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The Ubyssey Nov 13, 1985

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Array is
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXVIII, No. 19
Vancouver, B.C. Wednesday, November 13,1985
*ajn*     228-:aoi^
The Hunger Project
A financial feast
ANNOUNCER: "Tired of video images of starving children?" (Screen
shows Ethiopian refugee camp).
ANNOUNCER: "Tired of reading long, boring articles about how meat
eating and waste here, and land ownership concentration lack of tools and
military spending over there means millions will go hungry tonight?"
(Screen shows pile of textbooks).
ANNOUNCER: "More and more, Canadians are turning to quick, easy
way of ending hunger. The Hunger Project." (Screen shows smiling
African children).
WOMAN ON STREET CORNER: "/joined the Hunger Project and
now 1 feel good that hunger will be ended in my lifetime. "
ANNOUNCER: The Hunger Project. It makes you feel good about
hunger. "
T
his advertisement may appear on your television screen
soon.
Armed with slick brochures and
snappy slogans, the Hunger Project
is taking on the country. The upcoming head office move from
Vancouver to Toronto signals a
philosophical move to the center of
Canadian society.
Once dismissed as a fringe cult
group, the Hunger Project has now
moved into the mainstream of the
food and hunger debate. It's as
much a sign of change within the
aid community as it is a sign of how
much Canadians want to believe the
Hunger Project's message.
Hunger Project workers are happy people. They believe world
; Ipager eat| be ended by, the year
2000 and they're trying to spread
the word. They say what's needed
to end hunger isn't political or
economic change, but the belief
world hunger can be ended. No
guilt and no pain.
In their statement of purposes
submitted to Revenue Canada, the
Htthger Project says it is working to
create a public climate or context in
which hunger cart be ended. "We
help individuals in experiencing,
acknowledging and expressing their
responsibility for making the end of
the persistence of hunger and starvation an idea whose time has
come," reads the statement.
to 1984 Canadians gave the
Hunger Project, a registered charity,; more than $500,000 to help
reach their goal. Hot one cent of
tlits money left the country to buy
food for those who are starving
right how. According to Hunger
Project's own statements this
money goes to administrative costs,
more Hunger Project's documents
and more briefings.
Werner Erhard founded the
Hunger Project in 1977 in California. Five years earlier Erhard
founded est or Erhard Seminars
Training, now also known as
Forum.
Hunger Project's message is catching on. Today it claims 4,000,000
members in 24 countries worldwide.
According to Mike Kropveld, director of the Cult Project at McGill
University in Montreal the simplicity of the Hunger Project's message
gives it universal appeal.
"It's a great way of relieving middle class guilt by providing simple
answers to complex economic and
political problems," says Kropveld.
Given the popularity of "We are
the World" and "Tears are not
Enough" songs and videos, it's no
surprise thousands of Canadians
are looking for another way to feel
better about themselves and do
something to help end starvation.
The Hunger Project's prescription
is painless — a little money to the
Hunger Project and a lot of will —
no difficult reading to do and no
difficult political decisions to make.
The Hunger Project may be the
answer for people who want to
change the world and stilt drive
Volvos.
Aid groups, however, are concerned that people who give money
to the Hunger Project may not be
aware that none goes to food.
The World Food Day Association executive decided not to accept
the Hunger Project as a participant
when they applied a year and a half
ago. The application caused a great
deal of debate about the Hunger
Project, said Brian Moore, one executive. (The World Food Day
Association is a collection of groups
concerned about food and hunger
that organise a day of education
about hunger every Oct. 16).
Moore says members of the
association were concerned about
"the street corner tactics" of the
project.
For two weeks this summer,
Hunger Project workers combed
the streets of downtown Ottawa
shaking hands and handing out
copies of "A Shift in the Wind",
the project's newsletter.
"Do you have a few minutes to
help end world hunger?" they ask.
What follows is an invitation to a
Hunger Project Briefing session.
"A Shift in the Wind" features
happy stories about progress in
food production around the world
snd photos of siniKng, weR fed
African children.
"Most people just can't say no,"
says Moore. "It's like motherhood
and the flag."
He says that although most
members of the food day association are skeptical of the project,
some prefer to give it the benefit of
the doubt. "They say this may just
be the way to get people to start giving a damn," says Moore. "Maybe
their slick, pizazz is what's required
today."
Attitudes within the aid community have changed since 1981,
the year Oxfam-Canada voted not
to endorse or participate in any
Hunger Project-sponsored activity.
There are still critics of the Hunger
Project but they are less vocal and
less willing to dismiss the group entirely.
7i
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by samantha brennan
National Features Writer
Canadian University Press
Nigel Martin is the executive
director of the Canadian
Council of International Cooperation, an umbrella organisation of non-governmental agencies
sending aid abroad. He says more
and more people, especially in the
United States are willing to accept
the Hunger Project as a legitimate
aid group.
"People who would have completely dismissed them a year or two
ago say it (the Hunger Project) is
changing," he says. "In the U.S.
they are picking up credibility both
with their peers and with the
media."
Even in Canada the media's attitude toward the Hunger Project is
changing. A feature in the Oct. 12
Ottawa Citizen was based entirely
on material supplied by the Hunger
Project. It describes the tremendous
progress already made towards ending world hunger and repeats the
project's maxim that hunger can be
ended by the year 2000.
The article makes no mention of
the Project's founder, its roots in
California or its link with EST.
It's the EST connection that has
cult watchers worried.
Ian Haworth, the president of the
Council On Mind Abuse, a Toronto
based organisation monitoring cult
activities says EST is still the group
about which his office receives the
most calls.
"In its earlier days, it was alleged
some people involved in the Hunger
Project moved on to become involved in EST," he says. He
believes the Hunger Project should
be treated with suspicion because
Erhard founded both organisations. He uses the analogy that if
Rev. Sun Myung Moon started
another group different from the
Unification Church the fact that he
founded it would be enough reason
for cult-watchers to monitor the ac-
See page 2: PROJECT Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Wednesday, November 13, 1985
Hunger project draws on EST for new enthusiasts
From page 1
tivities of the group.
Other than the overlapping
membership, a direct link between
the Hunger Project and EST is hard
to prove. Mike Kropveld, the director of the Cult Project at McGill
University, has his own theory
about the connection between the
two organisations.
Kropveld believes the Hunger
Project was developed as a way of
channeling the energy of people involved with EST.
"Hunger is an issue 99.9 per cent
of the people can relate to," he
says. "Who's against ending world
hunger?"
Sam Burke, a Hunger Project
worker, admits Hunger Project has
a lot to thank EST for.
"Those who undergo the est
training are encouraged to join the
HP — EST is very supportive of
our work and helps us a lot. We
share basic fundalmental
principles," says Burke.
Linda Manion is one person who
became involved in the Hunger Project through EST. A mother and
part-time bank teller living in
Halifax, Nova Scotia, she is also the
contact person for the Hunger Project listed with the Oxfam office in
Halifax.
NOW OPEN TILL
8:00 P.M. FRIDAYS
Yes we're open Mondays
Although Manion says she no
longer has the time to do volunteer
work on the project, she still supports the group's ideas.
"I became involved when I realized that one individual can make an
enormous difference," says Manion. Her words echo the Erhard
philosophy of change through individual will. And that's no coincidence. Manion says she became
involved in the Hunger Project
through EST while living in Victoria
Manion put that training to work
leading Hunger Project seminars.
Kropveld came up against the
Hunger Project workers handed out
membership cards and held briefing
sessions at the university.
Students are particularly
vulnerable to the Hunger Project's
message as most feel the need to
help end world hunger but have little time to contribute. The Hunger
Project offers a simple guilt-free
answer.
If students are interested in helping, Kropveld and other anti-cult
groups advise people to take the
time to research the issue and the
groups involved before making
commitments.
The Hunger Project's recruitment tactics have also upset some
universities in the United States. In
HAIRWASH &
CONDITIONING
STUDENT WITH AMS CARD
GET OUR STYLE
FOR ONLY
September of this year the director
of activities at Cornell University
called the Hunger Project a "classic
case of exploitation." The Project
was charging Cornell students $10
to attend a Hunger Project briefing.
The Hunger Project moves in
quickly to silence its enemies; it
already has libel suits pending
against three major Canadian daily
newspapers and the Council On
Mind Abuse.
EST   is   suing   Coma's   Ian
Haworth for $2.5 million for mentioning EST is a lecture about the
dangers of cults at the University of
Guelph in Nov. 1982.
One month later Hunger Project
launched a $3 million suit against
Haworth for distributing a one page
handout entitled "The Hunger Project Exposed."
Haworth believes both groups are
proloning the legal proceedings.
"They're scared of going to
court," says Hayworth. "It's simp
ly another way to intimidate
critics." By launching a suit and
avoiding the actual court case the
Hunger Project can exert pressure
on its critics without the embarrassment from the publicity a court case
could create.
These days, however, there are
fewer and fewer people willing to
criticize the Hunger Project. Says
Nigel Martin, "They're either
cleaning up their act or pulling a
damn good snow job."
$9.00
2105 W. 16th at Arbutus
App. Phone 734-2343
THE LAST NOON RUN OF THE TERM
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 14
12:35 p.m. SUB PLAZA
ALL RUNNERS RECEIVE A 1 -SHIRT
WITH THEIR $10 ENTRANCE FEE
BE A ROAD SCHOLARS
OidC iK&iam/ia&... {m, moa' sbot6s\
Rooms in Fairview Crescent Townhouses Now Available for Grads
EXPO '86 has leased the entire Fairview Crescent Townhouse complex from UBC for one
year, November 1, 1985 to October 31, 1986,
in order to guarantee accommodation to the
staff of exhibitors who will be working at
EXPO during the fair. EXPO has now agreed,
however, to let the University rent some of
their surplus rooms to full-time students beginning November 15, 1985.
To be eligible for accommodation this Winter
Session at Fairview, you must be either 23
years  old   by  December 31,   1985,   OR   be
registered as a  graduate student at  UBC.
Students who are assigned to Fairview now
will be given reapplicant status for 1986/87,
and EXPO has agreed that these students can
move in again in September, 1986. During the
summer,   May   through   August,   1986,   all
students must move out of Fairview; rooms in
the Place Vanier staythrough houses will be
available for students. After the 1986/87 Winter Session, those
students assigned to Fairview may continue on with an annual
contract  not  requiring summer student status  May through
August.
Most of the available townhouses in Fairview Crescent are four-
bedroom units. Each four-bedroom townhouse has 1V2
bathrooms, a living room and dining area, and a kitchen equipped
with a large fridge, electric stove, and a dishwasher. The
townhouses will be completely furnished including linen in the
bedrooms. Kitchen utensils and cleaning equipment however,
are the responsibility of the tenants. Electric heat, water, and
satellite television are included in the rent.
Fees for Fairview Crescent will be based on a daily rte, and will be
due in monthly instalments in advance on or before the 15th of
each month. Rates will vary by the size of single room as follows:
Small Single = $8.25 per day ($247.50 for 30 day/month or
$255.75 for 31/day)
Medium Single = 9.00 per day ($270 for a 30 day/month or $279
for 31/day)
Large Single = 10.00 per day ($300 for a 30 day/month or $310 for
31/day)
A late payment penalty of $10 will be added to rents after the 15th
of the month. Parking is available in an underground parkade for
an additional $20 per month. Surface parking is also available
nearby in UBC's B lots.
A cleaning deposit of $50 per person is required when paying the
first instalment of fees. This deposit will be returned, with interest, after inspection of the unit following departure.
All other terms and conditions of tenancy in UBC's single student
Residences will apply to occupants of Fairview Crescent.
Applications for FAIRVIEW CRESCENT, or transfer applications,
may be made at the Student Housing Office, 2071 West Mall,
UBC. Assignments of eligible students will be made on a first-
come-first-serve basis. Students wishing to share a townhouse
should apply together.
An OPEN HOUSE will be held on Thursday, November 14th,
from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., at 2637 and 2639 Fairview Crescent.
Come over and have a look at UBC's newest student residence
area! Wednesday, November 13,1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Students forced to use
%:%i%
By SUE MCILROY
Shrinking student loans and rising costs have forced Simon Fraser
university students to join other
B.C. residents in line at the food
bank.
St. Vincent de Paul, a Catholic
group which does work in crisis intervention at SFU has been
operating a campus food bank in
conjunction with the Catholic
students society said group official
Terry Fowler.
St. Vincent de Paul which had
been running an unpublicized food
bank decided to organize a public
campaign because the society
couldn't keep up with student demand for food.
"We have two reasons for going
public," she said. "First we want to
make food accessible to those in
need, secondly we'd like to get
other students involved to help
them to see there is a problem."
Boxes for tinned food have been
placed in all campus retail food
outlets and money tins have been
put in the pub and restaurant.
Catholic students society member
Roger Roy said student response
has been good, adding the money
tins have received the most student
support so far.
"It's hard for students to bring
cans of food to campus," said Roy.
Fowler said money collected
from the tins will be usd to "fill the
gaps" in food donations. "We have
a special problem getting protein —
we get spaghetti but not spaghetti
sauce," she said.
Fowler said students coming for
food aid have included married
students with families, single
parents, and visa students, especially those not sponsored by their
countries.
She added some students whose
parents are able to support them
but refuse to, have come to the
food bank. These students are ineligible for student aid because of
their parents' financial status.
St. Vincent de Paul has been at
SFU since Christmas 1984.
At UBC, although a food bank
has not been set up, several campus
groups have organized food drives
for the Vancouver food bank.
Nindy Duggal, science
undergraduate society food drive
Bill 1, students 0
By STEPHEN WISENTHAL
Okanagan College student have
mixed feelings following their early
morning meeting with Premier Bennett Monday where he agreed to attend a future public meeting with
students at the college.
The students expected a private
meeting with Bennett, but were
greeted by press representatives
when they showed up at his constituency office at 7:30 a.m., said
Karen Schild, an Okanagan College
student association executive
member.
"We didn't know what to think.
We had assumed it was sort of a
private meeting," said Schild.
"We  were  intimidated  by  the
U of T gives
SJl. grants
TORONTO (CUP)—University of
Toronto president George Connell,
who convinced the governing council not to divest six weeks ago, has
created bursaries for four black
South African students.
There are few details on the bursaries, other than they will come
from the regular bursary budget
and could cost up to $25,000 a student over a four-year program.
In September, anti-apartheid activists criticised Connell for refusing
to divest U of T of its holdings in
Canadian companies dealing with
South Africa. At the time, Connell
said he wanted to refrain from
"political action in matters not relevant to university affairs," and
recommended U of T divest only if
the companies failed to adhere to
federal guide lines on doing
business in South Africa.
Claire Johnson, a student
representative on the council supported divestment and thinks Con-
nell's bursaries show a contradiction.
"There's no question about it —
it's political," she said. "It's a
charitable effort" and "charity is a
little harder to attack" than
economic sanctions, she said.
The part-time undergraduate said
the bursaries are a "nice gesture"
but she questions whether there are
many blacks who can use them.
"Under the Bantu education act,
not that many (blacks) are qualified
to attend university," she said.
Connell could not be reached for
comment.
The university has promised a
written policy on divestment by
January.
media there."
Okanagan student Lome Tod-
derian said eight or ten media people representing the local cable
television company, newspapers
and radio stations attended the
meeting as well as deputy finance
minister David Emerson and Bennett's deputy minister Norman
Spector.
Todderian said the six-day student occupation of Bennett's constituency office earlier this month
was a success because it gave the
students an opportunity to meet
with the premier — something that
would not have happened without
the sit-in. He said the occupation
will be a "90 per cent success" if
Bennett attends a public meeting at
the college.
The student's goals for the occupation included forcing the
premier to attend a public meeting
in the short term, and an all-grant
student aid program, a reduction of
tuition fees to pre-restraint levels
and no cuts to the college's 1986-87
budget in the longer term.
Bennett agreed Tuesday to a
public meeting when it fits his
schedule.
"Norman Spector said he could
get back to us this week on a
meeting," said Schild.
Bennett agreed college fees are
high, adding he would raise the
issue with the college's board. He
blamed the high fees on faculty
salary increases.
Schild said it was understood
before Monday's meeting that it
was not to discuss education issues,
just to work out the details for a
public forum at the college.
"I think that it's really sleazy on
Bennett's part to make (the Monday meeting) a public meeting," she
said.
coordinator, said boxes have been
place in SUB and in all the major
science buildings in the SUS campaign which started Monday and
runs till Sunday.
"It makes me sad to think that
there are students on campus who
go hungry," said Duggal.
Gays and Lesbians UBC collected
donations for the Gay food bank at
their last beer garden and plans to
do the same at its next beer garden.
Nancy Horsman, women
students office assistant director,
banks
said they had counselled two
students who had no money for
food this term.
She said assessed rents and food
allowances for students are too low,
adding present financial aid is not
meeting students needs.
— ed mou photo
<amine tomorrow's
Corey or Gary but
YOU GOTTA HAVE have heart — miles and miles and miles of heart. Inquisitive students e
cook's special at your favorite campus eating establishment. Nobody can agree whether it is
they sure don't want to break it.
Co-op program to offer work experience
By KEITH STRINGER
UBC is a target for a co-op
education program which will allow
students to combine study with
practical work experience, said a
UVIC faculty creates bursaries
VICTORIA (CUP)—Eighteen students from rural British Columbia
have each received $1000 bursaries from a special fund organised by
the faculty association to attend the University of Victoria.
The new programme, financed through grants from individual
faculty members, was set up to encourage students from rural areas
to attend university. To be eligible, students must live at least 30
miles from Vancouver or Victoria, demonstrate financial need, and
show academic merit.
In 1983/84, 17 per cent of high school graduates from Victoria and
Vancouver chose to attend university, compared to only seven per
cent of students from rural high schools.
Bill Pfaffenberger, former faculty association president, says attitudes towards education are just starting to change in rural areas
and universities should encourage this trend.
The Faculty Association Rural Grants Fund has raised $19,000 in
donations from 75 faculty members. The board of governors has
agreed to match funds raised dollar for dollar.
prominent federal cabinet minister
Tuesday.
Co-op education allows more job
training on the way to a degree
which prevents students from
wasting four years on an unsuitable
course of education said Pat
Carney, federal Energy, Mines and
Resources minister speaking to over
100 students in SUB 202.
It was her "major in Ubyssey"
that gave Carney the most educational benefit at UBC, she said.
"There was nothing I really
learned at UBC that equipped me
for this (position as parliament
member)," she said. With a degree
in planning, she worked as a professional journalist for 15 years
following her work with The
Ubyssey before running as a Conservative party candidate.
Carney said her party "still wants
to make changes to our society to
make it fairer, better and more accessible."
The problem of national recon
ciliation is one her party's three
specific goals, said Carney adding
the Conservatives want to "get rid
of the bitterness left by the Liberal
rule."
She said another goal is economic
renewal. At the time of the last
federal election "you could sense
this country with such potential
wasn't going anywhere. We were
slipping," she said.
"We (the Conservatives) are
turning the deficit around; we are
cutting it back," said Carney. "We
will have to cut $75 billionn out of
the budget by 1990."
Carney also said "300,000 more
Canadians are working today than
a year ago" and "youth unemployment has dropped by three per
cent."
Carney concluded by complimenting the UBC school of planning, calling it 'the finest institution of its kind in Canada." Carney
obtained her degree here. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Wednesday, November 13,1985
Me afraid to review plays? No,
I'm doing Arms and the Man!
hwrna^mydayinhappvlanri . .cfmpv people ware poshwrtygnjmpy and depresatves were dropping I9ce fSes Then trie revolution happened and the oppressors were overthrown so the people lived
happily and cotoarfulty aver after.
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i ft inorilu fi..t\i with oxc iti'ircnt and ■•pccial
M-M event',- from jinhoi v.si:.s to fashion shows
JL   *V from prtxlutt day. :o our annual book sale'
Here arc ius: a few items hdpnening in V\fcek #1
featuring the NOV t MBF.K HOOK SALE dnd
PRODUvT DAYS'
NOVEMBER BOOK SALE - NOVEMBER M5
MON
11*
VETERAN'S
DAY
UNIVERSITY
CLOSED
TUES
12
th
NOVEMBER
BOOK
SALE
*Arts and Graphics Dept. is
featuring HUNT, TENUNE,
CHRYSALIS Products
Demonstrations on the ff.
medias: Pastels, pencils,
markers, carbothellos and
watercolours by local artists.
WED
"I Oth       NOVEMBER
I S% BOOK
SALE
Autographing:
MICHAEL KLUCKNER
12:30-1:00 p.m. Will be signing copies of his book and
heritage prints from VANCOUVER The Way it Was.
'Local artists demonstrating contemporary and Japanese calligraphy,
watercolours and Japanese paper
carving.
THURS
H   Ji+h     NOVEMBER
I fl. BOOK
"""^ SALE
Autographing:
ROBERT BATEMAN
1:00-2:00 p.m. will be signing copies of The World of
Robert Bateman.
'Local artist demonstrating oils, pen
and ink made by TALENS, FABER-
CASTELL, SENNELIER.
■FRI
15
th
NOVEMBER
BOOK
SALE
'Local artists demonstrating
markers, fabric dye, and pencils made by
DIXON, PENTEL
and BEROL.
NOVEMBER
In our Book Sale this year the
emphasis is on first rate works
of literature. We have included:
• publishers' remainders and
special editions •"hurt" books
from some of the finest publishers, at reduced prices
•a large selection of children's
books SALE ENDS NOV. 15th.
ROBERT BATEMAN
will be signing copies of
tFuTworiBof
ROBERT BATEMAN
and
THE ROBERT BATEMAN
NATURALIST'S DIARY 1986
at
mm BOOKSTORE
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 14th
1:00-2:00 p.m. Wednesday, November 13,1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Canadian Peace Alliance formed
By JAMES YOUNG
A major campaign against Canadian participation in Star Wars was
announced at the founding conference of the Canadian Peace
Alliance held in Toronto last
weekend.
"End the Arms Race from Vancouver has taken on the responsibility of starting the organization
of the campaign," said Al Banner,
a member of UBC's Students for
Peace and Mutual Disarmament,
who attended the conference at the
University of Toronto.
Banner said EAR will be responsible for the campaign's initial
organization until the national
alliance is ready to spread it across
the country.
"The conference was undoubted-
Joblink to expand in 1986
Joblink, the Alma Mater Society
student summer job placement service, will expand its services this
year to fill the void left by cuts to
campus Canada Employment Centres.
Government funding for the
campus CECs will be cut by 30 per
cent on April 1, 1986, and AMS external affairs coordinator Duncan
Stewart expects student job search
will be reduced.
"Joblink will have to increase to
fil that role," he said.
Stewart said the AMS had been
planning to increase the size of
Joblink next year before the federal
cut was announced. Because of the
cuts to the UBC CEC, expanding
Joblink "may not only be a good
idea, it may be a necessity," he
said.
Steward estimates it will cost the
AMS "approximately an additional
$4000 maximum" to make any expansion necessary because of CEC
cuts.
The federal government has to
make cuts somewhere, and "they
are going to make them in universities," said Stewart. "That's a
trend we're going to have to look
forward to in the next few years."
Joblink has been operating for
the past two summers finding summer jobs for UBC students. It
generated over $300,000 in student
wages last summer, said Stewart.
Pat Brand, director of the UBC
CEC, said he is "not sure how the
reductions (to the CEC) are going
to take place." He said it may be
necessary to close the office for a
few weeks, or to reduce the number
of staff.
The CEC, located in Brock Hall,
placed over 3,100 students last year
in permanent, temporary and
casual positions, said Brand.
Brand said since 1982, student
employment levels have been getting "progressively better," but are
still not as good as before 1982.
ly one of the largest collections of
peace-related groups that has happened here in Canada," Banner
said.
About 450 people attended the
conference, 230 as peace group
delegates and 200 as observers.
"The conference represented all
the major national, provincial and
regional peace groups, as well as
many local groups such as SPMD,"
Banner said.
Speakers included UBC's Dr.
Thomas Perry, who represented the
Canadian chapter of Physicians for
Social Responsibility, University of
Toronto chancellor George Ignatieff, British historian E. P.
Thompson, and William Arkin of
the Washington based Centre for
Defense Information, said Banner.
"The major purpose of the conference was to adopt the structure
document which would lay out the
mandate and the functions of the
national alliance," he said.
The structure document calls for
the involvement of the Canadian
public in the world-wide movement
towards disarmament, a freeze and
reversal of the arms race and the
establishment of Canada as a
nuclear weapons free zone.
"The primary function of the
alliance will be to facilitate communications between peace groups
on a national level and to facilitate
the coordination of national campaigns on issues such as Star
Wars," Banner said.
The relationship of the CPA to
established political parties is not
' yet clear.
"The decision on whether or not
political parties should be allowed
to join the alliance was tabled to the
steering committee for further
study," Banner said, adding this
will be discussed at the next annual
convention.
B.C. youth discuss their mutual concerns
By JIM CHOW
Federal monies earmarked for
post-secondary education should be
wholly spent for that purpose, was
one of several resolutions passed at
the Provincial Youth Conference
held in Mission, B.C. last weekend.
The conference, the first held for
youth from across the province,
was part of the United Nation's International   Year   of   Youth   ac
tivities. About 250 participants aged 15 to 25 attended the conference.
Other resolutions included: the
topic of homosexuality in high
school sex education; lowering the
provincial voting age from 19 to 18;
raising the minimum wage from
$3.65/hour to $4.50/hour; supporting South African Youths Against
Apartheid; recognizing Native Indian aboriginal rights.
"I got a lot out of the conference, but the resolutions were
based on unreal expectations," said
Meagan Hoverman, a Capilano student.
Michael Moeti, a UBC student
from South Africa, said South
African youths have organized in
their struggle against Apartheid. He
emphasized the need for youth to
organize. "Oppression is worldwide; the cutbacks to education in
B.C. are another form of it," said
Moeti.
Native youths, Fred Anderson
and Don Burnstick from Round
Lake Drug and Alcohol Rehabilitation Centre said the B.C. educational system deprives Native youth
of their Indian culture. "Without
an identity of their own they
(Native youth) believe the
stereotyped image of drunken Indians," said Burnstick. "I tried to
live up to that image."
Burnstick said Indians should be
proud of their past. They stressed
Native culture as one aspect that
helped them overcome their drinking problem.
The conference held workshops
on networking, media relations,
theatre, public speaking, community organizing, fundraising, and lobbying.
Education, employment, peace,
youth rights, minorities, making
choices and recreation were also
discussed.
Jon Gates, a conference
organizer, said the conference had a
$42,000 budget and is expecting a
short-fall of $8,000. "We could've
come in on budget if we hadn't
flown in participants from Prince
George and other far off places but
we wanted to make it province-
wide, not a lower mainland con-'
ference." No participant paid more
than $30.00 for transportation to
the site.
Four B.C. youths, Paul Gibbard,
Roseanne Moran, Lawrence Kootnikoff and Colbey Peters, organized the conference for the UN
association as a two part project for
the International Year of Youth.
The first part of the project involved the four travelling across the
province and listening to youth concerns.
Students sell juice for jobs
—jim chow photo
UBC STUDENT MICHAEL Moeti, from South Africa, speaks to B.C. provincial youth conference delegates
about the struggle against apartheid in his country.
University and student funding tittle more than peanuts'
WATERLOO (CUP)—Funding for
universities and students amounts
to little more than peanuts, according to the Wilfrid Laurier University student council.
To symbolise government under-
funding, council members gave a
bag of peanuts to each student that
contributed to a council-sponsored
bursary fund campaign.
In a covering letter to donors, the
council said the bursary, as well as
improved student aid, can make the
difference "between half a box of
Kraft dinner and a meal that would
make mom proud."
The campaign was a symbolic
gesture, said councillor Scott
Howe.    "It   is   students   helping
students," he said. The two week
campaign was in support of the Ontario Federation of Students' protest against student aid and university underfunding.
A similar "Nuts to Underfunding" campaign last year against
the provincial Bovey Commission's
recommendations raised $87 for a
bursary fund.
MONTREAL (CUP)—Stationed in
big, red, round huts which squat in
the middle of downtown Montreal
shopping plazas, young people are
not only selling apple juice, they are
selling themselves.
"The Apple Network for Youth
Employment" is a job search project bringing together young people
looking for a job and prospective
employers - over a can of apple
juice. The Network, launched this
month, is the first project by the
Youth Association for Economic
Initiative, a non-profit organization
run for and by unemployed youth.
The Apple Network was inspired
by a similar project called the
Orange Network started just over a
year ago in Paris. Unemployed
youth set up 47 orange juice stands
in the streets and subways of Paris,
hoping to meet their future
employer. According to 20-year-old
Guy Leroux, one of the initiators of
the project here, more than 40 per
Carlton council boycotts South African products
OTTAWA (CUP)—The Carlton
University student council voted
in mid-October to boycott South
African products, even though
they claim none are presently
sold in the council businesses.
The vote came after a successful lobby by the campus
anti-apartheid group, which also
intends to launch a campus-wide
petition on university divestment.
"The product boycott is the
least of it," said Paul Gross of
the Carleton Anti-Apartheid Action group. "We're more concerned about public awareness
and we wanted to start with (the
council's) help."
The boycott does not include
beer brewed by Carling O'Keefe
because of an Ontario law which
requires   licensed   facilities   to
serve brands most frequently requested. According to Martin
Doyle, assistant director of
Housing and Food Service at
Carleton, Carling O'Keefe's
miller beer is the second most
popular brand.
The UBC Alma Mater Society
recently voted to post information on apartheid to make
students aware of the issue.
cent   of  the   Parisians  who   participated found work.
Only two huts have been set up in
Montreal so far in Place Bonaven-
ture and Place Dupuis. The stands
are constructed in "a strategic location" where there is lots of traffic
to and from the shops and subway.
Armed with only their curriculum
vitae and a button which reads, "I
am looking for a job" they patient-'
ly sell apple juice and speak with
customers from 9:00 a.m. until the
malls close. Their buttons give their
names and the type of employment
they are seeking.
Guy Mineaux, one of the six now
employed by the Network, wants a
job in the hotel industry where he
has some experience. He said he
does not shove a resume at every
passerby, but gives one only to
those who show "interest, curiosity, or friendliness" toward him.
After only one week's work he has
an interview with a large Montreal
hotel, he said. The other project
workers are looking for jobs in the
technical end of the music industry,
bookstores, small businesses and in
truck driving.
Leroux said the Network helps
dispel many misconceptions about
unemployed youth. "The
employers can see young people
face to face and can see how hard
they are working and how much
they want a job," he said. "This
dispels the myth that young people
just sit at home and wait for jobs to
come to them." Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Wednesday, November 13,1985
Enjoy lunch
Hunger surrounds us.
For the poor it is represented by empty cupboards and growling
stomachs.
For the rich, it means running out of defrosted hamburger. It is
all relative, but each one of us can understand hunger in its many
forms.
Our televisions pump in daily images of swollen-bellied African
children crying in dusty refugee camps. In our newspapers there
are countless stories about long lineups of miserable people waiting
for a monthly hand out of a bag of groceries.
Hunger is everywhere.
Simon Fraser University recently established a food bank to meet
the growing demand of poverty-line students who were not getting
enough to eat.
With growing unemployment, rising fees and a razed student aid
program, don't assume that the trendy person sitting next to you in
your English class had enough to eat for breakfast.
Concerned people at UBC should consider establishing a food
bank to help hungry members of the campus community.
Astrology refuted
In response to the article,
Astrology: The Blueprint of the
Soul,( The Ubyssey, Oct. 29) it
seems implausible to me that, while
astronomers using the most advanced devices available can gauge the
inter-relationship of planetary influences upon the tides and other
natural phenomena, an astrological
reader can possess the capacity to
predict the subtle nuances of the
human experience with such a
remarkable degree of accuracy
from the same celestial motions using practically nothing.
When one considers the vast
scope of human interaction on a
global scale and the interpenetra-
tion of various fields of human
endeavor, (i.e.: political, cultural,
social, economic, etc.) and the consequent myriad of interdependant
ramifications, it test one's credulity
to believe that the motions of a
finite variety number of planets can
determine or predict the infinite
variety of results for each individual
on this planet.
In addition, to subscribe to
astrology one must believe that in
the midst of this global panorama,
out of an escalating total of four
billion people, these several planets
are in some way responsible for the
characteristics and personalities of
every single individual. To my
knowledge, no computer is capable
of calculating the number of
variables, (even if they could be accurately defined and catagorized,)
inherently necessary to interpret
such an intricate phenomenon.
Astrology, then, is spurious
technology which smacks of
religiosity, the results of which are
highly inconclusive and admittedly
open to varied "interpretations." It
attracts those who cannot extract
any personal sense of rhyme or
reason from the intricacies of reality
which confront them daily. Indeed,
dabbling. in astrology may be
thought of as akin to playing a
celestial stock market where the
astrologers are merely aggrandized
guru-like stock brokers; they are
confident of their sources, occasionally successful, and immanently
impeachable because of the incalculable variables inherent within
a capaciously complex market. In
the long run it is like a giving a
monkey a set of darts and a copy of
the evening stock index; statistically, chance is likely to give the
astrologers some very stiff competition. The tragic difference between
these two businesses is that the
clientele of the astrologers are
speculating not only with their
money but with the quality and
orientation of their lives as well.
Steven Ward
arts 3
THE UBYSSEY
November 13. 1985
The Ubyssey is published' Tuesday and Friday throughout
the academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff
and are not necessarily those of the administrataion or the
AMS. Member Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey's
editorial office is SUB 241k. Editorial department,
228-2301/2305. Advertising 228-3977/3978.
Even if James is Young and Vera Manuel, our Stringer James got the Lo-down from another
Kontic(t) besides Sieved) that Burt Reynolds is in a Houston hospital with AIDS. Steve (2) has a
Neufeld hope that this is baseless, as do Michael Groberman and Stephen (3|, so Wisenthal is he (he
put me up to thatl. Meanwhile Gordon Clark-Kent promises to Chow down with Ed Mou and
Cam-rm-not-ille-enough-to-Dionne-you-yet when SteveW finishes shuttering from the bugs in Delia
Douglas's fir. So, who is Cameron Anderson and what was Rhino doing in the office today? Any
resemblance to persons living or dead is purely coincidental.
OPEN EARLY
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THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
Evening Star evokes past legends
By VERA MANUEL
The Bride of Evening Star, a
Spirit Song production of a
Blackfeet legend gave a final performance among the ghosts and
relics of the past at a benefit at the
UBC Museum of Anthropology,
October 26.
this  story that  is  the  case  with
Feather Woman (Kat Norris)".
Worn Staff was cautious in her
directing not to dwell too heavily on
the husband and wife relationship,
lest Evening Star appear too
overbearing and Feather Woman
too much the errant wife. The story
The one-act play written and
directed by Sadie Worn Staff has
appeared at Vancouver's first annual Fringe Festival and throughout
several Indian communities since
August.
Worn Staff is the resident writer
and apprentice director of Spirit
Song, a Vancouver-based Indian
theatre group. Worn Staff, a
Chiricahua-Apache journalist from
southern Texas and Mexico, confessed that her first attempt at
writing and directing a stage production from a legend was a risky
but challenging experiment.
Using the Blackfeet legend was
an attempt to get away from local
oriented material previously done
and to move toward a more universal theme for the Indian community.
"I chose this particular legend
because it deals with human beings
and because it is a love story,"
Worn Staff said. "A legend that
deals with humans is a rarity
because more often they deal with
mythical characters and the animal
kingdom."
The strong legendary message of
The Bride of Evening Star was
challenging for Worn Staff to present. "What the message says to
me," Worn Staff reveals, "is that
the strength of Indian society is
dependent wholly upon the people
following the ways of that society."
It is a simple message but the problems that it creates because of the
human element are so complex. "It
seems to be human nature to always
do what we are told not to do and in
message has a much broader scope
and as is often the case with
legends, forces the audience to seek
answers for themselves.
The Bride of Evening Star is one
of three variations of a legend from
Myths of the American Indian. The
play is scripted from the original
legend intertwined with a Coast
Salish song, and costumes by Indian designer Doreen Manuel in an
attempt to blend traditional and
mythical, coastal and prairie.
Also called The Legend of Poiaa
and Scar face, the story is about a
young Blackfoot girl who longs for
something more from life than what
her people have to offer. One night
after rejecting the advances of all
the young men in the village, she
goes to gather firewood and, when
she spies the evening star high in the
sky, she cries "I wish that bright
shining star were my husband."
One day Evening Star comes down
to the Blackfoot country to claim
her as his bride.
To an Indian, the story is a
memory of the stories that our
grandmothers used to tell around
the fire at night. It is the story of Indian people and their relationship
with the things around them. It is a
story of the Evening Star, the sun,
the moon, the bear, the racoon, and
the Blackfoot nation.
The young actors' often playing
dual roles, move easily from one to
the other, and this is what the director strived determinedly to achieve.
"It was of the utmost importance to
me that they know that we (Indians)
come from a strong line of creative
expression. Our history, our
customs, were passed down by oral
tradition. Our forefathers were
great storytellers." Worn Staff
said.
Kat Norris, in her first role as
Feather Woman, also does a commendable job as the wolf who leads
Scarface (Greg Williams) up to the
sky country. Jerry Peters, the Sun
Spirit, switches easily to the role of
the bear eating berries in the woods
with the timid racoon (Alana
Aspinall). It is interesting to see the
animal kingdom which is often portrayed in the West Coast traditional
dance, appear in this medium, it
seems so natural. The human
characters and the animal
characters appear in a unique way
that was often told to us by our
elders. The elders talk about a time
when Indians could talk to the
animals. They were like brothers,
they always respected one another
because that was most necessary for
survival.
Spirit Song, sponsored by the
Native Youth Advisory Committee,
has encouraged talented young Indian actors, writers, directors and
producers, providing a much needed outlet for this unique style of
drama. As well Spirit Song is a learning experience for those who may
have lost touch with their traditional ways or perhaps were not
brought up in that way. "Some of
the actors did not have the strong
been re-scheduled for the early spring because of financial difficulties.
They are also planning a series of
legends and vignettes following the
theme of transportation and communication for Expo 86. The
canoe, one of the earliest forms of
transportation, will play a major
role; Worn Staff will be working
closely with Elders from the local
Indian communities compiling information on oral tradition. They
also hope to be able to use the
Chinook jargon as one of the
themes.
"At this time we are feeling very
ambitious," Worn Staff said. "We
have quite a few thoughts about
eventually moving into the area of
radio, using oral tradition and bringing it to technology via radio
drama.
Brenda Taylor, who has been involved with Spirit Song and the
Native Youth Advisory Committee
since it began, says that they never
seem to have a shortage of talented
young Indian people interested in
theatre, and there are a lot of opportunities for Indians in the
theatre today.
Margo Kane, famous for her role
in the Ecstacy of Rita Joe, also has
a theatre company preparing productions for Expo, along with the
Chief Dan George Foundation
under the direction of actor
Leonard George.
Scarface begs Wolf to lead him to Sky Country
traditional ties that others had and
it was a growing and learning experience for all of us. I was striving
not only to provide the actors with
the basic skills, but to instill in them
the power of their ancestral
heritage," Worn Staff said.
Directing the actors to portray an
emotion was like asking them to put
on a mask. "Masks are prevalent in
Indian society," Worn Staff said.
"We have masks in our dances, our
ceremonies, and our warriors used
to don war paint, which is like a
mask. The mask is the protective
shell for the real person behind.
When I ask the actor to display an
emotion, what I am really asking is
for them to trust me; that I am not
going to leave them vulnerable. I try
to be supportive and to inspire
them. One of the rules was that
once they hit the stage they were no
longer Kat Norris, but Feather
Woman, no longer Buffalo Child,
but Evening Star."
Facial expression was one of the
more difficult things that Norris
said she had to contend with. "I
think it is hard for an Indian to
openly show emotion," she said.
Spirit Song's next major production, a play written by Val
Dudoward titled Teach Me The
Ways Of The Sacred Circle, has
Bear and Racoon enjoying blackberries. Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Wednesday, November 13,1985
1985/86 BUDGET FOR THE ALMA MATER SOCIETY
Introduction
The Alma Mater Society is a large and diverse operation providing a comprehensive array of student services.
The Society is run as a non profit operation where the revenues derived from business centres are used to subsidize
our many service organizations and student government.
Each year the AMS collects a $32.50* from all full time UBC students. $15 is earmarked for capital projects such
as the SUB expansion, athletic facilities, etc. $4.50 is used to pay for the majority costs of the University Extramurals
program. $.50 is used to support two refugee students here at UBC. The AMS is left with $12.50 of the original
$32.50 to assist in running all of its direct operations.
In the 1984/86 fiscal year, AMS business operations returned over $423,000 to students in the form of student
THE ALMA MATER SOCIETY OF THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Balance Sheet
April 30, 1986
"   .■ (With comparative figures for 1984)
wages. This is equivalent to almost $20 per student. Business operations in 1984/85 also provided the equivalent of
$13,56 per student to subsidize our service organizations and student government.
In 1985/86, AMS business operations will increase its student payroll due to opening of three new operations,
Tortellini's, Snack Attack, and the AMS Word Processing Centre. The combined return of student wages and student services subsidies will be approximately $50 per student. Such a return to students places the AMS in a unique
position envied by student societies across Canada.
•Exclusive of varsity athletics.
James F. Collins
Director of Finance
ASSETS
$58,925;
Current assets:
Cash and term deposits
Accounts receivable:
Publications advertising
Sundry accounts and advances (Schedule 1)
Accrued interest (Schedule 2)
Inventories
Loans to student society's and other
organizations, current portion (Note 2)
prepaid expenses
Total current assets
Investments, at cost (market value-
1984-$59,550) (Schedule 2)
Total current assets and investments
Loans to student society's and other organizations,
non-current portion (Note 2)
Art Collection
Total general funds assets
• Student facilities, at cost less
depreciation (Note 3)
See accompanying notes to financial statements
1986
$   359,723
24,323
32,213
12,526
151,441
44,000
976
625,202
59,775
684,977
1,165,497
444,800
2,295,274
5,078,804
$7,374,078
GENERAL FUNDS
1984
LIABILITIES AND SURPLUS
1984
993.198
33,123
70,602
22,792
109,925
32,193
1,138
1,262,971
59,775
Current liabilities:
Accounts payable and accrued charges
Due to clubs and societies (Schedule 3)
Construction contract holdback payable
Total current liabilities
Special purpose reserves and provisions
(Schedule 5)
Total current liabilities and reserves
Retained income, per accompanying statement
Contributed surplus—Art Collection
Total general funds liabilities and surplus
$   704,144
154,849
198,740
326,175
154,415
1,057,733
660,359
480,590
806,260
1,718,092
132,382
444,800
1,286,850
131,674
401,600
2,295,274
1,820,124
1,322,746
95,778
401,600
1,820,124
STUDENT FACILITIES
3,541,874
5,361,998
Loan from General Fund (Note 2)
Equity in student facilities (Schedule 7)
Total student facilities liabilities and equity
Commitments (Note 4).
1,085,719
3,993,085
4,193
3,537,681
5,078,804
3,541,874
$7,374,078
5,361,998
THE ALMA MATER SOCIETY OF THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Statement of Revenue and Expenditure
Year ended April 30. 1986
(With comparative figures for 1964I
Revenue:
Student fees
Aquatic Centre levies
Grad class fees
Graduate Students'
Association levies
Undergraduate Societies
fee levies  .
Investment income
Business operations, net (Schedule 8)
Used Bookstore
Rental income
Sundry
Non-discretionary allocations:
Aquatic Centre
Grad class fees
Graduate Students' Association
Intramural fees
Undergraduate Societies fee
levies, including special levies
Registration photos
S.U.B. Art Fund
A.M.S. Bursary reserve
A.M.S. Bursary reserve-rentals
Capital projects acquisition reserve
Management reserve
Repair and replacement reserve
Discretionary allocations:
Special purpose reserves and
provisions (Schedule 5)
Expenditure:
Student government (Schedule 91
Publications (Schedule 10)
Excess of revenue over expenditure
1986
1984
758,336
120,433
28,676
4,842
111,247
94,584
25,357
1,531
6,468
2,551
761,053
123,531
28,048
4,000
95,950
73,043
54,968
2,128
2,031
1,154,025
1,144,752
$ 4,397
28,676
4,842
105,364
111,247
5,514
1,500
2,500
6,468
352,079
12,871
9,458
644,916
123,531
28,048
4,000
106,018
95,950
5,627
1,500
360,025
12,752
7,305
310,777
81,588
509,109
116,036
393,073
392,365
275,602
83,649
708
744,756
399,996
40,000
359,996
359,251
745
See accompanying notes to financial statements
THE ALMA MATER SOCIETY OF THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Schedule of Student Government Expenses
Year ended April 30, 1986
(With comparative figures for 19841
Student government expense:
Council:
Constituency aid
General
Job Link
External affairs
Student leadership
Handicapped Access Committee
Homecoming Committee
Student Lottery
Student Directory
S.A.C.:
Travel grants
Special projects
General
Election
Art Gallery
Whistler Cabin management (Note 1)
Service organizations:
CITR Radio (Note 2)
Speakeasy
Volunteer Connections
Women's Committee
Summer Films Series
Ombuds office
Programs:
Coordinator
Concerts
General
Orientation
Speakers
Special events
1986
i    2,335
55,232
12,087
6,761
2,037
(1,953)
4,509
305
4,339
1984
600
75,992
1,355
6,829
4,217
5,000
Total student government expense
See accompanying notes to Schedule 9 on Page 2 hereto.
85,652
93,993
4,425
4,710
2,427
1,515
14,037
14,745
11,353
3,708
1,777
1,092
49,109
33,187
83,128
58,957
87,915
72,519
2,653
3,103
910
937
4,389
3,406
(659)
(1,295)
1,270
1,533
96,478
80,203
36,530
32,777
8,853
(1,082)
21
264
587
2,770
(782)
4,997
310
2,723
45,519
42,449
$   310,777
275,602
THE ALMA MATER SOCIETY OF THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Publications Year ended April X, 1986 (With comparative figures for 1984)
1986
1984
Expenditure:
Administrative
Salaries and benefits (Summer)
Bad debts
Distribution
Sales commissions
Special professional services
Printing
Photography
Mailing
Honoraria
Telephone
CUP membership fees and conference
Stationery and supplies
Staff meals
Sundry
Student handbook (Inside)
43,761
54,296
7,602
3,222
3,235
3,485
8,375
7,696
5,550
21,867
—
329
149,139
145,328
1,029
1,534
1,604
999
1,500
1,500
4,935
3,382
20,133
18,325
1,047
1,126
3,431
2,382
1,020
639
34,485
28,629
Revenue:
Alumni—W. Gage grant
Display advertising:
A.M.S.
Local
National
Classified advertising
Subscriptions
Student handbook (Inside)
Constituency publications
Excess of expenditure over revenue
286,846
1,200
294,739
Revenue
Fees
Investment
Building
Commercial Bookings
Games Room
Copy Centre
Subcetera
Vending
Pit Pub
Gallery Lounge
AMS Temporary Personnel and Word Processing
Summer Film Series
Snack Bar
Restaurant
AMS Used Book Store
Total Revenue
Nondiscretionary Expenses
CPAC Reserve
Intramurals
Art Fund
Management Fund
WUSC
Registration Photos
SUB Renovations ft Replacement
AMS Bursary Fund
Total Nondiscretionary Expenses
Revenue Subtotal
Less Constitutional Margin
Total Discretionary Income
AMS BUDGET
AMS BUDGET-SUBSIDIES
Expenses
Council Budget
External Affairs Budget
SAC Budget
WCMB Budget
Art Gallery Committee Budget
Job Link Budget
Programs Budget
Ombudsoffice Budget
Speakeasy Budget
Gays and Lesbians Budget
Volunteer Connections Budget
AMS Women's Committee Budget
Business Office Budget
CITR Budget
Allocation for CITR —High Power
Ubyssey Budget
Summer Ubyssey Budget
Inside Ubyssey Budget
Homecoming Committee
22,688
16,552
97,729
118,918
29,476
27,106
7,531
6,289
274
298
45,836
38,318
524
3,609
205,258
211,090
$     81,588
83,649
744,935
90,200
102,800
1,650
62,000
30,500
1,000
7,550
28,150
3,850
8,000
810
2,000
5,000
200
1,088,645
339,756
101,676
1,500
12,420
10,643
6,000
10,000
2,500
(484,495)
604,150
(30,208)
573,942
1984/86
1986/86
Actual
Budget
57,976
71,694
6,761
4,600
23,615
24,090
50,517
37,815
1,777
2,555
12,087
11,080
48,997
23,657
1,277
750
3,179
3,310
—
1,000
873
1,030
3,728
2,875
250,760
222,570
87,593
58,196
—
5,000
69,949
83,782
8,592
6,991
1,963
10,000
1,101
572,096 Wednesday, November 13,1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 9
-S3--J"-i5-"-:?;A*T«'i,#«^-^s
'SPP§aS§5?'f^^iS^^^^R^'l^*N'™? Iflfeffit^'l *
"fSPW*»"
Philippine consul general defends her views
. The anonymous writer of the letter captioned "Privileged Del Mundo mixes filipino issue," in your
October 22 issue accuses me of
defending the "Marcos Ideology"
because I am alleged to live luxuriously in a penthouse complete
with maids and driver.
My apartment is not a penthouse.
It costs less than the homes rented
by other foreign consuls who live in
the British Properties. I have lived
during 16 years of foreign
assignments in a one bedroom
apartment and would be content to
do so even now. But as consul
general I have, to reciprocate the
dinners by colleagues who have invited me to their homes. It is more
expensive to entertain them in
hotels and restaurants.
The furnishings of my suite have
been bought from personal lifelong
savings. Some of the furniture
comes from Manila which gives me
a chance to show Canadians the
kind of furniture we export. After
16 years of being alone in foreign
postings I believe I have earned the
right to have a maid whom I pay
from my own salary. I don't want
to have to cook my meals and buy
medicine and groceries when I fall
ill with the flu and to clean the
apartment on top of my other
duties as consul general. I have no
driver but one of my assistants
drives me to official functions
because it is hard to find parking in
the streets of Vancouver especially
at night. How can "name withheld" know if my apartment is luxurious unless he or his friends have
been extended the hospitality and
welcome of my home.
The distribution of land titles to
tenant farmers is real. Ask the
many Filipino citizens whose lands
have been distributed under the
land reform program. The lands we
inherited from my grandfather in
Mindoro have been so distributed at
low price, but we do not mind as
long as it helps poor farmers to improve their livelihood. Is it not better to proceed several concrete steps
forward on land reform than to
wait for the grand day when all land
shall have been distributed equally
to each individual Filipino, according to the communist ideology?
Our export sales to Canada in
1984  came   from   garments,   fur-
THE DINER
I Serving U. B. C. and West Point Grey for
the last 27 years.
I        We put our Sole in your
|       FISH & CHIPS
* English Style Home Cooked Meals
I at Reasonable Prices — including
I Roast Beef and Yorkshire Pudding
■ Open Monday to Saturday
j 8:00 a.m. to 8:30 p.m.
I and Sundays
| 1:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.
j 4556 W. 10th Ave. - 224-1912
L.
We accept Chargex
TOP GIRLS
By Caryl Churchill
Directed by Julie Akers
NOV. 20-23
8 p.m.
Sat. Mat.—Nov. 23 at 4p.m.
Student Tickets: $4
Box Office * Room 207 *
Frederic Wood Theatre
DOROTHY
SOMERSET
STUDIO
The University of
British Columbia
Res. 228-2678
niture, electronics, etc. rather than
from coconut or sugar. Today we
export to the Middle East, the
USSR, the PRC, where before we
exported only to the U.S. and
Japan.
Our inflation rate has decreased
this year from the 50 per cent of a
year ago. We have a poor population as in other Third World countries. There are many causes for this
poverty, one among them being the
population growth rate, which we
are trying hard to curb and the difficulty of getting our economy out
from under colonial or neo-colonial
control.
Students feel free to demonstrate
in the streets of Manila, thus belying the statement that freedom of
speech, press and assembly are curtailed. A visiting professor from
Vancouver observed that the press
is so free and that freedom which
borders on license because of the irresponsibility in many of the articles
therein would not be permitted in
some neighboring Southeast Asian
countries.
I have my misgivings about
following the dictates of Vox
populi, of the rabble and the mob
and those who engage in street
riots. And I still feel that Filipinos
abroad should not bend with the
remover to remove before an audience that cannot really understand our problems and our situation at home and the causes behind
those problems. It is simplistic to
attribute all problems to the president. His predecessors could not
solve the same problems which have
been there for decades. The
Japanese, the Koreans (some of
whom oppose their current government) and other nationals do not
bend with the remover to remove
abroad. If the issues are to be
threshed out, this should be done
in our home country. "Name
withheld" could perhaps go back to
live there and help resolve the
issues. If our country has wounds,
let us bind and heal those wounds
each in our own way and not parade
them to foreign eyes who cannot
really know or care about the condition of our people. In my own way 1
brought home help for our typhoon
victims last year and am generating
funds for a depressed barrio this
year.
As for the Fetter letter, I did not
directly refute Balan's statistics
because the statistics I had a year
ago in Manila may be outdated and
% ON THE BOULEVARD
hair and suntanning co.
SUNTANNING
10 SESSIONS-$39
HAIR
15% off any hair service
with presentation of ad. Expires Nov. 30
5784 University Blvd.
(in UBC Village) Vi Blk. Away
Ph. 224-1922
224-9116
WOMEN AND THE
ARMS RACE:
Learning to Take a Stand
Peace has always been a women's issue. But many
women today, despite increased personal anxiety, are
finding that an aversion to things military and
technological is weakening their capacity for
understanding and action.
SHEILA TOBIAS
UNIV. OF ARIZONA
PIONEER IN WOMEN'S STUDIES
THURS., NOV. 14
12:45-1:45
IRC 3
(Woodward Building)
Sponsored by the UBC Office for Women Students
with the assistance of the Leon and Thea Koerner Foundation and The UBC Centre for Continuing Education
being here, I cannot have access to
the most recent statistics. Unless I
can personally investigate, I do not
presume to champion one set of
statistics over another as Fetter et al
have done. Dr. Jones of Vancouver
Community College, who visited
my country for five weeks, cites
protectionist barriers to our exports, barriers against cultural
understanding, exaggerated
rhetoric about the Philippine security situation which discourages
Canadian business from entering
into joint ventures that would be
advantageous to both sides. Our
hardworking Prime Minister comments on the effects western media
has had on the government's efforts
to stabilize the economy and restore
political stability.
I do not condone the killing of
any human being by the abusive in
the military or by the New People's
Army or by the plain lawless. All I
am saying is it is not all black or all
white as Fetter et al would pain our
situation to be, with the government being the complete villain and
the student demonstrators the
saints. Our situation is not that simple. Mr. Fetter can find out who
controls our economy by looking at
the list of the top 100 corporations
in my country and the foreign
names of some of the largest taxpayers. I would also say to Mr. Fetter that his little learning about the
Philippines is a dangerous thing.
How long was he there, one week,
two or three weeks?
, We could argue ad infinitum.
Perhaps Fetter et al had really better mind their own business and not
meddle with ours and leave us to
our own if they cannot, at any rate,
live through our problems and help
to resolve them for us.
I hope you will print my reply
since you devoted two pages to the
Balan interview.
Luz Del Mundo
Philippine Consul General
The University of Manitoba
Faculty of Management
M.B.A.
INFORMATION NIGHT
Is a Manitoba M.B.A. for you?
Dr. J. L. Gray, Associate Dean, Graduate Studies, will be in
attendance to discuss:
• the requirements • the curriculum
• the purpose • the opportunities
Thursday, November 21—7 p.m.
Sheraton Landmark Hotel
1400 Robson Street, Vancouver
R.S.V.P. Your Attendance (204) 474-8448
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 13
Rabbi WILFRED SOLOMON
Congregation Beth Israel
on
MARRIAGE (Civil) and
KETUBAH (Jewish)
For What Purpose?
12:30 p.m.
Thursday, Nov. 14
12:30 p.m.
Mimi Penciner,
Academic Affairs Coordinator
Canadian Friends of
HEBREW UNIVERSITY
Introduction to
STUDY IN ISRAEL
HILLEL HOUSE 224-4748
(Behind Brock Hall)
Dukes
Gourmet Cookies
and Cappuccino
NOW 8 a.m.- 10 p.m.
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK Page 10
THE    UBYSSEY
Wednesday, November 13, 1985
TODAY
AMNESTY UBC
Meeting and film, noon, SUB 205.
INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS STUDENTS
ASSOCIATION
Slide show and discussion on travel in S.E.
Asia, noon, Buch B224.
FILM SOCIETY
Films: L'age D'or and Cat People (19421, S2
each, 7:30 p.m. and 9:30 p.m., SUB
auditorium.
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Aerobics, exercise to music, $2, free to
members, 5:30 p.m. - 6:30 p.m., SUB bsmt 1,
plaza south.
UBC PERSONAL COMPUTER CLUB
General meeting, new members c'mon down!
noon, Hebb 12.
HORSE LOVERS AND EQUESTRIAN CLUB
Membership general meeting, all welcome,
3:30 p.m., SUB 206.
ANARCHIST CLUB
Meeting and office warming, noon, SUB 237.
JSA/HILLEL
Rabbi W. Solomon — "Marriage and Ketubah",
noon, Hillel House.
UBC FENCING
Fencing practice, 8 p.m., Osborne Gym East.
STUDENTS FOR A FREE SOUTHERN
AFRICA
Meeting,   noon,   T.A.   Union   Office,   the   Ar
mouries.
PRE DENTAL SOCIETY
Chalk carving today, Dr. Spears will be here on
November 28, noon, IRC 5.
PSYCHOLOGY STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
General meeting, noon, Buch B322.
THURSDAY
PEOPLE'S FRONT
Condemn    media    incitement    of    racist    and
chauvinist hatred, noon, Buch A203.
UBC STUDENT LIBERALS
Policy committee meeting, noon, SUB 119.
FILM SOCIETY
Film:  "A View to a  Kill",  $2,  7  p.m.,  SUB
Auditorium.
CHRISTIANS ON CAMPUS
Fellowship meeting, noon, HA 328.
UBC PROGRESSIVE CONSERVATIVE CLUB
Special speaker, noon, SUB 205.
TEACHING ASSISTANTS UNION
Teaching workshops — problem solving session,
1   p.m.   to 2:15  p.m.,   Grad  Centre 2nd  floor
lounge.
ISMAILI STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Committee meeting, noon, SUB 211.
JSA/HILLEL
Torah study, 11:30 a.m., Hillel House.
NETWORK
Introduction   to   study   at   Hebrew   University,
noon, Hillel House.
INTRAMURALS
Noon run — 4th Avenue Grind, SUB Plaza.
UBC PROGRESSIVE CONSERVATIVE CLUB
Special speaker   —   The  Hon.  Jean  Charest,
noon, SUB party room.
GREAT LAW TRIALS ON THE SILVER
SCREEN
"The Trial", based on Kafka's book, noon, Law
Building, Room 101/102.
ENVIRONMENTAL INTEREST GROUP
Lecture:   nuclear   war   and   the   environment,
noon, Geography 212.
CUSO - UBC
Development    education    series    —    "South
Africa's dispossessed", 7:30 p.m., free admission, International House upper lounge.
GRADUATE STUDENT SOCIETY
Music night, featuring Avi Gross, 8:30 p.m. to 11
p.m., Graduate Student Centre, Garden Room
lounge.
FRIDAY
THUNDERBIRD TENNIS
Intercollegiate tennis tournament, call 228-4396
for schedule, all day, Tennis Bubble.
THUNDERBIRD HOCKEY
Canada    West    game    versus    Saskatchewan
Huskies,  free admission with AMS card, 7:30
p.m., Thunderbird Arena.
THUNDERBIRD BASKETBALL
UBC women play host to Regian Cougars, 6:45
p.m.. War Memorial Gym.
ftelp Feed the Vancouver Food Bank
Support the S.U.S.
CANNED FOOD DRIVE
NOV. 12-15
Deposit Canned Food in Food Drive
Boxes located in all major Science
Buildings & the Student Union Building
A Science Undergraduate Society Charity Drive
rams
Applications are now being
accepted for three (3)
student-at-large representative
positions on the
UNIVERSITY
ATHLETIC COUNCIL
The council has responsibility in all matters concerning
athletics, including the development of general policies,
the coordination of specific policies, and the allocation
of funds.
Applications may be obtained at SUB 238 and returned
there by 4:00 p.m., Friday, November 15, 1985.
For further information please contact: Glenna
Chestnutt, AMS President, Sub 256, 228-3972, Simon
Seshadri, AMS Director of Administration, SUB 254,
228-3961
THUNDERBIRD SWIMMING AND DIVING
Meet versus Central Washington, 7 p.m., UBC
Aquatic Centre.
UBC FENCING CLUB
Fencing practic, 7 p.m., Osborne gym A.
HEALTH SCIENCE LESBIANS AND GAYS
Potluck dinner social, 7:30 p.m., information at
SUB 237A, 228-4638.
FILM SOCIETY
Film: "A View to a Kill", $2, 7 p.m. and 9:30
p.m., SUB auditorium.
UBC STUDENT LIBERALS
Resolution meeting for Model Parliament, noon,
SUB212A.
UBC ENTREPRENEURS CLUB
Jeremy Hewett —  Ministry of Smali Business,
noon, Angus 226.
November 12-16 will be United Way
Week at U.B.C. Come join the fun
at the Hawaiian Night at the Pit
Thursday November 14. Costumes
are required but if you can purchase
Students Only
25% Discount
on any bodywave
and highlights
(with this ad)
Super Style Cut
at a
Super Price
DINO HAUTE
COIFFURES
4532 W. 10th
224-7440
late appointments Thursday
and Friday evenings
OFFER EXPIRES DEC. 15/85
GET THE COMPETITIVE
EDGE!
UBC TRIATHLON
CLINICS
A series of clinics are being   offered   prior  to  the
UBC Triathlon  IV,  Saturday, March 8, 1986.
CLINICS:
2 Saturday, November 16
Cycling, Swimming
Clinic: 	
Kori Sinclair, Canadian
National Cycling Team
Jean Paul Saindon,
Canadian National
Triathlon Team
Member.
3 Saturday, November 30
Diet & Nutrition:
Susan Barr, School of
Family & Nutritional
Sciences
All clinics held in Home
Economics Bldg.
Room 60
10:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
Admission to Clinics is Free
i/(uC ihAojho/ui&...
fat, aood sbtnti! <
GIANT CHRISTMAS BOOK SALE
Book (book), n. 1 heavy object carried by students, used as a source of
information, door jam or carried on ones head to improve posture.
2 to make an airline reservation on a TRAVEL CUTS
CHRISTMAS CHARTER to Toronto, Montreal,
Ottawa, Winnipeg or Saskatoon.
THROW THE BOOK AT HIGH PRICED AIRFARES!
CALL TRAVEL CUTS (Your local bookie) TODAY
TRAVELCUTS
Going Your Way!
Student Union Building
University of British Columbia
Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1W5
224-2441
a lei at the door for a dollar. All proceeds will be given to the United
Way. Also on Thursday Nov. 14
come support your favourite Intramural Hockey team at Thunderbird Stadium. The best cheering
section will win "Nacho and Beer"
coupons. There will be donation
cans at the door and noisemakers
will be sold at the game. During this
week information booths and donation cans will be around campus.
Please join us and have fun supporting the United Way.
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: AMS Card Holders — 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional
lines, 60c. Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $4.50 additional lines, .70c. Additional days, $4.00 and -65c.
Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a. m. the
day before publication.
Publications Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
Charge Phone risers over $10.00. Call 228-3977.
COMING EVENTS
AMS
ART GALLERY
Nov. 11-Nov. 15
Elizabeth Pechlaner
Nov. 18-Nov. 22
Susan John/Jacki Koh
Student Union Building, UBC
Mon.-Fri. 10-4
20 - HOUSING
WANTED: Amiable adult to share modern,
comfortable family home with professor &
older teenager. Near UBC gates above
Spanish Banks. Lge. garden. Magnificent
view. $425/mo. 224-0584.
CLOSE TO UBC. Immac. 5 br., 2 bath., full
bsmt., sep. din. rm., f-pl., 6 appl., fenced
yard, near school & ammenities. Avail.
Dec. 1, $1300 incl. oil/heat. 261-9665.
30 - JOBS
Success Breeds Success
College Pro Painters
Manager Recruiting
Presentation
Nov. 19
12:30-2 p.m.
Henry Angus Bldg.
Rm. 213
Earn More Than
Experience Next Year
35 - LOST
LADIES GOLD SEIKO watch on Tues., Nov.
5 bet. 9:30-noon in Angus Bldg. or Main
Lib. Call Audrey 222-1581. Reward.
BLACK WALLET lost Oct. 31. Elephant
leather. Contains ID! Reward offered. No
questions. Sean Foulon, 325-8129.
40 - MESSAGES
FRED T. — I love blonds with blue eyes.
If you do too, please find me. Bob.
FREE to good homes, world's best kittens!
5 weeks old, all colors and sizes. Phone
736-4002 after 6 p.m.
70 - SERVICES
RECYCLE
All metals — jars — bottles — newspapers
7 days a week til 6 p.m. 327-2315.
70 - SERVICES
HAVING A PARTY? From Neanderthal
cave stomps to Ihe latest computer chip
cha-cha, CITR can deliver it right to your
next party with its mobile sound system and
the rates are fantastic1
DOUBLE DATE
ADVENTUROUS! Discover Doubledate.
You & a
friend, with someone else
& a
friend.  A
friendly foursome having
fun.
Hot  Air
Ballooning,  Texas  BBQs,
Boat
Cruises.
736-4444
85 - TYPING
CP   HOTELS   CHATEAU   LAKE   LOUISE
is now taking applications for Xmas
employment. Positions available from Dec.
20 to Jan. 5. Please send resume & letters
of reference to personnel office Chateau
Lake Louise, Lake Louise, Alberta, T0L 1E0.
EARN $$ FOR XMAS. Start immediately.
Flexible hrs. Make bet. $10-20/hr. Comm.
for Vane. East. Call 873-2516 bet. 1-5 p.m.
or 585-2199.
ALARM MONITORING company requires 2
part-time employees for 1) Mon.-Fri., 10
p.m.-12:30 a.m. & Sun. 11 a.m.-7 p.m. &
2) Mon.-Fri. 6:30 a.m.-9:00 a.m. & Sat. 11
a.m.-7 p.m. $4.50 /hr. telephone answering
exp. an asset. Call 731-8204, Mon.-Fri. 9-4.
BABYSITTER NEEDED. Thursday & Friday, early afternoons. Call 224-9283.
WORD    PROCESSING    SPECIALIST.    U
write,  we  type  theses,   resumes,  letters,
essays. Days, evgs., wknds. 736-1208.
WORD WEAVERS - Word Processing.
(Bilingual) Student rates. Fast turnaround.
5670 Yew St. at 41 St. Kerrisdale 266-6814.
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST. 30 years ex
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UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED Wednesday, November 13,1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 11
Volleyball Thunderbirds lead league with two wins
The weekend's volleyball matches between UVic's Vikings and
U.B.C. were exciting tests of the
Thunderbird's skill.
On Saturday night, the 'Birds
sweat the Vikes 3-1 (6-15, 51-2,
15-6, 15-9). Brian Snelling, rookie
power hitter, was named player of
the match as he led the Birds with
20 kills. David Risso led the Vikes
with 18 kills.
Also winning three games to one
(13-15, 15-7, 15-13, 15-1) on Sunday, the Thunderbirds relied on
quick, solid attacks and consistent
blocking. Brad Willock, team captain, (5 stuff blocks) and Greg
Williscroft (21 kills) typified this
kind of skill throughout the match.
Though outpowered, the Vikings
displayed good defense, especially
in the first and third of Sunday's
games.
Dale Ohman, UBC team coach,
commented that the Vikings played
tough ball for such a physically
small team, thereby forcing the
'Birds to block often. He also said
the Vikings were better defensively
than the Thunderbirds. UVic's
coach, Paul Brasson, had no comment.
The Birds take their league
leading 2-0 record into Saskatoon
this Friday in a first place
showdown with the University of
Saskatchewan.
Hockey fans!
Five hockey teams including
UBC will be in a January tournament featuring American collegiate
hockey powerhouses Yale and Cornell.
Local hockey fans will be treated
to some of the finest hockey
anywhere. It will definitely be the
highlight of the Vancouver hockey
season and should not be missed by
hockey buffs and newcomers alike.
The most important aspect of the
tournament will be the positive effects it should have on the UBC
hockey team. Cornell strongly
recruits and features 23 Canadian
hockey   players.
UBC coach Fred Masuch said the
four major aspects of building
hockey at UBC are (in order):
academics; good hockey; stature of
the program and finance.
"Yale is one of the top academic
institutions in the world and they
never recruit," said Masuch.
"Players come to the team because
of its academic standing."
Masuch wants good hockey but
to get the players, "you need to
convince them of the stature and
the financial feasibility of coming to
the university, "he said. UBC has
the academic standing and the tournament might provide some of the
money needed for scholarships.
Tennis anyone?
Nov. 15 to 17 marks the arrival of
the first-annual Thunderbird Fall
Classic tennis tournament.
The stars of the UBC men's tennis squad will battle opponents
from western U.S. universities in
the tennis bubble near Osborne
Centre.
On the strong team coached by
Mike Kerr are B.C.'s top under-18
player, Martin Lampa; Eric Honing, a recent defector from the
University of Texas at El Paso;
returning players Terry Hubbard,
Mike Bruehels, Rick Johnson, Nag
Mitha; and rookies Gareth Jones
and Dino Resnich.
Their first set, Friday at 7 p.m.,
will be against the University of
Washington Huskies. Last year, the
Huskies placed first in the Pac-10
North Division arid their top seed,
Chris Pearson, was voted player of
the year.
Saturday, at 2 p.m., they play
against a team from Whitman College, and on Sunday at 2 p.m. they
wrap up the tourney against U. of
Idaho. Tickets are available for $1
from the U.B.C. Tennis Centre,
team, or club members.
HANDLEY CUP SOCCER BOWL
PRELIMINARY ROUND FINAL STANDINGS
MEN
League A
1 Education
2 Pharmacy
3 St. Andrews
4 Arts I (II
5 Gage (II)
1 Ski Club
2 Arts 2 (II
3 Science 2
4 Civil Eng.
5 Law I (II)
1 Phys. Ed
2 Kappa Sig.
3 Int. House
4 Commerce I
5 Science 3
1 VST I
2 Arts 3
3 Mech 4
4 Totem
5 Geology
1 Chem. Grads
2 VST 2
3 Fiji
4 CSA
League B
League C
League D
League E
W
4
3
2
1
0
3
2
1
0
w
4
3
2
1
0
w
4
3
2
1
0
W
4
2
2
1
UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
FACULTY OF DENTISTRY
DENTAL EMERGENCY CLINIC
J. B. Mcdonald Building, 2199 Wesbrook Mall
Clinic Hours:
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday 1:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Thursday   9:30 a.m. to 12:00 Noon
Phone for appointment: 228-2112
After Hours:
Go to the Emergency Department of the Health Sciences Center
Hospital at 2211 Wesbrook Mall.
College
Pro®
earn more
than money
next summer.
SEMINAR FOR
MANAGER POSITIONS
NOV. 19
HENRY ANGUS
ROOM 213
12:30-2:00
College Pro®
Success Breeds Success.
AT A GLANCE
League B
5 Agriculture
Chem Eng
Music
DekesI
Forestry I
Alpha Delts
Forestry 2
Gage 2 (I)
Geography
Georox
Dekes2
1 Betas
2 MBA
3 Physiology
4 Eng. Phys.
5 Architecture
1 IVCF
2 llCaffee
3 Arts Hotspurs
4 ZBT
1 Law 2
2 PI Delts
3 Commerce 2
4 Mining United
5 Forestry 3
League F
League G
League H
League I
League J
League K
1    3
W L
3 1
3 1
3 1
1 3
0    4
W
4
3
2
1
0
Vt
4
3
2 Blasting Caps
3 Susl
4 EUS
1 Gage
2 Commerce
3 Agriculture
4 Nursing
5 Prateres
WOMEN
League A
W
4
3
2
1
0
1 EUS
2 Kappas
3 Science
4 VST
5 Law
AT A GLANCE
, Upcoming evant Registration Deadline
Thurs. Nov. 14   4th Ave. Grind Nn. run drop-in
SUB plaza 12:30. 10 km.
Sat. Nov. 16
Triathlon Clinic
Home Ec. Building
Room 00, 10 a.m.
W    L
2    1
SUN.-WED. 10% U.B.C. STUDENT CARD DISCOUNT
2043 W. 4th AVE.
(SALE PRICES AS MARKED)
* shorts fleece *
* t-zfutfb 6000 gkitifo *
jVownier 72 -15
BOOKSTORE
OtoC   fnthmi(A>a& ... /(ot aood sports( Page 12
THE    UBYSSEY
Wednesday, November 13, 1985
'Birds win national soccer final
By STEVE NEUFELD
Hard work, perseverance and
raw talent combined to give the
UBC soccer Thunderbirds a 2-1
overtime win in the CIAU national
final against the Concordia
Stingers.
Nearly 800 cold but enthusiastic
fans watched the Thunderbirds capture their second straight national
title: the third for Coach Joe
Johnson.
The first half was dominated by a
determined 'Bird team as John
Gasparac netted UBC's opener.
Concordia's Alan Pescatore
answered just before the end of the
half on a penalty kick.
Frank Major, the senior official
from Manitoba, was busy with the
boisterous and sometimes rough
play in the second half. He issued
yellow caution cards to Peter Mit-
Hockey loss
The UBC hockey club hosted a
pair of tough games to the visiting
Alberta Golden Bears this weekend
at Thunderbird Arena.
The 'Birds lost 5-1 on Friday
evening as Craig Dill paced the
Alberta attack with two goals.
Mark Didcott, on defence, scord
the lone UBC marker, a pretty shor-
thanded goal on a breakaway late in
the game.
"We were very flattered by the
score and especially the generosity
of our hosts," said Alberta assistant coach Robinsonian
Spinorama.
On Saturday evening the score
was much closer as a seesaw battle
raged all night long. Eventually the
'Bears prevailed on an empty net
goal by Dennis Cranston.
Sid Cranson led the Alberta attack with two goals and Craig Dill
added another two for a four goal
weekend.
Al Perich, UBC's Yugoslav import, scored two goals for the home
side.
chell and Richard Anas of the
Stingers^as the final half concluded
with no more scoring.
After a scoreless overtime period
a shootout set the stage for controversy and tense moments. By the
end of the match Major had called
for five retaken kicks because of
premature   goalie   movement.
Stinger goalkeeper Alex Polidaro
was ejected during the penalty
kicks, and it was past replacement
Wolfgang Rosner that Murray
Mollard blaster home the winner.
The pressure was then on All-
Canadian keeper Brian Kennedy to
salvage a UBC victory.
He stopped two shots by Bryan
Football ends on loss
The UBC Football club ended its
season on a sour note losing 38-13
in Alberta on Saturday morning.
UBC, Manitoba and Alberta all
finished with identical four-win
four-loss records. Yet Manitoba advanced because of a better point
differential in play against the other
two teams. Generally the season
was a successful one for the 'Birds,
though they did not make the
playoffs. The many rookies on the
team played well and will only be
better next season.
Proof of the 'Birds success can be
seen in the seven players named to
all-star positions in the C.I.A.U.
ballots.
Mike Torresan at offensive guard
and offensive tackles Leo
Groenewegen and Don Adamic are
1985 all-stars, as are rookie kick-
returner Matt Pearce, defensive
lineman Carey Lapa, linebacker
Jack Beestra and defensive-back
Mark Norman.
Pearce has also been nominated
as the western candidate for the
Peter Gorman Trophy as the most
outstanding first year player in
Canadian collegiate football. He
will be attending the Vanier Cup
ceremonies and game as a guest.
Henry, with the official ruling that
the goalie had moved too soon. He
then made the final save on a diving
grab to preserve the win.
His teammates mobbed him
jubilantly while Stinger Coach Andy Onorato and his dejected players
left the field. Kennedy was credited
with four saves during the game
while his counterpart, Polidaro,
had seven saves.
"It was a wee bit exciting," said a
smiling coach Joe Johnson.
"I felt the lads played well and
did the necessarv things in such a
situation," added Canadian university coach of the year.
The Thunderbirds placed five
members on the All-Canadian
squad including Kennedy, who is in
his last year, and rookie Gregor
Young on the first team. Terry
Klim, Mike Malana and Jonathan
Pirie received places on the second
team. Next year's soccer 'Birds will
have about 50 per cent returnees
from this season's championship
team.
Basketball 'Birds lose to clan
This weekend the men's basketball Thunderbirds lost the
Buchanan Classic series in two
straight games to the SFU Clan in a
series marked by fouls and frustration.
Friday night, despite the support
of a full house in the War Memorial
gym, the 'Birds fell to the rival Clan
87-78.
The 'Birds' 16 team fouls in the
first half accounted for the Clan's
45-39 half-time lead as they scored
on 15 of their 22 trips to the line.
In the second half, tempers flared
and the game maintained its fast
pace, with SFU capitalizing on a
number of quick breaks to the
hoop. Paul Johannson and Ken
Klassen netted  23  and   12 points
respectively for the 'Birds.
UBC coach Bruce Enns conceded
SFU had "better atheletes," adding
UBC can play better, despite their
inability to keep the Clan off of the
boards.
Saturday night on their way to
losing 84-72 at SFU, the T-Birds
started quickly and build a lead.
However, SFU responded with full
court pressure and led 30-26 at the
half. With 3:51 remaining in the second half, the 'Birds came to within
three points after falling 13 points
behind. The Clan hung on to their
lead to win.
On Thursday, Nov. 21 the 'Birds
host the Regina Cougars in War
Memorial Gym.
"IT'S GOING TO bite me," screams agitated soccer enthusiast. Marty
Stein, photographed practicing a few years ago appears courtesy of
Ubyssey's chronic lack of sports photographers.
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