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The Ubyssey Nov 4, 1971

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Array 3,000 say 'no'
Vol till, No. 22       VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 1971
48
228-2301
to blast
Breakaway group
invades post office
About 3,000 demonstrators turned out for Wednesday's
anti-Amchitka bomb protest in spite of pouring rain, but the
scheduled program was soon upstaged by a breakaway group of about
1,000 people who paraded around downtown blocking traffic and for
a short time invading the Federal building.
The group made its first move halfway through the main
demonstration, at 2:30 p.m. when it moved in small groups from the
rear of the U.S. consulate on Alberni Street to block Georgia Street in
front of the consulate. —^^———
WALL OF PROTEST blocks traffic on Georgia Street during anti-Amchitka demonstration Wednesday.
Protesters pictured broke away from scheduled program to fill streets and invade Federal building. Below,
they surge toward Granville. ~
Their numbers grew when an
announcement was made at the
main demonstration that
disturbances were occurring in
front of the building and that
demonstrators were urged to stay
in one group.
Speakers continued with their
program in front of a diminished
but still very sizable crowd.
Speaking from 1:30 to 3:30
p.m. on a small covered platform
behind the Burrard building, the
speakers expressed concern from
several viewpoints about the
Amchitka test, now scheduled for
November 6.
The breakaway demonstrators,
chanting "Stop the bomb" and
"Get off your ass and stop the
blast" at drivers of blocked cars,
moved to the intersection of
Burrard and Georgia.
Few adults
Like the main demonstration,
the group was composed largely
of high school students, some
university students and some
unemployed youth. Although
there were some adults at the
main demonstration, few of
Vancouver's taxpaying public
seemed to be in evidence.
From Burrard the breakaway
group marched up Georgia to the
intersection at Granville.
Up to this point the group had
been essentially unorganized. At
Granville, loud hailers were used
by Don Clogg, vice-president of
the Scientific Pollution and
Environmental Control Society
and Jim Edgar of Delview Junior
Secondary School.
Clogg led the crowd in singing
"O Canada" and then announced
a decision to move back to the
consulate.
Demonstrators did not stop
there, however. They marched
past the Burrard building which
houses the consulate, turned left
onto Thurlow and back along
Alberni to Burrard.
Story by
Berton Woodward
Photos by
Kelly Booth
By this time the marchers at
the front of the crowd, who were
leaders by default since
loud-hailers were being used only
for leading chants, were almost
entirely members of the Youth
International Party.
The demonstrators once again
marched up Georgia to Granville,
staying only long enough to
decide that the Marine building at
Burrard and Hastings should be
occupied.
They marched back down
Georgia, turned north on Burrard
and arrived at the Marine building.
It was decided at that point to
occupy the Federal building at
Hastings and Granville instead.
Once there, after a short
hesitation marchers moved into
the building, chanting "Stop the
bomb" at bemused postal
workers.
The federal building houses
Postal Station "A" on its main
floor.
One office window was broken
inside the Federal building,
apparently by an over-zealous
demonstrator.
Police peaceful
The "occupation" of the
building lasted about 15 minutes,
after which the demonstrators
marched up Granville to Georgia
once again.
By this time the number of
dropout demonstrators had
increased greatly and the group
had dwindled to about 500.
One last stab was made at
blocking traffic in front of the
consulate, but demonstrators
seemed to have tired of the rain
and many were heard to express
weary desires for a hot bath.
The breakaway march broke
up at 4:30 p.m. under the
watchful eyes of about six
motorcyle policemen.
The police were peaceful
throughout the demonstration,
confining their action to directing
traffic around demonstrators
when possible and behind them
when not.
The only intervening action
police took was to prevent
demonstrators from entering the
Burrard building.
A Ubyssey photographer and
reporter were not allowed into the
building to take pictures of the
demonstration outside.
Police also had a say in the size
of the main demonstration's
delegation admitted to the office
of the assistant U.S. consul.
Lois Boyce, co-ordinator of the
Canadian Coalition to Stop the
Amchitka Blast, said Wednesday
See page 3: PROTEST Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 4,  1971
Speakeasy
Baby Sitting and Day Care Centres
If you just need a babysitter for an evening or a day, look in the
Yellow Pages under "Baby care". The Vancouver Baby Sitting Bureau
(phone 73M525) refers you to a sitter. Their cost is 75c an hour plus
bus fare for the sitter.
Day care centres throughout the city provide programs for
children from three years to school age. Most centres open at 7:30
a.m. until 5:30 p.m., at an average cost of $60 a month per child for
full days, and $30 a month for half-days. Call the agency in your
neighborhood for enrolment and more specific information.
9 Central Registry for Day Care: (information on all centres)
phone: 253-3146 - 616 Cordova St.
# Alexandra Neighborhood House (Kitsilano) phone: 731-5837 —
1726 W. 7th Ave.
0 Cedar    Cottage    (Cedar    Cottage-Kensington    area)   phone:
874^231 - 4065 Victoria Drive.
# Gordon Neighborhood House (West End) phone: 683-2554 —
1068 Davie St.
# Acadia   Day Care   Centre   (UBC)   phone:   224-6255   -   589
Agronomy Road.
Things To Do
The music listening library in SUB is open Monday to Friday, 9
a.m. to 11 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday, noon - 10 p.m. There are over
600 albums to listen to in stereo, with earphones; your choice of
music.
Need a job? Try the UBC student placement office on West Mall
There is always a selection of part-time jobs on the bulletin boards.
If there is anything you would like discussed in this column,
write to Speakeasy Column, Box 115, SUB, UBC. We welcome
readers' contributions and suggestions.
Drug survey finds
pill bills will fill tills
You can't depend on consistent pricing in any area — including
birth control pills.
A survey shows prices of a 21-day supply of Ortho-Novum SQ
(sequential) vary widely in Vancouver stores, with University
Pharmacy Ltd. on campus charging the second-highest price of $2.45.
Viaduct Drug Store Ltd. on Main, and Magee United Pharmacy
on West Boulevard charge $2.50 per month — the highest on the list.
Saver's Drug Mart on Arbutus and Isaac's Bayswater Pharmacy
on West Broadway have the lowest prices at $1.49 each.
Other prices include: Willow Pharmacy, $2.25; Woodward's
Pharmacy, $2.15; Shopper's Drug Mart (W. Broadway and Oak
branches), $1.99; Alma Western Drugs Ltd., $1.98; Baker Drugs Ltd.,
around $1.98; Kripps' United Pharmacy, around $1.98; Crawford's
Western Drugs, $1.95; and Shoppers Drug Mart (on Fourth), $1.69.
Fisher Pharmacy (Western Drugs), Wes Pharmacy Ltd., Toban
Pharmacy, and London Drugs refused to quote prices on the phone.
One interesting note — prices at different branches of Shopper's
Drug Mart vary from $ 1.99 to $ 1.69 to the low price of $ 1.49.
agparula
Politique
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WITH ACCOMMODATION AT THE FABULOUS Thursday, November 4, 1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
Anthrosoc
campaign
launched
The anthropology and
sociology undergraduate union
decided Wednesday to launch a
campaign to get students who
have taken courses from Ron
Silvers and Matthew Speier to
write testimonial letters on their
teaching.
Arts undergrad society
president Colin Portnuff said
Wednesday the union will ask
students to send one copy of their
letter to him and a second copy to
the faculty of arts promotion and
tenure committee.
Portnuff said the undergrad
union, which is independent of
the AUS, also decided to present
motions to the anthrosoc
department regarding student
representation on departmental
committees — specifically the
tenure committee which will
make the final decision of tenure
for Silvers and Speier.
"We are concerned about what
courses we can take, and from
what professors," said Portnuff.
"The implications are clear
that we can look forward to worse
conditions than now if Belshaw
(anthrosoc head) succeeds in his
purge."
The union has tentatively
scheduled a learn-in for
Wednesday to examine how
structural issues, such as tenure
and the direction sociology is
taking, fit into the university.
A book titled, Learn-In — The
Sociology Crisis at UBC, has been
published by the union and will
be available Friday at the
bookstore and Duthie's and from
members of the undergrad union.
—art roberts photo
TENDER LOVING CARE draws Ellen Javorski, arts 3, to lap of
The Miner in Buchanan plaza. "He's really comfy," Ellen saysof
implacable gent.
Students act
to save prof
By MIKE SASGES
A group of English instructor Seymour Levitan's students plan to
.protest his tenure denial.
The students, who were in Levitan's English 100 class last year,
plan to write a letter to arts dean Doug Kenny and administration
president Walter Gage.
Kenny and the arts faculty tenure and promotion committee
must decide whether to give Levitan tenure on the basis of
recommendations from English department head Robert Jordan.
Thirty associate and full professors in the department's tenure
committee evenly divided on whether to give Levitan tenure.
"As department head I am obliged to make recommendations but
I'm not going to make any public statements on whether I've made
those recommendations, and what they are," Jordan said Wednesday.
Jordan refused to say if he has or will recommend against
Levitan.
"I can't get into the business of answering every accusation
thrown at me," he said.
Levitan said Monday Jordan has a contemptuous attitude towards
students' opinions.
"Since Jordan's mind appears to be made up we're not sending
him a letter," Ken Lassesen, science 2, said Wednesday.
"It's now up to Dean Kenny to decide Levitan's future," said
Lassesen.
"As a science student, I had headaches with English," he said.
"Levitan made it more interesting and more involving than ever."
In a letter which Lassesen and Colin Lester, arts 2, are drafting,
the students claim Levitan represents the difference between the
elitist European education system and American liberal arts
education.
"In effect there is tension between these two poles and Levitan
represents this tension very well," said Lassesen who is also university
clubs committee treasurer.
Lassesen said he and Lester have only contacted 11 of the 22
students from the last year's class.
He said the students will meet today at noon in the SUB clubs
room to discuss the final draft of the letter.
The English department promotion committee recommended in
1969  and   1971   that  Levitan  be  given  an  assistant professorship.
Levitan, who does not have his PhD, joined the department in
1964 on a seven-year probation period with five others.
Two of those junior instructors, Brian Mayne and David Powell,,
have been denied tenure, Herbert Rosengarten was granted tenure and
two have left the university.
Protest hears Greenpeace Too communique
From page 1
police told her the delegation had
to be cut to four people from
eight.
She said that the delegation
met with assistant consul John
Horan for about half an hour. He
was read a brief written by Boyce
and talked with Boyce, Ray
Haynes, secretary-treasurer of the
B.C. Federation of Labor, Tom
Gooderham, regional director of
the Canadian Labor Congress, and
Jean Lawrence of New
Westminster Secondary School.
She said Horan was greatly
interested in how many people
each delegation represented.
She added that a guard, one of
several inside the consulate,
seemed to be taping the
proceedings.
The highlight of the main
demonstration was a live
broadcast from the Greenpeace
Too, the 154-foot protest ship
now headed to Amchitka to
monitor the blast.
Chris Bergthorson, of the
Don't Make A Wave Committee,
said: "Speaking for all the
members of the crew, we are with
you all the way."
The ship's doctor said crew
morale was helped immensely by
, the demonstration.
"Health is excellent and the
spirit great," he said.
Haynes, speaking to the crowd
earlier, commended the various
unions that walked off their jobs
from 11 to 11:30 a.m.
"Vancouver postmen stopped
working under the threat of
reprisals from the federal
government," he said.
He emphasized it was the first
time in B.C. labor history,
"perhaps North America's", that
labor has stopped working "not
for better wages, not for better
working conditions but for the
survival of mankind."
Dr. Leonard Walker, a former
radiation biologist at Berkeley and
consultant to the Swedish atomic
energy commission said he was
concerned about radioactive
leakage from the test.
"Leakage could injure
plankton in the sea and produce
tumors and mutations in
animals," he said.
The platform was chaired by
AMS ombudswoman Joan
Campana.
Other speakers included Linda
Meissenheimer, president of the
Simon Fraser Student Society,
Reverend Herbert O'Driscoll of
Christ Church Cathedral, John
Stainsby, grade 10 at Kensington
Secondary, Hilda Thomas, UBC
lecturer and Bob Hunter of the
original Greenpeace.
Jim Bohlen, also from the
original Greenpeace, read a
written speech on behalf of the
crew to the crowd.
Campana said after the
demonstration that she was very
pleased with the turnout
considering the heavy rain.
"It exceeded all my
expectations," she said.
"I think three or four times as
many people would have come
out if the weather had been
better."
Campana said that
demonstrations   were   also   held
Wednesday at Selkirk College in
Castlegar and at Notre Dame in
Nelson.
Some classes were cancelled at
the University of Saskatchewan
Wednesday and at the University
of Manitoba Tuesday to enable
students to attend Amchitka
protest demonstrations.
Seminars on the subject have
been conducted for the past
several days at Winnipeg
University and a silent vigil is
being maintained at Winnipeg's
U.S. consulate until the weapon is
detonated.
Fur Woman pelts reporters with obscenities
By TRICIA MOORE
A company dealing in the sale
of fur pelts, many from animals of
dangerously low populations, is
using SUB space to sell its
products.
Stephen Chatwin, engineering
1, said in a letter to The Ubyssey
the pelts "were identified by the
charming salesgirl (who later
called me a fucking asshole for
questioning her on the morality of
the sales) as red fox, raccoon and
grey wolf.
"Red fox and grey wolf are
already approaching the point of
extinction in British Columbia
and the raccoon population is
decreasing at an alarming rate,"
said Chatwin.
Two Ubyssey reporters spoke
to the Fur Woman Monday.
FUR WOMAN. MAN ... furrin' affairs
She told them they were
"pricks and assholes" and "if you
don't want us to sell this, piss on
you, I don't give, a shit."
She also told a Ubyssey
photographer who tried to take
her picture: "You're a fucking
asshole."
The Fur Woman is employed
by the Papas fur company.
John Cull, SUB co-op crafts
store manager said Monday the
furriers are not part of the store
. but are "just hardy little
capitalists being subsidized by the
students."
"Anyone is able to sell their
products in SUB," Colin Portnuff,
SUB management committee
member said Monday.
Portnuff said company sales in
SUB should not be allowed. Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 4, 1971
From our western Canadian vantage point,
it's often difficult to make valid judgments about
events in Quebec.
We can try to educate ourselves and others
on the subject; we can support the movement for
Quebec self-determination; but we must always
acknowledge that the shaping of the means and
ends of this movement lies, in the hands of the
Quebecois.
This supportive stance does not, however,
prohibit us from questioning some of the actions
taken during the course of Quebec's move
towards national self-determination.
We wonder, for example, about a
phenomenon reflected in two recent Ubyssey
news stories about Quebec.
^VltW did iOU TexL Know NUCtt po you)
Credibility
One story was run in Tuesday's edition, and
the other is on page 8 of today's edition.
Both concern themselves with student and
trade union reactions to the death of Michelle
Gauthier, who suffered an asthma attack
precipitated by a police charge Friday on
demonstrating supporters of locked-out workers
at La Presse in Montreal.
While it is clear that the asthma attack was a
result of police actions, and that police should be
condemned for their role in the demonstration,
we find it difficult to go along with the attempt
by some Quebec student and labor groups to turn
this woman into a martyr.
For the most part, these groups have
succeeded through the years in building a solid,
credible Quebec independence movement.
And this movement has had more than its
share of tragic deaths — many due to the fact the
Quebec police consistently ride shotgun for
government and management in their fight to
wipe out unions.
However, we wonder whether segments of
the Quebec movement are taking a political
shortcut when they seek to turn Michelle
Gauthier into a martyr.
We only hope that their actions are the right
ones and that the credibility of an otherwise solid
movement is not being jeopardized for the
purpose of reaping short-term political hay.
ooes ite rviA<e tfl_/
owe D/Vt? >
>(PTt DOUAfc
Letters
Used
I know this is an old
complaint, and hardly worth
bringing up again, but the UBC
bookstore is just unbelievable!
I bought a chem book, Atoms
and Molecules, on Sept. 29 for
$4.75. Two days later, I changed
to a different chem course. I
bought the book for that course
($14) but didn't have Atoms and
Molecules with me to return at
the time.
I didn't get around to returning
it until Oct. 22. At that time I
found out that you can't return
THE UBYSSEY
NOVEMBER 4,1971
'Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the writer and not of the AMS or the university administration.
Member, Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a
weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located
in room 241K of the Student Union Building.
Editorial    departments,   228-2301,    228-2307;   Page    Friday,    Sports,
228-2305; advertising, 228-3977.
EDITOR: LESLIE PLOMMER
Tricia Moore and Berton Woodward tangled with the Fur Woman —
and lost. Meanwhile, the aging UBC prevert Irving Fetish was in the office
directing an orgy and all the usual degenerates, led by Mike "Sloshed"
Sasges, really got it together. Kelly Booth made a soggy appearance after a
day with the masses and nasty Nate Smith told him he was all wet. Sandy
Kassed the Very Vaughn Palmer who started to cry until lurking Laurence
Leader told him it happens to the best of us. Sandi Shreve sang softly while
Dick Betts and Kathy Carney danced, etc. Mike Finlay limped in looking
for jovial Jan O'Brien, but he was distracted by Fetish and Bernard
Bischoff who were practising animal acts in the garbage can. Gord Gibson
told them their act needed more work but Keith Dunbar dug it. Lesley
Krueger went off in search of wilder adventure, but she didn't find it. John
Andersen giggled like a turkey when Paul Knox told his Erwin Epp jokes.
Leslie Plommer roused herself from an apathetic stupor long enough to
warn the collected creeps about a staff meeting today at noon.  j
books you've had more than 10
days - they're considered 'used'.
I went in and argued with the
boss but he wouldn't budge. Now
I don't object to this 10-day
policy, but who knows about it?
The guy I talked with claimed
that the bookstore went to great
expense to notify students of this
policy.
He said that:
1. Printed sheets were
handed out early in the term at
the armory.
2. There is usually a sign in
the bookstore stating this policy,
but at that moment it was being
replaced because someone had
destroyed it.
3. Advertisements to this
effect have appeared in The
Ubyssey. (Perhaps you could
check on this point.)
He did say I could get a refund
if I went to my prof and got him
to prove I had changed courses.
Now I'll do this and (hopefully)
get my refund, but I bet very few
students know about this 10-day
policy.
I     I  think the bookstore should
go  to more  efficient means to
publish this fact.
Jean Dickie,
Science 2
In answer to your question, a
look through this year's Ubysseys
shows that although the
bookstore has placed a number of
display advertisements in the
paper, none of these has
mentioned the 10-day policy.
Green
As one of the silent majority of
UBC students, I am offended by
your petty and unfair criticism of
Cecil Green's gift to the
university.
I fully support Mr. Green's
sense of hurt over the Oct. 15
article and I fail to see where you
have any right to criticize a great
man like Mr. Green.
After all, what he does with his
money and with the company and
the 45,000 people he owns is
none of your business. Besides,
Mr. Green has done a great deal
for ingrates like you: He was
helping to get oil to defend the
free world before you were even
born. Joe Greene, our energy
minister, also supports the cause
of getting raw materials to defend
the free world. Aren't you
patriotic?
As for your childish remarks
about the integrity of Lyndon
Johnson and John Connally, the
record of their actions speaks for
itself: These are men of complete
honesty and sincerity who are
above the temptations of
influence and power, just like Mr.
Green.
At any rate, it just is not right
to start raising unfair and indecent
questions about all of these things
now, when we are fighting a
worldwide communist attack on
the raw materials we need to
defend freedom. Shouldn't we
let things sort themselves out?
Let's  win the war first, andj
then decide what we're going to
do.  I  bet you don't print this
letter, pinkos.
A radical,
Artsl
P.S.   Now   do   we   get  more
money, Mr. Green? Thursday, November 4, 1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
Letters
Song
Last Wednesday night, under
the guileful disguise of being a
member of a local RED
organization, I infiltrated the
AMS council meeting with the
minimum of pomp, ceremony,
,and certitude.
From my vantage point near
the exit I witnessed several strange
monologues from a ruling class
calling itself the human
government. Absolutely
impressed was I as David Mole
leaped into view, grasping his guts
with all his might and quoted
from Marat/Sade (from memory
yet) and later when Steve Garrod
stealthily snuck around the
council table, easily overcoming
the beer bottles and papers
scattered around while harshly
tongue-lashing us with more
words from Marat/Sade.
As I was wondering what could
possibly follow this act, the
meeting was adjourned and the
entire Original Cast of this human
gov't, group assembled and came
on strong, nostalgically singing
Solidarity Forever. So impressed
was I with this vocal group that I
suddenly remembered SONG
FEUST, the annual song
competition that the Engineers
Undergraduate Society will be
presenting today at noon in Civic
201.
In keeping with that popular
Engineering tradition of
suppressing apathy wherever it
appears, I would like to extend an
invitation to the human gov't
choir to participate in SONG
FEUST'S festivities and to show
to all these talents that we have
previously been denied.
D. Stasuk,
Co-ordinator of Activities,
EUS
Friends
In response to the
anti-hitchhiking letters in
Tuesday's Ubyssey: A lot of
students depend on hitchhiking to
get to classes, since they cannot
afford a car or $80 a year for bus
fare.
No, you don't owe hitchhikers
a ride. But it is fortunate that
many drivers take the
responsibility of picking up
hitchhikers, because if everyone
drove a car the congestion would
be even worse.
I notice a large number of cars
that pass me by every morning
carry only one or two people. If
you left your car at home
occasionally and hitchhiked, and
then picked up all the hitchhikers
you could on the days you did
drive, the congestion would be cut
down a lot.
It could even be argued that
you do owe hitchhikers the use of
. your car, since it is because they
are poor that you are rich enough
to buy a car.
On a rainy morning like today
(Wednesday) I cannot understand
what goes through your minds as
you pass by hitchhikers. Are you
afraid we will get your seats wet?
Are you afraid to meet people?
Doesn't it bother you that I may
* recognize you sometime as the
unfriendly person who never picks
me up?
It doesn't cost you anything to
give a person a lift, and you might
- occasionally meet an interesting
person who may even become a
friend. If the free-loading aspect
bothers you, then get together
with hitchhikers or other drivers
in your area and form a car pool.
Anything to get your
smoke-belching, intersection-clogging behemoth either filled up or
off the road.
Peter Jordan,
Science 4
Hitch
I would like to voice my
concern over hitchhiking.
People don't seem to realize
that they would have felt the
same as J. Nolan (letter to The
Ubyssey, Oct. 28) if they had
been hitching without success in
freeze-your-balls-off cold.
When you see long-haired
middle-class-type hippies roaching
a ride, remember that they are
human. And that if they had a car
and you were hitching they would
pick you up.
Name withheld,
Science 1
Le May
Re the defeat of the human
government.
I have recently learned from
reliable sources that General
Curtis E. Le May (George
Wallace's running mate in the
1968 presidential race) has
decided not to seek the 1972
vice-presidential nomination.
Perhaps, if some of the
"concerned" 4,020 students who
voted the human government out
of office last Wednesday were to
get together, they could persuade
general Le May to enroll at UBC
in '72.
With the support of the
engineers I am sure that he would
consider seeking AMS presidency.
If elected, I am sure he would
provide the responsible leadership
that is much needed by the youth
today in its effort to
constructively change the world.
Think ■ of the constructive
changes that would occur on
campus. Take, for instance, the
chariot race at the annual teacup
football game. Instead of merely
spraying acid and blinding a
scienceman like they did a few
years ago, the engineers, with Le
May's endorsement, could use
napalm to prove their superiority.
I am stare that General Le May,
rather than a "subversive" like
Steve Garrod, is the type of man
that Bob Dylan had in mind to
make way for change when he
wrote The Times, They Are,
A-Changing in 1963.
Name withheld,
Arts 2
Theft
Beautiful
clothes. .
I wonder if it would be
possible for you to publish a
request regarding the
identification of persons who
might be involved in thefts from
about six cars in B lot Tuesday.
My car was broken into and
the resulting damage and theft
came to more than $75. When I
reported it the police, I was told I
was the sixth person to report
such an incident.
If anyone has any information
on the identity of persons seen
loitering Tuesday in B lot it would
appreciated.
If any info could be left in The
Ubyssey office I would be glad to
collect it.
Dale Broening.
for
beautiful
neople
urn chAteau
"a step ahead"
776.GTanville 687-2701
DIAMONDS & ENGAGEMENT RINGS
BUY WHOLESALE
SAVE 50%
VISIT YOUR JEWELLER ON CAMPUS
DIAMOND ROOM JEWELLERS
UBC Village - Beside World Wide Travel
Easy Credit — We Listen Better
Bestsellers
for the
week
Tarantula—3.95
Crystal Cave—1.25
Khrushchev Remembers—1.95
The Governor Llsteth—1.50
Luescher Colour Test—1.25
Inside the Third Reich—1.95
Boss—R. J. Daley of
Chicago—1.25
the bookstore
228-4741
Today-Nov. 4-12:30 p.m.
SUB AUDITORIUM-50c
Walter Zuber Armstrong Ensemble
Free Form Jazz
Walter Zuber Armstrong
Composer, Arranger
WOODEN FLUTE (Oriental and own design)
ALTO-FLUTE - BASS-CLARINET - PICCOLO -TAMBORINE
MUSIC
The music represents a break from traditional concepts of music
and moves within a free rhythmic structure. It is an expression of
a spiritual creative freedom.
puis
V2 PRICE!
tapestry
denims
by Canada's most famous pant maker
A new look in blue denim ...
tapestry patterned pants with
26" flared bottoms, narrow
knees, button flies and two front
pockets. Sizes 28 to 36.
Headquarters for—
G.W.G.
LEVI'S
H.I.S.
LEES
Manufacturers
suggested
Retail was $10
Now at only	
55 W. Hastings
2115 W. 41st
2967 W. Broadway
2140 Western Parkway
U.B.C. Square
Monday to Friday — 70o.m. to 9p.m. — Saturday 10a.m. to 6p.m. Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 4,  1971
'Tween classes
TODAY
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
SUB 111,3:30 p.m.
ACTION CANADA
SUB 113, 12:30 p.m.
NISEI VARSITY CLUB
Elections     and     general     meeting,
12:30 p.m.. SUB 219.
VARSITY DEMOLAY
General meeting, 7 p.m., SUB 213.
COLD MOUNTAIN INSTITUTE
Poet    Paul     Reps,    8    p.m.,    Hebb
Theatre.
UBC SKYDIVERS
General   meeting, 12:30 p.m., SUB
211.
SPECIAL EVENTS
Jazz   concert   with   Walter   Zuber
Armstrong,       12:30     p.m.,     SUB
auditorium.
GAY PEOPLE'S ALLIANCE
General   meeting, 12:30 p.m., SUB
224.
CCF
Post   Halloween,   12:30   p.m.,  SUB
205.
PHOTOSOC
Studio    classes,   12:30   p.m.,   SUB
245.
ALPHA OMEGA
(UKRAINIAN CLUB)
General  meeting, 12:30 p.m., SUB
105B.
LEGAL AID
SUB 232, 12:30 p.m.
CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR CHRIST
The   uniqueness   of   Jesus,    12:30
p.m., SUB 111.
BAHA'I CLUB
Rap session, 12:30 p.m., Buch. 230.
UBC ANTI-WAR CLUB
Anti-war  film   festival,  12:30  p.m.,
SUB 125.
FRIDAY
PHOTOSOC
Studio   classes,   12:30   p.m.,   SUB
245.
UBC STUDENT LIBERALS
Pat  McGeer,  12:30 p.m., SUB 211.
UBC CYCLE CLUB
Bike   maintenance  clinic and  film,
12:30 p.m., SUB 205.
SPECIAL EVENTS
David    Suzuki    on    science,    the
university and the individual, 12:30
p.m., SUB ballroom.
COMMITTEE FOR AN
INDEPENDENT CANADA
Publisher   Jack   McClelland,   12:30
p.m. SUB clubs lounge.,
T-BIRD MOTORCYLE CLUB
General   meeting,  12:30 p.m., SUB
105A.
PRE-SOCIAL WORK
Ward    Moir   from   family   services,
12:30 p.m.
A.V. lab in school of social science.
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
General   meeting,   12:30   p.m.,   IH
upper lounge.
ABORTSOC
SUB 210, 12:30 p.m.
SATURDAY
CVC
Car    rally,    7:30    p.m.,    Oakridge
parking lot.
HILLEL
The film Petulia with Julie Christie
and George C. Scott, 9 p.m., Hillel
house.
SUNDAY
TAEKWON-DO CLUB
Practise with Mr. Choi, 6 p.m., Gym
B of the Winter Sports Centre.
MONDAY
UCC
Budget   meeting,   12:30   p.m.,  SUB
clubs lounge.
ELCIRCULO
Conversation hour, 12:30 p.m., IH
402.
TUESDAY
UBC SCIENCE FICTION SOCIETY
General meeting, 12:30 p.m., SUB
215.
llllllllWBIIIIIIIIIIIIIlllllllil!,
Independent
Canada
Canadian publisher Jack
McClelland will speak on
Canadian Independence and the
Committee for an Independent
Canada in the SUB clubs lounge at
noon Friday.
McClelland is national
chairman of the CIC.
Following the meeting a UBC
branch of the CIC will be
organized.
Suzuki to speak
David Suzuki, UBC zoology
professor, will speak on science,
the university, you and I, in the
SUB ballroom, Friday at 12:30.
Hot flashes
The lecture is sponsored by the
special events and speakers
committee of the Alma Mater
Society.
Danting, music
A demonstration lecture on
dances and music of India will be
presented at the Oakridge
Auditorium, 343 Oakridge Friday
at 8 p.m.
The lecture is sponsored by
Oxfam of Canada, proceeds to go
to the combined appeal for
Pakistani refugees for
rehabilitation work.
Tickets are $2 each and
available at Graham The Cleaner,
5633     Dunbar,    Collins    of
Kerrisdale, 2144 West Forty-first
and Gagel Photo Service, 3616
West Fourth.
Peace and war
Medical-physicist Dr. John
Goffman will speak today on the
implications of peaceful and
warlike atoms.
Goffman, who has quite often
disagreed with the policy of the
Atomic Energy Commission, will
speak in Bioscience 2000 at
12:30.
Goffman has degrees in
medicine and nuclear physical
chemistry and has done much
research into the field of
radioisotopes and their effect on
living organisms.
Friday 5
& Saturday 6
7:00 & 9:30
Sunday 7-7:00
SUB THEATRE-50*
a SUB FILM SOC presentation
THE REVOUmOMRV
SPAGHETTI HOUSE LTD
4450 W. 10th Ave.
Hot Delicious Tasty Pizzas
famous charbroiled steaks — spare ribs
FREE DELIVERY - Right to Your Door
Phone 224-1720 -  224-6336
OPEN FOR LUNCH - SPECIAL MENU
HOURS - MON. To THURS. 11 am, to 3 am,
; FRI. & SAT. 11 am, to 4 am, -SUNDAY4 p,m. to 2 a.
m^\\ Accicien
v*LA5blrlcD
Rates: Campus — 3 lines, 1 day $1.00; 3 days $1,10
Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $1.25; additional
lines 30c; 4 days price of 3.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and arm payable
in advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m.,the day before pabfieafpJEr
Publications Offce, Room 241 SJJ.B., UBC, Van, 8, BXX-*:"
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
POLKA PARTY — DANCING AND
great refreshments, Friday, Nov. 5,
from 9 p.m. - 1 a.m. at Interna-
tional House.	
ENGINEERS MIXER FRI. NOV. 5,
9:00 p.m. Lions Gate Hall. 2611 W.
4th.	
DANCE TO CARIB 71 GRAD STU-
dent centre, Sat. Nov. 6th, 9 p.m.-
1 a.m., Tickets $1.00 each at Grad
Centre  Office.
Lost & Found
13
LOST LAST WEEK: SQUARE
brown glasses, either hitching to
or walking around campus. Desperate   521-0882.
Special Notices
15
MALE AND FEMALE DANCERS
and singers needed for Songfest
'72. Performing February — Students—contact Rory, 224-9691. Au-
ditions  Nov.   7,   Partyroom,   SUB.
SUNDAY INFORMAL WORSHIPT
"Chapel Loft" 7:00-7:45 p.m.
FIRESIDE Lounge, 8:00 p.m.
Guest John Williams "What Is A
Typical Indian?" V.S.T. 6050
Chancellor.	
IN CONCERT "A DAY IN OUR
Lives"—Rock Ballet and Light
Show, Thursday, Nov. 4, 12:30,
SUB Ballroom, 50c per person.
U.B.C. BARBER SHOP IS OPEN
Mon.-Sat. See Dino or Rick at
5736   University   Boulevard   (near
Campus).       	
SKI   WHISTLER
OR
MOUNT  BAKER
Six week ski course at above areas,
only    $32.00    includes    return    buB
transportation  and  1%  hour lesson.
Further information from:
Canadian Youth Hostels Association,
1406 West  Broadway,  Vancouver  9,
738-3128.
CYPRESS LODGE YOUTH
HOSTEL
WHISTLER  MOUNTAIN
Open Dec. 1st until Apr. 30th. 1972.
Special Midweek Package: 5 nights
accommodation with  3 meals a day
$22.00
Further information from: Canadian
Youth    Hostels    Assn.,    1406    West
Broadway, Vancouver 9, 738-3128.
HEAR  DR.   NORMAN  MacKENZIE
speak   on   the   Student   Christian
Movement Fri.  Nov.   12th.  Dinner
at 7:30 p.m. $2.50 per person, $1.50
for   students.   Please   register   by
Mon.   Nov.  8th.   Contact Rev.   An-
derson 228-9031 or 224-0069.	
AUTOMOTIVE
Autos For Sale
21
1959 MERCEDES BENZ DIESEL
engine in good condition. Transmission and tires good. Sell for
$125 or best offer. Call 732-7935,
evenings.	
1970 SUNBEAM ALPINE G.T. Excellent condition. Must sell. Phone
681-1708.   Best   offer   takes.	
'68 AUSTIN 1100 STN. WGN. 30,000
miles. Excellent condition, new
brakes. Extra snow tires. Phone
224-4480.       	
1965 BLUE BUICK FOUR DOOR.
Comfortable Commuter. $800.00
plus your trade worth $100.00.
Auto France, 1234 Kingsway. Call
873-2454.
Automobiles—Parts
23
STUDDED SNOW TIRES. HARD-
ly used 5.50x12 -whltewall, Uni-
royal. Mounted and balanced, $45.
224-3469.
Auto Repairs
24
If you own a British Car
we  can  offer:
* Low  Labour Rates
* Below   Retail   Parts
* Repairs and Modifications
* Personalized  Attention
* Guaranteed Work
BRITISH CARS ONLY
1906 W. 43rd        266-7703
(rear) at Cypress
BUSINESS SERVICES
Photography
   35
INFORMAL PORTRAITS BY
Carol Gordon. May be taken outdoors. Ideal Xmas gifts. 733-0715
or" 736-4923.
Rentals—Misc.
Scandals
36
       ~37
MALE NEGRO SINGER-DANCER
interested in performing' early
February Songfest '72. contact
Rory, 224, 9691. Auditions Nov. 7.
PHOTOSOC MEMBERS — LAST
two days for studio classes —
today and tomorrow noons.
Sewing & Alterations
38
Typing
40
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING.
My home, essays, thesis, etc. Neat,
accurate work. Reasonable rates.
Phone 263-5317.
TEDIOUS TASKS. PROFESSIONAL
typing. IBM Selectric—days, evenings, weekends. Phone Shari at
738-8745.   Reasonable   rates.	
TYPING—ESSAYS. THESIS. Assignments, Research Papers, Fast
Service Near 41st & Marine Drive.
266-5053.	
ESSAYS, ETC. TYPED NEATLY,
quickly and efficiently. 35c page.
Phone   224-0385   after   5   p.ro.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
SECRETARY WANTED. PART
time. Five hours a week. Apply
Student Christian Movement (224-
3722) (224-0069). Write Room 39,
6000  Iona Drive. 	
POSITION AVAILABLE ALMA
Mater Society general office clerk
typist (temporary full time) December 1 '71 to February 29 '72.
Salary $315 to $335 per month
(presently under review). Apply
in writing to Mr. D. Wey, Office
Manager, Student Union Building
by November loth, 1971.
INSTRUCTION  & SCHOOLS
Music Instruction
61
Tutoring Service
63
COURSES CONFUSING? GET
help with a tutor. All subjects,
reasonable rates. Register at UBC
Tutoring Centre, SUB 228, 12:30-
2:30.
Tutors—Wanted
64
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
KNEISSL WHITESTAR RS. BIND-
ings $75; Blizzard Formel total
bindings $125. Both 210cm. 526-
3378.	
SUNN CABINET WITH TWO 15"
D140F's 100 watt dynakit for bass?
Both for $350.00. 732-7376 after 5:00
96 BASS ACCORDION INI EXCEL-
lent condition for sale. Good
Christmas present. Phone Donna
228-9531  evenings.	
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
ROOM IN LARGE OLD HOUSE.
Kits area, shared facilities. $50.00
per month. Phone 733-4585, after
6 p.m.	
TO RENT. SLEEPING ROOM ONE
Block from gates.  Male, priv.  ent.
224-4746
Room & Board
82
ROOM AND BOARD — $110 MO.
Males. Excellent food. Color TV.
Sauna. 5785 Agronomy Rd., Ph.
224-9684.	
MEAL PASSES AVAILABLE AT
the DKE House. 5765 Agronomy,
224-9691. Enjoy excellent home-
cooked meals on campus at prices
you   can   afford.          	
Furnished Apts.
83
FURN. BSMT. SUITE. PRIVATE
entrance, bath, cooking. Near
gates. One person $100. Avail. Dec.
1. Phone 224-3882.
Unfurnished Apts.
84
PERSON 24-30 TO SHARE 2 B.R.
apt. in Kits. Nov. 3rd. Telephone
732-9702 $60. or $70. ■
Houses—Furn. & Unfurn.      86 »
GIRLS. COUPLES TO SHARE
large friendly house very close, to
university. Call 224-0230 after 5:30. Thursday, November 4, 1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
Soccer 'Birds i
action today
The Thunderbird soccer team
takes on the tough Firefighters at
noon today at Thunderbird
Stadium in a Pacific Coast Soccer
League game.
Last Saturday, the 'Birds
travelled to Victoria to play the
Victoria Gorge-Molson team and
emerged with a 2-1 victory.
A fast end-to-end game was
played despite a wet and muddy
field making footing treacherous
and ball control difficult.
Captain Doug Wilson opened
the scoring for UBC by volleying a
Clark Glanville pass into the top
corner of the net. UBC led 1-0 at
half time.
Gorge-Molson equalized the
score 15 minutes into the second
half with a goal by George Hyne.
With only ten minutes remaining
in the game UBC's Jim Sator
crossed   the   ball   mid-field   and
Tony Mayor headed the ball into
the Victoria net.
Mayor's winning goal put the
finishing touch to a sound
performance, as his earlier
attempts to score had been
stopped by the Victoria
goalkeeper.
Gorge-Molson pressed for the
equalizer but failed.
UBC coach Joe Johnson,
although satisfied with his team's
record of two wins and one tie,
still feels that the team has yet to
live up to its potential.
UBC is in second place in the
Pacific Coast League with five
points and has a game in hand
(today's game) over the league
leading North Shore United who
have six points.
Game time today is 12:30, and
the stadium has a roof to protect -
spectators from the elements.
Saturday, the 'Birds take on
North Shore United at Kinsmen
Park.
shots
eiJ»«J?fgAR
If Peter Mullins' Thunderbird basketball team is to regain
the Canadian championship, one of the key players will be
forward John Mills.
The 6'3" Vancouver College grad will be entering his third
year as a Varsity player, but the pressure to produce will be
stronger this year over any other.
The brunt of this pressure lies in the fact that Mills must fill
the shoes of the departed Derek Sankey and Terry MacKay. It
might have been an easy job except for the fact that both Sankey
and MacKay are two-year veterans of the Canadian National team
as well as former key players for the Thunderbirds.
JOHN MILLS ... strength in rebounding.
Mills, however, seems to be reacting very well to the added
importance of his role with this year's team. In practices so far
this season Mills is showing more confidence around the basket.
During the off season it also appears that John has
improved his inside shot. It is even rumored that he is attempting
moves like the great Elgin Baylor when he gets the ball in close to
the basket.
As with Stan Callegari, word has it that Frank Gnup would
have loved to have had John Mills play football for him. He was
heard to ask John what the hell he was doing playing basketball
again this year. "You've been second string for two years now;
what makes you think that you will do any better this year?'
Mills, however, was not doing too much listening, and he should
prove to be a solid performer on the basketball court.
-Find out this Friday in War Memorial Gym as action begins
at 8:00 p.m.
a MAZDA
-garry gruenke photo
GREG   WEBER,    UBC   goalie   jumps   over   a   Victoria
Gorge-Molson player after making save in Saturday's game.
UBC won 2-1.
Reflections from a female
on a 'Bird football game
I don't think I led a
particularly sheltered life.
But back in Wood High School
in Firebank, Arkansas, I had come
to believe that college football
games were the 'big social event'
on campus.
Like, you had to be seen at
games to ensure a productive
social life.
So, Saturday, I put on my
spectator outfit, complete with
recently purchased blue and gold
scarf, and headed out to
Thunderbird Stadium.
Never having witnessed such a
match, I was rather relieved to see
that they started off with some
music. Quite a catchy piece. And
everybody seemed to like it. They
all stood up when they played it.
Moving along, the cheerleaders
started a routine. Before they's
even finished, the game was
started. (Seems to me, they might
show some courtesy here.)
After that it was a constant
stream of players off and on the
field. All the guys wearing the
same uniforms would get together
and figure out (I guess) what was
going on. Because, when they
finished their little tete-a-tete,
everyone lined up really neatly.
Then someone would wreck it
by taking the ball from where a
little guy in a striped shirt had just
deliberately placed it. And the
players always got the ball.
Seemed to me he could have given
the other players a chance.
Other weird things: two guys
wandered around all afternoon in
front of the benches the players
Intramurals
HOCKEY league games get
underway today at 5:15 p.m.
with forestry  meeting the grads.
SOCCER schedule will be up
Monday. Check outside the
intramural office.
BASKETBALL league play
continues tomorrow at noon.
TENNIS finals continue until
November 19.
who didn't feel like playing at the
moment were sitting on, with
wires in their ears.
One guy in baggy white
pantaloons stood on the far side
of the field and flipped these
cards over all afternoon.
No matter how hard he tried,
he just couldn't get past three.
At least, I don't have to attend
another one of these productions.
Some engineer with a hole in
his sweater asked me to go to a
hockey game next week.
SAVE MONEY
ON REPAIRS!
We've been fixing cars in
Vancouver for over 8 years
specifically serving the
university community. Up
till now we've concentrated
on fixing VW, Volvo,
Mercedes, Porsche and
B.M.W. but now we have
added staff and facilities to
service Mazdas, Toyotas and
Datsuns. Come to the
experts — all work
guaranteed!
DIVE!
N.A.U.I. SCUBA COURSE
STARTS THIS SUNDAY
NOV. 7 AT 6:30 P.M.
HELD AT ST. GEORGES SCHOOL
29th & CAMOSUN
Enroll Now!
Phone Neil McDaniel
738-0343
tW%lager
£ljoe sfioppe*
GRBfTSHOBSFa^HB
i jn^aer^mijtmVR'uxmoHf
By Torino
Available in
Brown Leather
only $49.00
542 Granville and 435 W. Hastings St.
776 Granville — Adams Apple Boutique
Open Thursday and Friday nites.
CO.D. orders accepted. Credit and Chargex cards honored.
* "Design and word Trade marks in Canada of the
Villager Shoe Shoppes Ltd." Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 4,  1971
Human gov't executive resigns, election set
By SANDY KASS
Alma Mater Society, secretary
Evert Hoogers announced
Wednesday the resignation of
seven human government
executive members.
Hoogers told a student council
meeting the resignations will take
effect    Dec.    1,    following    an
election of new AMS executive
officers, scheduled for Nov. 24.
In a brief presented to council
by law rep Grant Burnyeat, the
law students association praised
the human government programs
to date, and commended the
human government's integrity in
calling    for    a    referendum    as
promised in its campaign during
the spring of 1971.
Council endorsed a list of 18
persons recommended for visiting
professorships by special events
committee chairman Julian Wake.
• A proposal by science rep
Adrian Belshaw that former
Ubyssey   editor  Nate   Smith   be
recommended for a visiting
professorship was ruled out of
order.
Council passed a second
motion by Wake, protesting that
"student opinion was not
included in consideration of the
appointments of Harold Gray to
director of continuing education
1,000 mourn Montreal attack victim
MONTREAL (CUPI-MDQS) -
Eight busloads of students from
the CEGEP Vieux-Montreal were
among 1,000 persons who turned
out Tuesday for the funeral of the
young student who died in the La
Presse solidarity demonstration
here Friday.
Michelle Gauthier, a student at
the college, succumbed to an
asthma attack during the
demonstration in support of
locked-out workers at Quebec's
largest French-language
newspaper.
The Comite D'Action
Politique, a student movement at
the CEGEP, denied official police
reports that Gauthier had died a
natural death due to an asthma
attack and charged that she was
assassinated.
"She suffocated during the
hysterical charge of the billy-goats
COMMERCE
GRADUATES!
Would you like to earn a
good income when you are
young enough to enjoy it
and still have a career 20
years from today?
will
KEN G.KELLER
Assistant mgr. of the
Vancouver General Office
be    interviewing    graduating
students for sales and management
careers   at  the Student Placement
Office on
Thurs. & Fri. Nov. 4 & 5
Call      the      Placement     Office
228-3811 for an interview.
THE
TOWN
PUMP
THE BEST DINING
AND
ENTERTAINMENT
DEAL IN GASTOWN
Full facilities
7 days a week
Dancing to the 'Now
Sound' of the Town
Pumpers — Mon. thru
Sat. from 9 p.m.
Old-Time Piano from 5
p.m. Daily (4 p.m. to 10
p.m. Sundays)
8 of 9 Entree Items
$2.50 or Less
GROUP PARTIES CAN BE
ARRANGED SUN.-THUR.
CALL 683-6696
in the anti-riot squad," a leaflet
handed out by the committee
read.
The Quebec Federation of
Labor, the Confederation of
National Trade Unions and the
Quebec Teachers' Corporation
echoed this opinion Monday and
condemned police brutality.
"The ferocious attack by
Montreal   police   on   more   than
15,000 workers Friday evening
definitely ends a chapter of
peaceful and naive
demonstrations," said Marcel
Pepin, president of the CNTU.
More than 200 students and
workers were injured Friday
because of police actions.
Gauthier was standing right up
in  front  of the  barricades and
suffered the full force of the
police charge. According to her
husband, the intense fear caused
by this charge precipitated the
fatal asthma attack.
The 27-year-old CBC employee
blamed Power Corporation
(owners of La Presse) and Mayor
Jean Drapeau's police for his
wife's death.
in commerce and D. J. McCorkle
to the head of the music
department".
The motion also asked council
to request the administration to
familiarize students with selection
methods and criteria, and to
include students in
decision-making procedures on a
parity basis.
A request for free space in SUB
for concerts presented by Project
'72 designed to provide funding
for summer student employment
schemes and youth hostels, was
referred to finance committee for
approval.
A motion by arts rep Colin
Portnuff asking the AMS to urge
students to wear black on
Remembrance Day, Nov. 11 to
protest imperialism was also
passed.
TUXEDO
RENTAL & SALES
+ D.B. & S. B. Tuxedos
+ D. B. 8> S. B. White Coats
+ D. B. «. S. B. Suits
+ COLORED SHIRTS
Parking at Rear
BLACK & LEE
Formal Wear Rentals
631 Howe 688-2481
lENlffl ■«■
BIKE COLD?
Drive the
MONTE CARLO
WINNER
CALL JIM CLELAND
873-2454
1234 KINGSWAY
mtmummmm
mm+m
MMMMMMRMH
MMM
X-KALAY
SHELL SERVICE
10% OFF fo U.B.C. STUDENTS with
presentation of current student card.
ON GAS, OIL, REPAIRS, TIRES,
BATTERIES & BUBBLE GUM
Help Us To Help Others
I     X-KALAY • THE PEOPLE'S BUSINESS
738-8733
3395 WEST BROADWAY
MkMMMMIMIMMl
FIRST TIME in VANCOUVER
LIVE! In Concert!
"BLOOD,
SWEAT and
TEARS
IJ
Sunday Nov. 7 — 7 p.m,
P.N.E. AGROPOME
TICKETS $5 - $4 - $3 On Ssle Now
VANCOUVER TICKET CENTRE
All Eatons Stores — All Union Jacks & Jeans
Planetarium - The Butcher Shop - Personal Shopping Only
THE ROCK OPERA BY THE WHO
sound by Kelly-Deyong
NIGHTLY TO NOV. 6-8:30 P.M.
UBC OLD AUDITORIUM
TICKETS: $2.50 & $3.00 at Vancouver Ticket Centre 683-3255
and outlets; Pants Plus in the Village.
STUDENT SHOW
Today—12:30 Noon—$2.00 with card
2
CD
O
o
£
I
Q
DENVER, HOST CITY FOR
1976 WINTER OLYMPIAD
In cooperation with Northwttt Releasing Corporation
Proudly Present*
THE DENVER SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
BRIAN PRIESTMAN, Music Director
and Conductor
First Northwest Tour
QUEEN ELIZABETH THEATRE
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 1971
8:30 P.M.
"Denver Symphony Orchestra rated
brilliant... opening concerts sold out."
Denver Post, September 1971
"Denver Orchestra attains quintessential
brilliance." Salt Lake Tribune, April 1971
Piano Soloist: Donn-Alexandre Feder
"Elegant,  Clear  and  Imaginative"  N.Y.  Times
PROGRAM
WALTON: Portsmouth Point Overture
KHATCHATURIAN: Concerto for Piano and
Orchestra
WEBER: Bassoon Concerto in F Major, Op. 75
George Zukerman, Soloist
VAUGHAN WILLIAMS: Symphony No. 4
in F Minor
TICKETS — S.2S, 4.2S, 3.75, 2.75
Students with cards $2.00
THE BAY BOX OFFICE, FOUR1H FLOOR, THE BAY
DAILY 10 to 5:30 — PHONE 681-3351
ALSO: THE BAY RICHMOND AND LOUGHEED STORES
PHONE RESERVATIONS ACCEPTED — 681-3351
CHARGE TICKETS TO YOUR BAY CHARGE ACCOUNT

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