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UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Nov 27, 1987

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Array THEUBKSSEY
Faculty stalls daycare funding
By Lisa Langford
The faculty association voted
Thursday to give UBC daycare up
to $40,000 but the vote was defeated on a technicality.
After the vote was taken approving the grant, one of the faculty called quorum. Without the
necessary 75 members present,
the vote was quashed.
Faculty association president
Joost Blom said some members
felt a motion involving a large
amount of money should be discussed with more members present. Other members questioned
the benefit to their membership of
such a grant.
"There were a number of
people who thought this kind of
expenditure would be of benefit to
a minority of members? said
Blom. He added that some members thought a mail ballot to all
eligible voters would garner a
larger response.
The daycare will have
nowhere to go unless
building plans begin
soon.
But daycare advocate Don
Holubitsky said faculty are the
largest users of campus daycare.
Three percent of the faculty currently have children in campus
daycare. Children of faculty members comprise twenty per cent of
the UBC daycare enrollment.
Holubitsky said he is disappointed that faculty hasn't taken
positive action on the daycare issue. "It could have a disastrous
result? said Holubitsky.
The present structure will be
demolished this spring after a fire
marshal   declared   the   wooden
World War Two army huts a fire
hazard and structurally deficient
in 1982, said Holubitsky.The
daycare did renovations in 1982
and received a reprieve, but the
five-year extension runs out at the
end of March. The daycare will
have nowhere to go unless building plans begin soon.
"The fire marshal was right -
when there are preschool children
involved, it is better to err on the
side of caution,"said
Holubitsky.The daycare still
needs additional funding before
new buildings can be erected.
If the faculty association
passes the daycare motion, they
will donate $20,000 through reserve funds and match any private
donations from individual faculty
members up to an additional
$20,000.
The university administration has said it will match private
donations from the university
community (students, staff, and
faculty), to a maximum of
$500,000.
A Capital Projects Acquisition Committee was created
through referendum to administer
money for community facilities
like athletic centres and daycare.
In 1984, students allotted
$350,000 towards new daycare
buildings, subject to approval of
design plans.
The federal government has
agreed to match any monies donated by the B.C. government, but
requests to the provincial ministries of social services, education,
and the provincial secretary for
funding have been denied.
The Canadian Union of Public
Employees and the Association of
University and College Employees
have also turned down appeals for
money from daycare.
Holubitsky said that while
the financial cost of new daycare
facilities is high, the cost of losing
daycare on campus would be far
greater. Over one per cent of
UBC's approximately ;i0,000 students use campus daycare, said
Holubitsky. He addec. that the
UBC daycare is also i research
and teaching facility.
The next regular faculty association meeting is next spring,
although Blom said several members indicated a desire to call a
special meeting to discuss the
daycare grant. If 25 members request a meeting, there could be a
decision on the motion before the
present daycare structures come
down.
Holubitsky, who is the coordinator for the CPAC construction
committee, said that in 1984 the
estimated cost for new facilities
was about one million dollars. "It
has undoubtably expanded to 1.2
or 1.3 million? said Holubitsky.
Street kid pondering his uncertain future in the Granville war zone. See story page 3
Recession graduates
seek recognition
Lobbyists slam heavy debt loads
By Corinne Bjorge
B.C.'s student loan program
has come under attack by a two
week old grassroots lobby group.
The lobbyists, two recent
graduates, criticized the provincial government for not addressing the high debt load racked up by
students who graduated during
B.C.'s economic recession.
"There are three years of students that don't get a break from
loans? said UBC history graduate
Susan Wright.
Wright graduated last May
with a high debt load, and although she is now working at a job
with a reasonable entry level salary, she is paying an "unreal"
amount of money each month to
pay off her student loan.
"I'm livinglike a student, even
Volume 70, Number
though I'm not a student? said
Wright. "Sure, you can live with a
roommate, but for ten years?" she
said.
Wright is angry that between
1984 and 1987 graduating students were not given any bursary
or grant breaks from the provincial government. Today, students
who take no more than one extra
year to complete their degree will
be remitted any amount over
$12,000.
CFS executive officer (Pacific
Region) Roseanne Moran praised
the two graduates. "It's great
they're taking some initiative?
she said. "We get calls in our office
all the time from students who are
desperate."
Moran said the provincial
government is not dealing with
the issue. "It's one generation of
students in the lurch? she said.
But Moran said the government could look at several ways of
helping out students that graduated between 1983 and 1987.
"(There could be) Home kind of
a ceiling over which sradents don't
have to pay it back? she said.
Moran said the government
should also reconsider a longer
repayment period. Ten years is too
short, she said, twenty-five would
be better.
Wright said a big problem was
getting locked into interest rates.
With a maximum repayment time
often years, students with debts of
$20,000 and more can end up paying more than $200 a month.
"That's a lot of money to have in
that   kind   of rigid   repayment
fund? said Wright.
But Dick Melville, director of
communications for the ministry
of post secondary education said
the ministry judged each case with
"firmness and fairness" and that
the loan remissions reflected the
times.
"It was very difficult around
the world (at that time). There
were cutbacks in many programs.
Older people had the depression
years, some lost their land. Those
were the times. You can'tgoback?
he said.
"Sure, you can live
with a roommate, but
for ten years?"
"What happened in those
years, is that a number of students
couldn't continue on. Those that
could, did so knowingly? said
Melville.
But Wright's lobby partner
Michael Hoogbruim, a graduate of
Simon Fraser University, disagreed. "They can say ~you signed
the  deal', but the  assumptions
have changed," said Hoogbruim.
The assumptions were that
you were pretty much guaranteed
a job when you graduated, that the
interest rates would be low, therefore repayment easier and, that
there would be grants and bursaries available throughout," said
Hoogbruim. "These assumptions
have been shattered?
Wright said their goal "is to
try and find out what the nature of
the problem is. We want people to
communicate with us and we want
to assist those students?
"Write to the Ministry of Education and send us a copy of the
letter? urged Wright.
Hoogbruim said "if people
don't write in, the government
won't know that people care about
education?
Hoogbruim said the government should show it has some
credibility. "What's to guarantee
the program won't change - and
work to the detriment of the students (in a few years)?"
"The way that students of the
past are treated is a symbol to
students of the future? he said.
ancouver, B.C., Friday, November 27,198 CLASSIFIEDS
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Le Club Francais
Reunions du Club. Noon,
International House*
Japan Exchange Club
Free movie; "Himatsuri," Noon-
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Friday lecture anti prayers* 12;4Q
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Association to Baha'i Studies
Discussion on "Women in CMna-*
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Con tent Lecture on Careers in
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Lounge,
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["Bzzr Garden^ everyone invited!
&:30*_ p.m., SUB 205.
Zen Meditation Society
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Dance to th_ music of'DJ Kelly
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Last big meeting before exams. 1 j
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Free film showing: "Gui Dao - On
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2/THE UBYSSEY
November 27,1987 Street kids
plight remains
despite more aid
Don't let the pressure of school crack you, visit Speakeasy and listen to a rational voice
Privatization
hurts street kids
By Ross McLaren
Private group homes which
cut costs end up driving children
back onto the streets, according to
a Vancouver street
worker.
Allen Roscoe of the Downtown
Eastside Youth Activities Society
said group homes tell the government they will provide resources
at the lowest price."
"These homes put five kids
together when you want a two or
three bedroom foster home. The
staff is inadequately trained or not
trained at all and are different day
to day? he said.
Roscoe said placing kids in
these group homes is not much
different from putting adults in
jail, "except that kids can take off
and head for the street. There are
any number of adults, be they
pimps or pedophiles, willing to
exploit children ?
Roscoe said most group homes
in Vancouver have beer privatized
since the 1982 restraint program.
A government social worker
for children, who requested anonymity because of a provincial
government order not to talk to the
media, said it is hard to Snd foster
homes for kids on the street.
"If you get street kids connected , off the street and cleaned
up from drugs and then the end
resultis no resources for kids, they
get pissed off and say" why did you
clean me up?'. There is a lot of
anger? the social worker said.
Simon Fraser voters shunned
BURNABY (CUP) — Students at Simon Fraser University
may be left out of a civic election
due to a mistake in voter registration.
The municipality of Burnaby
has neglected to register voters
living on Burnaby mountain, the
site of SFU's main campus, and
student politicians are upset.
Student society official Paul
Mendes will be writing a letter to
Burnaby council to voice the
society's disappointment with the
municipality.
SFSS representative Stephen
Howard phoned Burnaby city hall
to complain.
"One guy said they just forgot
to enumerate voters up here. I
talked to another who told me he
hadn't realized people live up
here? said Howard.
"Both are pretty lame excuses."
Mendes will be drafting an
information sheet on how students can vote at the polls. The
sheets will be delivered to the residences.
The registration mistake
comes at a time when the provincial government has proposed legislation that would eliminate 'section 80 voting—a provision allowing people to register and vote
outside of their designated areas
on polling day.
The elimination of section 80
voting would drastically effect
transient groups hke the poor,
homeless people, and students.
Mendes said council is considering getting a delegation of students to go to all candidates meetings.
One issue that coul d be raised
at the meetings is illegal suites, he
said.
Vancouver area municipalities are launching zoae-by-zone
public reviews to determine the
future of secondary suites, a move
that could also drastically effect
students and low-income residents.
by Justine Hunter
VICTORIA (CUP) — Hundreds of BC teenagers choose to
face a tough life on the street
rather than go home. And while
the provincial government and
others continue to up the ante in
financial aid for street kids, the
problem just won't go away—neither will the kids.
The ministry of social services
and Housing spends $1.7 million a
year on the youth who have run
away, or have been cast away,
from their homes. This month, an
extra $280,000 was added for more
street workers.
Yet half of the youth on the
street will not be caught in the
province's safety net. Often, they
don't want to be "rescued" because
it means first being caught by the
police. Others simply distrust the
system, and the adults who run it.
"You've got to have come from
some environment that's worse
than the environment on the
street? said Dean Forntin, a director of Victoria's Association for
Street Kids.
Making contact with the kids
is not difficult, but earning their
trust can be. "They are lacking the
family support that we take for
granted? the young lawyer said.
"But you can't do something for
somebody that they don't want
done."
Social workers estimate that
90 per cent of these youth have left
abusive homes. Most will end up in
Vancouver or Victoria, where
there are the resources to stay
alive.
Some will only stay a short
time, others will stay years.
One Victoria street youth
(who ask he not be identified) left
home when he was 15. He spent
five years living on the street before he walked into ASK for help.
Now he is training in a government-sponsored graphic arts program that will give him and other
street kids the job skills and experience to find work.
"A lot of kids out there, they
know they shouldn't be out there,
but they're scared, they don't want
to be exposed? he said. It was only
after several arrests and some
time in an adult prison that he
started working within the system.
Lawrence Demoskoff is the
coordinator of the Street Youth
Services program in Vancouver.
He said the system, built up over
the last decade in the city, is too
structured, and the standards of
success are too high.
"We need to loosen up the
rigid ideas about what constitutes
success — there are some of these
kids who are never going to leave
the street? he said. Helping them
find a safer and healthier environment should be the focus. "Yet the
expectation is to get them into the
white, middle-class lifestyle."
DemoskofTs program serves
only the "uptown" section of the
city core, including Granville
Street. Other areas have their own
programs, and some areas have no
services at all. This year, his
office has identified and had
hands-on contact with 250-300
street youth. "Services are not just
inadequate, they're embarassing?
he said. Case loads for street workers are too high, and help with
health and drug problems are limited, he added. Yet "it's looking
better than it ever has."
The ministry of social services
and housing has just added four
more social workers, at a cost of
$280,000 a year. This is only part
one of their new Reconnect program, aimed at "getting young
people off the street and back into
communities? according to the
minister responsible, Claude
Richmond.
With nearly $2 njillion a year
from the the ministry, Fortin and
Demoskoff still have costly wish-
lists that include more follow-up
programs, more accessible services, including shelter, and financial aid for the under-17 youth who
are ineligible for welfare.
Their requests are being answered in bits and pieces. In Victoria, a detox centre now reserves a
few beds for street kids in their
emergency shelter. A cook-training program, similar to ASK's
graphic arts project, gave a dozen
youth a chance to join the
workforce this year. The safety net
is expanding.
The Reconnect program
promises "a coordinated approach
involving all of the agencies that
work with these young people."
Aside from the extra social workers, it offers no specifics. Only a
promise from the honorary
Claude Richmond to learn from
experience.
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November 27,1987
THE UBYSSEY/3 "THE CHAMPION LAUGH-OUT-LOUD COMEDY OF 1987!"
- Michael Medved, SNEAK PREVIEWS
Steve Martin )ohn Candy
Planes.Trains and
What he really wanted was to spend
Thanksgiving with his family.
What he got was three
days with the turkey.
PARAMOUNT PICTURES PRESENTS
)ohn Hughes
FILM
PLANES. TRAINS AND AUTOMOBILES
Music Score by IRA NEWBORN   Executive Producers MICHAEL CHINICH and NEIL MACHLIS
Written.Prod.ced and Directed by )OHN HUGHES   A PARAMOUNT PICTURE
Soundtrack Album Available on TM & Copyright ©1987 by
Hughes Musk/MCA Records. Paramount Pictures Corporation.
Cassettes and Compact Discs. All Rights Reserved.
B.C. W'.RNING - Some very       (§3jjS)
coarse & suggestive language
CAPITOL 6
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Showtimes effective
Nov. 27 - Dec. 3
No Passes
For This
Engagement   FAMOUS PLAYERS j
No go for Joe
By Carolyn Sale
The Arts Club Theatre is touting its current Seymour Street
production of Joe's Cafe as the wild, wicked, wonderful world
of Wyckham Porteous. Who ever came up with that alliterative string of inappropriate adjectives was extremely inventive -
more inventive than Porteous who is passing off comic moments in
his own life as 'found' theatre.
The 'events' of Porteous' one-
man show revolve very loosely
around the locale of Joe's Cafe,
the hip cappuccino bar on Commercial which the politically
THEATRE
Joe's Cafe
by Wyckham Porteous
Arts Club Seymour St.
'correct' downwardly mobile types of the East Side treat as their
living room.
Porteous sings, Porteous dances, Porteous tells stories. Which
would be all very well if Porteous could sing, dance or tell a tale
worth telling. He's not a half-bad singer b\ t only two or three of his
eleven numbers have any real pizzazz or lyrics that make sense.
The 'charm' of his stones palls quickly, mostly because there is
nothing either earth-shattering or interest-sustaining about his
choice of material. He's downright dull when he tells us how uncomfortable it is to return home at Christmas empty-hnnded to a
houseful of present-laden successful siblings. He's ridiculous when
he finds having to piss into a funnel on a Green Tortoise slow bus a
'challenge to his masculinity'. And when he tells the audience how
he realized that his common cold was more dangerous to an Aids
victim with whom he shared lunch and spoon than anything 'the
walking corpse' could give him, he sinks to new lows of bad taste
with his 'Joe Liberal' pose.
His more amusing moments center on fear of becoming a stereotypical parent and an homosexual (to be heterosexual in the East
End, he claims, is equivalent to voting Socred). But we've all heard
more entertaining versions from our extroverted friends. As for any
'enlightenment' value, we're better off watching the daytime soaps.
With the exception of a blow at Ronnie, a jab at the Kitsilano crowd,
and a crack at the expense of Hollywood trans-channellers, Joe's
Cafe is devoid of the socio-political commentary which would have
given the show some substance.
As it is, vignette gives way to song, and song to vignette for no
greater purpose than showcasing the talents of Mr. Wyckham Porteous who fancies hit c. self as some kind of folk hero, a Springsteen-
Beat Poet, a rock'n'rolling intellectual. (Wife Patti Fraser is tellingly
credited with the conception of this family affair.)
Just before intermission, Porteous cracks, "This is the part
where I'm supposed to be brilliant." Sorry, Wyckham, but we've long
since given up hope of that.
Joe's Cafe is, from beginning to end, a gratuitous, self-satisfied
piece that qualifies as neither entertaining theatre nor art. In the
mass-media dominated twentieth century, there is enough triviali-
zation of emotion. Too bad we have to find it on the stage.
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HF ■■"J.jAijrv GOES IN BEFORE THF NAMi. GOFSilN
4/THE UBYSSEY
November 27,1937 Stars' vehicle
crashes
I
by Mary Ainslie
f you think that two talented comedians, Steve Martin and John
Candy, can make even a John
Hughes movie funny you're wrong.
But, ifyou think washing your face
in someone's dirty sock water is
funny, you'll love Planes, Trains and
Automobiles. In fact, the greatest accomplishment of this movie is that it
reduces two very funny men to
performing slapstick, gross jokes, and
cheap visual gags for laughs.
FILM
Planes, Trains, and Automobiles
Capitol 6
moments in this movie due to this empathy be
tween the viewer and the boys in the movie.
Deep down everyone wants to tell the blabbermouth seated next to you on the plane that the
vomit bag is more interesting than he is.
Likewise, at one time everyone has craved to
tell the chipper Hertz rental lady to "wipe
that fucking grin off your face". And, after an
exhausting day of travelling you can identify
with Martin hocking his Rolex for a bed
in a cheasy hotel.
But this empathy extends towards
only a few isolated incidents. Otherwise, the comic situations are extreme, cheap, and not very funny.
The only reason to see this
A Marsalis
family triumph
I
The story follows two very different men who are thrown together
trying to get home for Thanksgiving
weekend. They suffer every possible
cliche nightmarish travel experience,
with which every viewer can in some
way identify. There are some funny
By Panos Grames
t was a family
affair for Wynton
Marsalis at the
Queen Elizebeth
Theatre on Wednesday
night. His father, Ellis Marsalis, made a special, one night
guest appearance, replacing
Marcus Roberts on piano, who was
occupied in Washington, D.C. at a
Thelonious Monk competition.
With the impressive foundation of
regulars Jeff Watts on the drums, bassist
Robert Hurst,and young sax-man Todd Williams, the Marsalis duo laid down some articulate jazz pieces for the warm, receptive audience.
Father Ellis proved well able to share the spotlight
with his son. His command of the piano was awesome,
his light touch accentuating impeccably through "Autumn
Leaves and "In Walked Ed". Drummer Watts was equally impressive, displaying his prowess with the brushes in powerful
style. Wynton's soloing was as tasteful as his father's, as he blew
his sweet tone in staccato and lagatto with bravado.
movie would be to marvel
that some directors
still have the audacity to use
trite, syrupy,
and oh so
happy
endings.
The most succeessful aspect of the
show, however, was the power of the
band as a unit. None of the musicians tried to dominate the show;
instead they worked together as a
powerful unit. Clearly Wynton
Marsalis' most remarkable achievement is his recruiting and selection of
the band members.   But he also deserves accolades for his flawless skill,
most evident while he was flying
through the chord changes of "Autumn Leaves".
JAZZ
Wynton Marsalis
Wednesday November 18
The quintet played two sets and
then, after the audience's call for an
encore, the father and son team of
Wynton and Ellis Marsalis closed the
night with a slow duet. I can't wait
for the next Marsalis to make up a
trio.
\>/^~—>*X^-
FR&Smmm?U*&
Nothing sheepish about the taste of Lamb's.
Or the people who drink it.
Lamb's. A quality worth experiencing.
November 27,1987
THE UBYSSEY/5 of VvuA^er W believe +tal « FOOD &ANK is uwr\ec-ew*j *'
One more nail in the
daycare coffin
The facility association voted 45 to four
Thursday to give money to UBC daycare.
But this vote was squashed when one of
the dissenting voters called quorum. Without 75 members present, the faculty will
have to put off a vote on daycare until the
spring.
This means that the $40,000 faculty donation will be stalled. But more significantly, the administration's donation of
$500,000, which is dependent on the contributions of the campus community (ie.
the faculty), remains in limbo. The
faculty's hesitation is one more nail in the
daycare coffin.
And perhaps the most fatal one.   The
40 year old army huts housing UBC
daycare, which were originally built as a
temporary boot camp, are a fire hazard.
The fire marshall's patience is at an end.
Hence the buildings will be torn down this
year, with no reprieve from demolition.
Without new buildings, UBC daycare is
dead.
Why then did some faculty members
deny daycare money? Some felt the donation would only benefit a minority of their
membership. Others felt more members
should vote. But affordable and accessible
daycare for the university community is of
benefit to everyone. It means the difference between attending university or not
for a single parent working towards a
degree. It means that a faculty member
may work full time to support a family.
There is no time left to quibble.
By stalling, the faculty is burying an
essential service which benefits everyone
staff, students, and most of all, faculty.
THE UBYSSEY
NOVEMBER 27,1987
Thy Ubyssey is published Tuesdays & Fridays throughout the academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the
University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are
those of the staff and not necessarily those of the university administration, or of the sponsor. The Ubyssey is a
member of Canadian University Press. The editorial
office is Rm. 241k of the Student Union Building. Editorial Department, phone 228-2301/228-2305; advertising, 228-3977.
Once upon a time an impressionable young aspiring writer with golden
dreadlocks, named Laura Busheikin, discovered the door to the Ubyssey
office. After two years of harrowing adventures designed to test Laura's
mettle, Corinne Bjorge and Michael Groberman gave her a magical amber
potion, further warping her mind. Next thing she knew, she was an editor.
One day she was sitting at her cluttered desk recounting her tale to a wide-
eyed Lisa Langford, who gasped appreciatively at the exciting bits. Laura's
mind went back to the beginning She peeked in the room and saw three
computer terminals all glowing eerily in the subdued light. The cavernous
room appeared empty. She went to the first terminal which had a large solid
oak chair in front of it. It was too hard. So she went to the second terminal,
with a cushy armchair placed in front. It was too soft. The third terminal
exploded when she pressed the 'enter' button, sending Goldliocks flying
around the room. Deanne Fisher, Carolyn Sale, and Victor Chew Wong came
in to the office at that moment. Ignoring Goldilock's ballistic flight, they
rushed to their respective terminals crying with dismay,"someone's been
using my computer!"
Hearing their cries, Mike Gordon rushed in, with Steve Chan and
Mandel Ngan scurrying behind. "I'll save the day!" announced Mike, and
began looking for the culprit. Goldilocks was still orbiting the room faster
than the speed of light. Mike couldn't find anything, so he went to continue
his war against techno-fascism in the SUB video games room. Steve and
Mandel were unable to catch Goldilocks on film so they followed in hot
pursuit of Mike. Katherine Monk, Mary Ainslie, and Steven Chess entered
the room carrying steaming bowls of fettucine. At the sight of Chris
Weisinger clawing his way over the balcony gasping for help, they shrieked,
dropped their pasta, and ran in search of master pasta-makers Stephan
Weaver and Dusan Milotovic, and were never seen in this masthead again.
Goldilocks finally stopped whizzing through the air and decided to sample
the food. The first bowl had too much garlic; the second not enough. The
third was laced with magic mushrooms, which promptly sent Goldilocks off
in space again. Peter Francis and Peter MacDougall came in after a hard day
of pickled pepper picking, plucked at the pasta, and passed out. Pat
Kirkwood and Panos Grames, hearing their pitiable cries, rushed in and
pointed accusingly at Goldilocks. Fearing the worst, Goldilocks, still half-
gone at this point, wondered what to do next. Just then, Ross McLaren, who
wasn't fooling when he dressed up as Superman on Hallowe'en, swooped
on to the balcony, picked up Chris and took him back to Krypton to be used
as as scientific experiment to be conducted by a crazed Susan Morrison.
Alex Johnson gasped in awe as they flew off. And as for Goldilocks, she
karate-chopped Pat and Panos, and lived happily ever after.
Mil
city desk:
production:
entertainment:
sports:
Corinne Bjorge
Ross McLaren
Usa Langford
Laura Busheikin
Victor Chew Wong
Letters
The Ubyssey welcomes letters on any issue. Letters must be typed and are not to exceed 300 words in length. Content
which is judged to be libellous, homophobic, sexist, or racist will not be published. Please be concise. Letters may be
edited for brevity, but it is standard Ubyssey policy not to edit letters for spelling or grammatical mistakes. Please bring
them, with identification, to SUB 241k.   Letters must include name, faculty, and signature.	
One loss does
not a loser
make
This is in response to
the unfounded and ignorant
barrage of criticism our football team has received as a
result of their loss in the
Vanier Cup last weekend.
In light of the remarks
heard on campus, one might
think these athletes
committed a crime.
As varsity athletes, we
know that in any high level
competition, the finals are
anyone's loss, anyone's win.
Yes, the Thunderbirds lost
to the Redmen, but should
this defeat obliterate UBC's
outstanding record: these
defending Vanier Cup
champions had their second
consecutive, undefeated
league season. This means
these men have played sixteen league, and six play-off
games and have only conceded one loss in Canadian
play.
We are not making excuses for the team's loss, we
are simply trying to make
the campus critics, the media, the coaches and especially the players themselves realize that they are
excellent athletes and have
risen to seemingly
unobtainable heights.
The UBC football team
is not a bunch of criminals,
but a group of hard-working, skilled athletes. Perhaps next year, the critics of
this successful team will
channel their energy into
cheering and supporting the
T-Birds to bringing back the
Vanier Cup. We'll see you
out there?
Jim Gamlin
Science 5
Gloria Loree
Arts 5
Live to lose
Attention all potential losers: As a result of
the mass hysteria surrounding our club, created
by the local media (Ubyssey Nov. 3; The Vancouver
Sun Nov. 18; CJOR Morning Show Nov. 23; and
Western News Magazine)
I have been encouraged to
give an account of our club.
Started last year out
of desperation, depression
and self-pity, we soon blossomed into a fully-accredited "service-oriented"
AMS club.
The present cult-like
state of the club proves
that average (and below)
persons do constitute a
majority on campus. I am
not just another disgruntled   Arts   graduate.
Not everyone can win or be
near the top. Remember
"51 is better than 91". Afford yourself a good look in
the mirror, if you can
laugh, then it's O.K. But if
you are so preoccupied
with the road to a Howe
Street highrise that you
can't laugh, then you are
the true loser.
For those who are
happy just striving for mediocrity we have plenty-o-
fun in store for the coming
months. Ifyou have ideas,
complaints, concerns, etc.
or just want to join, please
contact us at the AMS office Box #239. And...Dare
to Lose!
Losers to Live By
Brent Watkins
UBC Losers Club
How dare this "man"
call those of us striving for
excellence losers. Don't
get me wrong, I'm not los-
erphobic, but the world
does need garbagemen.
You, Brent Watkins, are
indeed the true loser. You
think of Howe Street whil e
we winners think of Wall
Street. One day, losers
like you will see light and
wish to strive for more
than mediocrity. But for
you losers, it will be too
late.
(P.S.: Where does one join
the club?)
Colin Erb
Science Grad.
Cowboys rope rascals
My thanks to UBC Traffic and Security for a job will
done. I hear that they caught a couple of guys in the act
of stealing plants Com the greenhouses last Saturday
night!
I usually take Campus Security for granted, but
now that I know they can catch young men on the run,
Fm impressed.
C. Roberts
AG. Sc. '90
Young heteros
offend,
irritate
This last Friday witnessed the first dance of the
Gays and lesbians of UBC.
Although the dance was
open to the entire homosexual populace of Vancouver,
attendance was poor, due
mainly to the coinciding
"Rock Hudson Romp" at the
Shaggy Horse nightclub and
to the First Year Students'
Council function, the "Dr.
Ruth Dance".
I think the way the
Frosh conducted themselves in advertising the
dance was unscrupulous.
Firstly, they advertised
their dance as "the hetero
dance". Furthermore, they
had obscene posters saying
"if sex is a pain in the ass
your doing it wrong" and to
top it all off, they had poor
control over their dance
(which turned into a brawl
at 11:30).
Also, several of them
were constantly peeking in
on our dance. One of my
friends who decided to wear
a dress that night said he
felt very uncomfortable with
all those teenagers staring
at him.
I hope that the First
Year Students' Council will
conduct itself better in the
future and learn to have
some compassion and understanding for people of
different sexual persuasions.
Tim Bennet
Arts 4
Please keep your letters concise; longer pieces will be considered for our "Perspectives" column. If no
staff are present in the office when you drop off your letter or "Perspective", please leave your telephone
number such that authorship can be confirmed.
6/THE UBYSSEY
November 27,1987 Legalize it:  Marijuana part of
a healthy epistemology
In a democratic society such
as ours, unless a strong rational
argument can demonstrate why
an action should be illegal, the
action must be permitted. The
only grounds for such an argument are that the action is harmful to others. Is there such an
argument regarding the use of
marijuana? The answer is: No!
There are no good reasons why the
use of marijuana by adults in controlled environments should be
prohibited. I believe that marijuana should have similar status
to alcohol: made available to
adults for use in the home, or with
a licence, at social functions.
But some people would object
to this plan. They might argue
that marijuana should be restricted on account of the health
damage it promotes. But cigarettes and alcohol are allowed;
why not marijuana? There is insufficient scientific proof that
marijuana causes more health
damage than beer or cigarettes.
Some people might argue
that drug use is an intrinsically
bad habit. But the use of marijuana clearly does not interfere
with the rights of others if it is
used at home or at advertised social functions, so that people who
disapprove need not be bothered.
The onus of proof is on those who
disapprove on moral grounds to
convince others, rather than to
impose their standards without
discussion.
Everyone should undergo a
state of altered consciousness if
they want to collect possibly conflicting observational beliefs, and
thus to be justified in thinking
which beliefs correspond to the
actual world. It is part of one's
epistemic duty to make a reason
able effort to seek our relevant,
possibly conflicting observations,
in order to make one's beliefs justified. On this note, I would propose
that the government make such
supplies available, instead of irrationally suppressing their distribution.
So, clearly the laws against
the use of marijuana are unjust
and should be abolished at once. I
would welcome any rational challenge to this claim. Failure to find
a sufficient counter-argument will
result in my view winning by default.
Randy Reiffer
Philosophy 4
it in \
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—683-8687
Everyone should
undergo a state of
altered consciousness if they want to
collect possibly conflicting observational beliefs, and
thus be justified in
thinking which beliefs correspond to
the actual world.
Keep in mind that
the greens in question are perhaps
not as benign as
salad. Personally, I
get stoned when I
eat the stuff. And
sleepy. And paranoid. But I don't
consider these
things to be harmful in themselves.
Question it:  Marijuana not
quite as innocuous as salad
Mr. Blair T. Longley's article
of Nov. 24 causes me some concern
as I feel that he may be misrepresenting certain facts in the case for
marijuana.
Let's be clear about this: salt
and sugar may be drugs according
to the definition provided by Mr.
Longley, but the "whole green
plant", Cannabis, contains upwards of 180 different chemical
substances. Some of these, to the
best of my knowledge, have yet to
be identified. Not one person I
have known to use marijuana (a
not inconsiderable number) has
used it because it is "not a drug". I
have noticed something appraoch-
ing a 100% correlation between
choosing to use Cannabis and recognizing its consciousness alter
ing properties.
Perhaps eating marijuana is
nutritious and good for me. Who
am I to argue with the ingestion of
fresh leafy greens? But please
keep in mind that the greens in
question are perhaps not as benign as the 'salad' that you introduce for comparison. Personally, I
get stoned when I eat the stuff.
And sleepy. And paranoid. But I
don't consider any of these things
to be harmful in themselves. I do
find it contentious that you think
that the only way marijuana can
be harmful is if it is smoked.
Surely it doesn't take much imagination to conjure up images of
impaired judgment etc., and the
potential for danger such a circumstance may create.
Finally, I find it difficult to
concede that there is absolutely no
comparison between eating pot
and drinking alcohol. Both play
important social roles. In many
instances, it would be difficult to
distinguish the reason!!, in the
social setting, for the use of one
over the other. Very often, both
are present in the samo setting.
Although I concur that alcohol
poses a higher risk to imbibers
than does marijuana, I disagree
that one faces the same prospects
from eating a handful of tossed
greens as one does a handful of
grass.
Let's do lunch, Blair. I'll pick
the restaurant.
Name Withheld
Arts 4
DID YOUR
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STAFF WISH  YOU  AND YOURS THE  MERRIEST.
SEASONS EATING &
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UBC BOOKSTORE
CHRISTMAS COUPONS
Use our Coupons and save Dollars off!
Coupons expire Dec 23! Also available
in the Gift Section are Christmas boxed
cards, ornaments and gifts.
I ?lgt[?
dUlfe BOOKSTORE
6200 University Boulevard 2284741
November 27,1987
THE UBYSSEY/7 Film full of kinks
By Dublin Meuse
P'ersonal Services is billed as a comedy about
kinky people. Unfortunately it is rarely funny
and with a few exceptions most of its characters
are quite ordinary.
Christine Painter (Julie Walters) is a waitress
who sublets apartments to prostitutes. The prostitutes never pay their rent so Christine decides to
go into business for herself. Christine, her friend
Shirley, and their maid Dolly open a brothel in a
residential neighbourhood that caters to kinky
people. The kinky people turn out to be a group of
older men who enjoy being pissed on or bound,
gagged and locked in a closet for hours on end.
The characters in this film are as flat as sheet
metal and nearly as interesting. We are given no
idea why Christine turns to prostitution other than
for reasons of wealth. This is clumsily expressed
in a dream she has as she waits for a client. All the
other characters are equally one dimensional.
Director Terry Jones must have been comatose
during the shooting and editing phases of Personal
Services. On the few occasions that he was
conscious it's obvious that he didn't know whether
Marriage a
Shaw
By Steven Chess
For its first professional
production, The Richmond
Gateway Theatre has chosen two
lesser known one-act comedies by
George Bernard Shaw, Village Wooing
and Overruled. They are well suited to
one another in their shared themes of love
and marriage.
THEATRE
Village Wooing/Overruled
By George Bernard Shaw
Richmond Gateway Theatre
to shit or fly sideways. The film jumps from one
scene to another with no apparent connection. And
if you're wondering if maybe this film is one of
subtleties, forget it. What humour there is is blunt
and borders on the prosaic. The few metaphors
offered, ifyou can call them that, have all the
subtlety of Expo and are nearly as stupid.
MOVIE
Personal Services
Royal Centre
There are a few interesting aspects to this
film: Christine's attitude that prostitution is a
business no different than any other; and that in
the world of sex for hire it is the Johns who get off
scot-free while the prostitutes get hassled by the
cops.
Overall, Personal Services is a big disappointment. Both Terry Jones (Monty Python's
The Holy Grail) and Julie Walters are capable of
far superior work. Better luck next time.
THE BEST
THINGS
IN LIFE
Staplers, paper cutters, hole
punches, tope, white-out, glue
sticks, paper clips and a large,
well-organized workspace.
kinko's
Great copies. Great people
-^06 I nivcr-.il>   Blvd.
222-1688
MTH 8 9 F 8-6 Sat 10 6 Sun 1,1 6
Ubyssey
Staff notice: Sun.
Nov. 29th.
BC CUP
discussion
at noon.
See notice
board for
details.
Ifyou are a big fan of Shaw's plays, then these
two well acted and well directed one-acts are well
worth seeing. Ifyou are not a fan of Shavian
comedy, however, beware.
In Village Wooing, the plot is carefully structured in order to provide opportunities for lively
Shavian banter. Christopher Gaze and Merrilyn
Gann play characters A' and 'Z' who meet aboard
an around-the-world cruise. A', wishing to be left
alone with his writing, is annoyingly hindered by
'Z' who is determined to engage the Englishman in
conversation. She is victorious, and the two
engage in spirited Shavian repartee.
When the two meet again a number of months
later in 'Z's' country grocery, 'Z' embarks on a campaign to lure 'A' into proprietorship of her store,
and then into marriage. The situation provides
ample opportunity for the two to debate the
concept of marriage.
Marriage and its companion fidelity take a bit
of a beating in the evening's second offering,
Overruled. This piece is a flip and insincere treatment of the infidelity of two adulterous coules.
Mrs. Juno is vacationing with Mr. Lunn, while coincidentally, Mr. Juno is vacationing at the same
seaside resort as Mrs. Lunn. The four meet and
more witty banter ensues. "It doesn't matter
about your conduct if your principles are right?
says one husband."It doesn't matter about your
principles if your conduct is alright," replies the
other. Such 'profundities' abound in the play,
proving that a well-turned phrase is no substitute
for a well conceived piece of theatre.
Poor choice of plays aside, the acting and direction are good, making the most of the material.
Gann and Gaxe are a pleasure to watch together.
The standout in Overruled is Scott Swan's sure
comic direction. Charlotte Burke's country
grocery set deservedly received its own ovation.
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8/THE UBYSSEY
November 27,1987

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