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The Ubyssey Nov 16, 1967

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 How
now
THE U8YSSE
'ol. XLIX, No. 24
VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 1967
— bob brown photo
"AACH! SO THERE!!" Says  irate  Dow protester destroying
polystyrene cups. Polystyrene is used in napalm.
>candal solves housing crisis;
teeler and gang, Mr. Minister?
Playgirl Christine Keeler has sparked a former graduate
-.udent's idea that could ease UBC's student housing crisis.
"Scandal is the answer to housing problems," physicist Dr-
im Whittaker, currently a post-doctoral fellow at the University
of London, said in a postcard to Jim Slater,
science 9.
"The place where we live used to be the
Stephen Court Hotel where John Profumo,
Chistine Keeler and gang were whooping it
up," he said.
"After the resulting scandal the management found it impossible to operate, and sold
the hotel to the University of London, cheap.
"I suggest you select a suitable hotel or
apartment near UBC, "and persuade a cabinet
ROHRINGER      minister to . . ."
When asked for comment, housing director Les Rohringer
dd it was a pretty good suggestion.
"But I don't know if we have a hotel near enough or a
.binet minister who would take up the suggestion," he said.
"Mind you, we haven't a Christine Keeler, either. Maybe
lat's the first thing we have to find-"
Picketers p
protest continuing
PERSKY
By MIKE FINLAY
UBC's demonstration against Dow Chemical
Co. continued Wednesday as peacefully as it
began.
"It wasn't meant to freak anybody out, and
it isn't," said arts president Stan Persky, one
of the organizers.
"I'd say it is going very well."
The protest, involving about 300 persons,
began at about 9 a.m. Tuesday as demonstrators
began picketing outside the student placement
office where Dow representatives are holding
job interviews.
Several sat down inside the
building, but did not block entrance   to  the interviews.
However, at about 11 a.m.
a group of 20 demonstrators
led by senator Gabor Mate,
arts 4, sat in front of the doorway leading to the interviews
and refused to let students pass.
Mate said he was acting as
an individual, and not representing any group.
"I represent myself," he said.
Persky said he was disappointed in the actions of Mate and the 40 others who eventually
joined him.
"A demonstration is not an individual thing,
but is meant to show group concern," he said.
"A situation that antagonizes people is not
useful."
Persky and his followers left the building
to picket outside until late in the afternoon.
About six faculty members led by anthropology professor Bill Willmott joined the
picketers in front of the office.
"We have agreed not to sit in, but to go
along with the protest as it was originally planned," Willmott said.
Alma Mater Society president Shaun Sullivan
who visited the demonstration at noon, said he
was disappointed that two-thirds of those blocking entrance were from Simon Fraser University.
"If there's an incident, it will give UBC a
black eye," Sullivan said. "There's a responsibility that goes with freedom."
Later, Sullivan stood outside looking at the
hundreds of demonstrators.
"What a crew," he said.
Also visiting the protest was the sociology
class of professor R. J. Silvers.
Silvers  brought his  100  students   who   are
studying deviates, to the demonstration to study
protest in society and the ways moral standards
change.
Fears that engineers might disrupt the de-
To page 2
see: PICKETERS
Student decision
clears the Daily
MONTREAL (CUP) — The McGill Daily has
been cleared.
The student council judicial committee Wednesday handed down a unanimous decision saying the publishing of the Realist article "did
not constitute an act of bad faith" on the part
of editor Peter Allnutt-
Allnutt, his supplement editor and a columnist were charged by the administration with
obscene libel after the reprinting of the Realist
article which contained a fictional account of
the events following the assassination of John
Kennedy.
Six of the seven men on the committee
agreed Allnutt's decision to print the article was
irresponsible.
The committee could only rule on a charge
of "bad faith" because of a precedent set in a
McGill daily controversy last year.
But the judges said: "Any suggestion that
the editor may only be dismissed because of an
act of bad faith appears erronious to this committee."
The committee, composed of law students,
conducted an open hearing Monday night, complete with two-man teams acting for the prosecution and the defense.
On Friday the McGill principal and student
union president issued a joint statement calling
for changes in the student role in the university.
"A deep assessment of the causes of this
confrontation, the McGill Daily confrontation,
must be made." they said. "And this will require
intensive work in the support of quiet reason."
McGill students had early in the year been
offered seats on several senate committees, but
council, at the urging of ex-vice-president Mark
Wilson and ex-education chairman John Fekete,
turned these down as being tokenistic.
Students mass at Dow protest demonstration.
— lawrmce woodd photo Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday,  November  16,   1967
Grade revision considered
By PAUL KNOX
UBC is considering adoption of a systerr. of
student grading similar to one at Yale University.
"We're#trying to work out somethin^tllat
will please* e very bo<!|C. said -UBC registrars. A.
Parnall Wednesday when asked to comment on
the Yale system.
Announced two weeks ago by the faculty of
Yale's undergraduate college, the system abolishes the traditional 40 to 100 numerical grading
in favor of grading in four categories: honors,
high pass, pass, and fail.
Parnall said there will be lengthy discussions
by the senate this winter on the grading system,
at the request of faculty of arts members.
"Students and faculty in the sciences favor
more exact grading than the Yale plan.
"On the other hand, some faculty of arts members would like to see only two categories — pass
or fail."
At present, three-unit courses at UBC are
marked out of 150.
The objection to such a subjective system as
Yale's is that a student transferring from Yale
to another university will have to get faculty
evaluations from Yale, Parnall said. "This can be
bothersome and time-consuming."
Acting UBC president Walter Gage said subjective grades have some merit and might possibly come to UBC, but that four would not be
sufficient at UBC.
"It would become hard to decide winners of
Brock  protests
Dow   protesters
Dow protestors were greeted toy boos and
hisses at the Brock coffee shop Wednesday noon.
Led by arts president Stan Persky, 10 placard carrying students marched among a munching mob of lunchtime students. They were met
by scattered boos, mainly from female students.
Most students continued talking while Persky
made a brief speech to explain reasons for the
protest against Dow Chemical.
The sole retort to his speech came from a
student who told Persky he would be more effective if his hair was cut.
"Do you believe my reasoning would be improved by shorter hair?" Persky said.
The placards protested the presence of Dow
employment officials at UBC.
The most prominent placard read: "Dow puts
money before morality."
scholarships. We might lose some very important
scholarships, such as those from the B.C. government, because we had no way of deciding on the
winners,'' he said.
Dean of arts Dennis Healy agreed that the
subjective system would create a problem with
scholarships.
"We would be foolish to discard a mechanical
scale such as the current 150-point one in favor
of letter grade or categories," Healy said.
"We're making increasing use of computers
now and you can't feed letters into a computer."
Dean of science Vladimir Okulitch said subjects such as math aren't conducive to a subjective marking system.
"No system is perfect and it's been-my experience that it doesn't make too much difference
what marking system you use," he said.
Dr. Conrad Schwarz, UBC consultant psychiatrist, said a more general system of grading
would.help relieve the pressure of competition
from students.
"The present situation, where decimal points
sometimes separate students, leads to inordinate
pressure on students competing for scholarships,"
he said.
PICKETERS
From page 1
monstration appeared to be groundless. Those
that did come come to the protest became involved in discussions of the issues at hand.
"This is where we really succeeded," said
Persky. "One of our main aims was to provoke
dialogue between persons of different views."
In a statement issued the morning of the protest's start, UBC acting president Walter Gage,
called for a peaceful demonstration.
"The university cannot countenance disorderly conduct, violence, harrasment or interference
with students and officials taking part in the recruitment program," Gage said.
Pickets paraded outside the student services
building throughout Wednesday, but entry was
not impeded.
Persky's group will continue their demonstration until the Dow interviews end this afternoon.
Mate decided not to continue his sit-in.
"I think we made our point," he said.
Meanwhile, Persky says he will also protest
10 other companies coming to UBC.
"We will demonstrate against any company
that manufactures war materials,"
The Faculty Of Graduate Studies
DALHOUSIE UNIVERSITY
invites applications for
THE IZAAK WALTON KILLAM
MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIPS
VALUE $3500 TO $5500
These scholarships are open to outstanding students wishing to pursue studies
towards the Master's or Doctoral Degree in any field of graduate research at
Dalhousie. Approximately forty awards will be available for the year 1968-69.
These range in value from $3500 to $5500 with an additional travel allowance.
For application forms and further information on these and other awards available at Dalhousie, please write to The Dean of Graduate Studies, Dalhousie
University, Halifax, Nova Scotia.
A Career In
CHARTERED ACCOUNTANCY
A representative of
ARTHUR ANDERSEN & CO.
an International Firm of Public Accountants, will
be recruiting on November 2 7 and 28 for Vancouver, Calgary, Toronto and Montreal.
Contact your  Placement Office
for an appointment.
'THE KNACK'
AND HOW TO  GET IT
TODAY, NOV. 16
12:30, 3:30, 6:00, 8:30
AUDITORIUM - 50c
Added Short - 'Skater Dater1
most conventional of all for diamonds. Whether it's
the way-back-when six-prong setting of the original
solitaire - or four prongs set conventionally or
north, south, east and west - it is, by far, the most
effective for emphasizing the beauty of the gems.
A. Set $400   B.Set $525    C.Set $475
Rings illustrated are exclusive Grassie designs,
and must be handcrafted
BUDGET TERMS—10%  DOWN
Preferential Discount to UBC Students
Diamond Specialists Since 1886
566 Seymour 685-2271
Open 5 days a week — Fridays unHil 9 p.m. — Closed Wednesdays. Thursday, November 16,  1967
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
— bob brown photo
TO BE OR NOT TO BE? That's the question this workman could consider as he stands directly under a multi-ton weight at the construction site of the student union building. Rather ominous,
wouldn't you say?
No strike—keep that garbage coming
By FRED CAWSEY
Vancouver wives and mothers still had their
garbage wrappers Wednesday.
That's because the Sun and the Province
published as usual.
Forty-eight hour strike notice was served
Monday by four unions involved in contract negotiations with Pacific Press, printer of the two
papers.
The four unions are: the Vancouver-New
Westminster Newspaper Guild, the International
Typographical Union, the Mailers Union and the
Stereotypers Union.
The notices expired at 11:05 a.m. Wednesday,
but there was no walkout as new negotiations
continued.
Late Wednesday, the guild rejected a new
Pacific Press offer.
A spokesman for the union said they would
do nothing until negotiations had ceased with the
mechanical unions.
The mechanical unions are scheduled to meet
with the contract mediator today.
Neither Pacific Press officials nor spokesmen
for the mechanical unions would comment on the
situation Wednesday.
Meanwhile the Pacific Press management is
preparing to counter the affects of the possible
strike.
Five closed circuit television cameras have
been placed on the loading docks at the back
of the building.
They are focused on the street and sidewalk
around the building, on Sixth Avenue.
The monitors are inside the building in a
receiving room.
Also, the company has stockpiled 3,000 rolls
of newsprint in the basement of the buildings.
Only 210 rolls are needed for an average day.
An area of the parking lot at the rear of the
building was recently converted to a helicopter
landing pad.
UBC SFU, UVIC
rallies slated
By JADE EDEN
Plans for a rally to rile students against provincial government neglect of higher education are getting into high gear.
Don Munton, Alma Mater Society first vice-president, said
Wednesday that the rally, Nov. 22, will be held in front of the
library, or in Brock, if it rains.
"We hope about 17,000 students will attend," he said.
Simon Fraser and the University of Victoria will hold rallies
the same day. The B.C. Institute of Technology may have a
rally also.
"Universities in this province were given $8 million in
capital funds—that is, to construct buildings—by the provincial
government this year. UBC, SFU, and UVic will have to limit
enrolment unless they are allotted more funds."
"The Economic Council of Canada estimated in its report
that the number of students wishing to attend university in
Canada will double within the next 10 years. There will not be
enough space to accommodate them," Munton said.
"At the rally we will ask that one person from every
electoral district in B.C. volunteer to talk to his MLA over
Christmas about the shortage of university space."
A letter has been sent to education minister Leslie Peterson
inviting him to meet with AMS president Shaun Sullivan, SFU
president Art Weeks, and UVic president Dave McLean. Peterson
has not yet replied to the letter.
"An increase in fees is not the answer to the shortage,"
Munton said. "Increasing fees by $200 a year would only pay
for one building. We need government assistance, and we want
to draw attention to it before the budget comes down in
January."
Sullivan, Munton, and UBC professor Dr. Pat McGeer
(MLA Point Grey) are among those who will speak at the rally.
Posters defy tradition
Bureaucracy can be bothersome at midnight at UBC.
This was the finding Wednesday of students who erected
posters of Vietnam war victims on the library lawn as part of
a protest against Dow Chemical Co.
At about 10 p.m. Tuesday, employees of physical plant
arrived at the library with orders from senior supervisor George
Rogers to remove the pictures.
However, they were met by students guarding the posters
from possible removal or damage.
"When the man from physical plant found someone protecting the pictures he went away," said Dick Woodsworth, graduate
studies.
"But he came back at about 11:15 p.m. He left again,
apparently to seek advice from his superiors."
Meanwhile, the students involved tried to discover why the
posters were to be removed.
Officials said physical plant has authority over all posters
erected anywhere on campus but in front of Brock and in the
auditorium quad.
Rogers said this authority was granted long ago in meetings
with the administration, but could not cite specific regulation
in question.
"Traditionally, only posters concerning elections, the blood
drive and homecoming are allowed on the library lawns," Rogers
said.
"Application to post anything else must be made through
the academic activities co-ordinator, and it was not done in this
case."
A request by academic activities committee chairman Blaine
Kennedy to have the pictures remain was turned down by Rogers.
"If we make an exception in this case, every club on campus
will be putting up posters," Rogers said. "The posters will come
down."
Later, acting president Walter Gage told Kennedy that the
posters could be left up.
"He said he could see no reason why they couldn't be left
up," Kennedy said. "And he pointed out that we hadn't gone
through proper channels in requesting to put them up."
Physical plant was then told of Gage's decision by Arnie
Myers, UBC information director.
^^^^^M^Ifl^^^^BERT; WU ALUAVS &NB TUET2yW/W$r BE! TrWTS AGAINST THE LAil!(JE'RE GOINfl)
mrFAfim M jST<SD*^SK^^^%^^ ansuersf either vow re sailwTt> see the general amut this? r~—^r^ ^v.-mmssaxf-^nr^^'^ >*&^
TM UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and, Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the editor and not of the AMS or the university. Member,
Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey subscribes to the press services
of Pacific Student Press, of which it is founding member, and Underground
Press Syndicate. Authorized second class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash. The Ubyssey publishes Page
Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City editor, 224-3916. Other
calls, 224-3242: editor, local 25; photo. Page Friday, loc. 24; sports, loc.
23; advertising, loc.  26. Telex  04-5224.
The skins of a thousand sheep are not worth
the armpit of one fox.
— from The Book of Lord Shang
NOVEMBER 16, 1967
VK&.    N   _•','
Hail Yale
The faculty at Yale UniveTsity has waded through
its ivy-covered tradition to change completely its numerical grading system. A new system will begin next year
with only four designations—fail, pass, high pass, or
honors.
Yale's innovation is a wise one.
The worst thing about numerical grades is their
inaccuracy. While reasonable in such fields as mathematics, number grades don't work in such studies as
English, philosophy or law.
Two professors in the same department frequently
have widely different ideas of what constitutes a performance worth, say, 80 per cent. In such situations
number grades become meaningless.
And it is well-known that, while grades between 90
and 100 per cent are frequent in the sciences, they almost
never happen in arts.
An arts student might produce an excellent essay
—but few profs want to give it 95 per cent, thus implying that it could be only one-twentieth better than it is.
The profs would find it easier—and more sensible—to
give such an essay honors standing.
Let's learn from Yale.
400 years later
On Wednesday, about 15,000 students wandered
out to UBC and wandered into large lecture halls
where they heard lecturers recite.
Many of the lecturers mumbled or were disorganized. Some of them, on the other hand, spoke well.
But all that the students heard were 50-minute
presentations of generally routine material, most of
which is easily accessible—or could be made easily
accessible—in printed form.
Perhaps whoever designed the lecture system as used
at UBC was well-intentioned. But it seems a strange
system to use in 1967.
Advocates of the lecture system might be interested
to know of something called the printing press. It was
invented almost 400 years ago.
Winter
Usually, winter in Vancouver is all wet.
Prom the beginning of November, the sun is talked
about only in whispers. The sales volume of umbrellas
soars. Noses begin sprinting. Buses run later, to keep
passengers waiting. Car heaters refuse to heat. And
beaches are deserted.
Professors, stricken with acute colds, punctuate their
lectures with a series of sneezes, building in intensity.
Relatives you've never heard of begin writing, hinting they'd like a B.C. totem pole for Christmas.
There are numerous cures for this. Jack Frost could
be lynched. Professors could be lynched. Relatives could
be lynched. Each morning a special water bomber filled
with vaporub could spray the entire campus. Or we could
begin calling it the monsoon season. Achoo! —S.G.
He cyreio u^hen
he realised he *+x&
oi sacred a^euV!
VV.AWAW
Non-violence no good
against  Nazis, Yanks
By GABOR MATE
Many people think that a
vietnik is necessarily a peacenik.
Aside from the fact both
terms are rather meaningless
pejoratives — what are the
opposites, warnik, and LBJ-
nik? —. aside from this, to
think that someone opposed to
what is happening in Vietnam is
necessarily opposed to violence
in principle reveals a certain
confusion of mind. To be sure,
this confusion follows from
the fact that some opponents
of the Vietnam war are pacifists who abhor all violence,
without regard to the possible
justification of any particular
violent action. But not all, not
even most, of the opponents
of what is happening in Vietnam are pacificts. And pacifism is not a valid basis from
which to oppose the war.
GHETTO
For pacifism condemns all
violence — not only the violence of the aggressor but also
the violence of the victim. In
this view the embattled Jews
of the Warsaw Ghetto uprising were not much better than
the Nazis who sought to exterminate them. In taking up
arms against their murderers,
the Jews "descended to the
level" of the Germans. The
pacifist would have preferred
the Warsaw Jews to march
into the gas-chambers without
violent resistance, as today he
would prefer the Vietnamese
people to cease their armed
struggle.
No doubt there are examples
of violence in which both sides
are unjustified. There was
little to choose between the
opposing imperialisms of the
First World War as they clashed    for    the    domination    of
peoples and territories which
didn't belong to them, just as
there was little to choose between the Capone gang and
the Moran gang as they fought
for the domination of the
Chicago crime world.
But sometimes, and particularly in the case of the
Vietnam war, the struggle is
not between two criminals,
but rather between a criminal
and his intended victim. And
most of the time, and again
particularly in Vietnam, the
only way to deal wth the aggressor is to keep him forcibly
from achieving his goal.
For the ideals of the pacifist
are fine, but they are completely incapable of resolving a
situation in which the aggressor will not be persuaded by
nonviolent means. No amount
of non-violent resistance would
have swayed the Nazis from
their purpose of exterminating
the Jews.
The purpose of the Americans
in Vietnam is not to exterminate
large sections of the Vietnamese
people but to dominate
them militarily and politically
EDITOR: Danny Stoffman
City   Stuart Cray
News   Susan Gransby
Managing   Murray McMillan
Photo     Kurt  Hilger
Associate .... Al Birnie, Kirsten Emmott
Senior   Pat Hrushowy
Sports   Mike Jessen
Wire   Charlotte Haire
Page Friday   Judy Bing
Ass't. City   Boni Lee
Shouts oi hilarity bursting from
their megaphones, a hotel-full of
chefs went to pot. "Don't be saucy
to me," said Ann Arky to a bearded
Frenchman who said she was a
dish. Another kept peppering salty
spoonerism at Lin Tse-Hsu. "That's
not knife," said Irving Fetish, who
walked with a lisp. Finally, after a
pancake cook in a stovepipe hat blew
his lid, they left.
Mike   Finlay   made    friends    with
in order to exploit them—and
the rest of Southeast Asia —
economically. But this is not a
purpose from which they will
be easily swayed — in fact
they are quite ready to exterminate large sections of
the Vietnamese people to
achieve their aim.
MUST DEFEND
But the Vietnamese
have learned through their
many struggles for independence from foreign imperialists
—. Chinese, Japanese, and
French — that no aggressor
lhas ever left their country
but when he was forced to
leave. And the only thing that
will force the Americans to
leave Vietnam is the continued
success of the National Liberation Front to frustrate th?
American attempt to conquer
Vietnam.
Thus, far from being judged
the moral counterpart of American violence, the violence of
the Vietnamese people led by
th National Liberation Front
must be supported as th°
quickest and only road to a
just peace in Vietnam.
Dumbo and went for a ride, but
caught elephantitis. Norm Gidney
walked in with a colonel's uniform
on, and went rank. Irene Wasilew-
ski, Hew Gwynne, Godfrey Golashes
and Alfred Hitchcock played rushing roulette and lost. Steve Jackson
ordered a Brock steak and ate somebody's rubber by mistake, while
Paul Knox translated Chinese bus
advertisements. Jade Eden threw
bommerangs, which Laurie Dunbar
caught.
Fred Cawsey brought his trampoline and became quite Jumpy, as
Luanne Armstrong, Alexandra Volkoff and Judy Young helped pry
Richard Baer and Mark DeCoursey
loose from the jaws of the Phyfatal-
phynx.
Using racy language, Jim Maddin,
Mike Fitzgerald, John Twlgg and
Piognore Ilran ran circles In the
jock shop.
Taking an average of 187 pictures
each, Chris Blake, George Hollo,
Bob Brown and Lawrence Woodd
ate chocolate ant-eaters. Thursday, November 16,  1967
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 5
Miniworld
Editor, The Ubyssey:
International House has concluded another Fall Fair, a
well-organized, most enjoyable
event of the year.
As one wanders through the
various display rooms, sits in
on fashion and floor shows,
dines on international delicacies in romantic candlelight,
has the future read from his
palm, takes part in the unique
Japanese tea ceremony performed by pretty girls, dances
on a crowded, but happy floor
to the exotic steel band and
mingles among friendly citizens of every corner of the
world, the globe we live on is
but indeed a miniworld!
I think it should be highly
commended on this effort. It
is no easy matter to always so
successfully sponsor events of
mutual interest and of
thorough enjoyment to everyone — young and old, rich or
poor, black or white.
MARIE  LETO
arts 2
'Symbolic  image
Editor, The Ubyssey:
This letter is to formally acquaint you with the intention
of the education undergraduate society to claim it's rightful designation as the EUS.
This will cause our great
and good friends of the applied science undergraduate
society (vulgarly called the engineers) to adopt the coghomen
ASUS.
We feel they will willingly
accept this recommendation,
as it provides them with a
symbolic image far more
meaningful than the non-representational EUS.
Also, we are sure they will
immediately see not only the
logic but also the traditional
truth of their new (though oft
used) name.
COROL SMITH
ed 2
Cards  immoral?
Editor, The Ubyssey:
We would like to express our
opinion on the banning of card
games in the Ponderosa cafeteria. We were informed of
this during a friendly card
game (no gamblng involved)
which we held between classes. The official reason given
for the ban was that card
players took up table space
which was needed by people
eating their lunch.
This excuse was handed to
us at 2:15 p.m. with perhaps
50 people occupying a cafeteria designed to hold several
hundred. We put the cards
away and sat there for a few
minutes, occupying the same
ass-space as before. No complaints. We then resumed our
game and were again told to
stop.
We are, at the present time,
under the distinct impression
that the members of the Ponderosa staff consider card-playing immoral.
One further (futile) complaint:
The Ponderosa serves hamburgers consisting of approximately one hamburger bun,
one handful of ground meat,
one-half of a raw onion. This
may be fine for engineers but
it gives us heartburn compounded with halitosis. Could
the Ponderosa staff fry the
onions, add chopped lettuce
and tomatoes, for variety and
to disguise the taste, and supply 10 litres of a good mouthwash  with   each  burger?
JOHN ANDERSON
science  1
GERRY  CLARK
science  1
CONAN HAY
science  1
Late  debate
Editor, The Ubyssey:
On behalf of the UBC debating union, I would like to
apologize for the delayed arrival of the Victoria debators
for the McGoun Cup competition in Brock Hall last Tuesday. We had been informed by
both phone and letter prior to
Tuesday that they would be
here by 12 at the latest, but
they were unfortunately delayed en route. We greatly
appreciate the patience of
those who waited for an hour
to hear the debate, and we regret any inconvenience to
those who attended but had
to leave prior to the debate.
RICHARD WATTS
president, UBC
debating union
No  hope
Editor, The Ubyssey:
The peace march in Washington has left me less enthusiastic than the organizers.
My hopes for a higher morality in this world have been
blasted. The high morality and
tolerance (both self-proclaimed) of the marchers are, in
fact, nonexistant.
The militancy and intolerance is perhaps crystalized in
the marchers' clash with the
Nazis. I believe the peaceniks' attitude may be summed
up as: "I'm a very tolerant
person and I'll fight any son
of a bitch who disagrees with
me." This leads logically to:
"I'll kill any s.o.b. who is not
a pacifist like me."
Peace and tolerance has
again been still-born.
OTTO RIEVE
comm.  2
Human  contact
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Until last Tuesday I escaped
each  day  after my  last  class
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to my own sanctuary where
I could forget the impersonality of UBC. But Tuesday I
read Warren Bell's article, "Be
Human; Pick Me Up." Since
then I have picked up every
hitch-hiker that I have seen,
hoping to find this "human
contact," this "real communication," this "real bond."
The first fellow I picked up
had a beard and I immediately
thought, "Ahah, an intellectual. Now I will find that real
communication." But all this
fellow could talk about was
the great summer job he had
had last year; how much he
had earned; and how he looked forward to next summer.
Oh, what wounds he opened.
My past summer with its $1.45
an hour wage flashed by me,
tantalizingly — like life does
at death time — making me
feel more morbid than ever. I
dropped my intellectual at the
next corner.
Undaunted, the next day I
saw a fellow trying to push his
car in the visitors' lot across
from Wesbrook. Recalling my
newly discovered gospel, I volunteered to push. You drive in
that lot like I would slalom,
with wide runs to the side before coming back to take the
curve. The cars went around
and around the course. However, each time I accelerated,
I was startled by an unknown
honk which reduced my speed.
Apparently a poor girl was
having trouble with her horn
—it kept getting in the way
of her embraces. Being unable
to maintain my speed I left,
chalking up my second failure. Even our cars had not
formed a "real bond".
By Monday I had decided
that I would immediately fire
the question, "Is God dead?" at
my hitch-hiker, thus giving
him full opportunity to really
communicate. At 5:20 p.m. I
picked up a girl. It seems that
I   should   always    wear   my
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glasses because she turned out
to be a boy in grade eight. I
hesitated to ask him my question and so tried some less profound ones like "What school
do you go to?" and finally
I asked him if he would go to
UBC. He said, no, he thought
he would go to college.
You can see, Warren, that
none of my hitch-hikers has
offered me any of the three
benefits which you proposed.
But don't worry, I will keep
trying. I might still find a
fellow who will erase these
feelings of impersonality by
"real communication," or by
real contact". But judging
the visitors' lot I would recommend that he use your third
proposal, "human contact."
MARGOT JONES
arts 4
Terry Turner [above] of San Jose,
Calif., working in a castle
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insuring you of on the spot help at
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for contacts Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 16,  1967
INTERVIEW
New president Hare: he wants to
Following is the concluding part of a Ubyssey interview with incoming UBC president Kenneth Hare. The
interview was conducted last September by Ubyssey
editor Danny Stoffman, city editor Stuart Gray, and
associate editor Al Birnie. Part One appeared in The
Ubyssey on  Nov.  9.
Ubyssey: Maybe we should move over to the
overall university structure. Do you still stand behind the recommendations in the Spinks Report?
(Hare was a member of the Spinks commission on
graduate education in Ontario.)
Hare: Yes, certainly.
Ubyssey: Do you think the University of California type system, of one huge university, might
work here?
Hare: Do I believe that there ought to be some
kind of inter-university corporation? I think it's
inevitable. Simon Fraser, Victoria and UBC are not
really in competition, they're absolutely necessary
to the people who live in this province and indeed
the whole country, the whole continent. It's obvious
that we shall only be able to do what we want to do
if we arrive at some kind of modus vivendi.
What the Spinks Report says is that co-operation
between institutions should be agreed on by the
institutions and not forced on them by the government. That's why I think that you have to have
some kind of structure that exists between the
universities, voluntary if you can, if not then, as In
New York and in California, guaranteed by legislation or by constitution. But I'm sure that there
must be some way of co-ordinating the work of the
institutions.
Ubyssey: There hasn't been anything like that
until now in this province. The three universities
in this province have been in competition. What is
the easiest way to avoid this?
Hare: Well, very simply I think it depends to
some extent on me. I have a personal friend — may
I put it in these terms — I'm a personal friend
of Pat McTaggart Cowan (Simon Fraser University
president) and I've known and liked Malcolm Taylor
""Fifteen hours a week sitting listening to a
lecture is saturation bombing."
(University of Victoria president) for a long time.
I would very much like to sit down with them and
suggest that it's about time we did in fact set up
a pretty firm co-operation.
If we then can persuade our respective senates
that this is desirable and our respective boards
that this is desirable and our respective students
that this is desirable, because I think the students
are probably further advanced in this than any of
the rest of them. If we can do this, then I think
the problem is licked without any help from the
provincial government.
Ubyssey: Would greater emphasis be placed on
this as a vehicle for administration or for intellectual
activities?
Hare: Well, you can quote me as saying that
administration is only a necessary evil. I mean, a
university is about intellectual things. It has to be
run, it's a machine, it somehow has to go, you have
to make sure that the ashtrays are emptied. But
the university is an intellectual thing and I'm talking specifically about — well, let me just get down
to cases.
We have this project, the tri-university thing,
which now is more than "tri", it involves universities beyond that. I think everybody in the physical
sciences would agree that it would be a splendid
thing if that came into being. Maybe there's one or
two people that don't believe in big physics, but I
think most people do, in the physical sciences. That
is a resource of which there can only be one and
obviously there has got to be collaboration between
them. In that case it's so obvious it sticks out a mile.
There already is a joint thing. You take the
English departments where the costs are relatively
low. It would not make sense to have three or four
or  five independent  collections  of  Canadiana,  for
example, if one collection would be better than any
of thrm, and universal access.
It seems to me to be nonsense that a graduate
student should have any difficulty getting into the
library of another institution and so on. And that's
what the Spinks Commission recommended for the
Ontario universities and it's what I think ought to
happen here.
Ubyssey: Getting into financing. Effective this
year, the federal government has replaced direct
grants with the tax abatement system under which
the provincial government gets a percentage of tax
collections. It's been a matter of faith that the provincial government would in fact give these to
higher education. Was this a wise decision by the
federal government?
Hare: No, I think it was a disastrous mistake
and I'm appalled that it was done and I think that
— it was clearly done as part of the crisis with
Quebec. I think that from the point of view of the
whole country, including Quebec, that it was a very
grave error for the federal fiscal people to have
backed out of this.
Ubyssey: What should we do about it?
Hare: Well, a lot of course is done in the tradi-
Dr. Kenneth Hare
tional smoke filled room. But I think, very simply,
that people like me say it is a bad thing, go on
saying it's a bad thing, and only say loudly.
Ubyssey: Would you recommend going back to
the Bladen formula of financing?
Hare: I like the Bladen formula in principle. In
detail, I think it could be improved on. As a matter
of fact in Ontario they have now arrived at a slightly different formula. It's a formula that has to do
with the weighing as between graduate versus
undergraduate students, but I think the Ontario
formula that has now been adopted is a pretty wise
one and could bear imitating elsewhere. They
haven't done everything wisely in Ontario, but this
is a very good device. For what it's worth, let me
say that the Ontario university system has had its
growing pains, but they've done a splendid job
and they're still doing a splendid job.
Ubyssey: They haven't adopted any such formula in B.C. In fact, when it was used by the federal
government, the provincial government rigged their
own grants so as to override this formula.
Hare: Well, I haven't yet talked money to either
the premier or the education minister. I've met
them socially, but you're asking me questions here
on what is right and what is wrong. Specifically
I think it is wrong for the federal government to
say it has no responsibility for the intellectual
health of the country.
Ubyssey: Of course, it is obvious that graduate
and professional education needs more money.
Hare: Yes, and isn't it obvious that what is now
happening in the country is going to push this a
lot faster. This is becoming a service economy.
At the moment in B.C. we are still mostly working for the lumber companies, and the fishing companies and the primary resource developers. Well,
all the records show everywhere that in the wake
of that you move very rapidly into services — I
mean I work for a service and get paid $32,500.00
per year and everybody knows that figure as it
gets published in the newspapers.
Now that is money which is — incidentally, I've
seen it in certain columns put down as non-productive expenditure. And of course it is in the sense
that it doesn't produce anything tangible, it produces university education, I hope,   if I have any-
"I personally dislike exams very much and I
am fully aware of the hateful consequences of
them."
thing to do with it. But the point is that more and
more we'll be dentists, we'll be professors, we'll
be — well I was going to say go go girls, but the
point is that we won't be cutting down trees.
We still cut down trees, we still fish, we still
mine, we still smelt, but the proportion of people
doing that steadily goes down, the proportion of
people serving other people steadily goes up and
almost all the professions now have a science core,
even the humble ones have a science core and many
of them like medicine have a terrifically expensive
science core which means of course that the costs
of higher education will go up much faster than the
number of people involved in it.
Ubyssey: Is it fair to expect the students to
absorb the tuition fees as direct payment? Shouldn't
this more properly come from the state as a whole?
Hare: Well, this is an argument that you can
twist in any number of different ways. Forgive me
for saying that I haven't talked about this to my
other board, your board, our board.
I don't know what the arguments in the past
have been. But I can tell you what my British experience is recently, because here I have been
very directly involved. There the universities have
fought like steers to keep the tuition fees, because
it means there is one more, one different avenue
other than from the Department of Education and
Science. But equally they have also fought for the
universal provision of direct grants to students. No
British student does in fact pay those fees, but the
fees are there. It means that you are not drawing
all your money from one kitty, but it doesn't actually come out of the pocket of the student or his
parents unless his parents are rich. That's the way
the British work it. I'm attracted to that. I'm not
attracted to the idea at the moment of having to
get all my money from one line.
If you ask me that same question ten years
from now I would probably answer you yes, of
course,   educational   expenditure  is   an   investment,
"'I think it is wrong for the federal government
to say it has no responsibility for the intellectual
health of the country."
we are investing in the future, you are the fortunate recipients of that investment. But just at the
moment until we've got the idea of the free university a little more firmly established I don't
like the idea of being dependent on just one road.
So I think that in the long run that this is the way
to being dictated to, everywhere. Thursday, November 16, 1967
THE      U BYSSEY
Page 7
teach  a  course to test  himself
I'm very happy to be quoted as saying that I
would like to see the situation where every student
can get the education he requires up to the limit
of his intellectual ability and that financial provision can be made for him to get it. I'm not prepared to spell out how that financial provision
would be made but certainly I want to see to it
that not one person is left below the level that he
is capable of reaching.
Ubyssey: Dr. Hare, getting back to teaching, we
have a system where professors are hired primarily
to teach and yet they are promoted and given tenure
on the basis of the publishing or perishing that
they do. Is there any way of getting around this,
of making teaching a factor?
Haie: Well, I think it's quite wrong that teaching should be ignored in promotions policy. I didn't
know that was the policy. It would not be my
policy if I were a dictator, which I'm not. But, my
own policy — I am the chairman of the staff committee at Birkbeck College and there is no dissent
about this—I was equally responsible for promotions
over about half the staff at McGill University for
••The middle-aged population is now thoroughly
alarmed, scared stiff about the young. They
think the young are going to hell.""
a number of years. It was very simply that a university teacher has a responsibility to advance his
field, to teach his field and to a certain amount of
administration. None of us can escape that.
Administration includes things like examining
and so on. And we used to have a rough and ready
working rule. Anybody that did two of these to
the satisfaction of all concerned got hia promotions.
One of them didn't have to be research. But, you
know, this is a non-problem because, at least I think
it is if it's approached right, because the best research men are nearly all good teachers. The difficulty is that many bad teachers are lousy research
workers. So it's necessary to take this with a bit of
a pinch of salt.
Ubyssey: Are there a lot of good teachers who
are bad research workers?
Hare: There are a lot of good teachers who don't
do research. That's a different thing. They choose to
teach, and I, personally, respect these men because
I love to teach myself. Incidentally, I would like
to be allowed if I could stand it, I'd like to give a
course to see if you can tell whether I mean everything I say or not. I don't know whether Bill Robinson (geography department head) will let me do it
or not but at any rate I'd like to do it. And, I think
that the teaching is, for a good teacher at any rate,
an extreme pleasure. Also, I don't think any university teacher without students is in much of a
shape. This is also true of the researcher as I said
before.
The joy of academic research is that you have
students with you.  I've  had a very large number
•*Unlil we've got the idea of the free university
a little more firmly established I don't like the
idea of being dependent on only one road."
of graduate students and they end up my personal
friends and this is the common experience throughout the campus. They are spread all round the world
and I stay in touch with them and this has been
the main reward, as far as I am concerned, of my
whole life.
Ubyssey: How should a department head rate
teaching effectiveness among his professors?
Hare: Well, use his ears and look at the exam re
suits and listen to what he hears. I don't really think
that — well, I know this is a problem in some parts
of Canada — I would certainly always ask the question myself, is the fellow a good teacher, and does
he neglect his teaching responsibilities.
One thing you've got to bear in mind is, it isn't
easy to identify good teachers. I have to say that
one of the best teachers I ever had, I disliked when
I was an undergraduate and this is the fallacy of anti-
calendars and arts and science surveys, like the ones
we did.
The immediate appeal may not be a good answer.
I'm very suspicious of referendum-type assessments
of teaching a'bility.
Ubyssey: How important do you think exams are
in the academic structure and what detrimental effects can they have on students?
Hare: Well, I personally dislike them very much
and I am fully aware of the hateful consequences of
it. If we had a staff/student ratio such that there
really could be a genuine personal tutor system in
Canadian universities, I would prefer to seek assessment based on essay writing or performed projects,
rather than the present way. I do, however; I part
company with the open university characters who
say that they (examinations) have no role. I think
competition or at least the achievement of a goal is
a necessary part of the intellectual training process.
I believe that there must 'be some test but I don't
like the three-hour examination taken at the end of
a session, although I see no alternative to it at the
moment with the existing staff/student ratio, which
is a millstone round all of our necks, everywhere.
Ubyssey: How about a system that's used here in
the arts faculty and the science faculty of instruction
• Simon Fraser, Victoria and British Columbia
are not really in competition, they're absolutely
necessary to the people who live in this province
and indeed the whole country, the whole
continent."
by lectures three times a week? Is this a good way
to learn?
Hare: No, I don't think it is. I think the lecture
is a priceless thing if you don't get too much of it. But
fifteen hours a week sitting listening to lectures Is
saturation bombing. The student should spend most
of his time reading and writing and particularly writing stuff that is going to be genuinely criticized afterwards.
Again, the staff/student ratio is against you here
because we haven't got enough—the North American
university system because of its open door policy has
a 12:1, 15:1 ratio and, if you really did do the essay
writing technique that the Oxford tutor does, for example, you'd need at least twice as many staff, If
any research was to be done at all. Even as it is, I
don't know whether you know this, but people leave
Oxford and Cambridge because it takes up so much
of their time, with a 5:1 student ratio, and to do this
properly, so, I think the answer is that here we are
at grips with economic inadequacy.
Ubyssey: In view of the present ratio predicament
of students and teachers, do you think it would be
better for a teacher who is acknowledged as being
very exceptional to teach, say, a class of five hundred
students than to have eight mediocre teachers teaching much smaller classes? This is an idea advanced
last year in the arts faculty.
Hare: Well, I think that once you get beyond the
seminar group — I mean, if you put as many students
in here as we could comfortably get and you let me
talk, I think that that would be a good lecture, but
once it gets beyond that I don't think it matters
whether there's thirty, three hundred, three thousand
or three million, because there's no difference providing that you have adequate modern technology.
And if you have, what shall I say, a Kelly or a Shen-
don or some brilliant teacher, not to use closed circuit
television or some techniques so that other people
can hear it is a crime, because there are so many
other things that the people you call mediocre tea-
chers can do. I don't think — well, not too many of
them are really mediocre teachers — I think that the
occasional 'bad teacher gives a bad reputation to a
profession that on the whole does its work pretty
well. I defend my colleagues about this. But, in view
of the need for tutors, the tutor is a man who really
does — if I were your tutor, you would be writing
essays for me once a week.
I did this in London and I would then tear that
essay to shreds just the way Ubyssey editorials do
the president. Once a week and at the end of three
years, by God, you'd be able to write essays! There
is a need for that kind of chap and it would obviously
•*I think it's quite wrong that teaching should
be ignored in promotions policy.'"
make a lot more sense if we had more time to do this.
At the moment we just sort of have a stipulation that
a chap who isn't giving lectures nine hours a week
or twelve hours a week to a large class in a classroom
isn't working, which is just silly. But, this again —
I agree with you about this but it is exceedingly
difficult to do this. In fact, in the first place it's a
question of breaking ingrained habits, then you have
to convince the board of governors that this is a genuine advance, you have to worry about what the
Ministry of Education will think about it, worry what
the parents think about it, because many of our students are minors, the parents have to be heard from,
at least if they are heard from you can't ignore, them,
and it's exceedingly difficult to bring this about but I
would like to see it done.
Ubyssey: You stated the other day that you were
in favour of many more people in Canada going to
university. Won't this create problems, in view of
what you've just said?
Hare: Yes. Of course it will. I'm only in favour of
many more people going to university in Canada if
"•The costs of higher education will go up
much faster than the number of people involved
in ii."
Canada is willing to devote the resources to set the
institutions up to do this. This is the first —
Ubyssey: I think that has to be done first.
Hare: It has to foe done simultaneously with it, at
at least. The country is not yet devoting a large
enough proportion of its resources to higher education. It's got the right motive though. I mean, it wants
to see this available but it hasn't yet got to the point
where it — and, incidentally, I know that the B.C.
government is often criticized, but it isn't the only
government to be criticized for this, all governments
are to some extent. I think in Britain they do spend
enough. So I think what I would like to see here is
both an extension of public financing and indeed of
private financing, if it's forthcoming, but anyway of
financing. And, of a very crude guess as to what the
right balance, the right mix is between professor and
student.
Sure we've got too many students, too few professors at the moment. I am sure the British have
gone the other way in relationship to the money they
could get, at any rate. Somewhere in between, there's
a golden mean and I would like to know what that
is, but being a pragmatist I can only determine it experimentally, there's no theory about this that I know.
Administration is only a necessary evil. The university
has to be run, its a machine, it somehow has to go,
you have to make sure the ashtrays are emptied. But
the  university  is  an  intellectual thing. Page 8
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 16,  1967
Violent vs nonviolent politics
Violence comes from social conditions and institutions and is transmitted by socialization'
By DONALD McKELVEY
Donald McKelvey is former assistant national secretary of Students for a Democratic Society. The following
are excerpts from an article which appeared in Liberation
in August 1965.
Violence comes from social conditions and institutions and is transmitted by the process of socialization by which people, on the one hand, learn to
accept, even to glory in, violence, and, on the other,
are made so insensitive to others that they are
constantly violent toward them.
I do not mean primarily physical violence —
though there is far too much of that. I mean the
insensitivity, unconcern and lack of love exhibited
toward other people—a trait learned from parents
and peer groups and constantly reinforced until
there is precious little room for genuine feeling and
love in human relations, and virtually none in international affairs, where the human beings involved
are so unperceivable..
The important thing is not to seek ways to permeate institutions of war and violence but to recognize their social and psychological roots.
An example: The institution of property in capitalist society, of owning things, does much more to
make us fearful and untrusting of our fellow men,
and therefore alienated from and violent toward
them, than does the entire war machine governed
by the pentagon.
Pacifists implicitly recognize this by denouncing
non-murderous physical violence as well as murder.
There is a legitimate balancing of the acceptance of
the not-directly-lethal violence involved in conditions
of gross injustice, on the one hand, and, on the other,
the acceptance of the use of violence in order to
create conditions which will lead men to be more
non-violent.
Some   pacifists   seem   to   believe   that  violence
corrupts absolutely—at least in relation to, say, Cuba
and Vietnam. Because the Cubans and the Vietnamese Liberation Front have used violence and still
do, they say, a person who fails to condemn them
cannot be a pacifist.
There can be no question that violence tends to
corrupt individuals, no matter how worthy their
goals.
The negative effects of violence in making (and
continuing) a revolution can be offset by the positive
effects of the creation of a social order which is more
just, liberating, and on the whole non-violent; i.e., a
society where men are not impelled by social conditions to be physically and psychologically violent
to others.
• Let us assume that a non-violent and revolutionary individual has become a leader in a village
of peasants in an underdeveloped country. The
peasants live in the conditions of degradation and
physical misery which we all have read about. They
seek to gain their revolutionary ends in non-violent
ways, such as petitioning the landlord and the government.
Eventually the peasants non-violently occupy the
landlord's lands and the government sends troops,
who kill a number of peasants and return the lands
to the landlord. Now what does our non-violent
leader do?
If he counsels the peasants to continue their nonviolent forms of protest, even in the face of selective
terror by the landlord or his agents (the government),
he runs the risk of divorcing himself from the
peasants, who by now are prepared to take weapons
and go into the hills. Thus, he risks being unable
to affect the substance of the new order—not only
when the liberation movement eventually comes to
power, but also during the important formative
period when it is struggling for power.
e    In order to create the conditions for a non
violent society, a revolution is needed in the entire
way of life of underdeveloped countries.
Liberation means a very active and assertive
struggle for freedom and development. The essence
of that struggle is the release of enormous amounts
of energy, both creative and destructive, in the
peoples of those societies.
I would argue that Gandhi's greatest mistake was
not to make an effective economic revolution along
with his effective political revolution. (He proposed
a reactionary revolution which was unrealistic.)
His technique of non co-operation was applicable
to the political revolution but not to the badly
needed economic one. In fact, Gandhi must share
the responsibility both for the partition riots that
followed independence and for the continued degradation in which the Indian masses live.
Both these could have been at least substantially
bettered if the people of the Indian subcontinent had
been urged and structured into a vast effort at
socialist economic development, which would have
channeled energies away from internecine struggles.
Without implying a point-by-point comparison, I
would argue that Chinese society, though based on
violent revolution, includes many more of the conditions for a non-violent society than does India's.
In fact, just what, aside from largely irrelevant
political independence, do the Indian people have
to show for Gandhi's efforts?
Men can change their attitudes towards others
no more rapidly than the social conditions which
shape them. This is a virtually universal rule of
human affairs; and it is immoral and stupid to ask
or expect peasants to be supermen by being pacifists,
when the entire fabric of their lives is so violent.
What is important is to seek ways to structure
social institutions so as gradually to draw men from
their violent predispositions to more healthy and nonviolent ones.
UBC
OPENING
SPECIALS
Sift*
NOW OK TIRE STORES
HAVE OPENED A BRAND
NEW LOCATION AT 4th AVE.
AND DUNBAR.
YOU ARE CORDIALLY INVITED
TO  INSPECT THEIR  NEW STORE
AND SAMPLE SOME OF THE
BARGAINS.
HO* (»« TO ran
OCT. SHEW*.
WHITE-tMHSti,,
WINTER SPECIAL
SAFETY CHECK
99c
— Check tires, brakes,
shocks and alignment
STATIC  WHEEL
BALANCE FOR
ANY MAKE
99c
3601 W. 4th AT DUNBAR 732-6113 Thursday, November 16,  1967
THE     U BYSSEY
Page 9
—george hollo photo
OH, THE TRIALS and tribulations of the work-laden university student. All I wanted were the
books to write my geography of Pango-Pango essay, due in exactly 32 hours. And if you think
that's bad, they're all on two-hour loan.
Witness questions assault incident
By W. H. "PEPPER" PARR
Special to Canadian University Press
MONTREAL (CUP) — A young lecturer was
ilubbed, arrested and charged with assaulting
» police officer during a student demonstration
it McGill University early Friday.
This reporter, watching from only a few
ieet away, did not see the arrested man strike
)r kick anyone.
Communist club  charter
revoked  on  anniversary
The Alma Mater Society has revoked the
JBC Communist club's consitution due to lack
)f members.
By coincidence, the action toy AMS council
:ame on the day marking the fiftieth anniver-
iary of the Russian revolution.
"In the last two years, the Communist club
tas gradually dwindled into non-existence," said
Irian Fogarty, tmiversity club's committee
ipokesman.
Stanley Gray, 23, a political science lecturer
and chairman of the McGill Students for a
Democractic University, was hit several times
on the back of the neck with a policeman's
nightstick and dragged off to a police van.
As Gray was being pulled toward the van,
this reporter heard him ask a senior officer,
"Am I under arrest?"
"Yes," the policeman replied.
"What for?" Gray asked.
"I don't know yet," policeman said.
Gray was dazed as he was loaded into the
truck. He incoherently asked bystanders to get
him a lawyer, and called out the name of a
cute brunette who had accompanied him to
the demonstration.
The incident during which Gray was arrested was sparked by a high-strung student. The
student, who was not arrested, took a swing
at one of a line of policemen who were trying
to move the crowd away from the building's
entrance.
COLIN WILSON
- ANTI-FREUDIAN
EXISTENTIALIST
BRITISH WRITER & CRITIC
(1) NOV. 17 - FRI. - NOON - BROCK LOUNGE
'Nature of Sexual Impulse
(2) NOV. 17 - FRI. - 8 P.M. - HEBB THEATRE
LECTURE DISCUSSION
"BEYOND THE OUTSIDER"
(The Philosophy of the Future)
(3) NOV. 18 - SAT. - 9:30 A.M. - BU. 106
DIAtOGUE BETWEEN COLIN WILSON AND
CRITIC KINGSLEY WIDMER ON
"The Critic Against Culture"
Moderator Dr. Stephen Black, Dept. of Eng., S.F.U.
SPECIAL EVENTS
ADMISSION:
(1).   35 cents
(2).   Students $1.25 — Others $2.50
(3). Students $2.00 — Others $4.00
Admission which includes (2) and (3)
Students $2.50 — Others $5.00.
PANGO PANGO (UNS)—The tiny village of Sgnift, 14 miles
south of this island capital, was completely obliterated Wednesday as 8,617 tons of mangoes fell on the settlement. Cause of the
descent is unknown. Authorities are investigating.
went to a
FAITH
AT     WORK
WEEKEND
and came back to
AN ADVENTURE IN LIVING	
at   the  iame  old place!
There was warm  acceptance   and freedom
to share in things that really matter.
Nov. 17-19 at 529 Queen's Ave., New Westminster
Registrations limited Adults—$5 Teens—$2
Mail to Registrar: "FAITH AT WORK"
102 - 714 Royal Ave., New Westminster, Ph. 521-6287
U.B.C. THUNDERBIRD
WINTER SPORTS CENTRE
SKATING SCHEDULE 1967-68
Effective September 29, 1967 to April 14, 1968
TUESDAYS —
WEDNESDAYS   —
12:45 to_2:45 p.m.
2:00 to 3:30 p.m.
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
FRIDAYS — 3:00 to 5:00 p.m.
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.*
SATURDAYS — 3:00 to 5:00 p.m.*
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
SUNDAYS   — 12:45 to 2:45 p.m.
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
•Except when Hockey Games scheduled:
November 10, 11, 24, 25.
December 1, 2.
January 12, 13, 26, 27.
February 23, 24.
Admission: Afternoons—Students 35c. Adults 60c.
Evenings—Students 50c. Adults 75c.
Skate Rental - 35c a pair. — Skate Sharpening - 35c a pair
For further information call 228-3197 or 224-3205
The Handiest Book
On Campus
- especially at Christmas
BIRD CALLS
1967-1*61
THE UNIYHBTY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA STUDENT TELEPHONE DIRECTORY
KJ
BUY YOUR COPY TODAY
Publications Office, Brock Hall
or UBC Bookstore
Pre-Sale Ticket Holders Must Claim Their
Books at Publications Office before Dec. 29 Page 10
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 16,  196.
COUNCIL JOLLIES
— lawren ce woodd photo
ARTS GIRL, KNOWN AS SUNSHINE, made a point Monday
at an Arts council meeting in John Stuart Mills lounge where
the Dow demonstration plans were finalized. Sunshine
pleaded for clemency for the wicked.
Representatives of
THE
International Nickel Company
OF CANADA LIMITED
Will visit the University to discuss Summer Employment
at Thompson, Manitoba with 1st, 2nd and 3rd year
students in
ENGINEERING
• MINING
• METALLURGICAL
• CHEMICAL
• ELECTRICAL
• MECHANICAL ,
• CIVIL
CHEMISTRY
GEOLOGY and GEOPHYSICS
COMMERCE
On November 22, 23 and 24
We invite you to arrange an interview through
The Office of Student Personnel Services
THE
International Nickel Company
OF CANADA LIMITED
THOMPSON, MANITOBA
'Get high on an AMS meeting
By NORMAN GIDNEY
Ernie Yacub, physical education, wore a
white and red stingy brim. Gene Zabawa, agriculture, wore a battered straw hat with a lace
brim respendent with pink, green and purple
ribbons.
A lone coke bottle stood in front of Evie
Popoff, AMS executive secretary, and the coke
slowly emptied out.
Walter Coates, music, didn't say a word but
scratched his head occasionally.
Dave Hoye, treasurer, picked his nose at 20
minutes to 8 p.m. and looked quite dashing
with his tie thrown back over his right shoulder.
Jim Lightfoot, co-ordinater, fired a starter's
pistol twice* and the first time scared Evie Pop-
off. She shrieked.
The Alma Mater Society tabled a vote on
the 10 cents per student B.C. Assembly of Students fee levy.
"Jesus Christ!" muttered Frank Flynn, former BCAS president who wandered in to hear
the vote and wandered right out again. Flynn
was annoyed.
The graduate student representative attended for the first time this year. Congratulations.
Gene Zabawa asked that The Ubyssey print
the facts about a rumored campus brothel. Dave
Hoye said, "There's a brothel. I know. I've beer
there." Lynn Spraggs said, "Print the price."
Kim Campbell said, "No copulation withoul
representation.''
Weird, surrealistic, like a Van Gogh paint
ing — that's what AMS council meetings ar<
like.
Most students won't agree. The meetings
are actually boring, they say, filled with nit
picking, mindless discussion and lots of sounc
and fury.
Don't believe them, AMS meetings are quite
interesting if you have the patience to scrap«
off the moss and find the real characters under
neath. Often you need a shovel.
But I get some of my best trips that way.
Grab photos, grads
Anyone for grad photos?
The mobile studio has moved off campus
In case you missed it, there is still time to have
your mug captured at Campbell's Studio, Tentl
and Burrard. Free, too.
"I figured that mobile studio for a fly-by
night operation," said Irving Fetish, grad studies
Swahili.
EFFECTIVE
RAPID
READING
can help YOU
There's a long year ahead—a lot of reading must be accomplished, understood
and remembered. The Reading Dynamics method GUARANTEES to at least
triple your reading speed while retaining or increasing your present comprehension.
EMKHIMECT IN READING
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You will enjoy our modern up-to-date class rooms
You will meet our top rated teaching staff
You will be impressed by our detail and personal
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During your classes you will meet and get to know
some interesting people
Your fee is tax deductible
On graduation you receive life time membership and
without cost receive additional tuition at any
Reading Dynamics office throughout the world.
LFARN THE MOST RECENT STUDY PROCEDURES
AND RECALL SKILLS
Contact one of our
U.B.C. Campus
Representatives
PERRY SEIDELMAN
Phone 261-1809 or leave a
message in student mailbox in law building.
•
MIKE MENARD
Phone 266-5574
•
JIM RUST
Phone 266-0403
They'll tell you how effective Reading Dynamics can
be!
(Ove/wi nitmd READING DYNAMICS OF B.C. LTD.
eoa-.D7& MELVILLE STREET. VANCOUVER 8. ■.&      PHONE MS'3374
L
ubcr. hursday, November  16,  1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 11
Hippie-like army  infiltrators
spread through  pentagon crowd
By BILL HOBBS
Washington Free Press
Special lo Canadian University Press
WASHINGTON (CUP-UNS)—Teams of U.S.
trmy infiltrators, dressed like hippies, were
spread through the crowd of demonstrators dur-
ng the anti-war demonstration at the pentagon
Det. 21.
"There were more men infiltrated by us into
he crowd at this demonstration than at any
.vent I can remember. Our infiltrators were the
vorst-looking ones out there," Col. George Creel,
tssistant chief of the army's public information
)ffice, told a George Washington University
public relations class last week.
Exactly what role the infiltrators played dur-
ng the demonstration was left unclear by the
:olonel, who began clamming up when asked for
nore information by students.
"They were in radio contact with each other
ind with the army operations center in the
►entagon," he said. "And they acted in disciplined units, with certain people designated to make
iecisions."
'ENOUGH INFILTRATORS"
"How many infiltrators were there?" a
itudent asked.  "Enough,"  said the colonel.
Would the colonel give this information to
he press?
"Well, it's not the kind of story we push. I
say this in a certain academic license."
No one asked him what he meant by academic
icense: Apparently it means you can say things
o students you wouldn't say to other people.
One wonders how many TV cameramen,
;ager to find their perfect stereotype of hippie
lemonstrator, spent their time filming no one
>ut the worst looking ones there, which Colonel
2reel and the army public relations machine had
:onveniently supplied.
What role did the army infiltrators among
he demonstrators play in the violence of the
iemonstrators against the troops? One does not
lave to be paranoid to imagine that the role was
i* large one.
About a month ago the army staged a mock
riot at Fort Belvoir, Virginia, to provide training
for its troops, since more and more of them are
expected to see duty in American cities as the
great society comes apart at the seams.
As reported on television (NBC), this mock
riot included squads of troops dressed like the
army thinks rioters dress (complete with beards
and signs proclaiming the virtues of acid), and
behaving like the army thinks rioters behave
(charging troops, grabbing their rifles, etc.).
Many of the same troops used as mock rioters
at Fort Belvoir last month were probably used
as infiltrators at the pentagon. They were nearby, already had the beards, and supposedly knew
how to behave like a demonstrator at a riot,
which is what the army expected the Oct. 21
demonstration to be.
(Creel still expected it to be a riot a week
after it was all over. He kept refering to it as
the pentagon riot until one student called him
on it, when he admitted almost wistfully it was
only a demonstration.)
Thus the U.S. army put teams of the worst
looking hippies out there into the crowd of
demonstrators after telling them to behave like
demonstrators at what the army and the mass
media all expected to be a riot-
Is it odd to assume that some of them followed orders?
Were the demonstrators the pentagon said
were tear-gassing themselves really demonstrators or infiltrators?
A DIFFICULT ASSIGNMENT
Were the soldiers who supposedly defected
from the line of troops just guys who suddenly
remembered that they had received a different
duty assignment that day?
Was the white guy waving the no Vietnamese
ever called me a nigger sign really an infiltrator
counting demonstrators and paying no attention
to what sign he had picked up?
Only Creel knows for sure, and he isn't
talking because it has been rumored that he is
really a crazy pot-head demonstrator whom the
peace creeps have infiltrated into the pentagon.
Enjoy a candlelight dinner
at the
BAVARIAN
ROOM
Delightful food —
Excellent service
in an
Intimate Atmosphere
»        phone for reservation
MODERN   CAFE
Bavarian Room    —   3005 W. Broadway   —   RE 6-9012
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
Public Relations Committee
Students interested in working with on-campus and off-
campus publicity and higher education promotion are
invited to join the Public Relations Committee. People
are needed for the following projects:
—radio and newspaper liason
—poster painting
—content research for radio and television
programmes
—speakers bureau
—compilation of a weekly activities bulletin
for newspapers
—office organization and secretarial duties
Interested persons should contact Kim Campbell. 2nd
Vice-President in the Public Relations office, upstairs,
South Brock, or by leaving their names in AMS mailbox number 53.
ON   CT   N
TO  ACTO A
I        CTON
I     A TION
C
you can share in the action
If you owned a National Equity Life Insurance Policy you would share in the action
of common stocks and still have much of
the basic security demanded of a Canadian life insurance policy. This new
National Equity Plan is unique and the
first of its kind in Canada.
The Equity Plan is a basic ordinary life
participating plan, same premium, same
dividends, but with this difference—assets
held to support cash values are divided
and half the policy reserves are invested
in common stocks.
Where stock dividends and increase in
market values exceed National's regular
earnings, the extra is credited to the
policyholder. It is used to buy additional
paid-up insurance and has a related benefit in increasing cash worth.
If the economy experiences a slow-down,
there could be a corresponding decrease
in insurance and cash values but studies
of the period 1947/67 indicate that if the
Equity Plan could have been purchased
20 years ago, results compared to the
ordinary plan would have been as good or
better each year.
The Equity Plan is an answer, over the
long term, to the historical decline in the
purchasing power of fixed savings. Here's
how the Equity Plan would have kept pace
with dollar values, 1947/67. Total sum insured provided by the plan is compared
to the consumer price index.
Life insurance often seems like a complicated subject. It is worth a little study
to come up with the right answers. We
would like to supply further details on the
Equity Plan and other alternatives.
Why not phone...
MU. 5-7231
Dick Penn. C.L.U.
1131 Melville Street.
Vancouver
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THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, November  16,   1967
Censor bans Girls
Censorship has incensed Gerry Cannon,
special events chairman.
Cannon said Wednesday he was angry because of a last-minute decision by R. McDonald
to ban the public showings of Chelsea Girls by
Andy Warhol.
Only UBC students and staff were allowed
to view the film Friday and Tuesday.
"We have been advertising the film for two
weeks downtown," Cannon said.
"They could have told us before we spent
all that money advertising that the film would
be banned."
Cannon said he learned that an assistant
censor saw the movie at the Vancouver International Festival.
"It wasn't officially as a censor, but if you
see a movie, you see a movie," he said.
"I think they should have indicated well in
advance there would be a closed audience."
Special events didn't learn until Friday the
movie would toe closed to the public.
*      '       '   ~j    •" '•" '. f- "■   ■■'. '   "■'•'".  --**•"•<**:
— bob brown photo
THERE IS SOMETHING about a tree trunk that
attracts the attention of haggard students; the
lichen, perhaps, the color of the bark, the intricate mysteries of nature.
CUSO   recruiting
The Canadian Universities Service Overseas
comes to campus today to recruit students for
overseas work.
Les Johnson, area director in charge of Asian
programs, will speak in Bu. 100 at noon.
Johnson said he hopes to recruit 7,000 students from across Canada.
"Overseas governments put in applications
for professionals such as agriculturists, nurses
and lawyers," he said. "The volunteer would
work in his own profession."
Johnson said a graduate with a BA or BSc
would teach,
"A volunteer may state a preference for a
country, but whether he got it would depend on
the request from the government.''
The host government pays the volunteer's
salary for the minimum service time of two years.
CUSO provides an orientation to the area, a
language course and any teacher's training required.
There is a rigorous selection process, Johnson
said and thus a low dropout rate of volunteers.
"Generally, we take any interested, sincere
and sensitive person."
RICHARD LESTER'S
THE KNACK
WITH RITA TUSHINGHAM
TODAY, NOV. 16
AUDITORIUM—50c
11
your Jesus
is
contaminated!"
The angry cry of a young Negro rings out of this searing
documentary of the compromising fears, confusions and hopes
of a white northern Lutheran parish, faced with the challenge
of "loving thy neighbor" .  . . when  "thy neighbor" is black.
A Time For Burning
See this documentary
NOON TODAY
HENRY ANGUS 110 - 25c
Hear L. William YOUNGDAHL
Creator of this racial storm; now of Berkeley.
And commentary by Dr. John ROSS and Jack WASSERMAN
PRESENTED BY LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
0
ELDORADO
9
ELDORADO   MINING   AND   REFINING   LIMITED
ELDORADO REPRESENTATIVES WILL BE AVAILABLE
FOR INTERVIEWS ON CAMPUS
NOVEMBER 23rd.
Opportunities exist in the following fields:
PERMANENT EMPLOYMENT:   Geol°3is,s
Mining Engineers
Mechanical Engineers
Electrical Engineers
SUMMER EMPL0YENT:
Geologists (Post Grads,
Undergrads)
Mining Engineers
Chemical Engineers
Metallurgical Engineers
Mechanical Engineers
Electrical Engineers
Contact the Student Placement Officer for interview times and further information. rhursday,  November  16,   1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page  13
Co-ops-the best social situation'
By STEPHEN JACKSON
Ubyssey Housing Reporter
Two old houses in New Westminster with purple
bedroom walls and orange doors, inhabited by
people with beards, books, cats, typewriters and
guitars — that's a co-op.
In the houses live 43 young men and women,
mostly Simon Fraser instructors and students, who
belong to Greater Vancouver's only residence co-op.
They pay $75 monthly for room and board in
the adjoining former boarding houses on Queens
Avenue.
To a visitor, their restrictions seem minimal: no
drugs; self restraint for everything else.
"I always, trust we have no more structure than
we need to have," said one resident, Art Stone, an
assistant math professor at SFU.
Carpools to the university aren't organized and
the supper cooking schedule is not always followed.
"At first we tried to make decisions by consensus,
which was idealistic," said Rosemary Gagne, a co-op
resident since its  formation  in  June.
"But we discovered that not everyone could do
their bit because of difficulty in knowing what one's
bit was. So, responsibilities have become centered
on specific people."
Bach house has an elected manager who collects
rent, signs cheques and makes arrangements but
has no authority over the residents.
One couple buys all the food and stores it in
the freezer of each house. Bill Fix, an SFU teaching
assistant in education, is organizing the bookkeeping.
But the trend to impersonalization will level off,
Miss Gagne said. "This place could never become a
university residence. It's got something indefinable."
Having both sexes share the building helps avert
the mob character of campus residences, said Stone.
"Students seem much more capable of making
decisions and taking care of themselves than university administrators believe."
Lyn Bowman, former UBC and SFU student
described as a pacifist-anarchist-vegetarian, said
residents in a co-op must learn to live with a lot of
responsibilities not rigidly put upon them.
"One thing we've discovered is that it is invaluable to have people around who are not students,"
he said.
"It takes a great deal of self-denial and learning
to relate one's own place to that of other people,"
said Harry Markowicz, an SFU linguistic teaching
assistant who occupies an Easter-egg blue room in
the co-op.
"Whether that lesson is learned determines if
this is a workable co-op. I can't think of any better
social situation for people to live in."
The co-op, said Miss Gagne, evolved over a period
of nine months from SFU professor Brian Oarpen-
dale's project for a free university.
His intention was to provide an alternative to
Simon Fraser and UBC so that each student could
be free to define success for himself.
Jim Erkiletian, a civil rights worker and last
year a teacher for the bureau of Indian Affairs, said:
"If a student wants just a degree he should go to
UBC. I'd like to see universities introduce a real
learning attitude much more."
But Carpendale's project fell through. No one
can say just why. The six student founders, including Miss Gagne, then formed the Campus Residents'
Co-operative Association and commenced organizing co-op housing.
"We managed to get a guaranteed loan for
$8,000 from a defunct co-op committee at UBC,"
she said. "With this guarantee the B.C. Central
Credit Union actually loaned us that amount."
The co-op union (retail distributors of such
things as groceries and furnace oil) gave $1,600
outright, she said, and on a total of $9,600 the co-op
association arranged a 20 year Central Mortgage
and Housing Corporation loan for over $86,000.
With this amount the students purchased and
renovated the two houses.
Of the $75 monthly fee to residents, $50 goes to
pay off the mortgage, taxes, and operating expenses,
and the other $25 for food, Miss Gagne said.
There is just one fee, whether the rooms are
single or double. The two house managers do not
pay for their room and board.
"We eat amazingly well," she said. "We have
L '<1, •' '■■>'. '* ■ ■"•  ■
^m. '■—■'      -f-'    '-"HHiji un ffi
— lawrenco woodd photo
Having both sexes helps avert the mob character of campus residences.
— lawrenco woodd photo
Supper schedule not always adhered to.
roast beef, stews and steaks regularly, and turkey
once a month. There's lots of soup and at least two
eggs each per day."
Much of their canned food they obtain for 40
per cent under wholesale price from a salvage
company.
Residents make their own breakfasts if and
when they want them. There is no lunch served and
bagged lunches are too expensive to provide.
"People here are not too well-off," Miss Gagne
said. "But the two teaching assistants do all right
and some of us get cash from parents-"
For entertainment there is a stereo set in one
of the basements. One room has a T.V. tout it is little
watched except for good movies and the Enterprise.
About 10 residents have formed a jug band they
call The Vacant Lot, which has already had one
engagement and has an offer for another.
"I see the objective of a co-op to be to create
a place where all sorts of things can exist side by
side," said Jim Erkiletian.
As he was speaking, poet Milton Acorn was conducting a seminar in the living room across the
hall.
Later this month, artists Bob Vaugeois and Leo
Labelle will hold a showing in the co-op.
"We want to get university off the campus;
make life and learning synonymous — live in education, learn life," said Erkiletian.
"One becomes emotionally involved," said Miss
Gagne.  "It's group dynamics. I think it's terrific."
RESTAURANT
and
Dining Room
4544 W. 10th Ave.
Vancouver 8, B.C.
Ph. 224-1351
^^^^H            HEAR                                            ^^^^^H
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• Try Our
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"Pick Up" \Pa&e 14
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 16, 196
THEHOYSTER
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TWO PLAYERS INJURED
Cal competition is cripplint
The UBC soccer Thunderbirds received a
first-hand account of the improved calibre of
American soccer on their four-game trip to
California.
Birds lost their only game to San Jose State
College, 3-1, in a close contest.
Gary Thompson headed a cross-pass from
Jim Briggs into the net to give UBC the lead
with five minutes gone.
But tragedy befell the Birds
three minutes later when captain Jim Berry broke his collar bone. He will probably be
unable to play any soccer until after Christmas.
The Birds proceeded to lose
the game as they scored a goal
against themselves and their
defence played generally poor
soccer.
The other three games were BERRY
somewhat better as they won two and tied one.
The game against St. Mary's College was a
farce as the Birds won 19-1. UBC gave St.
Mary's their only goal and ended the game by
taking players off when they scored a goal.
The Birds beat Hayward State College 6
as Ash Valdai, John Haar and Harvey Tho
scored two goals each.
"The game was too rough for college soccer
said coach Joe Johnson.
The trip to the University of Southern Ca
fornia at Berkeley was another matter. Tl
Birds thought they were having hallucinatioj
as two of their goals were disallowed becaui
the referee called them offside.
The Thunderbirds managed a 3-3 tie on goa
by John Haar and Gary Thompson <2). Coa(
Johnson swallowed the bitter pill withoi
malice.
"It's all part of the game," said Johnso:
"Actually, the game was quite enjoyable."
An unfortunate result of the Berkeley gan
was an injury to John Haar. He has a broke
ankle and will be out of action for about s:
weeks.
Otherwise the trip was a success. The Thu
derbirds have learned to respect their Americs
opposition now and better soccer should be tt
result.
JVs to compete independently
The UBC Jayvee basketball team will play an
independent schedule this year, leaving behind
the Inter-City Junior League to fight it out among
themselves.
"When you're winning by
20 or 30 points a game, there's
not much use in staying in, is
there?" said Norm Watt, JV
basketball coach. "We pulled
out because we are looking for
stronger competition."
And they'll certainly get it.
To name a few of their opponents: Seattle University
frosh, who regularly have a
couple of gigantic boys from MARGETSON
California or Texas, Western Washington State,
who are always trouble, University of Victoria
varsity, a collection of the best players on the
island, numerous Washington junior colleges,
and of course, Simon Fraser University.
"And because we're out, we won't be going to
the national finals," he added.
The Jayvees have won the Canadian chan
pionships the past two years while losing onl
one game in that period.
Back from last year's team are Terry McKa;
6'6" center, Bill Ruby and Keith Margetson.
New arrivals include high school all-stars Ro
Thorson and Bruce Kennedy, as well as Re
Clarke, Terry Brine, Wayne Desjardins, Gar
Best, Jim Williams and Russ Black.
Ken House migrated from SFU to play also.
"We have absolutely no height, except .
center, but we make up for it in quickness an
great shooting. Defense is still a bit of a problei
too," said Watt confidently.
The team will use a basic open-post systei
where each man is continually rotating with n
set position.
"This way we can lure those big hulks .
center out from under the basket and give oui
selves a chance to shoot."
Let's Go Skiing!
• Erbacher, Gresvig and A & T skis
• E.C.L., Tyrol and La Dolomite Boots
• E.C.L., Tyrolia and Allais Harness
• Junior Ski Sets
• After Ski Boots and Slippers
• Toques, Parkas, Hoods, and Hats
COMPLETE SKI SETS AT $39.95
SKI OUTFIT
E.C.L. Engelberg Ski
Thunderer Step-in Harness, Steel Poles — $45.95
SKI OUTFIT COMPLETE
E.C.L. Jaguar Ski
Salomon  Allais W.E.  Step-in   Harness
Steel Poles
Tyrol Krista Boots $99.95
Sweaters and Sox
Goggles and Glasses
•
Repairs and
Installations
SKI
RENTALS
North Western Sporting Goods Ltd.
10TH AVE. AT ALMA ROAD
224-5040 'hursday, November  16,  1967
THE     U BYSSEY
Page  15
Nins by both countries
nark cross country meet
Successful is definitely the way to describe the Pacific North-
vest Cross Country Championships held at UBC last weekend.
The largest meet of its kind in the area, it attracted 14 wo-
lan's teams and 36 men's teams from both sides of the border.
In what was billed as the main event, the Seattle Falcons
Hub's Vicki Foltz took the senior women's open while perenni-
Uy strong Richmond Track and Field Club took the team title.
Although Seattle's Doris Brown was unable to show up to
ompete, the event was still the most exciting.
In the senior men's open, Vancouver Olympic Club, as exacted, took the team title with ease, winning with 32 points,
leattle Pacific was second with 50 and UBC close 'behind with
4.
John Cliff of Victoria Spartans, trying a comeback, pulled
ff a big surprise by beating veteran Dave Wighton of VOC in
de senior event. Jack Burnett and Gerry Glyde of UBC finished
th and 9th respectively.
University of Washington took the junior men's honors as
Jill Ross of U of W finished first. Ken French, Tom Howard, and
)ave Greening came in 2nd, 4th, and 5th respectively and earned
TBC second place. Simon Fraser was third.
Rick Ritchie of King George High won the senior high school
vent and Nanaimo Secondary took the team title.
In the junior high school race, Frederick Banting won the
vent overall and Tom Mills was first.
"It was an extremely successful meet," said Lionel Pugh,
rBC track and field coach, who looked after the huge crowd
ssembled to run.
"The judges, all 50 of them, did a wonderful job. Everything
rent according to plan."
This weekend the Birds will take on a little easier competi-
on as they travel to Victoria to tangle with Royal Roads College.
,ast year, the UBC team took home the Admiral Nelles Cup for
winning the meet.
They're not expected to have much trouble bringing it home
gain.
Graves scalp opposition
Our Braves are absolutely scalping their opposition.
The ice hockey Braves took one of their closer games on
londay night.
Outshooting the Vancouver Hornets 28-25, the Braves won
2.
Marksman for the Braves was Ernie Lawson whose arrow
;raight shots accounted for the UBC hat trick.
The Hornets, not giving our boys any rest, got both their
oals from Mickey Hamm, who knocked them past UBC goalie
•on Cram.
Braves' coach Andy Bakogeorge, who is reasonably proud
E the team's seven-game winning streak, said that this was the
est game of the year.
"It was rough, fast and close," he said.
The team's next game will be next Tuesday in Richmond.
lame time is 9:30 p.m.
GSA
NEWS
Grad Centre Expansion Activities
THIS WEEK
THE ARCHITECTS MODEL IS IN CENTRE FOYER
Thursday, 16th:
Friday, 17th:
Saturday, 18th:
Beergarden 3:00-5:30
12:45 in upper lounge, Faculty of Music.
Brass quartet in concert. Including a recent composition of Mr. John Swan of UBC.
Beergarden, 2:30-5:30
Club night dance with the "Seeds of Time"
-Full facilities
—50c per person
—Bar open at 8:00 p.m,
Dancing from 9:00 p.m.
UBC Nurses-GSA Mixer with the "Carse
Sneddon Quartet"
-Full facilities
—Pot-luck supper
—50c a head (UBC nurses free)
—Bar open at 8:00 p.m.
Dancing from 9:00 p.m.
THESE ARE JUST FOUR of the beautiful Finnish female gymnasts who will visit UBC Wednesday.
Twelve girls for two dollars
By PIO URAN
Would you like to spend an evening with 12
beautiful, curvaceous girls?
They are known as Finngymnasts and they
are on a North American tour celebrating the
fiftieth anniversary of the independence of Finland. The troupe will perform only once in Vancouver — in UBC's War Memorial Gym, Wednesday at 8:30 p.m.
Combining the esthetic qualities of artistic
gymnastics and the dance, the company will perform such exciting numbers as rhythmical floor
exercise,  folk  dances,  movement fundamentals
and movements with balls, clubs and hoops.
These girls are the result of a new concept of
physical education training which started in the
Scandinavian countries and is receiving a lot of
attention from PE teachers in the rest of Europe.
With their training, the girls can do the most
difficult gymnastic manoeuvers with an effortless grace that is beautiful to watch. (After looking at the picture I'd bet that most red-blooded
UBC males would be willing to pay just to look
at the girls).
Tickets are: reserved -— $2: student rush —
$1.50; and special rush and group pre-sale rates—
$1 each. For information  phone 228-3838.
w
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE'
SHAKESPEARE'S
^
a dark comedy of innocence and corruption
with
Derek Ralston
Barney O'Sullhran
Peter Brockington
Shirley Broderick
Directed by John Brockington
Designed by Richard Kent Wilcox
November 17-25
L
STUDENT TICKETS $1.00
(available for most performances)
- SPECIAL STUDENT PERFORMANCES -
Monday, Nov. 20th, 7:30 p.m. - Thursday, Nov. 23rd, 12:30 p.m.
Tickers: Frederic Wood Theatre, Room 207 or 228-2678
Don't Miss This Opportunity To See One Of Shakespeare's
Rarely-Performed Masterpieces
SUPPORT YOUR CAMPUS THEATRE
.FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE Page  16
THE      U BYSSEY
Thursday, November  16,  1967
'TWEEN CLASSES
Panel matches fiery film
V.
LUTHERAN STUDENTS
Movie: A Time for Burning
followed by panel. Rev. Young-
dahl (Berkeley), Jack Washerman (Sun), and Dr. Ian Ross
(UBC). Admission 25 cents,
today, noon, Ang. 110.
TEACHERS COMMITTEE
ON VIETNAM
The following faculty members will lead a discussion on
academic responsibility and
arms protecton, today, noon,
Bu. 104: Ken Pinder, Norman
Epstein, Ian Ross, Bill Willmott.
ARTS COUNCIL
Yes, a free dance, today,
noon, Brock lounge, with the
Blues Interchange from Seattle. Everybody and anybody welcome.
VISITING LECTURER
Mrs. K. Feuer, University of
Toronto, speaks on Tolstoy's
War and Peace as a political
novel, Friday, noon, Bu. 106.
COLLEGE LIFE
No  college  life  meeting  tonight.
ECONOMICS SOC.
Student  and  faculty   social,
today,  8  p.m., Zeta Beta  Tau
house, 5760 Toronto.
GERMAN CLUB
Bitte, vergessen Sie die Wein-
flasche nicht. Bringen Sie die
Flasche. Freitag, nachmittage,
zum IH.
RAMBLERS ATHLETIC
CLUB
Are you interested in playing ice hockey one or two
evenings a week? Come to
Ramblers clubroom, hut B-9,
today, noon.
HILLEL HOUSE
Israeli army captain Asher
Goldin, who led a Sinai contingent during the June war,
will discuss events that led
up to the war and its consequences at Hillel House noon
today.
PSYCHOLOGY CLUB
Film: Individual Behavior
and Motivation, today, noon,
A g. 207. General meeting,
1 : day, noon, Bu. penthouse.
N   W DEMOCRATS
' ;ave Barratt, NDP, MLA,
i«t  Coquitlam,   on  Regional
ism:  Progress  or  Politics,  today, noon, Bu. 203.
CIASP
•General meeting, Friday,
noon, IH, 402-404, for discussion of area study day.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Dr. A. Kalentar of New York
on have you heard of Baha'u'-
lah? IH, Friday, noon. Bring
silver spoon to tea and coffee
session at IH this and every
Thursday afternoon, 3 p.m.
ANGLICANS
Submit nominations, six
students and six faculty or
staff for 1967-68 UBC Anglican committee, to Dr. C. P.
Taylor, physics' dept. Meeting
and election, noon, Nov. 23,
Henn. 302.
DANCE CLUB
Today:   pin   classes.   Friday:
cha-cha.
SOCIAL WORK CLUB
Field  trip  to  G.  F.   Strong
Rehabilitation    Centre    leaves
at  1   p.m.   today,   outside  Bu.
extension, East Mall.
SCIENCE US
General   meeting,   noon   today,   Henn.   200.   Shoe   polish
raffle, movies.
FILM SOC
The    Knack:    starring    Rita
Tushingham     and      Michael
Crawford,   today,   auditorium,
noon, 3:30, 6 p.m., 8:30.
EIC
Aviation   expert   from   Boeing will talk on the SST, today, noon, eng. 200.
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
Karl Burau on human nature
today, 1:45, Bu. 202.
VOC
Members check list in clubroom to see where they stand
regarding work hikes completed. Last day for qualifications and activities is Sunday.
Fees are being taken daily at
noon.
CLUB CANADIEN
Prof.    Greenwood    discusses
COLLEGE
SHOP
BROCK EXTENSION
3ACK-T0-THE-
B00KS
EYEWEAR
Don't let poor
eyesight hinder
your progress.
If You need
new glasses,
bring your
eye physician's
prescription to
us.
SPECIAL
STUDENT DISCOUNT
iM^Optleol
seven
locations
in Greater
Vancouver
1701   W.   Broadway
731-3021
Hyeroft Med. Bldg.
3195 Granville
733-8772
GLASSES-CONTACT LENSES
"A COMPLETE OPTICAL SERVICE"
the    impact    of    the    French
revolution  on  French-Canada,
Friday, noon, Bu. 205.
AQUA SOC
Course   exam   today,   noon,
Bu. 202.
EL CIRCULO
Miss Molina from CPA will
speak and show movies today,
noon, IH. Everybody welcome.
Free coffee.
Do
you know what the
New Student Union
Building
is all about?
If you wish to know all the answers
concerning
your building, come to the SUB office,
Brock South
2nd floor  12:30 - 2:30 Monday
thru
Friday any
week.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students, Faculty & Clubs—3 lines, 1 day 75*, 3 days $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00, 3 days $2.50.
Rates for larger ads on request.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone.
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in advance.
Publications Office, BROCK HALL, UNIV. OF B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
DANCE: JASON HOOVEH AND THE
Epics, Sat., Nov. 18th, 9:30-1:00.
Place   Vanier  Ball   Room.
POLKA PARTY, FRIDAY, NOV. 17,
International House, 9:00-1:00. German Band, $1 per person. Everyone
welcome. Sponsored by I.H. & German Club.
TOTEM PARK MIXER, FRIDAY,
Nov. 17, 9:00-12:30, The Stags, Admission   75c.
KOMMEN   SIE   UND   SEHEN
"POLKA    DOTTS"
Live    at    International   House    tomorrow night 9:00   p.m. to  *••
Greetings
 12
"A TIME FOR BURNING", Documentary of an integration failure.
A classic. Today noon, HA 110, 25c.
Lost 8c Found
13
LOST AT WOLFSON FIELD ON
Sun. Nov. 5: 1 Bulova Stainless
steel self-wind watch and 1 gold
ring with family crest, phone Chris,
224-9900.
LOST: BEIGE LINED LEATHER
gloves. Stacks third floor. Phone
Steve,   731-5153  after  5.
Rides 8t Car Pools 14
WANTED — CAR-POOL, 8:30 LEC-
tures, Victoria Drive. Physical Universe   Text!   Phone    Bev.   876-0574.
STUDENT WISHES TRANSPORTA-
tion, to Winnipeg or Minneapolis at
Xmas, share driving expenses, etc.
946-6013.
CAR-POOD WANTED IN THE
area of 61st and Nanaimo. Please
contact   Maureen  at   327-2350.
Special Notices
IS
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance rates? If you are over 20 and
have a good driving history you
qualify for our good driving rates.
Phone   Ted   Elliott,   321-6442.
SEATTLE BAND AT ARTS DANCE
Thurs. 16th, 12:30 in Brock. By
donation, Blues Interchange, just
great. 	
KREE TEA, COFFEE AND SOFT
chairs every Tuesday at 3:00 p.m.,
upper lounge at I. House. Come
today,   bring  your  silver  spoon.
TICKETS FOR COUNTRY JOE,
Loyalists, and Papa Bears Dance,
Dec. 8th & 9th go on sale this week
at Psych Shop, Record Gallery &
Tartini's,  $2.50.      	
AUTOMOTIVE & MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
'66 B.S.A. 650-C.C. LIGHTNING.
Many extras, only 2,100 miles. 682-
3478.
'55 BUICK 4-DR. HTP. SEDAN.
Running condition, new retreads,
$125. 228-8170. Phone Jamie after 6
p.m.	
1965   VOLKSWAGEN,    18,000   MILES.
_ Red.   Radio.   Phone  263-8949.	
'59 VOLKSWAGEN FOR SALE —
Delux, radio, seatbelts, re-conditioned   motor,   ph.   738-7627   after   6.
1956 PLYMOUTH. GOOD RUNNING
condition. $125.00. Phone after 6:30
p.m.,   738-5003.
'60    VOLVO,    $695    OR    OFFERS
After   6  p.m.,   733-3841.	
FOR SALE — JAGUAR MARK F
sedan. New carpets, paint job,
motor has 50,000 miles. Good condition.   Reasonable   price.   Call  Rm.
14,    224-9031.
Automobiles Wanted
22
WANTED: '50-'54 MORRIS OR AUS-
tin. Phone Terry Mooney at 224-
9054.
Motorcycles
26
HONDA-FIAT
Motorcycles -   Cars
Generators - Utility Units
New and  Used
SPORT  CARS
N T
O      Motors      S
R E
T      W
145 Robson H 688-1284
Copying & Duplicating
31
Miscellaneous
32
Orchestras
33
BUSINESS SERVICES
Scandals
37
FROM SEATTLE: BLUES INTER-
change Arts tribal gathering in
Brock Thurs., 16th, 12:30. Dance.
By   donation.	
ROMANOFF AND JULIET, NOV. 16,
17, 18. Phone 433-5327 for tickets.
UBC students $1.00.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Female
81
Help Wanted—Male
52
Male or Female                   53
I CAN HELP YOU TO HIGH PART-
time earnings.  688-3379.
Work Wanted
54
Music
62
BEGINNERS     IN     FOLK
lessons.   Flexible   schedule
able rates.   Call anythime
GUITAR
reason-
224-3975.
INSTRUCTION
Special Classes
83
LEARN TO POLKA FRIDAY NIGHT
with live German band, lower
lounge, International House, every-
one welcome,   9:00  to  1  a.m.,  $1.00.
ANGEL MONZON, SPANISH FI_A-
minco dancing lessons for students
and others interested, contact Dun-
bar   Community   Centre,   224-1374.
84
Tutoring
ENGLISH, FRENCH, HISTORY,
Russian. Individual, no contracts,
$3.00 hr. by B.A., M.A., B.L.S. 736-
6923.
FRENCH, ENGLISH, HISTORY,
Russian lessons given privately by
B.A.,   M.A.,   B.L.S.   736-6923.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
UBC   TEXTS   BOUGHT   AND   SOLD.
Busy   B   Books,   146   W.   Hastings.
681-4931.
FOR SALE 1 PAIR ARLBERG 205
skis $20; Henkl ski boots, size 9, $10;
hand-made muckalucks, size 9, $20;
Sim Gar bongo drums; crash helmet.
261-1714.
GEOLOGY STUDENTS — MEXICAN
mineral specimens. $1.50 — $2.50 —
$3.50.   Phone   Murray   —   nites   AL
5-7986.
ROCK AND MINERAL COLLEC-
tion, Ruger .22 automatic pistol, 5-
string  banjo.   321-8436.       	
BALL AND CHAINS MADE TO
order. Ideal for stags, frats. Doug
Anderson, Law II or phone 263-8372
after 10 p.m.	
JASON HOOVER AND THE EPICS!
Jason Hoover and The Epics! Place
Vanier,  Sat., Nov.  18th,   9:30-1:00.
DAVID BARRETT, N.D.P. MLA,
Port Coquitlam. "Regionalism Politics or Progress", Thursday, Nov.
16, 12:30, Buchanan 203. UBC New
Democrats.	
U\B.C. BARBER SHOP IN THE
Village. 3 barbers. Open weekdays
8:30-6 p.m.  Saturdays 'till   5:30.
HOW THE WEST WAS WON —
Nov. 23, 12:30, 3:15, 6:00, 8:30. Aud.
50c.   Cinemascope   color. ^^^
MINISTER RESIGNS BECAUSE OF
integration apathy. Watch how it
happened in documentary: "A Time
For Burning". Meet minister, Rev.
Youngdahl at Lutheran Campus
Centre, afternoon; and noon, H.A.
110   (Admission   25c).	
MAKE 'EM LAUGH WITH AN UN-
usual gift this Christmas. Hutner-
ous gifts, jokes, cards, bar supplies, toys, lamps, (check our
prices on picture framing). The
Grin Bin, 3209 W. Broadway, 738-
2311, opposite liquor store and Su-
perValu  —  Post-office.	
TEA, COFFEE; SORRY NO CRUM-
pets, this afternoon and every afternoon from 3 p.mi. to 5 p.m., upper lounge,  International House.
Travel Opportunities
16
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
OLD ARCHEOLOGY PAPER —
case study of any old site — will
pay   —   phone   Fred,   688-3977.
BIGGEST DANCE TO HIT RESI-
dences: Jason Hoover and The
Epics, Sat., Nov. 18th, 9:30-1:00.
Place Vanier.
SAT., NOV. 18, 8:30 TO 12:30. OP-PHI
with The Shockers. Phrateres-
sponsored mixer. $1.00 each, $1.75
couple.
FILM SOC. PRESENTS "HOW THE
West Was Won", Nov. 23, 12:30,
3:15, 6:00, 8:30, Cinemascope, Aud.
50c.
LINNEY! I'M COMING HOME! I'M
all out of Dentyne wrappers! (And
I miss you a bit, too). Be patient,
love   Sydney.
AD:    HAPPY   21.   MAY   YOU    SOON
grow  up —  Your  Buddies.	
HOOTENANY AND DANCE THIS
Sunday evening at 8 o'clock, at St.
Mark's lounge, free admission and
refreshments, come casual and
bring a friend.
Typewriter Repairs
39
Typing
40
EXPERIENCED   TYPIST   —   BLEC-
tric.   Phone  228-8384  or 224-6129.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING, ARDALE
Griffith Limited, 8584 Granville
Street   (70th  & Granville).   263-4530.
AT LAST! An exclusive typing service for students. 24-hour service,
elec. typewriters, 1 block from campus. All this for only 30 cents a
page! University Typing Services —
Around the corner from World Wide
Travel — next to R.C.M.P. 2109 Allison Rd. at University Blvd. Mon. to
Fri.   9  to  5.   Phone:   228-8414.
EXPERT ELECTRIC TYPIST
Experienced eassay and thesis typist
Reasonable  Rates. TR. 4-9253.
TYPING—PHONE   731-7511—9:00    TO
5:00.  266-6662, artei" «:00.
FOR SALE TWO PAIR OF MARKER
turntables, like new. Phone Dianne,
261-3753.	
GOYA GUITAR FOR SALE. NEAR
new, good condition. For steel
strings — large sounding box. Ph.
733-7963.	
FANTASTIC BUY! AKAI (ROBERTS)
4-track stereo tape-recorder. Two
separate independant amps, and
tape deck in cabinet. In perfect
condition. Ph. 261-1731 (after 6 p.m.)
$250.00.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
81
Rooms	
LARGE" STUDIO WITH SKYLIGHT,
not for residence, $20 month, heat,
light, electricity included. RE 8-4857
after 6 p.m. First Ave. & Larch.
QUIET ROOM FOR RENT, NON-
smoker, non-drinker. Phone 224-
3096.  Near university.	
FOR MEN — DBLE. ROOM FOR 2,
sgle. for 1; bathrm., small kite.
Avail, immed. 3455 Trafalgar after
6:00 p.m.
Room & Board
82
ROOM AND BOARD ON CAMPUS.
Zeta Beta Tau Fraternity, $75  mo.
Phone 224-9660 after six.	
ROOM AND BOARD ON CAMPUS
available  now.   Phone  Don,  224-9665
after  6:00   p.m.
Furn. Houses & Apis.
83
GIRL WANTED TO SHARE FUR-
nished apartment near 4th & Alma.
Phone Judy.  733-6994.	
GIRL WANTED TO SHARE FDR-
nished apt. with third year student.
Phono Pam 732-5751.
BUY - SELL - RENT
WITH
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED

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