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The Ubyssey Jan 22, 1971

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Array —david bowerman photo
THESE KIDS and unemployed workers are one thing, but this old clown in the brocade is WEIRD!"
Canadian content motion
causes Senate waffling
By JAN O'BRIEN
Senate declined Wednesday night to vote on a
motion designed to encourage Canadian content.
The motion proposes that senate encourage
faculty to include significant Canadian content
where it is appropriate to fulfill the objective of the
course.
It suggests this could be done in classroom
illustrations, bibliographies and research projects.
Senate felt the meaning of the motion could be
misconstrued and decided to refer it to a president's
committee for rewriting.
George Volkof, physics head, said, "We don't
want the implication that we are starting something
we haven't done before."
Frank Cairnie, B.C. Teachers Federation
representative who presented the motion, said it did
not imply criticism just as the senate's adoption of
Break for UBC
Mid-term break still applies this year, said
administrative president Walter Gage at Senate
Wednesday.
Gage said he had not discussed the possibility
of the cancellatiofl-Qf-JTiid-term break as was
reported in The Ubyssey Monday,..
The   Ubyssey   reporter   said   thg~i5rjr3J€et^of
mid-term    break    did    come    up    during    their .
conversation.
teaching standards last year did not imply the
faculty was not teaching.
The question of academic freedom was raised,
to which Cairnie replied, "It does not restrict
academic freedom, as Canadian content is to be
significant and appropriate to the subject.
"But there still are a great many courses and
departments   where   Canadian   content   can   be
examined."
to page 6: see UBC SHOULD
Pageantry,
discontent
in Victoria
VICTORIA (Staff) - Dissatisfaction among B.C. unemployed
came to the surface during the opening of the legislative assembly
Thursday.
What began as a demonstration by 1,500 unemployed workers
sponsored by the B.C. Federation of Labor ended in a skirmish between
police and about 175 demonstrators in the corridors of the legislative
building.
Six hundred people in fifteen buses left Vancouver Thursday
morning, arriving in Victoria shortly after noon.
The B.C. Fed provided lunches at Crystal Gardens, where the
demonstrators were joined by about 300 Vancouver Island residents.
During the lunch, Yippie (Youth International Party) members
noticed a microphone supplied for B.C. Fed speakers standing idle.
A Yippie identifying himself as Peter Kropotkin liberated the
mike and welcomed the crowd to Victoria.
Another Yippie then told the crowd to feel free to use the mike
and several people responded.
"Support your Jocal lower income group," was the message from
Walter Olszewski, president of the Victoria Lower Income Group.
Gary Porter, organizer of the Vancouver League for Socialist
Action was advocating a 30 hour work for 40 hours pay when B.C.
secretary Ray Haynes had the microphone cut off.
"These are the officials. Now for the officials," Haynes said,
while moving demonstrators from the platform.
An unidentified person yelled: "Now for the bureaucrats."
Retorted Haynes: "Yeah, we're the guys who paid the shot."
B.C. Fed commends turnout
B.C. Federation president George Johnson commended the
unemployed workers for the large turnout.
"We had feared not enough people would come," he said.
Loud applause greeted comments by Vancouver alderman Harry
Rankin.
"It is important for the people of B.C. to see unity around the
question of jobs," he said.
He asked people to remember that results cannot be obtained in
one day or by one trip to Victoria.
"Governments are not going to move unless the people move," he
said.
He said problems of unemployment cannot be solved under the
present system of government.
Johnson announced there will be simultaneous demonstrations in
front of the Vancouver and Victoria city halls at 11:00 a.m. Monday as
part of a day of protest against poverty.
The crowd then left the Crystal Gardens and marched to the
legislature by a circuitous route.
During the march, the crowd swelled to approximately 1,500.
While the crowd waited on the front lawn, a 45-member marching
band announced the arrival of 110 soldiers in full dress uniform.
The band was drowned out by the crowd chanting "We want
jobs," in time to the music. ^
NDP MLAs Ernest Hall and Barrett then attempted to speak to
the crowd but were unable to be heard above the chants of "down with
Bennett", "down with guns", "down with Gaglardi", and "we want
jobs".
Vancouver mayor Tom Campbell then arrived in a chauffered
limousine to receive the loudest boos of the day.
Campbell smiled and waved at the demonstrators while his wife
blew kisses to them.
Bennett then appeared on the scene, sauntering down the front
steps of the legislature to receive his share of the boos.
Following a 21-gun salute, the officials and an RCMP bodyguard
went into the legislature.
to page 16 see: PRESS
Reality bothers legislature
VICTORIA (Staff) - Belleville Street wasn't the same
Thursday.
The quiet street in front of the legislative buildings in
Victoria was the scene of heavy artillery and armed troops,
as members of the Fifth Field Battalion, Royal Canadian
Armed Forces (formerly the army) moved in and took up
position.
They were stationed as a formal military welcome for
Lieut.-Gov. Col. John Nicholson as he arrived to give the
throne speech opening the 1971 B.C. legislative session
Thursday.
But the forces could have been better used inside the
house to defend the honorable members from the attacks
of several members of the unemployment demonstration
outside, who invaded the chambers.
The incident happened as Nicholson was reading the
following section of the throne speech:
"I am pleased to report that the age of majority has
met with general approval and is proving beneficial to the
young people of this province.
"At my government's request, the end of juvenile age
under the federal juvenile delinquents act was lowered from
the 18th to the 17th birthday.
"Improvement in the administration of justice will
continue to be made through altered procedures and rules
of practice designed to reduce delay and inconvenience."
to page 16 see: WE Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, January 22,  1971
If if s new, UVic has it:
a dial-a-rumor service
VICTORIA (Staff) - The image of the smooth,
soft spoken, debonair University of Victoria
administration president was certainly smashed
Tuesday noon when Bruce Partridge attempted to
squash rumours that all was not well in the
university.
Partridge's image both around the campus and
amongst the business community up to now has
been very good. He has always come across well in
the press and the electronic media.
However, at the meeting Tuesday, he lost his
cool under a barrage of student and faculty attacks,
and shunned the members of the press who had
been waiting for two days to speak with him about
the current tenure promotion dispute.
Before   the   meeting began, members of the
PARTRIDGE . . . 'know the facts'
steering committee of the Representative Assembly
(Student Council) had set up their own speaker
system to make sure the students were heard.
One student appeared at the
administration-called- meeting carrying a machine
gun.
When told by an administration official that the,
gun looked offensive, the unidentified student
responded, "It's supposed to look offensive."
Three thousand students and faculty gathered
at the meeting and were greeted with signs and
placards saying, "How can you even say that?";
"This is probably an outrage!"; "Keep on trucking";
"Today is Tuesday"; "Are you worth $50,000?"
(referring to the president's salary; "If your mother
didn't say it, it can't be true"; and "Martlet is
motherhood" (referring to allegations that the
student paper has been misleading).
Students were also flooded with literature from
both sides.
One pamphlet distributed by the administration
had a covering letter from Partridge saying "In
recent weeks there have been a number of
unsubstantiated rumours floating about the campus.
Recognizing that some have caused concern, I
believe you should know the facts relating to them.
"I have asked Mr. Nels Granewall (a university
financial aid officer) to serve as a clearinghouse for
rumors during the next few weeks."
The letter continued by requesting that
students who hear a rumor, phone Granewell to find
out the truth.
The attached five page memo from the
president to the students outlined both the
"rumors" and the "facts".
The first rumor, that the university was
conducting a purge of the faculty, was not denied in
the sheet. Dr. Partridge carefully outlined that the
five persons who were notified last year constitute
l'/4% of the faculty and that'the two who were
purged this year only represent %%.
To squash rumors that the president was
avoiding the CAUT hearings, Partridge outlined his
entire itinerary on his trip to Mexico, including
flight numbers.
In the same document, Partridge denied that he
was a campaign manager for Spiro T. Agnew by
saying that he had never participated in politics, at
any level.
"The   crowd   today   is   a   good   and   valid
indication of the concern of the students for the~
welfare   of  the university,"  said Willard Ireland,
Chairman of the Board of Governors.
Ireland explained the difficulty in talking about
all twelve cases as a "total package deal" since each
of the twelve is an individual case invoiing totally
separate details.
"We follow the Tenure Document not because
it's what we like, and we don't, but because it's all
we've got," said Roderick Haig-Brown, UVic
Chancellor.
"The university must have change and growth,"
he said. "Short term contracts allow for this."
"The university hires on evidence; much of it
heresay," he said. "Today's fashionable teacher may
be a bore in five years."
"I am very impressed with the quality of
education here," said Lloyd MacKenzie,
vice-chairman of the Board. "Not only can I find
someone who can say bullshit but I can also find
someone who can spell it."
"We found one who can speak it," yelled one
student.
The elusive Mr. Partridge
VICTORIA (Staff) -
University of Victoria president
Dr. Bruce Partridge played hard to
get following the mass meeting
Tuesday, and led a television crew
on a chase through the
gymnasium before disappearing
into a crowd just outside the
door.
The crew approached Partridge
as he came down from the
speakers platform at the close of
the meeting, and asked him if he
would grant them a brief
interview.
"I don't have time," replied
Partridge as he made his way
towards the nearest exit, "I have a
meeting at three p.m."
The television crews persisted,
and tried to interview him as he
walked away.
The more the reporters
questioned Partridge the more he
tried to avoid them by dodging
between students, and quickening
his pace.
"Can we talk with you as you
walk?" asked the reporters. "If you
can keep up," quipped Partridge.
In the confusion Partridge
almost walked into the women's
washroom. He caught himself in
time, however, and scrambled for
the main door with the reporters
in hot pursuit.
He shook off his tail just
outside the doors by
disappearing in a crowd of milling
students.
Minutes later Partridge
re-appeared and began looking
for the television people.
He   found   the   crew   angrily
muttering "If that's the way he
wants it that's just fine."
"Now hold on fellas," said
Partridge, "I didn't mean to act
tough, but I've got an important
meeting at three and I can't be
late."
"All we want is a two minute
interview," explained the
reporters.
"I can't make a two minute
statement," Partridge replied,
"I'm late."
"You're on camera now," the
camera man called out and the
radio and television people held
microphones up to Partridge's
mouth.
"I thought the meeting was
just fine," said Partridge as he
flashed a smile at the camera.
The reporters were not
impressed.
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REGISTERS) JEWELLER, AMERICAN GEM SOCIETY
 -~:—'        Granville at Pender Since 1904	 Friday, January 22,  1971
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 3
Report spots AMS ineffectiveness
By JOHN ANDERSEN
Death, taxes and Alma Mater Society structural
changes.
Those appear to be inevitable for UBC students, who
will be presented with the annual set of AMS structural
changes at Wednesday's general meeting.
The main changes to be decided at the meeting
involve a re-organization of the AMS executive, the
re-definition of the functions of the executive and a
re-alignment of relations between the executive and AMS
administrative staff.
The changes are recommended in a $12,000 report on
the function and structure of the society by management
consultants Kates, Peat, Marwick and Co.
Conclusions in the report are largely drawn from a
survey last summer on the needs of UBC students.
Approximately 2,000 students participated.
The report recommends the present seven-person
voting executive be reduced to five members: a president,
three vice-presidents and a treasurer.
The three vice-presidents would each be responsible
for one of the three main areas of student interest as
indicated by the survey: academics, student services and
community services.
The present positions of internal affairs officer and
secretary will be eliminated as voting members of the
executive.
The present position of vice-president will become
vice-president — academic, the coordinator will become
vice-president — student services and the external affairs
officer will become vice-president — community services
under the proposed scheme.
The third major change involves making the general
manager directly responsible to the AMS president. At
present, he reports to the treasurer.
This is intended to give the president a better idea of
how his administrative resources will respond to any
demands placed on it.
—david bowerman photo
"I'M TELLING YOU Francis, it's a yak," says one observer of the Aggies' apple cart beast of burden. Aggies chose this
cross between a Saint Bernard and a llama to pull the weight Wednesday as faculty members peddled orchard wares on
campus. Despite the size of the animal, the record shows that the apple cart was not upset ...
AMS to lean on users of hot goods
Alma Mater Society decided it will exert pressure on
all campus organizations still using supplies from the
strike bound A. B. Dick Company of Canada, at
Wednesday's council meeting.
The motion followed receipt of a brief sent to council
by UBC's New Democratic Party club, requesting council
to take action against such groups, and urging that they
refrain immediately from dealing with A. B. Dick.
A NDP club spokesman said by taking such action,
council would not be supporting either management or
labor, but would ease tensions of students who would not
wish to cross the picket lines that may form around all
users of A. B. Dick materials.
In  September,   1970, the  Retail, Wholesale, and
Department Store Union was certified by the department
of labor to bargain on behalf of the sixteen A. B. Dick
employees, in their wage dispute with the company.
After almost two months of fruitless attempts at a
collective bargaining, the employees went on strike.
The B.C. Federation of Labor declared all products of
A. B. Dick "hot" in November, 1970.
No mention was made of action council will take
against users of A. B. Dick supplies.
It is believed organizations still dealing with A. B.
Dick include: the faculties of law, education, commerce
and applied science; the registrar's office and the health
sciences centre.
The AMS recently cancelled its contract with A. B.
Dick and is dealing with other firms.
Roof danger at T-bird sports centre
The Thunderbird Winter Sports Centre is operating at
one-third ice capacity because the management fears
faulty beams may cause a roof collapse.
A fault was found in one of the two new rinks,
opened last year at the cost of $ 1 million.
It was discovered last Thursday, when the rink was
filled with physical education students, that one of the
90-foot laminated cross-beams branching off from the
main support beam, had a large crack running its entire
"Jength.
Consequently, both rinks were closed, and it was
discovered that other beams had similar faults.
The old rink remained open, and No. 1 rink will be in
""•operation by this weekend. "But it is anyone's guess when
No. 2 rink will be reopened," Stan Floyd, manager of the
stadium said Thursday.
"The cause of the fault is not exactly known, but a
manufacturing flaw is suspected," said Franz Conrad of
physical plant.
The manufacturer, Glue Lam Products of Fraser
Mills, is already checking similar beams that have been
installed in some 300 other structures on the Lower
Mainland.
"The humidity of the arena could have caused a
differential moisture content between the inner and outer
laminations, creating strong internal forces," said Conrad.
"A slight flaw would then have caused a split."
Despite the problems Floyd assures students that
they can come and watch the Thunderbird hockey team
play the University of Manitoba this weekend, with no
risk to their lives.
The management firm also proposed that the AMS
council be abolished entirely because "it could only serve
as an impediment to an executive."
This was later changed to a recommendation that the
constitution be revised to remove from the AMS council
"any power to obstruct the implementation of AMS
executive policies."
Changing the role of council will not be voted on at
the general meeting, however. Rather, it will be decided
by the council members themselves.
The report made several sharp criticisms of the
present AMS.
Students are becoming increasingly antagonistic
toward the AMS because of its lack of effectiveness, the
report said.
"The existing organization is such as to justify the
students' complaints of an ill-defined reporting
relationship, a lack of definition of responsibility and
general overall ineffectiveness," the report said.
"The basic problem is a lack of awareness by the
executive of what the AMS is trying to accomplish and
where it is failing," the report said.
The report also took a swipe at AMS general manager
Ron Pearson and unnamed administrative staff.
"The personal effectiveness of certain administrative
staff was found to be wanting," the report said.
"In particular, the general manager appeared to hold
a low opinion of the responsibility and decision-making
ability of the students, his employers.
"As a result, this attitude often lead (sic) to
antagonism between the general manager and the student
body as a whole," the report said.
The report said many of the problems with the
administrative staff resulted from "the fact that no
direction was received from the executive."
However, "personalities in the administrative area
continue to play an important role in the organization,"
the report said.
A move to fire Pearson in 1969 failed by a 14-34
vote of Council.
Hodge loses,
council stays
By NETTIE WILD
Despite earlier suggestions, the size of the Alma
Mater Society council will not be reduced from 40
members to 17.
The suggestion, supported by AMS president Tony
Hodge and rejected by council, was to be placed before
Wednesday's general meeting as a minority council
recommendation.
However, council Wednesday night voted that no
minority recommendations will be placed before the
general meeting. Because the rules of an AMS general
meeting do not allow motions from the floor, the
suggested constitutional change cannot be introduced.
"Those attending general meetings represent less of a
student cross-section than council," said social work rep
Bob Smith. "Council has decided it does not want the
reduction."
Council also passed a motion to propose to the
general meeting a constitutional change eliminating
eligibility requirements for students running for AMS
executive positions.
Currently students must have attended UBC for at
least a year before they can run for any position. Under
these conditions first year students cannot run for office
as they have not completed a full year.
Don Palmer, Arts Undergrad Society president said
the present system would present problems for the
students coming from junior colleges.
They would be in their third year and unable to run
because they would not have completed their full year
UBC requirement by the spring elections.
Palmer also moved a second constitutional change
to guarantee all undergraduate societies an annual income
of $200 plus 40c per capita of enrolment according to the
enrolment of the year before.
The motion was passed with exception of the time of
payment allotment.
Ryerson to speak
Stanley Ryerson will speak on Quebec: the colony
within Canada noon today in the SUB ballroom.
An historian of Canada and Quebec, he is author of
The Founding of Canada and Unequal Union which
outline and analyze the origins of the intense conflicts of
today. Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, January 22,  1971
Passing the bus
Are they serious?
We always hesitate when the time comes to write
something about the AMS council, but since council, for
all its inanity, is charged with the care and feeding of
some $500,000 of our money, we suppose something
has to be said now and then.
The old gang was in fine form for this week's
Wednesday night get-together.
Highlight of the evening, aside from a couple of
hours of esoteric constitutional nonsense, was council's
vote requesting the resignation of external affairs officer
Peter Hlookoff.
Council members self-righteously charged that
Hlookoff had violated the solemn trust placed upon him
by the students (or at least the 300 students who
bothered to vote in that particular election) by taking
office and doing nothing.
It was all quite funny.
Perhaps Hlookoff has done nothing, but what
have the other executive members done?
If inactivity is a sufficient reason for demanding
executive resignations, the entire executive should leave
with Hlookoff and we suspect most executive members
know it.
No, Hlookoff's crime was not so much that he
hasn't done anything as it was that he hasn't pretended
to be doing something.
It is impossible to find an AMS executive who is
not shuffling papers, answering a telephone or rushing
off to the day's fifth meeting.
But the fact is that for all such apparent activity,
none of them have really done anything that really
matters to the students. Because Hlookoff refused to
play the game of make believe, he is no longer wanted in
the club.
The acid test of the whole thing is this: If
Hlookoff has done nothing, have you noticed? Has
anything been better or worse because there was not a
firm guiding hand in the external affairs office?
Similarly, would your life be materially affected if
vice-president John Scott Mitchell was to be abducted
by a fashion photographer or treasurer Stuart Bruce
was to go stark raving mad trying to figure out the AMS
business operation?
If your answer to any of the above questions is
"yes", chances are you already hold some sort of AMS
title.
LETTERS
Third world
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
With reference to your reply to
the co-operative letter signed by
various overseas student
associations Tuesday, may I
humbly submit that you have
spouted bullshit.
Where and when have you ever
countered any "pro-western
propaganda" that you have
proudly boasted?
It is a pity that you have not
yet recognized your paper's bias
towards "petty mundanities of
every day living." There are other
places besides Pango Pango.
PHILIP F. W. BARTLE
grad studies
Mr. Bartle, of all people,
should know how easy it is for
people who know something
about the third world to get
articles published in The Ubyssey.
The Fraser Group, a group of
UBC students doing research on
the third world, and with which
Mr. Bartle has been associated,
wrote a two-page article on
Canadian exploitation of
underdeveloped nations, which
was published on March 26,1970.
Similarly, we gave coverage to the
formation at UBC of a branch of
the African Relief Services
Committee — the Biafra
moratorium movement.
We ran extensive coverage of
the Sir George Williams University
trials, a third world issue if there
ever was one. Our stand on the
Vietnamese struggle against U.S.
imperialism needs no explanation.
Our problem this year is that
Bartle and others who in the past
have been responsible for our
coverage of the Third World seem
to have retreated into the
woodwork. So far we have seen
nothing of the calibre of the
Angola Liberation Movement
pictures we ran on two occasions
last year, or the list of South
African immigration regulations
and repressive laws which we also
ran.
On the opposite page is the
first such piece we've seen.
Hopefully there will be many more.
Part of our lack of response to
the international community at
UBC has been the unfortunate
reluctance of foreign students to
talk about even their experiences
at UBC, let alone their own
countries. One reporter who spent
the better part of two days in
International House a couple of
years ago couldn't find one person
who    would    say   anything    for
publication.  All  were  afraid  of'
recrimination from their national
governments if they spoke out.
Finally, if Bartle would get out
from behind his MA. thesis and
departmental letterhead he would
probably realize that the petty
mundanities of everyday living are
what a lot of people want to read
about. Things like eating —
problems for about 30 per cent of
Canadians, too. Or the problems
of white Canada's racism toward
natives. If our concern with the
problems of Canadian society is a
bias, we admit it and we're proud
of it, even though they may not
be as glamorous — or as safe to
tackle — as the problems of the
third world. — Ed.
THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C.
Editorial opinions are those of the writer ind not of the AMS or
the University administration. Member, Canadian University Press.
Founding member. Pacific Student Press. The Ubyssey publishes
Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. The Ubysse'y's
editorial offices are located in room 241K of the Student Union
Building. Editor, 228-2301; city editor, 228-2305; news editor,
228-2307; Page Friday, 228-2309; sports, 228-2308; advertising,
228-3977.
JANUARY 22,  1971
Editor: Nate Smith
News Maurice Bridge
City     Ginny Gait
Jan O'Brien
Wire    John Andersen
Managing     Bruce Curtis
Sports Keith Dunbar
Ass't News    Jennifer Jordan
Leslie Plommer
Photo    David Enns
David Bowerman
Page Friday Tim Wilson
David Schmidt took off as Nettie
went Wild and Phil Barked for all he
was    Worth.    Dick    Betts    and   John
Andersen showed signs of liberation,
but Mike Sasges has a long way to go
before he'll see women like Sandy Kass
and Josephine Margolis as real people.
Paul Knox pledged to help while
fending off Mike Finlay, whose true
calling is selling books, not writing them,
Kathy Carney didn't buy because she
was visiting Cece Bennett, but Ken
Lassesen, Jan O'Brien, Judy McLeod
and Nathalie Apouchtine forked over
the cash. Jinny Ladner took to the hills
with Bill Ruby, Steve Willard and Tony
Gallagher. Jim Davies sank into the
mire with David Bowerman. Rosie was
there too. ' Friday, January 22,  1971
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 5
International House:
'colonial
relic'
By STEVE McFIELD
International House is, I hope, the last colonial
institution that international students at this University
will have to contend with.
I say it is colonial because of its bureaucratic
structure and obsolete functions. The name International
House implies that it's comprised of an international
governing body when in fact it is not.
The top people at I.H. are the board of directors. The
board consists of four faculty member, four students, four
community members and an ex-officio member who is
also the chairman of a program and service committee,
which is supposed to represent the ideas of international
students and to promote activities of their interests.
The insulting thing about this colonial hierarchy is
that members of the board do not represent the different
nationalities. Board members do not perform any
international function other than sitting on the board.
I am not saying that there should not be a board -
but what I will say is that the board should be composed
of international students and should not be dominated by
UBC.
The directions that International House has followed
are an insult to the needs of the international community.
If I.H. is to be judged by its performance, then I can
legitimately say that it is not needed.
It should stop operating under the guise of an
international body. The so-called program and service
committee is insulting to myself and many others.
. Instead of trying to comprehend the urgent problems
that international students face, these people ignore them.
Instead of getting involved in pressing issues that
international students face daily on this campus and in
this community, they plan "International Balls" - yes,
balls at the Hotel Vancouver and a beer garden at I.H.,
while foreign black students are denied a place to live, to
sleep, to study.
They wine and dine, and "they" include those foreign
students who kick up their heels and grin from ear to ear
just to belong and to be accepted.
This is colonialism. This is the kind of student that
most Canadians know. The kind that they do not accept
in their homes and apartments to live.
International House supplies the occasions and the
white-washed black-faced whitemask supplies the
entertainment. He pretends that everything is all right.
This is colonialism.
If International House wants to function in the
manner that is set out in the preamble for its existence, I
would suggest that it do the following immediately:
■ Make some demands to get foreign students
housing on campus for those who want to live there.
Foreign students have enough to do without running
around Vancouver to have doors slammed in their faces.
■ Amend the constitution to give the final say in the
activities of I.H. to the students, replacing the present
system under which only the UBC board of governors can
allow the Constitution to be amended. This satellite
position is one of constitutional subordination. It is a
colonial relic.
■ Play a greater role within the community and
inform Canadians of their part in exploiting the third
world.
■ Make a solid effort to help eliminate discrimination
against international students in housing and allocate
resources to the education of the Canadian masses toward
their moral obligation.
■ Press for the use of third world peoples' potential
in the university structure.
■ Make a genuine attempt to make International
House a truer representation of international ideas and
problems.
If International House carries on dancing and beering
without first addressing itself to these proposals, I can
only say that I and those who share my views will not
only be disillusioned but alienated. To carry on in the
present manner is to perpetuate a weak and useless
system. Quasi attempts wul not do. Only meaningful
action can be looked upon with respect.
(Steve McField is a UBC student from the Cayman
Islands.)
AMS officer refuses to quit
Alma Mater Society external affairs officer Peter
Hlookoff was asked for his resignation Wednesday night,
but has refused to give it.
Hlookoff said he will not comply with an AMS
council motion requesting his resignation until he has
taken the matter to Wednesday's general meeting.
AMS president Tony Hodge, who first asked for
Hlookoff s resignation earlier this week, said Hlookoff had
done nothing in his job and had not been present at
meetings for Six weeks.
Hlookoff replied that the entire council is guilty of
doing nothing during its term.
Grad student president David Mole said Hlookoff had
lived up to the standards of his job by doing nothing.
"At least Peter's inactivity is ideologically based. The
other executive members do nothing because they suffer
from a chronic lack of competence," Mole said.
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FPR UBC 25 Page 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, January 22,  1971
'UBC should get
Canada centre'
from page One
Dean of women, Helen McCrae suggested what students were
really asking for was a centre for studying Canadian affairs.
Political science head Walter Young, said the motion would
indicate the university is aware of growing concern among students
about Canadian content.
"There is something anomulous about a Canadian studies centre
in a Canadian university," he said.
Cyril Belshaw, anthropology sociology head said: "I'm frustrated,*
Senate encourages something but doesn't say how. I
"We are suffering from lack of financial support. Canadian
content will not be achieved until the Board of Governors puts money
into Canadian research.
After the waffling and discussion senate expressed sympathy for
the motion and referred it to the chair for rewriting.
Earlier in the meeting senate approved the proposal to establish a
water resources research centre.
The centre would be funded by the national government and
work done by faculty members now at UBC would be expanded on an
interdisciplinary level.
Student senator Art Smolensky stressed the need for a Canadian
staff because of the sensitive nature of water resources in relation to
national policy.
After the meeting Smolensky said he had been alluding to the
expected appointment of Irving Fox, as director of the UBC research
centre.
Fox is presently at the Wisconsin school of planning and water
resource centre.
Vice-president William Armstrong, who is responsible for the
hiring, said there were three Canadians suitable for the job, but none
were available.
One man died and the other two could not be sprung from their
a SUB Film SOC presentation-
the
President's
Analyst
JAMES
COBURN
Your kind of shrink!
-Great Satiric Comedy—
Friday 22 & Saturday 23
7:00&9:30
Sunday 24-7:00
SUB THEATRE
AMS Students—50c
General Public—75c
jobs.
Armstrong said Fox was better than any Canadian in the field and
would be a good man to bring the other members of the research centre
together in interdisciplinary research.
Senate also approved course changes, additions and deletions in
39 departments. This includes the addition of 66 courses to the faculty
of arts.
The last piece of business required senate approval of the colors
of new graduating hoods.
Liquor now served Tuesday
The Pit and the liquor service at the Ponderosa have been
extended to an extra day a week.
"The Pit will be open Tuesday to Thursday from 3:30 to 11:30
p.m." said Graeme Vance, SUB Building Manager.
'The Pit has proven extremely popular and adding another day is
one way of extending the load."
The Ponderosa is now serving wine and beer with meals Tuesday
and Thursday from 4 to 6:30 p.m. as a result of the success of its
Thursday service started last fall.
PAT PAULSEN
LOOKS AT
THE 70's
Tonight at 7:30
SUB Ballroom
The program consists of a four-part lecture series:
1) "How To Survive The Next Ten Years"
2) "Astrology, Zen, Occult, and Things That Go Bump in The Night"
3) "The Sexual Revolution-Is SEX a Four-Letter Word?"
4) "The Spaceship Earth Is Getting Fuller, Buckminster"
In addition, each  member of the audience will be able to take part in a National
Mediocrity Test which will be graded and returned to the individual.
~»
A sample question:
MIDI SKIRTS PREVENT:
A. Slips Showing
B. Knees Showing
C. Wet Dreams
!_.
Tickets $2.00 at the SUB Information Desk and at the door
FACULTY OF
PHARMACEUTICAL
SCIENCES
C.A.P.S.I. Referendum
Yes 42    No 54
DEFEATED
Ph.U.S. Referendum
Yes 79     No 18
PASSED
A Vh HOUR, COLORED
FILM from CHINA
THE EAST
IS RED
*
ff £*
English Subtitles
* A song and dance epic of the
Chinese Revolution
* A   unique   display   of   modern
Chinese arts and culture
* An    inspiring    performance
' involving more than 3,000 artists
TIME:
Jan. 28 (Thur.) 1:00 p.m.
Jan. 29 (Fri.) 7:30 p.m.
PLACE:
OLD AUDITORIUM, UBC
Admission:
Students-$1.00   Others-$1.25
rmnf im^t fln>»riTMi
GRADUATION (ciass Gift)
This year we have *19,591 of your MONEY as 1971 graduates, so what do you think we
should spend it on? Your Grad Class Executive needs ideas from anyone & everyone. It may involve
initiating a new project or supporting an established one. Please let us have a brief, clear account of
proposed projects including the dollar commitment & the rationale for such selection. Suggestions must be
received before Thurs., January 28, 1971. Address all ideas to Box 41, Student Union Building, U.B.C.
Include name, address, telephone & best time to contact during the day.
Remember, it's *19,591 of your MONEY!
GRAD CLASS GENERAL MEETING
THURS., FEB. 4. 1971 at 12:30 noon in SUB AUDITORIUM -
PROPOSED AGENDA:   1) Approve budget & social activities;
2) Elect honorary positions;
3) Allocate class gift.
This will be your last chance to have your say in
your grad class activities!
1) Questionnaires should be in by Fri.^ Jan. 22, 1971
2) Have you had your picture taken yet? — Candid Photo by appt.  ffc S& cf Hionids 01cpZ2teT);
W£E JJ-IN WHICH  ftHONBlB IS
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K-St^Ltm
PATIOJ
EAT IN -TAKEOUT. DELIVERY.
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Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. & Sat. 3 a.m.
NEW and USED
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• Pocket Books * Magazines
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BETTER BUY BOOKS
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a SUB Film SOC presentation-
the
President's
Analyst
JAMES
COBURN
Your kind of shrink!
MWMMMMlMMNMM
—Great Satiric Comedy-
Friday 22 & Saturday 23
7:00 & 9:30
Sunday 24-7:00
SUB THEATRE
AMS Students-50c
General Public—75c
MM
THE UNIVERSITY OF B.C.
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
ENDGAME
by SAMUEL BECKETT
January 29th to February 6th
directed by Stanley Weese
STUDENT TICKETS $1.00
(AVAILABLE FOR ALL PERFORMANCES)
SPECIAL STUDENT PERFORMANCES
Monday, Feb. 1st, 7:30 p.m.
Thursday, Feb. 4 - Matinee 12:30 p.m.
Tickets: Frederic Wood Theatre - Rm. 207
SUPPORT YOUR CAMPUS THEATRE!
Page Friday, 2
THE      UBYSSEY
PF Masthead
T.W.
There is a fellow named Anthony V. Mandel in Room 230
SUB, who needs a back up group for dancers, classical or other?
guitarists, male and female singers, stage designers and even
assistant producers (stagehands) for a non-profit musical
production by the students of UBC.
Now, is it going to be in the old auditorium, perhaps the
gym, maybe SUB ballroom? But no, on Friday, February 26, Mr.
Mandl is putting on a show at the Queen Elizabeth Theatre, a
show compsed entirely of UBC students. So if you're a budding,
burgeoning, mushrooming or even cataclysmic artist, then you
better get down to his office.
David Lui, our own UBC impressario, brings the Japanese
company the Noh Theatre to Vancouver soon. Lui has also been
instrumental in bringing Pat Paulsen through the AMS special
events committee. Paulsen will be here tonight in SUB ballroom
withth his lecture series on things like, is S-E-X a four letter
word? Tickets at the AMS office on the second floor, or at the
information desk, $2.00 per skull.
Anything that might have happened last week, just forget
about it.
Starting next week, Page Friday will publish ticket prices
for all the theatres along with what they are playing, well not all,
only those that give student prices. This is the least amount of
encouragement we can give to the barons of the movie houses. To
help take the strain off our collective empty pockets.
As a glowing Grant Dickin hurried to blue pencil any obfuscations in
this limitless orb of pleasing planaria, Nettie Wild wobbled with worry over
her latest expose of the stage, Keith Dunbar caught his foot in a folding
camera, screamed Tuum Est and was last seen on dry ice in the darkroom.
Grant turned back to his typewriter as the storm raged outside, the
wind whistled and howled through the cracks of his meagre dwelling,
cutting him to the bone through a sweater that he took from a dead Indian
on Seymour Mountain, Lightning flashed, and for a moment, a long
moment, maybe even two moments, his face was exuberant in the harsh
electrical light, he lifted up one debilitated foot, then the other, and
groaning, he laboriously typed out this message . . .
Due to the space limitations we regret that we are unable to
mention those who contributed to this issue. But, we'll all remember you.
And finally, poor undernourished Grant typed this postscript, with
many spelling errors due to the increasing cold and the awkwardness of
typing with size thirteen feet...
'Tell Laura I love her!"
SPAGHETTI HOUSE LTD.
Hot Delicious Tasty Pizzas
- 22 DIFFERENT FLAVORS -
FREE DELIVERY - Right to Your Door
Phone 224-1720  -  224-6336
HOURS: 4 p.m. to 3 a.m. — Weekends 4 p.m. to 4 a.m.
4450 West 10th Ave. -Just outside the Gates
Friday, January 22, 1971 Up
a
Tree
Tonight, however, was different.
Tonight, I climbed a tree.
I had sized it up months ago, determined that I would climb it, but I had been unable to do
it.
I had noticed the tree before. I had in fact, passed it nearly every day for about a year. On
that occasion, however, I had looked at it anew, and decided it merited closer attention. I walked
past several times, but I eventually passed on.
Again and again I had returned, paused in front of the tree, and continued on my way, only
to turn around once more. But I could not bring myself to climb it.
I had examined it closely. I had stopped-long enough to-touch it in several places. I was even
bold enough to grasp several handholds.
I satisfied myself with the excuse that it was late, and added to that the fact that it was cold.
Luckily, it was also raining, so I could claim that as a decisive factor. Fortified with such
reasoning, I had turned from the tree and gone to my room.
Tonight, however, was different.
Again, I walked past the tree several times. Again, I stopped in front of it, paused, and
continued walking. But when I could see no-one in the vicinity, and there were no headlights on
the road, I did it.
I stepped beneath the lowest branch. I reached into the air. The branch was several inches
above my fingers. I leaped into the air, grasped the slippery bough in my hands and swung my feet
up into the tree.
I was there. Pausing only slightly, I continued on my way. Grabbing another branch and
finding another foothold, I moved into an upright position. Several movements later, I had
advanced to what I believed to be the greatest height possible.
I was a dizzying thirteen feet from the ground. To be more precise, my eyes were thirteen
feet from the ground. Even my feet were well over six and a half feet from the surface of the
earth.
I found a comfortable position, leaned back and contemplated the view. Below me, behind,
ahead, and to my right, lay the road. A sidewalk passed beneath me and ahead of me. To my left,
were several large buildings housing people. All around me was darkness.
I sat and waited.
Nothing happened.
No-one ventured forth from any of the buildings to congratulate me upon my feat. No girls
came to the base of the tree to ask, timidly, if they could join me. No-one came to note the event
for the Totem Park Yearbook.
Slightly disappointed, I reached into my coat pocket and pulled out my marshmallows.
There were only two left.
I decided to eat one.
At that moment, two persons appeared on my right. I froze where I was in the tree, making
no sound. I even stopped chewing my marshmallow. Would I be seen? Would someone, for no
particular reason, look up and notice me sitting in the tree?
They passed by.
Another came. He too, did not notice me.
Two girls. They didn't look at the tree.
A guy and a girl. Neither of them looked up.
I decided to watch the road, instead.
At that point in the road there is a sharp curve. Cars going one way, I noted, tend to edge
into the other lane, while cars coming from the opposite direction tend to use part of that lane.
What, I thought, if two cars were to come upon this spot from opposite directions at the same
time. The result was obvious.
I would be the only witness to such an accident at that time of night. A lawsuit of course.
And I would be called to testify. I knew what a grilling I would get from the lawyer:
Lawyer: And you witnessed the accident?
Me: I did.
Lawyer: And (snicker) where were you when you witnessed the accident?
Me: (Wondering who tipped him off.) Uh ... in a tree.
(General laughter in the courtroom. Judge bangs gavel for silence.)
Lawyer: And (snicker) just what were you doing... in the tree?
Me: Uh... sitting.
Lawyer: Sitting. (Snicker.) Anything else?
Me: Yeah. Eating marshmallows.
I decided not to witness any accidents.
I ate my last marshmallow.
Time passed, the wind blew, and I began to get a feeling of security from the fact that I was
unseen to those who passed by and below me. I was thinking upon that when I was addressed from
below.
There was a Buildings and Grounds truck on the road beneath me. It was stopped and a man
was leaning out the door.
"What are you doing up in that tree?", he demanded.
"What are you doing down there in that truck?".', I returned. Orant
The door slammed, and I heard a muffled mutter as the truck moved away.
Dickin
Rudy & Peters Motors Ltd.
VOLKSWAGEN SPECIALISTS
Quality  Workmanship
Competitive Prices
Genuine Volkswagen Parts Only
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225 E. 2nd Ave.
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The University of British Columbia
READING & STUDY
SKILLS PROGRAM
SPRING 1971
Reading Improvement Course for
Students and Adults
The U.B.C. Reading Improvement Course offers individualized
programs for adults, university and college students, senior high
school students and others who wish to improve their reading and
study skills for educational, business, professional and personal
reasons.
Coursework emphasizes: increase in reading speed and
comprehension-previewing, skimming and scanning-study habits
and skills - critical reading skills - flexibility of reading rate -
reading skills in subject matter, professional, academic and special
interest areas.
Classes begin the week of January 25 and meet for VA
hours - twice weekly for six weeks in  East Mall Annex
(Rooms 116,118 and 119), U.B.C.
Fees:
Students   $30.00   (Senior   high   school   students,  college  and
university students)
Adults $60.00 (Part-time adult students and non-student adults)
Fee   includes    testing,   materials,   counselling,   use   of   reading
laboratory during current and future sessions.
Class Schedule: Early registration is recommended
SECTION
TIME
DAY
ROOM
1
3:30-5:00
Mon.-Wed.
119
Student
2
3:30-5:00
Tues.-Thurs.
119
Student
3
5:30-7:00
Mon.-Wed.
119
Student
4
5:30-7:00
Mon.-Wed.
118
Student
5
5:30-7:00
Tues.-Thurs.
119
Student
6
5:30-7:00
Tues.-Thurs.
118
Student
7
7:30-9:00
Mon.-Wed.
119
Adult
8
7:30-9:00
Mon.-Wed.
118
Student
9
7:30-9:00
Tues.-Thurs.
119
Adult
10
7:30-9:00
Tues.-Thurs.
118
Student
11
9:00-12:00
Saturday
118
Adult
12
9:00-12:00
Saturday
116
Grade 8-11
Writing Improvement Program -
SPRING
1971
Improve your essay writing ... This course is designed for those
who wish to improve the quality of their essay writing. The
common core of content for all sections includes the principles of
composition and the study of essay organizations and structure.
The instructor helps identify and deal with individual student
needs and also focuses on problems common to all students in the
class. Meetings consist of brief lectures, writing practice and
seminars.
Classes begin the week of January 18 and meet for 3 hours
once a week for 7 weeks in Room 1221, Buchanan
Building, U.B.C. Campus.
FEES:
Students  $30.00   (senior   high   school,  college and  university
students taking 9 units or more)
Adults $60.00 (part-time adult students, non-student adults)
CLASS SCHEDULE:
Section 1
Section 2
Section 3
Section 4
Students
Adults &
Sr. Students
Adults
Students
Tuesdays
Thursdays
Thursdays
Tuesdays
7-10 p.m.
7-10 p.m.
7-10 p.m.
7-10 p.m.
Name of Course  Fee enclosed
Section
Name (Mr.-, Mrs., Miss)      	
Address Phone
Occupation    Employer Phone
Student     Institution    Year'.
Please make cheques payable to the University of B.C. and forward with
this form to Education-Extension, Center for Continuing Education,
University of B.C., Vancouver, 8, B.C. (228-2181).
Friday, January 22, 1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page Friday. 3 Just before Christmas, two new individual Beattle albums
appeared, and their timely appearance was of course heralded by
the playing of "Jingle Bells" on innumerable cash registers. Crass
commercialism aside, the long-awaited solo productions of John
Lennon and George Harrison certainly help to reveal where the
real talent lay in the old Beatles. Both efforts are head and
shoulders above Paul McCartney's first album, which of course
came out last year. Where McCartney's record exuded an air of
ho-hum offhandedness, both Lennon's and Harrison's sound as if
they've been worked on with at least a modicum of care.
John's album, The Plastic Ono Band (SW 3372), is as
many-sided, and in some ways as irritating, as the man
himself. Musically, it is flawless, a thing of beauty. It doesn't
represent much of a progression from the days of the great white
double, but we're thankfully becoming more willing to sacrifice
progress for quality. The gentle, ballad-type cuts like "Love" are
reminiscent of "Blackbird", while the heavy, swinging rockers like
"I Found Out" are evidence of Lennon's devotion to early rock
'n roll. By and large, the album alternates between these two
extremes, and showcases John's talent for simple, moving
lyricism, as well as his sense of the varied rhythms of music and
their possibilities in rock. The slow, swinging beat of "Mother",
for example, is atmospheres removed from the frantic "I Found
Out".
POLITICS & PARANOIA
"Working Class Hero" has become the most controversial
song on the album as a result of John's use of that most familiar
of four-letter words. It certainly represents an interesting
departure from his usual style. It's done with acoustic guitar, and
this plus the protest motif:
Keep you doped with religion and sex and tv
And you think you 're so clever and classless and free
But you 're still fucking peasants as far as I can see
evokes memories of the old Bob Dylan.
It's the album's "message" which may prove irritating.
Where Dylan sang for everybody, John seems at times to be
singing for himself alone. The record is a personal statement, and
it is perhaps too personal in places. Paranoia seems to be the
dominant mood:
/ told you before, stay away from my door
Don't give me that brother, brother, brother.. .
Strange spaces. Pop music is notorious for its smothering of
individuals beneath tinsel-draped images. This was particularly
true of the Beatles. The Plastic Ono Band is Lennon's rejection of
the Beatle image, his re-assertion of himself as a person. It is
irritating, but for him necessary.
BEYOND TRIVIA
George Harrison's album is, to my mind, even better than
John's. All Things Must Pass (STCH 639) shows that George,
perhaps was, and certainly is now a more unique talent than
either of the Dynamic Duo. His little-known earlier solo effort,
Wonderwall Music (ST 3350), which he wrote and produced but
did not play on, is one of the most exciting records I have ever
heard. It combines Eastern and Western music to create original
and beautiful atmospheres. His latest is a more subtle blend, but
brings everything together in much the same way. It is a
seemingly incongruous mixture of Krishna chant-type music,
down-home country, and early 60's rock, and involves a plethora
of musicians, from Eric Clapton to Ringo Starr.
ORIGINAL GUITAR WORK
Harrison has, in the last few years, joined the select group
who can do original things with an electric guitar. His style is
gentle, a bit reminiscent of B. B. King. George caresses his guitar,
and evokes from it long drawn-out notes of ecstasy. His music
hovers and flows, and creates an atmosphere of peaceful
spirituality. This is obviously a result of his training on the sitar.
It also grows from his own personal outlook. The real
beauty of rock music is that it is basic, beyond trivia. The lyrics
on All Things Must Pass express a realization that ambitions and
achievements are superficial. What matters is not politics, which
turns man against man, not a superficial love-peace ethnic, which
turns young against old, hip against straight. What really matters
is person to person:
Isn 't it a pity, isn 't it a shame
How we break each other's hearts, and cause each other pain
How we take each other's love, without thinking anymore
Forgetting to give back
Isn't it a pity.
There is a religious quality to this album. What is
worshipped, however, is not a god, but life, in which we're all
one, united in common feeling and experience.
CHOCK-FULL OF GOODIES
All Things Must Pass is just chock-full of goodies. Many of
them, like "Isn't It A Pity" and "My Sweet Lord", are similar to
"Hey Jude", and for those of us who loved that song, that's good
news. Like "Hey Jude", these songs are inspired by the mantra
chant, and create a mood of ecstasy through repetition.
The high points of the album are the country songs,
particularly the ones written by or with Dylan, and "Apple
Scruffs". Many of the other songs tend to degenerate into
mish-moshes of massed sound, choirs, etc.
Chock Full of Goodies
Bill Storey Examines
George Harrison and John Lennon
George Harrison
They're really pleasant mish-moshes, to be
sure, but it's often hard to distinguish what's going
on musically beneath all that stuff. "If Not For
You", from Dylan's New Morning and "I'll Have
You Anytime", the result of a Harrison-Dylan
collaboration, are free from all this window^
dressing. George does them up proud. His singing
puts Dylan to shame, and his guitar-playing is just
fantastic, restrained yet so emotional. "Apple
Scruffs" is like old Dylan. It's done with acoustic
guitar and harmonica, and its unaffected zest and
energy are a breath of fresh air in the jaded pop
music scene.
My favourite thing on the album, though, is
the title cut. "All Things Must Pass" was originally
slated to be on Let It Be, but it was removed
because Paul wanted to do his thing. Even the Phil
Spector-type mass of sound can't under-cut this
one. In fact, the heavy sound only adds to its
subdued power. The beauty of "All Things Must
Pass" is its simplicity. No pseudo-hip bullshit, no
overpowering Dylanesque images, just a few words
with a lot of meaning:
Now the darkness only stays at night time
In the morning it will fade away
Daylight is good at arriving at the right time
No it's not always going to be this grey
All things must pass
All things must pass away.
BURGEONING BEATTLE BATTLE
The rest — songs like "Beware of Darkness",
with its floating guitar and expressive flashes of
imagery, and the vibrant, driving "Art of Dying" —
is of amazingly high quality. The "Apple Jam",
done with the usual collection of "friends" like
Dave Mason and Ginger Baker, is pretty mediocre,
but even it has its good moments. On "Out of the
Blue", for instance, both Clapton and Harrison get
in some good licks. What more can one say? with
this album, the Beattle battle has become no
contest. All Things Must Pass is bound to be one
of the best albums of the year.
Page Friday, 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, January 22, 1971 Toys in the UBC Gallery
// you like fun and smoke-ring-blowing machines, if you
like toys you will enjoy the exhibition TOYS at the UBC Fine
Arts Gallery on display until Jan. 30.
Some of the toys, created by approximately 40 Northern
Californian artists, are for children, some for adults, others for
the art-oriented viewer.
' They are the other kinds of toys - not the plastic, nearly
human representations of a mass-producing-war-making society.
These toys move and do. Inflating airplanes take you on
imaginary flights; Aunt Mabel's marbles are mystically musical;
and some things are bigger than life.
Buttons and pedals and sensuous textures invite
participation. These toys need people — imaginative people to
move them into all kinds of games.
The concept of play is extended to creating the toys and
recreating them every time you work with them.
The artists need toys to say things: to put the toy soldiers
into a museum-like showcase and nipples (more like mommy's
than Barbie's) on the lady ape.
And finally, people need toys for props on the stage of
their imagination, a stage where the actor is liable only to himself.
Josephine
The Comment Book from "Toys"
Aunt Mabel isn't as mystical as she thinks she is.
Happy happy happy.
* *   *
Beautiful! The most meaningful display I've seen here in 5 years!
There should be more things to handle and touch.
* *   *
Intriguing Imaginative. Will bring my grandson — He has ideas.
* *   *
I like the beepers of the gorilla lady.
* *   *
Interesting I'd love to take 'em home.
* *   *
Just what I needed!
* *   *
Aunt Mabel's musical mystical marble slot is a gas.
* *   *
Had good time with the toy toys. Thank you very much.
A Lady Gorilla
—david bowerman photo      Far Out.
The Stage:
The musical production of You're A Good
Man Charlie Brown at the Queen Elizabeth
Theatre was kept alive by occasional examples of
author, Charles Schulz's brilliant humour. The
slow pace of the Peanuts' comic strip however
proved it could not sustain a live audience's
interest for a prolonged length of time.
What constitutes a successful comic strip does
not necessarily provide the basis for a full length
musical. Schultz's style is more suited to the quick
glimmers of human comedy which the comics
offer on paper rather than a stage production
where a faster and more varied pace is needed.
However Schultz's ability to bring to life the
everyday events and exaggerate them into a
comedy where everyone recognizes themselves as
the fool saves the day. "Book Report", a bright
spot in a generally slow first act was a classic
insight into the mind of a child tackling the
agonies of homework.
Snoopy, played by Grant Cowan, offered the
pros and cons of a dog's life and promptly stole
the whole show. In the musical number entitled
"Suppertime", Mr. Cowan displayed the verve and
vigour everyone had been waiting for. Singing,
dancing and howling his way through the song in a
voice resembling that of the late Burt Lahr, he
provided the comical highlight of the show
bringing back memories dear to any dog-owner's
heart.
Equalling Mr. Cowan's excellent timing was
Cathy Wallace in her role of the incorrigible Lucy.
Vocally she supported the cast in the majority of
the musical numbers although her voice proved to
be gratingly strident after hearing her for one and
a half hours.
Richard Whelan played Charlie Brown, by far
the most difficult role from an actor's point of
view. It is difficult to play a character who's main
problem is his banality. Consequently, Whelan was
constantly upstaged by the other stronger
characters who surrounded him.
Vic Vail as Linus had strong guidelines to
You're a Good Man
Charlie Brown
work with in constructing his character as was the
case with Lucy and Snoopy. Mr. Vail follows
Schultz's character outline to the hilt resulting in
the only character with any kind of genuine
pathos. The characters of Patty as played by
Marylu Moyer, and Shroeder played by Dennis
Phillips, suffered along with Whelan in their lack
of material to work with. Schultz tends to neglect
these two as to what kind of characters they're
playing which in turn allows the stronger roles to
overshadow them.
It is one thing to create a comic strip which
makes its point in a matter of a few pictures and
quite another to create roles which actors have to
carry for one and a half hours. The actor must
have the character's past, present and future to
identify with so that his character can come to
life. If he has no criteria on which to base his
character's role the performance necessarily
becomes flat and uninteresting.
A criticism of the play in general is the lack of
feeling expressed between the characters. Again
the difference between the two medias of the
comics and the stage are apparent when an
attempt is made to bring the two together.
As it was impossible for director Joseph
Hardy to make the cast physically resemble their
cartoon counterparts, he concentrated mainly on
the personality and gestures of the characters to
bring the Peanuts' drawings to life.
The stage set however proved to be too stark
for the large Queen Elizabeth, suggesting perhaps
that this production would be more suited to a
theatre in the round where the performance would
be more intimate.
The greatest fact working in favor off the play
is Schultz's wide appeal to audiences of all ages. In
Peanuts there is a meaning for each level of
humour from that of a child who enjoys simple
slapstick to the adults who revel in the dry offbeat
humour found in the frustrations of everyday life.
Nettie Wild
The Fantasticks
The Act (Actor's Contemporary Theatre), production of
the twelve year old musical comedy The Fantasticks, is a
thoroughly enjoyable piece of theatre.
It is amazing how this fledgeling company under the
direction of Johan Parker has been able to utilize the
disadvantages of their showcase, the rustic Magic Theatre on
Granville.
The place is decorated in a sort of early Canadian decay,
with no curtains, no floating sets, nothing, it seems that would
aid the actors in their fantasy. At the start, one would think that
the setting would lead to an inevitable amateurish play, but no,
Act used the aisles, the seats, as a part of their stage, the flimsy
curtain, even the opening of the curtain and the musicians on the
stage become a part of the production.
They don't need an elaborate set, or an elaborate theatre in
which to present their play. Like the successful Act production of
the Boys in the Band, The Fantasticks comes straight across to the
audience unhampered by the formality of an elaborate stage. The
set and the setting are so unimposing that it is difficult not to feel
comfortable as they put on their play.
Aside from the theatre itself, the acting was good and the
lines in some of the very funny scenes in this child-like play came
across crisply, and well delivered by actors like Glenn Macdonald,
who plays Matt, the perennial, mythical and fantastical boy next
door to the girl next door.
There are no real stars in the play, because everyone is
good, and because there are no real star parts in it. The singing is
not terribly professional, except for the voice of El Gallo (Patrick
Rose), the fantastical purveyor of rape, but they don't need to
be, since the actors, through their fresh talents more than make
up for any lack in the singing department.
Together, the company put on a first rate performance of a
play that is neither new, nor terribly will suited to the inadequate
facilities of the Magic Theatre, but a play that surely meets the
standard for live theatre ... enjoyable.
T.W.
Friday, January 22, 1971
THE      UBYSSEY
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Page Friday, 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, January 22, 1971 In the Sub gallery now is the
work   of   four   photographers.
Page Friday talked with Keith
Dunbar, one of the originators
of the exhibition.
Pf. How did the exhibition come
about?
K. Walter Tai and I got together
and wanted to exhibit work on
the theme of East and West.
(The title applies not to the
work itself, but to the
photographers, who created the
focus.) We thought January
should be photography month in
the gallery. Walter and I
developed the theme "Faces"
using things we had already
done.
Pf. So all the pictures had been
taken before the idea of the
exhibition came to you?
K. That's right, they were all
done before we thought of the
exhibition ... I worked not only
on faces, but on demonstrations . .. The space left over was
left open to other
photographers. Bruce Stout
hung stuff from the ceiling and
John Clark ably filled up the
remaining space.
Walter's work is mainly posed
portraits and fashion shots,
along with weddings, some of
them Japanese.
My stuff evolved when I was
returning from Bellingham and
ran into the symbolic invasion of
the States. Being unable to cross
the border, I followed the
demonstrators, and took shots
of activities. The basic idea of
demonstrations began to intrigue
me from a photographic point of
view, especially in relation to
sociological concepts of
collective behaviour.
Pf. So you had a specific idea in
mind when you took those
shots?
The Strawberry Mountain Trilogy
Subphoto
K. Yes. I was thinking of the pictures in terms of a photo essay.
Pf. What's the photo essay here?
K. The idea of this photo essay ... is an attempt to create a
balance  between  documentary (or record of events), and the
aesthetic (a picture that is artistically pleasing.)
Pf. In this balance, do you attempt to keep it perfect - half and
half — each time, or is the emphasis dependent upon each
situation?
K.  It  depends  upon   the   subject  matter.  Some   things lend
themselves to that sort of emphasis, some to more of a record —
like the clubbing. That one is more of a news picture. It happens
so   quickly...   when   pictures   happen   quickly,   they   lend
themselves only to a news picture.
Pf. Most of yours are a blend of the two, like the picture of the
people at the rock festival.
K. Strawberry Mountain. That   was taken with Tri X at 1/500
second with a 300 millimetre lens.
I saw three people walking (see photo■) ... the way they
■ were walking and what they were wearing, struck me. The family
trilogy also interested me. I ran a fair distance away to get myself
out of the picture. Then I saw the two guys on the ground,
staring, tripped out; and waited for the trilogy to pass them.
The girl on the right was afterbirth. I didn't notice her
when I was taking the picture. I think she's a prime detail that
makes the picture. She is a centre of interest along with the
family trilogy.
How do you react to her? Who is she looking at? Does the
object of her attention seem to change to the viewer?
Pf. In the display, many of the photos appear to have been
deliberately grouped.
K. Some of the pictures have been put together on the mounting
board rather than in the camera. Although they are not 100%
photographic, they do have aesthetic qualities.
Pf. In other sequences, the pictures seem to be interdependent.
K. Some pictures were set up to relate to other pictures. I set up
certain relationships between pictures by their placement on the
board. Whether or not this works depends upon the viewer.
About eighty percent of the pictures succeed from my
point of view and the others just fit into the documentary.
Pf. Do you have any idea how the viewers are reacting to the
display?
K. We'd like to get some feedback on this... there is a comment
sheet on the table in the gallery, but people give us a lot of
garbage like, "It's a bunch of -".
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Friday, January 22, 1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 7 Love in the OR
Part II
You remember in our last installment Dr. Lance Sterling
avowed his love for the vohiptious Nurse White and then
dramatically succumbed to the dread disease Galloping Peedink X
which was sweeping the hospital. As well, Pops the janitor, after
falling with his head in his washbucket, lay perilously close to
death.
Before you all go mad, clutching at your gonads with
excitement, we shall resume this intriguing, if not entirely
repugnant, story.
Pops awoke on the hospital bed, cold rivulets of sweat
gushing from every known and unknown oriface in his body. He
reached down betwixt his hind limbs and felt a long, hard,
cylindrical protuberance. His fingers nimbly studied its length, all
seven feet of it. Pops screamed when his hand became entangled
in the coarse, stringy, wet bush at one end of the protuberance.
He was just about to phone the publishers of Ripley's
Believe It Or Not when he discovered that what he had been
fondling was one of his mops. "Why those cheap bastards stuck
me in the broom closet," Pops shouted. "I've heard of hospital
room shortages but this is ridiculous!"
Meanwhile, while Pops was vowing not to vote Social Credit
in the next provincial election, a dramatic scene was unfolding in
the operating room. Dr. Lance Sterling, doubled over and
somewhat hysterical as a result of the Peedink epidemic, was
performing operations as usual, Nurse White at his side.
"Take this sponge and chuck it in the garbage," said
Sterling, "It's totally soaked with blood!"
"But Doctor," exclaimed Nurse White as she sidearmed the
bloody mass against the OR room with a loud splat, "That's the
patient's brain!"
Undaunted by this minor setback, Sterling plunged into his
next patient, however, after she screamed and slapped his face, he
returned to his normal operating procedures.
Beads of sweat appeared on Sterling's forehead as he
slashed a large incision in the next patient's anal oriface. His hand
probed past the intestines and sliced off an offending morsel of
liver. "I'll have this later with a slice of bacon," he informed
Nurse White. Next he probed past the kidneys and explored the
peritoneal cavity, whacking off pieces of viscera here and there.
"Well, what do you think?" he asked his faithful nurse.
Nurse White exclaimed, "I think this is the most novel
sinus-unplugging procedure I've ever seen!"
"Oh, is that what was the matter with the bloke," said
Sterling. He then flipped the remains into the hamburger machine
in the hospital cafeteria and hollered: "Number 34: Who has
number 34?"
An elderly lady wheeled herself into the room on a
cafeteria tray and told the good doctor that she was suffering
from the dread strontium assbucket — a dilemma caused by color
television watching.
"Can you pay for the operation," Sterling inquired
sympathetically.
"No," she replied, "you see, I'm just an impoverished
pensioner and I have to look after my three demented children
and my crippled old mother."
"Oh," said Sterling as he dumped her into the garbage
chute. "Well, that's all the operating for today," he said and
gasping he threw himself onto Nurse White.
"I must relieve my Galloping Peedink X disease," he
shrieked, ripping off her uniform. She stood trembling before
him, succulently innocent in her filmy pink lace underthings. She
pleaded for him to stop but two deft sweeps of the surgeon's
scalpel left her quivering nakedness totally exposed before his
eyes.
Her ivory, pink-tipped globes caused the good doctor to
wax poetic in their praise. "Man, you sure got big tits," he said.
Then his eyes dipped to capture her bearded clam, alias her
honeypot, alias her jamjar, alias her forbidden valley, alias her
**** (fill in the blank, you sick perverts).
As he began his frenzied movements with Nurse White,
Lance noticed that his entire body was soaked. Thinking he was
perspiring more heavily than usual, Lance turned to see the
hospital's chief administrator drooling all over him.
"This looks like a job for Pop's mops," said Gay fertively
eyeing Sterling's rosebud-like anal oriface.
"Arrrggghhhh," bellowed Nurse White, "I think I've got the
dread Galloping Peedink X. Whatever shall I do, Whatever shall I
do????
"Anything except crap on the floor," warned Pops who was
already on the scene with Ids trusty mop.
The hospital was surely being maintained by the walking
wounded.
* * *
WUl Dr. Sterling and Nurse White overcome their Galloping
Peedink and find a miracle cure for the epidemic's onslaught? Will
Allan Gay take an insidious recourse to punish Nurse White and
Dr. Sterling for their minor indiscretion on the OR floor. Will
there be any complaints about the cafeteria hamburgers? Watch
this space next week for the third big installment of "Love In The
OR".
YEAR-END
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• 4068 E. HASTINGS. N. BUR.
(Across from Wosk's)
291-8491
• 5618 CAMBIE ST.
327-9451
• 1320 DOUGLAS ST., VICTORIA,
B.C.    386-7578
• 165 STATION ST.. DUNCAN, B.C.
746-4322
DUTHIE BOOKS
UNIVERSITY BRANCH
4560 W. 10th Ave. - 224-7012
OTHER STORES
919 ROBSON 684-4496
PAPERBACK CELLAR 861-8713
670 SEYMOUR 685-3627
1032 W. HASTINGS 688-7434
A time
to
decide
Part of growing up is choosing the
right steps to take. The day you
walk away from your old oxfords
in a new pair of heels probably
comes around the time you face
an important question: how to take
the problems out of those problem
days that happen every month.
Consider what Tarn pax tampons
can do for you. Worn internally,
they do away with bulky pin-pad-
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container-applicator makes them
easy to insert. Once they're properly in place, you can't even feel
you're wearing them. And both
the applicator and tampon are
readily disposable. You simply
flush them away.
Why not make the decision millions of girls in 118 countries have
already made? Tampax tampons.
They're definitely a giant step in
the right direction of becoming a
woman.
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Page Friday, 8
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, January 22,  1971 Friday, January 22,  1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 15
'Scholar or commie?'
The new head of the UBC linguistics
department will arrive here within two weeks after a
lengthy fight with Canadian immigration
authorities.
He is Michael Halliday, a specialist in Chinese
culture and language who has visited the Chinese
mainland in the course of his studies.
Associate linguistics prof Bernard
Saint-Jacques told The Ubyssey that Halliday, a
resident of Britain, was initially refused a visa by the
Canadian high commissioner in London.
"The government is suspicious of such people
— they want to know if such an interest in the
Chinese people is one.of, academics or;an ideological
interest," said Saint-Jacques.
He said the high commissioner "likes to show
that he's the boss."
Saint-Jacques said this kind of thing has
happened to the department before.
"Last year, a British specialist in Vietnamese
culture and languages was not granted an entrance
visa by the government," he said.
"Everything has been cleared up, however.
We're expected Halliday in a few days,"
Saint-Jacques added.
Some old myths exploded,
others upheld by Szasz
WE'RE
EXPANDING
Not only do we do repair work
we also sell a select few
premium quality used cars. So if
you are thinking of purchasing a
new car we may have what you
are looking for. *
Execptlonal trade in allowances
given for premium condition
cars, VW's especially. But our
basic business is still offering
expert repair service In V.W.,
Mercedes, Volvo and Porsche.
By SANDY KASS
To the tune of The Good, the
Bad and the Ugly, People
participants were introduced to
the mechanics of sexual behavior
Monday night, by gynecologist
George Szasz.
As the music played, slides
were shown on everything from
Romulus and Remus to the Virgin
Mary.
The Greeks, said Szasz, strove
to fall in love with one person and
enjoy sex with another.
The Victorians, on the other
hand, desired love, without sex.
But, according to Szasz we are
heading towards a need for sex
without love.
"Most people today are more
afraid of sharing hopes and
dreams than sexual experiences,"
he said.
Szasz went on to describe the
stimulants of sexual response.
The first was hormones, and
Szasz said he knew too little to
talk about them.
He claimed that thoughts, the
next stimulant, are culturally
determined, and vary in men and
women.
Thoughts lead to actions, and
as Szasz described, actions may
take one of three forms.
Solitary actions often stem
from erotic daydreaming, Szasz
said.
"This leads to noctural orgasm
in men, more commonly called
wet dreams.
He said that masterbation has
been overly condemned in
western society.
"Masterbation is no more
harmful to the body than
intercourse."
Heterosexual petting is probably
the most interesting of all sexual
techniques, Szasz said.
"Breast stimualation is also
becoming increasingly common."
He said this activity provides
far more enjoyment for men, as
No "Time Out" at
— We Hurry
HILLTOP GULF SERVICE
BIG SAVINGS-20%
Discount for Labor
(UBC Students-Only)
4305 W. 10th
Phone 224-7212
1st 1971 event in the EXPLORATIONS IN
THE HUMAN POTENTIAL series
STANLEY KRIPPNER
in a lecture-discussion on
DREAMS, ESP and ALTERED STATES
OF CONSCIOUSNESS*
Dr. Krippner, Director of the William C.
Wenninger Dream Laboratory, Department of
Psychiatry, Maimonides Medical Center,
Brooklyn, N.Y., is noted for his research on
telepathy and dreams involving hypnosis
and alphafeedback training
When:
FRIDAY EVENING, JANUARY 29, 8:30 P.M.
Where:
HEBB LECTURE THEATRE, UBC
Admission;
$3.00 (students $2.00)
For advance tickets phone 228-2181 (UBC),
or 683-3255 (Vancouver Ticket Centre)
*Dr. Krippner will also conduct an experiential
workshop on the same topic for the Shalal Institute,
Saturday and Sunday, Jan. 30-31.
For information phone 681-0221.
A Humanities and Sciences Program
Center for Continuing Education, UBC
they not only have the pleasure of
the contact, but satisfy feelings of
conquest as well.
Oral genital contact, he said, is
the best way to fully understand
another body, and is the best
sexual release for those who do
not wish to have intercourse.
The results of a questionnaire
distributed among last term's
participants were then made
known.
Of the 654 people that
answered, 69 per cent of the men
indicated they had sexual
intercourse, as did 60 per cent of
the women.
'This act is indeed the greatest
source of physical pleasure,"
Szasz said.
He described several positions
such as face to face, side to side,
or sitting up.
"However, a lot depends on if
your partner has a broken leg or
not," he added.
In the village
\\    SALES AND SERVICE      ■
2136 Western Park Way    224-7013
1 HM14 U8K at.                Zb3-8121l
Creation II
SALE
wALL
An "Open" Drama
Group
Sweaters-T-Shirts
Cardigans-Pull-overs
Jackets—Dresses
Pant Suits-Pantihose
at Anglican Theological
Socks-Slacks-Belts
College
Bedspreads-Mats
ASSORTED GIFTS
Mon. 25, 8 p.m.
a production
FABRICS
Wed. 27, 8 p.m.
Fortrel 3.95-Jersey 1.98
Crimpelene 4.95
a workshop
Dress Materials .99c to 4.00
Trevera 4.00-Velvet 4.95
other events on
Antique Cut Velvet 5.95
campus
Brocade 1.98 up-Suiting 2.00 up
Wool & Notions-Patterns, Reg.
Mon. Sub. Aud. 12:30
Tues. Sub Art Gallery 12:30
Special Discount to
Students and Staff
Place Vanier 8 p.m.
Wed. Arts 1 12:30
A.B.S. FABRICS
Thurs. 12:30 music mall
& APPAREL
7:00 Lutheran Campus Centre
Fri. Sub Art 12:30
3317 Cambie - 876-0013
Y'all come to the
FARMER'S FROLIC
There'll be a whole heap
of guitar pickin', foot
stompin' music and some
display's o' country humer
FARMER'S FROLIC
SAT. JAN. 28 8:30 TO 1:00
FEATURING:     HANK AND THE HOBOS
and   EVAN KEMP AND THE TRAILRIDERS
plus   TURLEY'S    TWEETYBIRDS
TICKETS: 3.50/COUPLE     DOWNSTAIRS IN SUB
REFRESHMENTS UNTIL 9:00 P.M. Page  16
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, January 22, 1971
'We wanna talk to you'
from page One
At this point six young men, who later
identified themselves as "members of the Young
Socreds of West Vancouver," burst into the house
and shouted:
"Hello, you fat pigs, we wanna talk to you
Bennett, you bunch of old stinking bastards, this is
the people. Let everybody in."
Others addressed themselves to Nicholson,
shouting: "What section of the people do you
represent."
University of Victoria administration president
Bruce Partridge smiled.
Vancouver mayor Tom Campbell scowled.
The house dutifully paid no attention to the
disturbance and continued to listen to the speech.
As the Outburst continued, members and invited
guests began to take quick glances at the upper
gallery, where parliamentary attendants were
attempting to remove the demonstrators.
A number of the men were repeatedly slugged
by the attendants until they were successfully
locked out of the public gallery.
The throne speech droned on; the house
remained silent, uneasy and fidgety.
Except for the outburst, the official opening of
the second session of the twenty-ninth parliament
continued as usual.
Premier Bennett's throne speech described
1970 as "a difficult year" for B.C. and blamed the
province's problems on the federal government's
anti-inflation policies.
He also repeated his government's professed
concern for the problems of pollution but failed to
detail any newpollution control programs.
The attendant pomp and circumstance was no
different than in any other opening.
During the opening prayer, all heads*were
bowed - except for Bennett's.
During the Lord's Prayer, all lips were moving
— except for Bennett's. He appeared aloof, as
though he were the God the members were praying
to.
At the official reception following the opening,
it was a different story.
Members and guests were buzzing with the
events of the day. You could hardly turn around
without hearing: "I think it was a disgusting display,
simply disgusting", or "I just don't understand it".
At the reception too, the six men who
previously caused the stir joined the guests at the
central table in the Empress Hotel and quietly
munched on petits fois and hors d'oeuvres as they
sipped their tea, filled their pockets with sandwiches
and chatted with the upper class.
Guests were shocked, of course, when two of
the men danced with each other for the benefit of a
Victoria Times photographer.
Nothing, it seemed, was going to go right. At
press time, plans were under way for an attack on
the state ball held at Government House last night.
IL
PEOPLE"
Applications are now being accepted from students for the
position of DIRECTOR of the programme "PEOPLE - AN
EXPERIENCE IN HUMAN RELATIONS AND HUMAN
SEXUALITY", '71-72. These should be directed to Sean
McHugh, Office of Interprofessional Education, Woodward
Library, Rm. 324.
Letters should include all material  that  the applicant
considers relevant to the position.
FORFURTHER INFORMATION CALL LYNN, 228-3083
Press gallery under seige
from page One
It was then discovered the people could also
enter th<\ building through other doors that had
been left open.
The crowd began to push forward and about
250 people managedto get inside the building.
The bulk of them went to the entrance of the
press gallery and forced the door open when a
reporter attempted to leave.
Fights broke out between demonstrators and
attendants.
Three uniformed and five plain-clothes RCMP
then appeared to push the crowd from the door.
Once the door to the press gallery had been
secured, the approximately 75 police in the
building began removing people. Most went quietly.
There were no arrests during the
demonstrations.
HILLEL
Presents
DR. S0L0M0M
H.
Assoc. Professor in the Yeshiva University, Wurzweller School of
Social Work speaking on, "VALUES SHMALUES" — WE NEED JEWISH
BEHAVIORS! on Monday, January 25 at 12:30 p.m. at Hillel House.
Dr. Green graduated Brooklyn College Magna Cum Laude, received
his Master's in Social Work from Case Western Reserve University in
Cleveland, Ohio and was awarded his Doctor of Social Work from the
University of Pennsylvania.
This man has extensive experience in social group work, in Jewish
Community Centers and in Jewish camping. He spent one year in Israel
organizing and establishing the Bar-lian University, School of Social Work
and was invited to be guest Senior Lecturer in Social Work at the
University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia. While in Australia, Dr.
Greene was active in Jewish communal affairs as consultant, lecturer and
speaker.
All students are welcome to attend.
»!•
YOU
Want an AMS
That Works ?
Better Come and
VOTE on it!
GENERAL MEETING
NEXT THURSDAY, JAN. 27
WAR MEMORIAL GYM   -   12:30 NOON
NOTE:   This is an important meeting to discuss and vote on Constitution Changes    The changes cannot
go   into effect unless  10% of the student body is present.
PLEASE — DO YOUR PART — PARTICIPATE — VOTE Friday, January 22,  1971
THE       UBYSSEY
Page  17
Justice in America:
the Seattle Seven
Against a wintry, frieze of long dole lines in
depression-hit Seattle one of the more bizarre
of revolutionary conrontations — the case of
the Seattle Seven — is being acted out.
The Seven, defendants in a showy
'conspiracy' trial, have all been given heavy
'contempt' sentences. Officially they are
'dangerous revolutionaries'.
from The Observer (London)
Seattle, heart of the Pacific northwest, is
the 'bombing capital' of the nation, with more
explosions per head of its one million
population than anywhere else in the United
States. The police and local authorities are
demoralized by open graft scandals. An
economic trauma — caused by collapse of the
aerospace boom — has the city in its grip.
M. he Seattle Seven, six men and girl whose
ages range from 19 to 27, saw the crisis as an
opportunity for a brave new alliance between
students and blue-collar workers fired from the
great Boeing plant. They talked Marx to the
jobless and handed out food and clothing at a
centre adorned with portraits of Che and Mao.
FBI chief Edgar Hoover personally
announced the indictments of the Seattle
Seven, involving the 1968 Federal anti-riot law
previously used only in the Chicago conspiracy
affair last spring. A Seattle riot there had been
— one of several across the country in protest
against the Chicago sentences — but none of the
defendants attended it. They were charged with
crossing State lines and conspiring to incite the
trouble.
The American Civil Liberties Union,
holding the 1968 law to be unconstitutional,
briefed one of its brightest hopes as defence
counsel. Michael Tigar, 29, law school lecturer
and former student activist, tried to play the
court game strictly by the rules.
In chambers, he makes no secret of his
views. The conspiracy law, he told me, was in
essence an attempt to contol men's minds — the
Seven were on trial for what they said, not
what they did. Four are New York students,
the others from Berkeley and Portland, Oregon.
Judge George Boldt, 66, moved the case
from Seattle to outlying Tacoma to ensure, the
defence claimed, a staid, small-town jury,
average age 42, no Vietnam critics accepted.
Then the FBI produced its star witness, a paint
salesman who said he had been inspired by
'hatred of Communism' to infiltrate the
defendants' 'liberation front'. The defence
claimed that he urged young members to do
what theyhad never thought of doing.
Horace Parker, 33, was candid about his
double life. It began last year when the FBI
asked if he wanted 'to serve his country'. An
Army veteran, he was to pose as a disillusioned
Green Beret and infiltrate the extreme
Weatherman faction of the Students for a
Democratic Society.
WWith all expenses paid and a $120 weekly
retainer, Parker left his wife and child and
moved with a group of Weathermen into an
apartment which he dubbed 'The Fort'. He
contributed an automatic rifle, an Army gas
gun and bumper stickers: 'Stop the pigs, save
the people'. All were provided by the FBI, who
also paid for purchases of drugs — marijuana,
speed, LSD, methedrine — to flavour his new
life-style.
From a street addict needing heroin he
bought five pounds of potastium chlorate,
paying with a marked 20-dollar note from the
Weathermen to ignite Molotov cocktails. He
promised to buy dynamite and collected $120
for six cases of explosives which, he said he had
buried on 'grandad's farm'.
To help his cover story, Parker got himself
arrested during a riot and was convicted of
destroying property. Let out on probation, he
joined in planning a march on the Seattle
courthouse as soon as the Chicago sentences
were known. Gallons of paint were splashed on
the building. It came from Parker's shop, paid
for by the FBI.
Acting on FBI instructions, 'or within their
guidelines', Parker recruited young people, gave
arms training, discussed sniping tactics, held
target practice for men and girls who had
seldom, if ever, touched a gun. The purpose: 'to
determine their level of skill'.
The FBI authorized him, he said, to do
anything needed to protect his cover. This
included urging people to break the law, 'So
long as I didn't kill anyone or something like
that'.
"ne of the Seven, Charles Marshal, 25,
protested: 'The FBI employed this man to do
illegal acts. They should be prosecuted. It's an
outrage. The real conspiracy is the Federal
Government'.
The judge promised to consider a defence
request that a diary kept by Parker during his
undercover years should be produced. Instead,
the trial was abruptly ended.
Lawyers and prisoners shouted: 'We're
winning the case. You can't stop it now.' But
Boldt nailed the accused for contempt. Five
were jailed for a year, and two for six months.
There can't be a retrial until they have served
their sentences.
J udge Boldt justified his action with these
words: 'I have no doubt that my daily prayers
to do that which is fair and just in the sight of
our Heavenly Father have been answered. I
believe divine providence may have given this
court guidance to an effective solution of
disruptive trials. I pray it may be so.'
Tigar commented: 'And that is the end of
any hope of human justice.'
Prisoners tore up their contempt citations.
One shouted, 'You old killer. You're so bloody,
it's unbelievable.' Another threw a Nazi flag at
him. Susan Stern, 5 ft. 1 in. and weighing 98
pounds, was lifted in the air by U.S. marshals.
Moving to her aid, as she had had an operation
the week before, Tigar was slammed against the
wall and had riot gas sprayed in his eyes. Male
defendants were marched out with truncheons
between their legs.
The prosecution was willing to allow the
six out on bail - at $25,000. a head.
Judge Boldt refused, claiming that he and
others 'feared for our lives' if they were let out
of jail. An immediate appeal to a higher court
overruled this decision, but so far without
practical effect. Judge Boldt declines to budge.
JL igar wonders if this is the upshot of
another divine 'revelation'. He told me: 'We are
appealing against the contempt sentences
because the defendants spoke only as permitted
by the judge.' The seven, he added, had no
contact with Parker. He was a Judas and a drug
addict whose word no one could take. 'It is the
Government's duty to indict him for drugs and
entrapment. He led lambs to the slaughter. How
can we expect the young to respect the law
when the State uses such men and such
methods to repress dissent?'
Tigar may advise his clients to sue Parker
for conspiracy with the FBI. But first he must
find them. They have been spirited out of
Tacoma and dropped into separate jails all the
way from Seattle to Los Angeles.
WUS accepting applications
World University Service of Canada has organized a seminar to be
held in Colombia for two months this summer, said Merrill Fearson,
WUS spokesman, Monday.
"A total of 35 students and five professors from across Canada
will be chosen by the WUS national office and successful candidates
will be announced by February 15," Fearon said.
A nominating committee of five professors and two WUS
representatives will select one or two suitable candidates from UBC
applicants and refer them to the national office of WUS.
To be eligible, applicants must be second year students or above,
return to UBC in the fall of 1971, be Canadian citizens or permanently
domiciled in Canada and have a working knowledge of Spanish.
Applications and further information can be obtained from the
executive offices of the Alma Mater Society, SUB 236.
Deadline for applications is Monday and candidates will be
interviewed by the nominating board that week.
PHOENIX 71
JAN. 26-30
JOB HUDTIHfi?
Write, telephone or stop in for
your copy of our Resume Form.
We prepare professional
employment resumes.
Dunhill  Resumes
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Vancouver 5, B.C.
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Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. & Sat. 3 a.m.
ORIENT
IET CHARTERS
S.F.-TOKYO $349
S.F.-TAIPEI $365
S.F.-HONG KONG $399
Round Trip
CONNECTING FLIGHTS TO
SINGAPORE.
MANILA, BANGKOK,
SEOUL AND CALCUTTA.
Many
Flights
To
Choose
From
For information
call or write:
Flight Committee
P.O. Box 2549
Stanford, Calif. 94305
Tel. (415) 968-2571
NAME   	
ADRESS   	
^On^Wa^FlightsareAvailable
CREATION II — Improvisational DRAMA
(Tentative Schedule)
Monday, Jan. 25
-Sub Auditorium-12:30
—Anglican Theological College 8:00p.m.
Tuesday, Jan. 26
-Sub Art Gallery-12:30
—Place Vanier—8:00p.m.
Wednesday, Jan. 27
Arts 1 Building-12:30
-A.T.C-8.00 p.m.
Thursday, Jan. 28
—Mall outside Music Building—12:30
—Workshop-Lutheran Center—7:00 p.m.
Friday, Jan. 29
-SUB Auditorium-12:30
PEOPLE
An Experience in Human Relations and
Human Sexuality
Monday, January 25 - 7 p.m. Sharp
"LOVE IS JUNK" - Dr. Bennett Wong
SUB BALLROOM
PLEASE DRESS CASUALLY Page  18
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, January 22,  1971
FRIDAY
MUSSOC
General meeting of West Side Story
company and all members, 6:30 p.m.
in Old Auditorium.
EXPERIMENTAL   COLLEGE
"Canada, the Misguided Democracy."
Discussion with Karl Burau, SUB 125
at noon. All welcome.
FOLK  DANCE CLUB
SUB party room at 12:30. Learn international  folk dancing.
VOC
Swimming  party,  7   p.m.,   CYA   pool.
NEWMAN CLUB
Practice for folk mass, bring guitars,
lunch,    friends.     Noon,     St.     Mark's
College music room.
ALLIANCE    FRANCAISE
Meeting at noon. International House,
come and speak French. Everyone
welcome.
SKYDIVING CLUB
Beer and chicken night, SUB party
room, 8:30-12:30.
CLASSICS CLUB
Philip Teece speaks on "Laughter in
Phaeacia" at 8 p.m.. 2726 West 29th
Avenue, Vancouver.
'tween
classes
EAST ASIA SOCIETY
Informal meeting to discuss year's
plans. Bring your own food and refreshments. 8:30 p.m. at 2756 West
10th Ave.
CRAFTS  CLUB
General meeting and election, 12:30,
SUB 251.
PRE-SOCIAL   WORK   CLUB
General meeting. All members please
attend. SUB 105, 12:30.
SUNDAY
PRE-MED   SOC
Medical careers conference, 2-8 p.m.,
International House.
FIRESIDE
Aid. Walter Hardwick will act as
resource person for an informal discussion of cities as inevitable features
of modern society. Union College
reception room, 6000 Iona Drive (on
campus), 8 p.m.
NEWMAN  CLUB
Folk   Mass   followed   by   coffee   and
discussion,    11:30    a.m.,    St.    Mark's
College chapel.
UBCSCC
Little T Bird rally and exciting three-
hour tour of Greater Vancouver. 10
a.m., north SUB loop.
MONDAY
HELLENIC   CULTURAL  SOCIETY
Greek dance, free coffee, everybody
welcome. 7:30 p.m., International
House.
SPANISH   CLUB
Discussion on Spanish Morocco, Buch.
204, 12:30.
ALPHA OMEGA
Meeting 12:30, SUB 130.
HILLEL
Dr.  Solomon H.  Green will speak on
"Values   Shmalues—We   Need   Jewish
Behaviors!" Hillel House, 12:30.
PHOENIX
Dr. Harry Smith will speak on
"Forestry in Three Developing Countries: Taiwan, Ecuador and Dominican
Kepublic." Room 160, Forestry Bldg.,
12:30.
PHOENIX
Peter Pavell, president, B.C. School
Trustees Assn., Room 100, Education
Bldg.. 12:30.
CREATIONS TWO
SUB auditorium, 12:30. Anglican
Theological College, 8 p.m. Special
Events and University Religious C'oun-
cU.
cuso
A discussion on the White Paper on
External Aid. Returned UBC CUSO
personnel and UBC students. International House, room 402, 7:30 p.m.
TUESDAY
COMMERCE   U.S.
Accounting option: find out about
the CA program and accounting
courses.  Noon, Angus 410.
UBC   THEOLOGY  CLUB
"Bibical   Criticism."   Noon,  SUB   111.
PRE  MED   SOC
Meeting at 12:30, Wesbrook 201.
CREATIONS   TWO   EVENTS
SUB art gallery.   12:30. Place  Vanier,
8 p.m.
MISCELLANEOUS
LEGAL  AID
Every Mon., Wed. and Fri., noon in
SUB 228 and 232.
QUEBEC   TEACH-IN
Stanley Ryerson to speak on Quebec
as a colony. SUB ballroom, 12:30 today. Public meeting.
SPECIAL  EVENTS
Pat Paulsen. SUB ballroom, Friday.
Jan. 22 at 7:30 p.m.
PHOEM 71
JAN. 26-30
GABRIEL'S
VILLAGE COIFFURES
ST**'
Featuring
* MR. GABRIEL, formerly of David Anson Coiffures, Gold
Medalist in Haircutting — Master of Modern and Conventional
Look.
* MISS DONNA
Body Waving.
Specialist in Coloring - Permanents and
We use the most tested and proven, the most
exclusive and the finest of all the products - from
Conditioners to Coldwaves and Permanents, from
Shampoos to Hair Sprays.
Don't hesitate to see us
if you are on a tight budget
In our Salon Money is not everything — HAIR IS!
We Are Located in the Village Spare
Upstairs-Directly behind the Bank of Commerce
WESTERN PARKWAY
(Upstairs) 224-7514
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Student*, Faculty & Club-3 lims, 1 day $1.00; 2 days $1.75.
Commercial— 3 lints, 1 day $1.25; additional lines 30c; 4 days price of 3.
Ctamaitied eds are not accepted by telephone ant are payable in
Publications Office, STUDENT UNION BLDG., Univ. of «.C, Vancouver 8, B.C.
Deadline » tl:30, the day boron*
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
WILD! TWO BANDS FUN! PULL,
facilities. I.H. 8:30-1:30 Fri., 22nd.
Come to the Walk-Walk-Eat
Dance.	
FORGET DANCING! ENJOY "THE
President's Analyst" starring
James Coburn in the SUB Auditorium, Friday and Saturday, 7:00
& 9:30, Sunday 7:00. AMS card
holders  50<.	
DANCE AT PLACE VANIER
"Sunshyne" 9-1 Res. $1.00. Non-
res. $1.25. Beer Garden also. Fri.,
Jan.  22.
HOT-FOOT IT WITH PAULSEN
tonight at 7:30 in SUB Ballroom.
Pat Paulsen looks at The 70's.
Tickets at information desk and
at the door.
Greetings
12
Lost 8c Found
13
FOUND: WOMAN'S EYEGLASSES,
small, tortoise shell, in my car,
lost by hitchhiker, Jan. 14, 15, or
16. Call Nathalie, 733-0244.
Rides & Car Pools
14
TWO DRIVERS NEEDED IN
British Property car pool. Phone
Liz 926-5771 or Cindy 922-3581.
Special Notices
15
THE TAURUS SPA, 1233 HORNBY
St. 687-1915. Guys only. Special
student rates. Best facilities.
TAXI LICENCE FOR SALE.
North Shore Business expanding.
$10,500. Accept. 1/3 down. Mr. Day
874-8667   or  926-3223.
DON'T MISS THE FUN. EVERY-
one's going to the AMS General
Meeting. Wed. Jan. 27. Memorial
Gym,   12:30.	
DANCE AT PLACE VANIER
"Sunshyne", 9-1. Res. $1.00, Non-
res. $1.25. Beer Garden also. Fri.,
Jan.   22.
WANTED: INTERESTED MUSI-
cians to form stage band to play
jazz, rock, etc. Phone Jamie —
988-7216.
ENJOY YOURSELF THE ENGLISH
way. Play cricket with the Varsity cricket team. For information
contact Mike Gerry 224-7970 or
224-2464 or come to Room 354
chemistry.
FIRESIDE: ALDERMAN WALTER
Hardwick speaks on "Cities In
Society Today", informal discussion, 8.00 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 24.
Union College reception room (on
campus).
REHABILITATION MEDICINE
Orientation. Next meeting 7:00
p.m. Wednesday 27 January, 1971,
at the School of Rehabilitation
Medicine.	
SUPPER AND WORKSHOP WITH
Creation Two, Thurs. Jan. 28, 7
p.m., Lutheran Campus Centre.
Phone 224-1614 for supper reserva-
tion.	
"THE EAST IS RED" — a 2% hour
colour film from China. English
subtitles. Old Auditorium, Jan. 28,
1:00 p.m. and J*an. 29, 7:30 p.m.
TAKE A SKI BREAK — SKI
Whistler. Stay Alpine Lodge,
dorms or s/c cabins. Full facilities.
Amer. plan available. Rates: $3.00
& up. Ph. (112) 932-5280. Write
Apline Lodge, Garibaldi Station,
Garibaldi, B.C.	
HEAR TURLEY'S TWEETIE
Birds at The Farmer's Frolic Jan.
23rd. 8:30 to 1:00 a.m. SUB Ballroom.
Travel Opportunities
16
EUROPE FROM $185 ROUND TRIP.
Employment opportunities (U.K.)
Discounts, travel service, low car
hire rentals for members. Anglo
America Assn. 60A Pyle St., Newport,  I.W., England.
HONG KONG RETURN — $345
687-2855; 224-0087; 687-1244.
106—709 Dunsmuir St.,
Vancouver 1, B.C.
Wanted—Information
17
Wanted—Miscellaneous 18
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale
21
BARGAIN — 1966 V.W. RADIO,
Low mileage, needs some body
work,  offers!   254-2258.  Must  Sell.
1966 VAUXHALL ENVOY. COM-
pact. Stan. "6". $595. Goes in the
snow. 731-7523.	
1960 V.W. CARMEN GHIA. GOOD
condition. $250 firm. Call Ed 274-
3476 after 6 p.m.
Automobiles—Wanted
22
Automobiles—Parte
23
BUSINESS SERVICES
Day Care & Baby Sitting    32A
Photography
34
Scandals
37
CAN YOU IMAGINE THOUSANDS
of excited bodies all in one room?
Don't miss the AMS General
Meeting. Wed. Jan. 27. Memorial
Gym,   12.30.
DANCE AT PLACE VANIER
"Sunshyne" 9-1. Res. $1.00, Non-
res. $1.25. Beeer Garden also. Fri.,
Jan.   22.
TWO BANDS IN THE WALK-
Walk-Eat dance Full facilities.
I.H.   8:30-1:30,  Fri.,  22nd.  Wild!
FIND OUT ALL ABOUT A PRESI-
dent's hang-ups in "The President's Analyst", a comedy starring James Coburn. SUB Auditorium, Friday and Saturday, 7:00
& 9:30. Sunday, 7:00. AMS card
holders,  50^.
PHOENIX IS COMING! JANUARY
26/ to 30.
ENJOY YOURSELF THE ENGLISH
way. Play cricket with the Varsity cricket team. For information
contact Mike Gerry 224-7970 or
224-2464 or come to Room 354
Chemistry.
HOMOSEXUAL COUNSELLING
Service: If you are waiting to be
discovered forget it. Like most
homosexuals, you are indistinguishable from the heterosexual.
Gamble on your future. Write for
details to graduate student, 23,
Box 6572,   Station G Vancouver 8.
A FIENDISH JAPANESE PLOT?
Two Japanese films invade the
SUB Ballroom, Thurs. Jan. 28 —
7:00 p.m.
HEAR IT FROM HIS OWN MOUTH
— Pat Paulsen gives his views on
world situations. Tonight 7:30 in
the SUB Ballroom. Tickets $2.00 at
the information desk and at the
door.
THIS IS NOT FOR A SEX ORGY.
Creation Two at Luthern Campus
Center, Thurs. 28. 7 p.m. Phone
224-1614 for supper.
BRIAN BELONGS AT THE B.C.
bull farm but meanwhile you can
find him at The Farmer's Frolic,
Sat. Jan. 23, SUB Ballroom.
Typing
40
FAST ACCURATE TYPING. ELEC-
trie typewriter. Shorthand. Phone
325-2934.
IBM SELECTRIC TYPING SERVICE. Theses, essays, etc. Neat
accurate, work, reasonable rates.
Mrs.   Troche,   437-1355.
TEDIOUS TASKS, PROFESSIONAL
typing service. IBM Selectric —
days, evenings, weekends. Phone
228-9304. 30c per page.
TYPING DONE AT MY HOME.
Neat and careful work. Essays,
Thesis. Reasonable rates. North
Van.  985-0154.
ESSAY & THESIS TYPING. IBM
electric. 35c page. Call after noon:
733-4708.
EXPERT IBM SELECTRIC TYPIST
—experienced in all types of technical thesis. Reasonable rates.
Call Mrs.   Ellis,   321-3838.
ESSAYS AND THESIS TYPED
neatly, accurately, 25«( per page.
Carol  Tourgis,   733-3197.
EFFICIENT, ELECTRIC TYPING,
my home. Essays, thesis, etc.
Neat, accurate work. Reasonable
rates. Phone 263-5317.
EXPERIENCED TYPIST —ESSAYS
and thesis. Electric typewriter.
Mrs. A. Treacy — 738-8794.
PART-TIME EVENING TYPING,
my home. Reasonable rates. 733-
4649 eves. Standard typewriter.
STUDENTS! I WILL TYPE YOUR
term papers. Reasonable rates.
Call Yvonne — 738-6874.	
ESSAYS AND THESES TYPED.
Experienced typist, electric typewriter. 731-8096.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
GENERAL ARTISTS SECRETARY.
She must know what she is doing. Must be versatile. All appreciable inquiries appreciated. Benefits $250.00 per month and travel
to all parts of the world. Please
send letter with qualifications to
P.O. Box 136, North Vancouver,
B.C.
Help Wanted (Cont.)
51
BACK TO SCHOOL MEANS
extra expenses. Need extra income? Investigate SARAH COVENTRY    OPPORTUNITIES.    Call
946-2258.
YOUNG COUPLE TO ACT AS RE-
ief houseparents for 5 teenagers.
Must be experienced, mature, able
to rap with kids. Contact Pat
Anderson, Youth Services, Children's Aid, 872-7711.
INSTRUCTION 8c SCHOOLS
Music Instruction
62
Special Classes
63
Tutoring
64
WILL TUTOR MATH 100 * 101,
day, evening, or Sat. Reasonable
rates. Phone 733-3644—10 a.m. to
3   p.m.
GERMAN TUTORING: CONVER-
sation & grammar, by qualified
ex-university teacher — native
speaker, group & quantity discounts.  Eves.  731-0156.
CHRISTMAS RESULTS Disappointing? Register at UBC tutoring centre and find some help.
Qualified tutors in over 50 subject
areas. SUB 100B, 228-4583, 12-2
p.m.  weekdays.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
BIRD CALLS
Your Student Telephone Directory
NOW HALF PRICE - 50c
at the Bookstore, Thunderbird Shop
and AMS Publications Office
GOOD DEALS — FUR COATS,
jackets, capes, etc., $5 and. up.
Pappas Bros. Sell, 459 Hamilton
Street at Victory Square. 681-6840.
Note: We are open only Friday
nights 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. and Saturdays 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
MUST SELL STEREO AMP, SONY,
headphones, Electra speakers, all
for $200, might bargain. Phone
Carolyn 224-1984.
LARGE DESK, TOP 4' x 2' 6", 7
drawers, $15. 872-7384 or local 4630,
Peter.
HEAD GIANT SLALOM 215 CM
with Look Nevada bindings $95.00.
224-7686.
HAVE TO SELL WEBCOR 8-
track car stereo tape deck. $35.00.
Phone 263-7274.
VERY RARE GOYA ELEC. GUI-
tar. A great Swedish made show
guitar with gold sparkle finish, includes: case. $110 or offers. Robert
Yip, 224-9016.
FABRIC SALE
READY-MADE  CLOTHES
SWEATERS  -  SOX  -  PANTI-HOSE
WOOL - NOTIONS - PATTERNS REG.
ABS FABRICS - 3317 Cambie
RENTALS 8c REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
SLEEPING ROOM. GIRL. PRIV-
ate entrance and bath. Near gates
and beach. $45.00 month. 224-4165.
EXTRA LARGE IDEAL FOR TWO.
Share furnished living-dining-
kitchen. Rides to UBC Shaugh-
nessy. 266-8255.
Room 8e Board
62
LARGE CLEAN ROOMS — BEST
food on campus. Deke House, 5765
Agronomy, 224-9691.
MEN ONLY. LARGE CARPETED
rooms. Good food. Color TV. Large
social areas. 5725 Agronomy Rd.
Manager, 224-9620.
GUYS! YOUNG COUPLE WITH
large home. Linen, great meals.
Days 266-6206,  eves.  224-4496.
Furnished Apts.
83
Unfurnished Apts.
84
Halls For Rent
85
Houses—Furn. 8c Unfurn.
86
BECOME 4th MALE ROOMMATE
in large house, available immediately. Location: 57th & Oak,
Phone 263-4990 after 6:00 p.m, Friday, January 22,  1971
THE       UBYSSEY
Page  19
SPOR TS
Crucial weekend
faces hoop team
It's a critical weekend for the
basketball   Birds.
They are in Manitoba for two
games which will have a great
influence on the league standings.
Losing either game, especially
Friday night against Manitoba,
will greatly jeopardize the Birds'
chances of finishing the league in
first place.
- Saturday night the Birds will
be playing the Winnipeg Wesmen
in a game which promises to be
tougher than the game played at
UBC earlier in the year.
The game against Manitoba will
be the Thunderbirds' most
important league game of the
season. It will be a matter of
pride. Rated number one this
year in Canada, the Thunderbirds
have been playing far below their
potential and their rating.
. Their previous losses to Manitoba
and Portland State should be a
positive incentive for the Birds to
play well. Coach Mullins noted "a
more aggressive week of practice
than before" with hope that now
his team will start to play up to
their capabilities.
Ron Thorsen, the Birds'
offensive star, will be assigned to
check Manitoba guard Angus
Burr, who scored 36 points in the
team's last encounter. Thorsen's
defense, plus the forwards' ability
to keep Ross Wedlake and Bob
Town off the boards are the keys.
Saturday night UBC plays
against Winnipeg. This should be
the easiest of the two games. The
Birds soundly defeated the
Wesmen when they last visited
UBC, but you never can tell.
Saturday night could be a
mental letdown for the Birds
considering the importance of
Friday's game. Also, Winnipeg is
much tougher in their own gym.
Hockey Birds host
prairie team tonight
The UBC Thunderbirds will be
hoping for a measure of revenge
tonight when they host the
undefeated University of
- Manitoba Bisons in Western
Collegiate hockey, 8 p.m. at
Thunderbird Arena.
Two weeks ago in Winnipeg,
-the     Bisons     edged     the
Thunderbirds   6-5   in   what   the
UBC     squad     thought     was
out-and-out robbery.
Apparently, it was the old
story of the visiting team getting
screwed in the ear by referees ...
a story that has been heard before
* and will be heard again. (It's most
commonly heard from collegiate
hockey teams leaving Winnipeg
and Brandon and collegiate
basketball teams departing War
"Memorial Gym.)
The  Thunderbirds may  have
had   a   valid   complaint   as   the
officials  fingered  them  to  play
-short-handed     11     times    to-
Manitoba's   three,   but  tonight's
m~r-  .    - -- -   m
FOR GOOD FOOD
At Prices
1  You Can Afford
THE DINER
4556 West 10th
Phone 224-1912
game is in UBC's home rink and
the advantages are all the 'Birds.
A loss will virtually eliminate
the Thunderbirds from
challenging for top-spot. Manitoba
currently rides a 10-0 record,
while UBC and the University of
Calgary are next with 7-3 marks.
Thunderbird coach Bob
Hindmarch thinks his club will
win, but the coach is concerned
that the team is not playing up to
its capabilities. "We can play
better hockey than we have been
playing," He looks for an
improvement starting this
weekend.
Goal-tending has also been a
UBC problem.
Hindmarch will start Ian Wilkie
in goal tonight. Wilkie came to
UBC highly touted after an
outstanding junior hockey career
in Edmonton and tryouts with the
Montreal Canadiens of the
National Hockey League. So far
Wilkie has failed to live up to his
A NOTE TO ALL
BIG BLOCK
MEMBERS
That there will be a beer night
on Monday, Jan. 25 in S.U.B.
Ballroom Extension at 8:00
p.m.
% SORE FEET?
End your ski boot problems with
foaming. Consult Vancouver's only
experts and they will show you
how to transform your old plastic
boots to a perfect, comfortable fit.
We also stock new shells ready for
foaming.
D0L0MITE-$130.00 complete
HUMANIC-$120.00 complete
CUSTOM
FOAM FIT
73 Alexander - Gastown
Phone 687-5228
Manager: Byron Gracie
POPULAR SPORTS ENTHUSIAST Jim Davies dropped in today
as first string quarterback of the
Ubyssey's sports squad. Well
known for his cogent analysis of
the sporting scene, he has also
been labelled as a sick degenerate.
INTRAMURALS
In Tuesday's Issue
Flips and rolls
This Saturday, in War
Memorial Gym, the UBC
gymnasts will be holding a dual
meet with the University of
Calgary. Starting time for the
competition will be 2:00 p.m. The
UBC team are the defending
Canadian champions.
potential. Tonight would be an
ideal time for the goalie to come
around to the form expected of
him.
The Thunderbirds will be
active at the Thunderbird Arena
Saturday also, hosting the
University of Winnipeg Wesman at
8 p.m.
But tonight's game is the big
one. It could be the most
entertaining game of the season
and should fill the arena to
capacity for the third game in a
row.
Davies states,
"balls to you"
By JIM DAVIES
I have always had a repressed urge to be a sports columnist,
however, the pervading aura of perversion in the subject has caused me
to refrain.
Perversion in sports? You bet!
A recent perusal of the sports pages in the downtown press has
shown the seamy side of sports. F'rinstance, isn't it basically
unwholesome for 30 or 40 guys to spend their time eating together,
sleeping together, travelling together and even (ecchhh) showering
together.
As well, there must be something peculiar about men who clad
themselves in leather garb, wear odd footwear, and hide their faces
behind grotesque masks.
If you are still dubious about this phenomena, permit me to be
more specific.
Golf: This sport, like so many others of the common genre, has as
its primary focus, balls. And what kind of treatment do the balls
receive? Nothing but the most sadistic—they are whacked about with
metal clubs, bounced off trees, shot through tall grass, and finally
dropped into a hole. The Ku Klux Klan couldn't do any better. There
can be little doubt why Arnold Palmer's wife, Winnie, kisses his poor
little balls and gingerly puts them in his bag before every tournament.
Football: The mere name of this game conjures up all kinds of
sado-masochistic images. I clutch my gonads just thinking about it. And
the participants boggle my mind. . . what on earth is the function of a
flanker? or an end? I imagine these are the young gentlemen who
commit intentional fouls .holding, forward passes, and, of course, illegal
use of hands and arms.
Lacrosse: Need I say more about this, Canada's national sport,
than the entire endeavor takes place in a box!
Hockey: What are the play-by-play announcers trying to tell us
when they say, "And the boys drop their gloves and go at it", or . . .
"He lets a hard one go right in front of the net". And what is this
unmentionable puck everybody is preoccupied with?
Basketball: The purpose of this sport is to deposit your ball in a
basket. This is understandable, because what else would a ball be good
for after it has been bounced on a wooden floor for an hour? This
brings up a question which I have always asked myself—that is, is it the
same fellow who dribbles before he shoots that gets his ball caught up
in the webbing? ... I imagine it would logically follow.
The list is endless-soccer players kicking balls for two hours (and
liking it)", ping pong enthusiasts smashing balls with mallets, and skiers
holding poles in both hands in spite of being frigid, etc., etc., etc.
So, dear readers, that is why I can't bear to write about
sports-it's the rampant pornography inherent in the subject. Why, even
UBC's most noted sportsman and coach of the varsity football team is
notorious far and wide for being, of all things, a gnupper. Disgusting!
JANUARY SALE
AQUA-LUNG 71.2 "J" Valve Tanks.
"Lifetime SALE
Guarantee" .. Reg. $119.74     $98.80
AQUA-LUNG Regulators from $58.50
Va" NYLON 2-side WET SUITS
(Pants & Jacket) Reg. $105.00       89.99
%" NYLON lined WET SUITS (Pants & Jacket)
Limited Supply Reg. $69.95       $59.95
NYLON lined Hoods, Boots & Gloves.
d Per Set   Reg. $23.50       $20.00
•   W-OUCHBVs      SALE EN||S JANUflRY 3^
-J? | '^        2745 West 4th Ave.
<ffrden 7386929
Different
At Scandia
SALE
BRING IN YOUR OLD
WOOD OR METAL SKIS IN
ANY CONDITION WITH A
U.B.C. STUDENT CARD &
RECEIVE A 15% OR MORE
DISCOUNT  ON   NEW  SKIS.
ALSO 15% OFF on all your CROSS-COUNTRY needs.
HART
KNEISSEL
DYNASTAR
KASTLE
MARKER
TYROLIA
SALOMON
MANY MORE
Drop in anytime and have your bindings checked and adjusted for 50°
BEST SERVICE IN TOWN & THE COFFEE IS ALWAYS HOT
4th &
Burrard
SCANDIA SKI SHOP
732-6426 Page 20
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, January 22,  1971
Quebec struggle battle of class:
the workers against the rich
By DICK BETTS
It is easier to talk about Quebec on the west coast
than it is in Quebec, said Quebec labor leader Theo Gagne
Thursday.
Gagne is an officer of the United Steelworkers of
America currently Hying in Rouyn-Noranda.
"They want things to be kept quiet in Quebec, so we
like to come west to talk to people about things we have
difficulty saying there," he said to 250 people in SUB
ballroom.
He then outlined the central point of the struggle in
Quebec. "It's not a problem of race but a problem of the
working class against the rich."
"It is always a battle of class. Even in Ireland it is not
a religious fight at all. The Catholics are generally those
who are poor or workers and the Protestants are the
wealthier class," he said.
Gagne explained that for the labor movement it is
also a battle to build democracy.
"Michel Chartrand said to us once 'we must build
democracy step by step'.
Chartrand is president of the Montreal Council of
the Confederation of National Trade Unions and is facing
trial for seditious conspiracy.
Gagne is with the Quebec
Federation of Labour.
Gagne than proceeded to
outline briefly how workers
have been stopped in the past
in their fight for democracy.
"Clergy and government
have broken strikes in the
past," he said.
"In 1957 in Murdochville
1,200 miners lost the right to
organize their own union.
Two men died in that strike.
Pierre Trudeau was there at the time and he blamed the
company for being anti-union."
"That was Trudeau in those days," he added. "But
Trudeau also said to the miners forget about the two men
THEO      GAGNE   . . .
Quebecois crushed people
No fair trials or good lawyers
for Quebec War Act victims
By LESLIE PLOMMER
and JOSEPHINE MARGOLIS
People arrested under the War Measures Act in
Quebec will not receive fair trials, Simone Chartrand said
Wednesday.
Chartrand, whose husband
Michel was arrested in
Montreal on Oct. 16 under
the act, told 500 people in
SUB ballroom that the
prisoners do not have the
means to get the good
lawyers and information they
need to fight their case
equally with Crown
prosecutors.
"The law means legality;
and legality doesn't mean
justice for me," she said.
(Simone's husband Michel is a socialist Montreal labor
leader, and is not a member of the FLQ. He denounced
the War Measures Act publicly when it was introduced,
but in general, preached moderation in Quebec.)
Chartrand noted that "about all judges in Quebec are
appointed by the government — either federal or
provincial," and many have strong Liberal party
affiliations.
She said that those on trial are not able to choose
their own lawyer because the man they want to defend
them, Robert Lemieux, is also in jail.
SIMONE     CHARTRAND
.. . Trudeau arrogant.
Those charged do not have the money to hire other
lawyers who have volunteered paid services, and law firms
refuse to defend the prisoners because they are afraid of
being associated with the case, Chartrand said.
She also said the government has the resources to pay
Crown lawyers $200 a day, tap telephones, produce
extensive documentation and send police officers throughout
Quebec to watch the actions of suspects.
She said this inequality before the already partisan
courts will mean unjust trials.
"If a judge is partial and you ask him to withdraw
then you've committed contempt of court."
(When Michel Chartrand first came before the court
he addressed the judge as "Monsieur le president de
l'assemblie" and asked him to withdraw from the trials
because of his bias.)
This netted Chartrand a one-year sentence for
contempt of court.
For most of the Wednesday meeting, Chartrand had a
sympathetic audience that responded to her sense of
humor and warmth.
"My main interest in life is human relations. I didn't
come to protect or defend my husband. He's freer in mind
in prison than Trudeau," she said.
"Pierre Trudeau is not a democrat. He's an aristocrat,
and he's arrogant and he's violent."
"If he was not prime minister, he should be in jail."
Chartrand said she is personally opposed to violence
and kidnapping, but will not judge the actions of other
political groups.
who died. He did not say that about Pierre LaPorte."        *
"Police helped to break that strike," said Gagne.
"Trudeau and Bourasse did not try to save the lives
of James Cross or LaPorte," said Gagne.
"The real answer is to save all lives. To do this we4
need equality."
Gagne said, "In politics we have voted for the old
gang too long. Gagne said also that no social change ever
came from a change in government.
"Now we must change the direction of   politics."
In response to questions on the trials and how he
thought they would progress Gagne said, "We Quebecois •
workers are a crushed people and we are being tried by
those who are not crushed."
When asked about the effect of the FLQ Manifesto he
said:
"Many priests in the Gaspe area said that one
hundred per cent of the manifesto was true. It is one of
the best political manifestos we have had and we liked it."
He was asked if these priests were arrested under the
War Measures Act.
"The priests and other important people are not
arrested. Those in power seem to become deaf when they
protest," he answered.
"I'm much more interested in solving the economic
problems and political problems that put the FLQ on the
map," she said.
One questioner met with laughter from the audience-
when he suggested that since the Duplessis era in Quebec,
"Bourassa and others have done a lot for the French
Canadians."
"Bobbie Bourassa is popular in Quebec," another
audience member said.
"No. He's in power because he's rich, not because
he's popular," Chartrand responded.
Asked about Trudeau's popularity in Quebec after _
the imposition of the War Measures Act, Chartrand said
statements by politicians and the press about "revolution
and blood in the streets" had left Quebecois feeling
insecure in October.
She said the people therefore supported Trudeau's
actions at first, out of fear.
"When it appeared that this 'insurrection' was just a
scenario - just two kidnappings and killing - opinions are-
changing," Chartrand said.
Chartrand's talk in the SUB ballrooom was put in
perspective by suspended Simon Fraser University prof
Mordechai Briemberg, who pointed out that FLQ member
Charles Gagnon had spoken in the same place in early fall
and is now in jail facing charges of sedition and
conspiracy.
Briemberg said Gagnon's UBC speech, in a supposedly"
"free forum" contributed to his arrest, since Vancouver
Sun reports of the speech were held up in Quebec as
Crown evidence against Gagnon.
Stanley Ryerson, historian of Canada and Quebec,
will speak today in the last of the Quebec teach-ins to be
held at 12:30 in the SUB ballroom
On Jan. 31, a meeting to organize around the issue of
political freedom in Quebec will be held at 8 p.m. in the
Inner-City Service building at 1895 Venables.
PHOEIX 71
M 26-30
VARSITY GRILL
SPECIALIZING IN
Chinese & Western Cuisine
FREE DELIVERY
ON ORDERS 2.50 & UP
Phone 224-1822 - 224-3944
4381 W. 10th next to Varsity Theatre
INCREDIBLE SALE
of
TANTALIZING GR00VIES
at
Bad Boys Ragge Shoppe
315 SEYMOUR ST.
ON NOW! - 683-3734
LORNE ATKINSON'S
ACE CYCLE SHOP
Student Discounts
10% OFF on Accessories
5% OFF on Bicycles
With Student Card)
3155 W. Broadway 738-9818
H. E. U. S.
FEE REFERENDUM
RESULTS
ON JAN. 19/71
from 9:30 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.
44% of the students voted and 93%
of those voting approved the $2 fee
levy.
NOTICE
I Due to a new AMS ruling dance
i    tickets must be sold prior to the times
! stated on BANQUET PERMIT.
j»«*_»«»~»~-» See ya'all there ™————-i
.W.V.V.TJV.V..
Therefore buy your Farmers' Frolic
tickets downstairs in SUB   on Jan. 23rd
before 9:00 p.m.
WHERE ALL
THE ACTION IS
3
Sensational
Clubs in
1
HARRY'S
ENTERTAINMENT
COMPLEX
OILCAN'S
DANCE to the sounds of
KENTISH STEELE &
THE SHANTELLS
THE BACK ROOM
The atmosphere of the
Roaring 20's
DANCE to the heavy sound
of NIGHT TRAIN
DIRTY SAL'S
Listen to the unique voices
of JUDY & JIM GINN
-OPEN-
MON. THRU SAT.
'52 THURL0W ST. 683-7306

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