. They are
now exerting control in Lima as
well, and have launched an attack
against one of Lima's strongest
unions, the Moraveco Metallurgical
Union, on strike since July 28. In
August, the military forces occupied a factory in the Moraveco
complex and are using it to produce
military weapons and transport
vehicles.
Please encourage President Garcia to respect human rights and to
promote a just settlement for the
Moraveco strikers. Ask him to
withdraw the army from the
Moraveco plant and from the
Southern Andean area and to step
up investigation of the prevention
of military repression in Peru.
Write to: President Alan Garcia.
Presidente de la Republica. Palacio
de Gobierno. Lima. Peru.
If you wish to donate money to
the Moraveco union, make cheques
payable to Fidel Perez Guevara and
address your envelope to Enrique
Heriz. Av. Alfonso Ugarte
1228-308. Lima. Peru.
Alicia Barsallo
Educ 4
Students for a Democratic
University
Committee for the Defense of
Human Rights in Peru
Suzanne Rose
Rhme 3
Latin America Solidarity
Committee
Committee for the Defense
of Human Rights in Peru
knowledge is obtained in this way.
Once we have picked our axioms
and definitions, conceptual analysis
is sufficient to discover all sorts of
interesting theorems. If we select
those axioms and definitions which
are true of material objects, we can
obtain startling and useful
theorems. Without conceptual
knowledge we could never have
flown humans to the moon.
When this additional source of
evidence is brought to bear on the
great questions of existence,
answers start to flow. The discipline
which produces these answers is
philosophy, and it yields fascinating
insights into seemingly insoluble
problems.
This combination of conceptual
analysis and empirical observation
answers, for example, the question
whether God exists. Conceptual
analysis reveals that if the Christian
God existed, then being all-loving,
omniscient, and omnipotent, He
would have created a world containing little or no suffering. Empirical observation reveals that the
world contains much suffering.
Therefore God does not exist.
The full argument is, of course,
much more complicated than my
three-sentence condensation suggests, but its conclusion is essentially the same. A longer version can be
found in "The Existence of God",
by W.I. Martin.
The value of religion is not as a
description of the world, which it
clearly is not, but as a metaphor
through which people may express
their vague but compelling
reverence for life and mystery.
Danger arises only when people
mistake metaphor for description,
and let dogma guide their actions.
Nick Sleigh
Philosophy 9
TOMMY GOES LIVE!
now at Tommy Africa's
THURS., NOV. 14 TIL SAT., NOV. 16
(9:00 p.m.-1:00 a.m.)
1010 BEACH AVE.
683-1993
; i.u>.<c
(    Ni'CiErs
f^'f^x
•-'   X dd    LUMCH   \   h   j>'A/C.W ^
■■<—--'   *- /   Y ' d
trum the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists
Food for thought
During the 10 minutes you spend reading today's Ubyssey over 2,300 children
died from preventable diseases and $12 million was spent on arms worldwide. Let's
be idealistic for one minute.
Scenario: Suddenly Canadians divert 9.3 per cent of federal budget to Third
World aid instead of to Canadian defence. Will the effort change the guns versus
butter equation?
Probably not. Canadians are pouring money into Ethiopia yet the Ethiopian
government is spending $1,980 for each solder versus $6 per person for both health
and education. Canadians are sending money to quakestricken Mexico. But their
government has upped its military budget by 90 per cent in 10 years, using profits
from their oil bonanza. The pessimist understandably concludes that throwing
money makes no difference.
Before we condemn the Third World we should look at our own government's actions. Canada spent about $10 billion on "defence" last year. If we consider it so important why shouldn't other countries? "I want some too" is expected behaviour
from children and governments. Perhaps the most effective way to change the
behaviour of Third World governments is to urge our government to quit playing
childish games.
THE UBYSSEY
November 8, 1985
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Friday throughout
the academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff
and are not necessarily those of the administrataion or the
AMS. Member Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey's
editorial office is SUB 241k. Editorial department,
228-2301/2305. Advertising 228-3977/3978.
Gordon Clark who was forgotten last time couldn't find the cat. When questioned, Carl Rosenberg,
Wade Gemmell, Romy Kozak and Byron Johnson all said, "Why not?". "Oh, Sam, where are you?"
moaned David Ferman. James Young, Dan Andrews and Sherida Levy wanted to help. "What colour
is this cat," they asked. "It's the only one-eyed, black and white cat around," Debbie Lo said. Erika
Simpson, Sue Mcllroy and Lise Magee who had been called in to assist were of no use whatsoever.
"We can't find him either," said anxious Jennifer Lyall and concerned Shirley Farlinger, while Svetozar
Kontic and Michael Groberman looked puzzled. "It's a she," Stephen Wisenthal quipped. Mike
Wallace and Bob Dawson accidentally tripped over Sam the cat and everyone looked shocked. Chris
Wong screamed and fell over in a faint. "It was his best friend," explained Vera Manuel, "I'm okay,"
said Sam and winked her good eye.
\\\ Oh What A Fun III
\\\ PLACE TO BE UJ
■  ■■■■■■■■
CUECKER5
Thru' Nov. 9th —Brian Griffith
Nov. 11th-16th—Jim Derhouse
(Home of the Frosted Mug)
oz Burger on a
(Share it with a friend)
10    Bun
$575
Th0
Overlooking English Bay
~   Corner Davie & Denman
Sea (Valet Parking) Friday, November 8, 1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 9
UBC hockey 'Birds win first games on road
By SVETOZAR KONTIC
The UBC hockey club earned its
first two victories of the young
season over the weekend at Regina.
Friday the 'Birds won 6-5, nearly
blowing a 6-0 lead with only three
minutes left in the second period.
The trouble started when Jay
Soleway received an additional two
minutes for unsportsmanlike conduct after loosening his tongue
following his first penalty.
Regina scored twice during the
ensuing   four   minute   powerplay.
They came out flying in the third
but UBC held on for the narrow
victory.
Saturday night Kunio Takagi,
formerly of the Seibu hockey club
of Japan, scored late in the game to
give UBC a 4-3 victory. UBC came
UBC and SFU play game United Way
By DELIA DOUGLAS
Tonight the UBC basketball
team plays host to the SFU
Clansmen in the opening game of
the 1985 Buchanan Classic at War
Memorial Gym with all proceeds
going to the United Way.
The game features the debut of
Bruce Enns, hired this summer as
the new full-time coach of the
men's team. The former Great
Plains Athletic Conference coach of
the year held the head coaching
position at the University of Winnipeg for twelve years. During that
time his win/loss record was an impressive 239-185.
Returnees include Ken Klassen, a
1983-84 Canada west all-star coming off a successful ankle operation.
Also returning will be Paul
Johansson (B.C. under 21 team)
and guard Kevin Hanson, both of
whom should be key factors in the
team's success.
Enns said, "the team's goal is to
maintain its commitment to playing
good basketball. This is not a year
of new beginnings but rejuvenation,
a renewal of a basketball tradition
which had been established in
previous years."
Lack of height will be a major
concern as rookie Gord Matson is
the tallest player at 6'6". Enns said
"the players more than compensate
for their lack of size by being big
from the neck up."
back from a 3-2 deficit in the third
period.
"The defence played well,
especially on Saturday night, but the
team did not move the puck as well
as I would have liked. This is a
skating league with the removal of
the red line and as a result UBC has
become much more of a skating
team," said UBC coach Fred
Musach.
Mike Coflin scored three goals
over the weekend giving him a
league leading eight goals in only six
games. Former Portland Winter
Hawk Kevin Griffin also scored
three times for the 'Birds with Jay
Soleway, Dean Thompson and
Steve Baker adding assists.
"After losing  Bill  Holowaty  I
had hoped to see the scoring spread
out more evenly and that seems to
have happened," said Musach.
The 'Birds play host to the
University of Alberta Golden Bears
this weekend in a crucial set of
games.
The 'Bears lead the league in
goals including one 22 goal
weekend.
"When we lost in Alberta they
exploited our systematic approach
to the game. We have made changes
to offset that possibility. Our objective is to take their forwards out of
the game. If we can do that then we
will win," said Musach. "But if
their forwards break loose it is really anybody's guess as to what will
happen."
AT A GLANCE
INTRAMURAL SPORTS
UNIT POINT STANDINGS
MEN'S
MEN'S UNIT
1. EUS
2. Beta Theta Pi
3. Science
4. Forestry
5. Physical Education
6. VST
7. Medicine
8. Fiji
9. Rowing
10. Arts
11. Cycling Club
12. UBC Fire Dept.
13. Kappa Sigma
14. Phi Delta Theta
15. Chariots of Manure
16. Commerce
17. Law
18. Psi Upsilon
19. Grad Studies
20. Orienteering
21. Totem Park
22. Dekes
23. VOC
24. Rehab Medicine
25. Vanier
26. Gage
27. St. Andrews
28. Zeta Beta Tau
29. Zeta Psi
30. Field Hockey
WOMEN'S
WOMEN'S UNIT
1. Physical Education
2. EUS
3. Arts
4. Forestry
5. VST
6. Rowing
7. FNSc
8. Nursing
9. Medicine
10. Phrateres
11. Swim Team
12. Science
POINTS
2543
1576
1090
887
761
714
705
683
585
505
489
400
398
329
265
241
235
234
220
190
171
170
160
156
145
136
125
120
108
65
POINTS
1400
1206
705
524
475
378
361
296
227
226
215
160
13. Ski Team
14. Vanier
15. Ballet/UBC Jazz
16. Delta Gamma
17. Agriculture
18. Education
19. Gamma Phi Beta
20. Rehab Medicine
21. Centre for Com. Ed.
22. Kappa Kappa Gamma
23. Alpha Delta Pi
24. Alpha Gamma Delta
25. Pharmacy
26. Regent College
27. Grad Studies
28. Delta Phi Epsilon
29. Sub Bound
30. Recreation
156
145
133
109
107
95
90
80
64
57
31
26
22
22
21
15
15
2
INTRAMURAL
HOCKEY RESULTS
Div. ) Men's League A
Law
Commerce
Arts II
Forestry
Kappa Sig.
Fiji
Science
Arts I
EUS
Beta
Geology
Dekes
Medicine
Totem
Georox
Science
Vanier
Dentistry
2 1
2 0
0 1
3 1
0 1
1 1
0 2
Div. I Men's League B
Div. II Men's League A
T Pts
0 2
1 3
0 2
0      2
EUS Chem 1
N Indians
Phi Delts
Commerce I
Arts
Div. II Men's League B
Comm II
Comm III
VST
St. Andrews
Forestry
Aggies
EUS EE I
Geology
Civil Eng.
Div. Ill Men's League A
Medicine
Pharmacy
Triumph
Armadillos
Fiji
SRTPSI
Betas
Robson
Phys Ed
Gage
Geology
Commerce'
Pharmacy
Aggies
Rehab. Med.
Law
VST
Forestry
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NETWORK INFO SYSTEMS INC.
850 Burrard Street, Suite305, Vancouver, BC V6Z 2J1
A SUMMER IN OTTAWA
UNIVERSITY OF OTTAWA 1986 UNDERGRADUATE SUMMER RESEARCH SCHOLARSHIPS
For students who foresee a career in research, the Summer Research Scholarships
will provide research experience with leading Canadian scientific investigators in one
of the fields listed below.
PARTICIPATING DEPARTMENTS
Anatomy
Geography (physical)
Biochemistry
Geology
Biology
Kinanthropology
Chemistry
Mathematics
Computer Science
Microbiology
ENGINEERING
Physics
Chemical
Physiology
Civil
Psychology (experimental
Electrical
Systems Science
Mechanical
VALUE: $1,200 (minimum)/month. Travel allowance
DURATION: 3-4 months (May-August) 1986. Reasonable on-campus accommodation.
REQUIREMENTS: Canadian or permanent resident. Permanent address outside of immediate
Ottawa/Hull area (Ottawa/Hull residents should apply for a summer award, such as NSERC, which is
tenable at the University of Ottawa). Full-time undergraduate students with excellent standing; priority given to 3rd year students (2nd year in the
Province of Quebec)
Forward the required information together with your most recent and complete university transcript before November 15, 1985 to the address below. Also request a reference from one
professor be sent to the same address by November 15, 1985.
1986 Summer Research Scholarships, School of Graduate Studies and Research
University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ont. K1N 6N5 Tel. (613) 564-6546
APPLICATION PROCEDURE:
  Name Page 10
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, November 8, 1985
Ui/A
vjtfgati
TODAY
STUDENTS FOR A FREE SOUTHERN AFRICA
Meeting, noon, TA union office, the armouries.
LAW-NATIVE LAW PROGRAMME
Series of lectures, noon, Curtis law building
101-102.
INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS STUDENTS
ASSOCIATION
Beer garden, 4-9 p.m., International House.
ASTRONOMY AND AEROSPACE CLUB
Regular meeting and guest speaker, 5:30 p.m..
Geophysics & Astronomy building.
UBC SCIENCE FICTION SOCIETY
Unicon convention committee meeting, noon,
common area no. 249
FILM SOCIETY
Film: A Passage to India, $2, 7 p.m. only, SUB
auditorium.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration for fall classes, $25 incl. member
ship fees, noon, SUB 208.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Practice, noon, SUB party room.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Lunch hour meeting, noon, International House
lounge.
THUNDERBIRD BASKETBALL
UBC men vs SFU Clansmen in crosstown
rivalry, 8:30 p.m.. War Memorial Gym.
UBC MOTORCYCLE CLUB
Beer Garden and free movie, 4 p.m., SUB 205.
THUNDERBIRD HOCKEY
Canada West vs Alberta Golden Bears, 7:30
p.m., Thunderbird arena.
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Gym night, 8:30 - 11:30 p.m., Osborne A.
UBC SOCIAL CREDIT CLUB
Annual general meeting, noon, SUB 215.
CIRCLE K
General meeting, noon, Buch D351.
SATURDAY
FILM SOCIETY
Film: A Passage to India, $2, 7 p.m. only, SUB
auditorium.
THUNDERBIRD HOCKEY
Game - Canada West vs Alberta Golden Bears,
7:30 p.m., Thunderbird Arena.
THUNDERBIRD SOCCER
Canadian university championship game, UBC
vs Concordia Stingers,
2 p.m., O.J. Todd Field, UBC.
THUNDERBIRD BASKETBALL
Second game best of three, UBC men vs SFU,
8 p.m., SFU east gym.
THUNDERBIRD VOLLEYBALL
Opener - Canada West vs UVic, women 6
p.m., men 8 p.m., War Memorial gym.
SUNDAY
UBC DANCE CLUB
Practice, 12- 5 p.m., SUB 212.
THUNDERBIRD VOLLEYBALL
Canada West vs UVic, women 2 p.m., men 4
p.m., War Memorial gym.
FILM SOCIETY
Film: A Passage to India, $2, 7 p.m. only, SUB
auditorium.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Worship service, 10 a.m., UBC day care gym,
2845 Acadia road.
Come to
t-/
irtAi<
ir&
FOR MEN
For smartly classic or uniquely
original clothes. For all occasions from casual to formal
wear.
Consignment Shop
with a difference—
5581 Dunbar at 40th Ave.
266-3393   Hours: Mon.-Sat. 10-5:30
Our Ladies'
Consignment store
provides superb quality at only a
fraction of the original price.
5587 Dunbar at 40th Ave.
263-2728
Open Tue.-Sat. 10:30-5:30 p.m.
LEARN TO SKI FOR
LESS THAN YOU THINK
UBC SKI CLUB
Now Offers Grouse Mtn. Lessons:
$60.00 for 4 1 % hr. lessons, 4 day passes,
equipment included
We Also Offer:
Grouse Mtn. day passes at $11
(Regularly $18)
Cypress Mtn. day passes at $11
(Regularly $16)
And much, much more savings!!!
FIND OUT MORE AT SUB 210, 12:30-1:30 M-F
pimsi
lams
Applications are now being
accepted for three (3)
student-at-large representative
positions on the
UNIVERSITY
ATHLETIC COUNCIL
The council has responsibility in all matters concerning
athletics, including the development of general policies,
the coordination of specific policies, and the allocation
of funds.
Applications may be obtained at SUB 238 and returned
there by 4:00 p.m., Friday, November 15, 1985.
For further information please contact: Glenna
Chestnutt, AMS President, Sub 256, 228-3972, Simon
Seshadri, AMS Director of Administration, SUB 254,
228-3961
ISMAILI STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Bowling tournament with SFU, $6, call
985-9436 for time, Brunswick.
Bowling, Park Royal.
MONDAY
FILM SOCIETY
Film: Hamlet starring Laurence Olivier, $2, 7:30
p.m., SUB auditorium.
THUNDERBIRD RUGBY
McKechnie Cup competition, UBC vs Fraser
Valley Reps, 2:30 p.m.
Burnaby Lake.
REMEMBRANCE DAY SERVICE
All welcome to attend, 10:45 a.m., UBC War
Memorial gym.
TUESDAY
LAW    NATIVE LAW PROGRAMME
Series of lectures, noon, Curtis law building
101/102.
FILM SOCIETY
Film: Laurence Olivier in Hamlet, $2, noon,
SUB auditorium.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Special rock and roll class, noon, SUB party
room.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Bible study and discussion, noon, Brock Hall
304.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION
Weekly meeting and bible reading, noon, SUB
215.
UBYSSEY SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM
Peace caucus meeting, noon, SUB 241k.
WEDNESDAY
UBC ANARCHIST CLUB
Office warming and meeting, noon, SUB 237.
AMNESTY UBC
Meeting and film, noon, SUB 205.
INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS STUDENTS
ASSOCIATION
Slide show and discussion on travel in S.E.
Asia, noon, Buch B224.
FILM SOCIETY
Films: L'age D'or and Cat People (1942), $2
each, 7:30 p.m. and 9:30 p.m., SUB
auditorium.
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Aerobics, exercise to music, $2, free to
members, 5:30 p.m.    6:30 p.m., SUB bsmt 1,
plaza south.
UBC PERSONAL COMPUTER CLUB
General meeting, new members c'mon down!
noon, Hebb 12.
HORSE LOVERS AND EQUESTRIAN CLUB
Membership general meeting, all welcome,
3:30 p.m., SUB 205.
Campus-
Cuts
5736 University Blvd.
(UBC Village)
228-1471
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: AMS Card Holders — 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; Additional lines, 60c. Commercial —
1 day $4.50; Additional lines, 70c. Additional days, $4.00 and 65c.
Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a. m. the day before publication
Publications, Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
Charge Phone Orders Over $10.00 - Call 228-3977
COMING EVENTS
THE VANCOUVER INSTITUTE
Free Public Lecture
Saturday, Nov. 9
Prof. Irwin Shainman
Williams College, Mass.
on
MOZART:
MYTH AND REALITY
Lecture Hall 2, Woodward
Building at 8:15 p.m.
CUSO-UBC
DEVELOPMENT
EDUCATON SERIES
"SOUTH AFRICA'S
DISPOSSESSED"
featuring a talk by Dr. Zayed
Gamiet from S.A.A.C. (Southern
Africa Action Coalition) and a film.
Thursday, November 14
International House, UBC
7:30 p.m.
FREE ADMISSION
COLLECTOR'S GIFT SALE
Nov. 24, 10-3 p.m. Royal Towers Hotel, 6th
St. & Royal Ave. New Westminster.
11 - FOR SALE - Private
76 DODGE ASPEN station wagon, Exc. running cond. New tires. Perfect students car.
$1900 obo. 922-5318 eves.
1972 MG MIDGET, looks great and runs
great! Light blue, lots of new parts. $2600.
Call Steve 224-9700.
506L BUSH1MELL CENCO microscope. Coaxial coarse/fine focus, built in light source,
diaphragm, condensor. Mechanical stage.
Optics: eye pieces — 5, 10, 15. Objec-
tives-4, 10, 40, 100. Oil immersion.
Lockable cabinet. $450. 732-1681 eve.
15 - FOUND
FOUND: White sweatshirt on Monday, Nov.
4 outside War Memorial Gym. Phone Chris
at 987-3896 evenings.
20 - HOUSING
MORE THAN JUST A PLACE TO LIVE.
Conversation, comradeship & more, participation in campus activities. We've just
renovated & still serve the best food on
campus. Come look us over. Sigma Chi
house, 5725 Agronomy R. Room & board
on campus. 224-3381.
3 BR. SUITE for rent, utilities incl. with sun-
deck & backyard, 2nd & Clark, $575. Call
876-6127.
WANTED: Amiable adult to share modern,
comfortable family home with professor &
older teenager. Near UBC gates above
Spanish Banks. Lge. garden. Magnificent
view. $425/mo. 224-0584.
25 - INSTRUCTION
LEARN TO FLY. Personal flight instruction,
private commercial sight-seeing. Call Allen
734-2977.
30 - JOBS
CP   HOTELS   CHATEAU   LAKE   LOUISE
is now taking applications for Xmas
employment. Positions available from Dec.
20 to Jan. 5. Please send resume &■ letters
of reference to personnel office Chateau
Lake Louise, Lake Louise, Alberta, T0L 1E0.
EARN $$ FOR XMAS. Start immediately.
Flexible hrs. Make bet. $10-20/hr. Comm.
for Vane. East. Call 873-2516 bet. 1-5 p.m.
or 585-2199.
ALARM MONITORING company requires 2
part-time employees for 1) Mon.-Fri., 10
p.m.-12:30 a.m. &■ Sun. 11 a.m.-7 p.m. &
2) Mon.-Fri. 6:30 a.m.-9:00 a.m. & Sat. 11
a.m.-7 p.m. $4.50 /hr. telephone answering
exp. an asset. Call 731-8204, Mon.-Fri. 9-4.
35 - LOST
LOST HP41CV CALCULATOR Buchanan D
Block. Fri. Reward offered. Phone Stu,
261-7086 after 6 p.m.
LADIES GOLD SEIKO watch on Tues., Nov.
5 bet. 9:30-noon in Angus Bldg. or Main
Lib. Call Audrey 222-1581. Reward.
40 - MESSAGES
FRED T. — I love blonds with blue eyes.
If you do too, please find me. Bob.
INTERESTED   IN   DEVELOPING   a   com
mercial mountain wilderness lakefront property in Yukon? Call Jesse, 733-7772.
SISTER SIGS LOVE SIGMA CHIS AND
PLEDGES You gotta like that! Thanks for a
great weekend! Love, the Sisters of Sigma
Chi
60 - RIDES
PASSENGER SPACE avail. Newton to UBC
Mon.-Fri. for UBC hours. 8 a.m.-4 p.m.
Reliable. Call Audrey, 594-8672.
65 - SCANDALS
WE DON'T NEED ANOTHER HERO! We
need more volunteers. Come to Brock Hall
200 or call 228-3811 to find out more from
VOLUNTEER CONNECTIONS.
70 - SERVICES
RECYCLE
All metals — jars — bottles — newspapers
7 days a week til 6 p.m. 327-2315.
GREAT MEALS ON CAMPUS.
Nutrition with flavour 8- variety, prepared
by a camp cook. Eat at the Sigma Chi
Fraternity House those evenings when you
just have to get caught up on studies &
home is too far away. 5725 Agronomy
Road. 224-3381. Call the cook at noon & let
him know that you're coming to dinner!
NEED A BREAK? Bring your lunch or buy
snacks at Gate Four Lounge, International
House, 12-2 p.m. weekdays or buy the
CHEAPEST DRINKS ON CAMPUS 7 to 11
p.m. weeknights. Open to ALL students.
TWO     GUY'S     GARAGE
Tune-ups, Brakes, Elec.
& Mech. Repairs. Inspections
& Body Work
Complete Car Care
Kirti 738-2520 Robert
"Your Neighbourhood Mechanics"
80 - TUTORING
TUTOR IN WRITING
-ALL DISCIPLINES-
COPYEDITOR
Carolyn Zonailo, M.A.
261-7066
SPEAKEASY TUTORIAL CENTRE. Find a
tutor or register as a tutor. SUB Concourse.
M-F 9:30 a.m. to 9:30 p.m.
85 - TYPING
WORD    PROCESSING    SPECIALIST.    U
write, we type theses,  resumes,  letters,
essays. Days, evgs., wknds. 736-1208.
WORD WEAVERS Word Processing.
(Bilingual) Student rates. Fast turnaround.
5670 Yew St. at 41 St. Kerrisdale 266-6814.
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST. 30 years ex
perience. Student rates. Photocopier.
Dorothy Martinson, 228-8346.
UNIVERSITY TYPING-Word processing.
Papers, theses, resumes, letters, P-U & del.
9 a.m.-11 *.m. 7 days/wk. 251-2064.
WORD PROCESSING IMicom). Theses
rate, $1.50/dbl. sp. pg. Tables & equations
(Chem., Engineering, etc.I at $14/hr.
201-636 W. Broadway. 876-5333 (Jeeval.
WORDPOWER —Editing, proofing & word
processing professionals. Xerox copies,
student rates. 3737 W. 10th Ave. (at Alma)
222-2661.
EXPERT TYPING: Essays, t. papers, fac-
tums, letters, mscpts, resumes, theses.
IBM Sel II. Proofreading. Reas. rates. Rose
731-9857, 224-7351.
JUDITH FILTNESS, quality typist. 3206
West 38th Avenue. 263-0351.
MINIMUM NOTICE REQUIRED. Essays &
resumes, 222-4661 (before 1 p.m.) 732-0529
(5-7 p.m.).
TYPING & W/P: Term papers, theses,
mscpts., essays, tech. equa., letters,
resumes. Bilingual. Clemy 266-6641.
YOUR WORDSWORTH word processing on
Wang Professional System by B.A.
English. Dictate letters, papers, etc. to dictaphone or drop off. Set rates. 980-2868.
TYPING, RESEARCH. Free editing, spelling check, carbon copy. 926-7752.
ADINA word processing. Student discount.
High quality work. 10th & Discover. Phone
222 2122.
TYPING: Professional presentations for term
papers, resumes, etc. Competitive rates.
734-0650 (24 hrs.).
TYPIST WILL TYPE essays, reports, theses,
etc. $1 per pg. Call 736-0052 after 6 p.m.
FOR
FAST RESULTS
USE
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIEDS Friday, November 8, 1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 11
The Nuns, a play reminiscent of Artaud and
Genet, at Kits House Hall <7th and Vine, 736-3580),
November 14th to December 7th, Wednesday
through Sunday, at 8:30 p.m.
Love for Love, a Restoration comedy, at The
Frederick Wood Theatre, campus (228-2678),
November 6 to 16, 8:00 p.m.
The Patrick Pearse Motel, an Irish comedy, at
Presentation House (333 Chesterfield Ave., N.
Van., 386-1351, 984-9833). October 31 to November
16, 8:00 p.m.
Under the Skin, a terrifying and suspenseful tale,
at the Waterfront Theatre on Granville Island
(685-6228), November 5 to 9 at 8:00 p.m., Saturday
performances at 5:30 and 8:00 p.m.
Sex Tips for Modern Girls, a musical comedy on
the battle of the sexes, at the Arts Club Seymour
Street (687-16344), until November 23, Monday to
Friday, 8:30 p.m., Saturdays, 6:30 and 9:30 p.m..
Special price matinees, Thursday, 5:30 p.m.
Stuff as Dreams are Made on, a one-actor tnter
pretation of The Tempest, at the Vancouver East
Cultural Centre (251 9578), October 31 lo
November 9, Fridays and Saturdays, 8:00 p.m., Sundays, 2:00 and 7:00 p.m.
Arms and the Man, a comedy by G.B. Shaw, at
the Arts Club Granville Island (687 53151, until
November 16th, at 8:30 p.m.
The Bat, a whodunit thriller, at Studio 58
(Langara, 324-5227), until November 10, at 8:00 p.m.
Tales at the Naam (2724 West 4th, 738-7151),
starting October 26 for seven weeks, every Saturday
at 8:45 p.m.
Talking Dirty, a record-breaking hit comedy, at
the Surrey Arts Centre, tickets at VTC, October
29 to November 9, Tuesday to Friday, 8:00 p.m.,
Saturday, 6:00 and 9:00 p.m., Sunday, 2:00 p.m.
Who's afraid of Virginia Woolf?, with William
Hutt and Janet Wright, at the Vancouver
Playhouse (873-3311), opens October 26, at 8:00
p.m.
Everything Old is New Again!, a musical revue,
at the Richmond Gateway Theatre, (270 1812),
November 6 to 23, Tuesday to Friday, 8:00 p.m..
Saturday, 5:30 and 9:00 p.m., Sunday, 2:00 p.m.
Waste
World Saxophone Quartet, from New York City,
presented by the Pacific Jazz and Blues Festival,
Robson Square Cinema (734-2828), November
15th, at 8:30 p.m.
Suffering Gaels and other performers from the
Vancouver Folk Song Society, at the Robson
Square Cinema (879-9972). November 8th, at 8:30
p.m.
Cecile Frenette, at the Landmark Jazz Bar
(Robson and Nicola, 687-9312), November 8th and
9th.
Jim Ptnschin, Jazz Quintet, at the Classical
Joint (231 Carrall Street, 689-0667), November 8th to
10th.
Jerry Jeff Walker, foot stompin' music, at the
Commodore (870 Granville, VTC, November 8th, at
8:30 p.m
Reggae Extravagance, at the Commodore
(VTC), November 9th, 8:00 p.m.
M.T. Vessels, at the Town Pump (66 Water
Street, 683-6695), November 8th and 9th.
Sounds Sensational from the Pacific Rim, at
the Vancouver East Cultural Society (1895
Venables, 254-9678), November 10th, at 8:00 p.m.
Little Mountain Band, presented by the Pacific
Bluegrass Heritage Society, at the ANZA Club (3
West 8th, 876-9788), November 11th, at 8:30 p.m.
Bach/Handel: Youthful Rarities, presented by
the Vancouver Cantata Singers, at the Orpheum
(280-4444), November 8th, at 8:30 p.m.
Salomon Quartet, from England, presented by
the Friends of Chamber Music, at the Queen
Elizabeth Playhouse (280-4444), November 12th, at
8:30 p.m.
Mike Harcourt and the rocking alderpersons, held
over at the Soft Rock Cafe.
EyUhik
Mao, the incredible wall climb<ng, man and
woman eating putty tat, I did I did, I did see that putty
tat climb Dorothy's wall.
The Expressive Hand: Images of Buddha,
presented by the Canadian Society for Asian Arts, at
the Asian Centre on campus, until November 15
from noon to 5:00 p.m.
RED LEAF
RESTAURANT
Luncheon Smorgasbord
Authentic Chinese Cuismv
228-9114
10CV DISCOUNT ON
PICK UP ORDERS
LICENSED PREMISES
Mini  Fri    11  30 <) 00 |i m
CLOSED SATURDAYS
Sunridys ,ind Holidays
4 00 p m   9 00 p rr.
2142 Western Parkway
UBC Village
Arthur Erickson: selected projects, an exhibit
of architectural drawings and models at the Vancouver Art Gallery (Georgia and Howe 682-5621),
until January 12.
Flown, paintings universale by Nicholas Fiwchuk,
at Pots Stews and Fondues (1221 Thurlow,
681-9812), held over until Nov. 30th.
Sally Michenar: Ceramic Sculpture, a bizzare
tableau vivant at the Surrey Art Gallery (13750 -
88th Avenue Surrey 596-7461) until November 24.
The Age of Paradox and Passion: prints of the
18th century at the Burnaby Art Gallery (6344 Gilpin
291-9441) until December 1.
Vancouver: six by six by six. The first annual Na
tional Exhibition of Small Scale Fine Crafts at the
Cartwright Gallery (411 Cartwright 687-8266) until
December 8.
It's time to go Hawaiian to support good causes all around Vancouver. Come out and support your
favourite Intramural Hockey team
during the United Way's Hawaiian
night Nov. 14. Prizes of Pit goodies
for good cheer.
BROADWAY RECORDS + TAPES
3207 West Broadway
(at Trutch) 736-1281 ,
Large selection of Rock, Soul, Jazz, Classical,
Folk ft Country Records, Tapes, Compact Discs a Accessories
DURING THE MONTH OF NOVEMBER
OFF ON ANY REG. PRICED LP OR CASSETTE
(with this ad)        ■—■'
Open 7 Days A Week
• Sundays 12-5
Gift Certificates Available
GENE HACKMAS
MATT DILLON
'othui^ exciting ever happened
in Chris lannlv Bui within 4s hours. Ins mother will be kidnapped.
His father will hr fun rd to reveal a si'-ret past and he will find
hnnseit at the i enter ot an adventure hr never
dreamed i iHild happen to him
TARGET
OSS pboouctkkws Prrsrnts A ZANUCK BROWN Produrtum   AN ARTHUR PENN Film
GENE HACKMAN ■ MATT DILLON
■'TARGET GAYLE HL'NNICU'IT ■ JOSEF SOMMER   Original Smr<- by MICHAEL SMALL
Storv bv LEONARD STERN   Srrrrnplay bv HOWARD BERK and DON PETERSEN
Produced bv RICHARD D ZANUCK and DAVID BROWN
Dm>rtrd In ARTHUR PENN rfmj ■J>\»*^
VRM R URl>*
OPENS FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8th AT A
THEATRE NEAR YOU
f
TALK OF THE TOWN.    *
p — ■¥pl
SUN.-WED. 10% U.B.C. STUDENT CARD DISCOUNT
2043 W. 4th AVE. Page 12
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, November 8, 1985
World peace is civic business
By BYRON JOHNSON
The Vancouver Peace Festival,
announced Monday by the Vancouver Centennial Commission,
will be the largest peace event held
in Canadian history, said End the
Arms Race vice-president Gary
Marchant.
In 1986, the U.N. International
Year of Peace, Vancouver will give
a centennial gift to Canada by
celebrating peace during Peace
Week, April 19-27.
Vancouver, one of the first Canadian cities to declare itself a nuclear
free zone, is the location of the
largest peace walk in North
America, and the 1986 Walk for
Peace will close off the week's activities.
The week is a joint initiative of
End the Arms Race, which
organizes the annual peace walk,
Vancouver's Centennial Commission and Vancouver's city council.
The city council's support for
peace actions has grown. "Peace is
now civic business, supporters for
peace actions are a majority on City
Council, the persistency paid off.
Politicians may be able to oppose
peace actions but they can not ignore them," said COPE councillor
Bruce Yorke.
"It was only natural that during
the Centennial, Vancouver should
celebrate the possibility of a second
century by holding a major peace
event," said Yorke. In 1984, city
council agreed to put $80,000
toward the Peace Festival and Symposium from the special events
budget of the Centennial Commission, he said.
In 1982, approximately 50 peace
groups in the Vancouver area formed End the Arms Race to coordinate the first Walk for Peace in
April 1982. About 35,000 people
walked in 1982, with 50,000 in 1983,
115,000 in 1984 and 85,000 this
year. This level of participation
made Vancouver's Walk for Peace
by far the largest in North America.
Marchant said the importance of
the Walk for Peace lies in "its
numbers which give a clear political
message of the level of public concern, its ability to get new people involved and in its joyous nature in
celebrating the peace movement."
The most intensive activity of this
year's Peace Week will be a
symposium, April 24-26. More than
20 internationally-renowned
speakers will address the participants of the five sessions in the
4,000 seat Orpheum Theatre.
Yorke said the sessions "will concern the current state of the nuclear
arms race, the economic and social
effects of the arms race on Canada
and other developed countries, the
social and health effects of the arms
race on Third World countries, the
role of individuals working for
peace and the role of medium-sized
governments in peace action."
UBC DEBATING SOCIETY
in co-operation with the
INTERNATIONAL YOUTH YEAR
SECRETARIATE
present
1985 UBC NATIONAL
UNIVERSITY DEBATING
CHAMPIONSHIPS
Come and see Canada's
Best public speakers in action
NOV. 9-11
Volunteer as a Judge
No experience needed
(Free lunches for all judges)
Call: 228-3835
*%J*:
J»-
gAfr'
WARNING: Health and Welfare Canada advises that danger to health increases with amount smoked — avoid inhaling. Average per Cigarette -
Export "A" Extra Light Regular "tar" 8.0 mg., nicotine 0.7 mg. King Size "tar" 9.0 mg., nicotine 0.8 mg.

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