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The Ubyssey Jan 12, 1993

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1
VOLUME 75, NUMBER 26
CIRCULATION 15 000
A founding member of the Canadian University Press
TUESDAY, JANUARY 12,
Publishing continuously since 1918
New child care centre not enough
by Sara Martin
Vancouver General hospital
employees are building a 24-hour
child care centre that some fear
will not be accessible to the union
members who are spearheading
the project.
The first of its kind in Canada,
the centre will be set up to provide
on-site child care services to hospital employees, including those
who work nights.
Laura Addis, the project coordinator, says, "the unique function of this centre is its ability to
provide care for the children of
hospital employees who work on
12-hour rotating shifts."
But the Hospital Employees
Union (HEU) is questioning
whether the centre will be truly
accessible.
Only 12 spaces have been allocated for overnight stays.
There are also concerns that
the cost of the services will be
unaffordable for some parents who
need child care.
Joe Fraser, HEU representative for VGH, says it is unclear
how the project will benefit the
union members. "IVe heard that
the cost of child care at the new
centre will be approximately $800
a month and there are not too
many members that can afford
that.
At this price the spaces will
be filled by children ofthe hospital
administrators," he says.
Fraser comments on the process of securing a child care pro-
gram: "It has been a long hard
fight and still there are many unanswered questions."
The HEU is part of a joint
effort involving several other
unions, employees, and the General Hospital Management that
has raised more than $800,000 for
the project.
VGH hospital president
Murray Martin says, "we are proud
to be providing this service to the
community, and to be leading the
way for other employers to do the
same."
Martin was instrumental in
advancing the child care program.
As a father of two young children himself, Martin says he sympathizes with parents looking for
safe and reliable child care: "The
challenges of shift work make it
difficult for many of our employees
to find adequate child care."
The planning and construction
of the project is modeled after
similar 24 hour centers in the
United States that have proved
successful.
The child care unit will operate as an independent, non-profit
centre.
However as a department of
the hospital, it will have access to
security, food, custodial and other
hospital services.
In order to accommodate children from different age groups,
the centre will consist of three
separate programs.
One area will be designed for
12 toddlers (18 months to 3 years).
David Suzuki prophesies doom.
SIOBHAN ROANTREE PHOTO
Another space will be constructed
for 12 infants (0 to 18 months) and
a third room will provide care for
up to 25 preschoolers (3 to 5 years
old); twelve spaces will be available
for overnight child care.
With these 61 spaces the centre hopes to care for more than 200
children over the course of a year.
The centre will also offer a
drop-in service to the community
at large.
Parents should be able to call
in the mornings and reserve a space
for that day.
This service will be useful for
out-patients who have children
that need to be cared for while they
receive necessary hospital treatment, Addis says.
The newround-the-clock child
care centre will be fully accessible
to people with disabilities.
It is also designed with a
nursing room where mothers will
be able to come during their breaks
to breast feed their babies.
Patty Stevenson, a student
representative of UBC's Nursing
Undergraduate Committee says "it
will be great for nurses to not have
to worry about who's taking care of
their kids when they 're at work."
Minister of Women's Equality
Penny Priddy says she is enthusiastic about the new project: "This
new centre represents a creative
response to the needs of working
families, child care is an integral
part ofthe government's commitment to create an environment
where children and parents matter."
"Over the long term, this inclusive approach will support the
positive growth and development
of our economy as a whole."
Development costs are estimated at $1,386 million. This figure includes construction costs,
equipment, toys, and staff.
The Ministry of Women's
Equality donated $500,000, the
maximum grant allowed for child
care.
The Greater Vancouver Regional District donated the land
for the new centre.
Suzuki declares a state of eco-emergency
by Jennifer Johnson
Scientist and former UBC
professor David Suzuki kicked off
environmental week with the
message that the next 15 years are
crucial in terms of bringing about
fundamental changes in attitudes
towards the environment.
Arguing that it is imperative
that we alter our present course,
Suzuki stated if we do not, "we
could so alter the living world that
it would be unable to sustain life."
To underline this need for urgency, Suzuki cited the fact that
the world's population is increasing by 90 million people per year
while, at the same time, food production is decreasing.
He presented further dismal
statistics such as the statement by
the Harvard Institute that 50 000
species are becoming extinct each
year.
Suzuki also cited "The World
Scientists'Warning toHumanity,"
a report released last November
which stated that human beings
and the natural world are on a
collision course.
Criticizing the media, Suzuki
said neither the Vancouver Sun,
the Globe and Mail, nor the CBC
publicized the report despite the
fact that it was endorsed by 1500
scientists, 101 of whom were Nobel
prize winners. Suzuki further
criticized the leaders of the G-7
nations for failing to make the
environment a priority.
Aiming his criticism at George
Bush, Suzuki said that he used
"blackmail" when he threatened
not to attend last year's Earth
Summit in Rio de Janeiro.
Describing the Earth Summit
as a failure, Suzuki said the real
tragedy was that, "out of that great
conference there did not emerge a
sense of urgency."
Suzuki claimed he had relatively low expectations ofthe conference because with 200 nations
participating he felt a watered
down agreement would inevitably
be the result.
Suzuki described the
conference's resultant document as
"[having] no teeth." Though the
document outlines a $600 billion
commitment to environmental issues, Suzuki questioned the sincerity ofthe commitment.
Three-quarters ofthe amount
is to be paidby the poorer southern
countries, he said, while northern
countries are to supply only a
quarter of the financial burden.
He said the Earth Summit
could not succeed Itecause the major
priorities were the "parochial demands of local constituencies."
However,rather than criticizing anyone present at the conference for this, Suzuki said it is impossible to transcend or forget the
local level.
For this reason, serious environmental initiatives will only result from the local or grassroots
level, he said. Quoting vice-presi
dent-elect Al Gore, Suzuki said,
"you cannot expect political leaders to lead [but]... when the public
knows what they want politicians
will scramble to get on."
Suzuki claimed we are "way
back in the dark ages" with environmental responsibility.
Citing issues which were formerly debatable.such as women's
right to vote, he statedit is time for
the environment to come out ofthe
political realm. Some issues, he
said, should be sacred in the sense
of being non-partisan and non-debatable.
Arguing that we should adopt
this attitude toward the environment, he stated that we cannot
afford the environment to be "nickeled and dimed in the political
sense.".
Suzuki advised we recall our
values and our relation to the environment. We cannot rely on science to answer all our questions
about the environment—science
"provides us with understanding
in bits and pieces but does not give
us a view ofthe whole."
In a more general sense, "we
must rediscover our spiritual connection with the rest ofthe earth,"
he said.
As a species, he argued, we
have been very chauvinistic in that
we believe that we are "the only
species thsit has the right to declare value on the earth."
Suzuki stated that environmental groups have been "castigated for lieing anti-everything."
Categorizing this treatment as
unfair, he said it is the role of
environmental groups to provide a
"vision of hope and greater self-
sufficiency,"
Referring to the goals of his
own charitable organization—
dubbed The David Suzuki Foundation—he said it was the aim of
his foundation to research and
"develop ground rules for ecological living." Announcement
Campus Calendar
      J*, fa-a-im .lam larw 19fh ta-»   l-annorw -|f*.ta-i
from January 12th to January 15th
TUESDAY
Student Knvironment
Ctr. Knviroweek:
displays, demonstrations
and presentations for
environmental
awareness and positive
action. 10 am - 4 pm.
SIB Main Concourse.
Centre for Research in
Women's Studies &
Gender Relations.
Michael Myers I BC
Psychiatry Prof. "Men's
I niu, lie Development
Issues Across the Life
Cycle." Noon,
Fam&Nutri Sciences,
Rm 50.
Student Knvironment
Ctr. Knviroweek guest:
singing
en\ ironmentalists "the
Raging Grannies."
Noon, SL It Main
Concourse.
I BC Student
Counselling &
Resources Centre.
Workshop: Study
Skills: Your First Step.
12:30-1:20 pm. Brock
Hall Room 200.
Hillel Jewish Students'
Association. Beginners
Hebrew Class. 1:30 pm.
Hillel House.
I BC School of Music.
Dal Grawer Memorial
Lectures. Richard
Goode, Masterclass.
7:00pm, Recital Hall.
WEDNESDAY
1 3
Student Knvironment
Ctr. Knviroweek:
displays, demonstrations
and presentations for
environmental
awareness and positive
action. 10 am - 4 pm.
SIB Main Concourse.
LBC School of Music.
Wednesday Noon Hour
Series. John Rudolph,
percussion, Martin
Berinbaum, trumpet,
Robert Rogers, piano.
12:30 pm. I BC Recital
Hall.
I BC Student
Counselling & Resources
Centre. Kilm: Stress
Management. 12:30-
1:20 pm. Brock Hall
Room 200.
LBC School of Music.
Dal Grauer Memorial
Lectures Richard Goode,
piano. 7:00 pm. I BC
Recital Hall.
THURSDAY
1 4
Student Knvironment
Ctr. Knviroweek:
displays, demonstrations
and presentations for
environmental awareness
and positive action. 10
am -4 pm. SI B Main
Concourse.
AMS Committee
Opposing Tuition
Increase. Organizational
Meeting. 12:30pm. SLB
260.
LBC PacRim Club. Phil
Barter (Price
Waterhouse). Challenges
& opportunities for Cdn.
businesspeople in Asia-
Pacific in year 2000.
12:30 pm. International
House.
Student Knvironment
Ctr. Knviroweek guest:
speaker Kvan Krost,
ecologist with Greater
Kcosvstems Alliance.
12:30 pm. Hut B5 2202
Main Mall (Sustainable
Development Research
Institute)
I BC Student Counselling
& Resources Centre.
Workshop:
Procrastination:
Discover the Pace That's
Right For You. 12:30 -
1:20 pm. Brock Hall
Room 200.
LBC Student Counselling
& Resources Centre.
Workshop: Mastering
your Textbooks. 12:30-
1:20. Brock Hall Room
200.
LBC Trotskyist League
Club. Class. 7:30 pm.
SLB Room 215.
LBC School of Music.
Dal Grauer Memorial
Lectures Richard Goode,
piano. 8:00 pm. LBC
Recital Hall.
FRIDAY
Student I^nvironment
Ctr. Knviroweek:
displays, demonstrations
and presentations for
environmental
awareness and positive
action. 10 am - 4 pm.
SLB Main Concourse.
Student Environment
Ctr. F:nviroweek guest:
speaker Liz Armstrong,
anti-chlorine bleaching
activist. 12:30 pm. SLB
Auditorium.
LBC Student
Counselling & Resources
Centre. Workshop:
(Jetting The Point:
Taking Good Lecture
Notes. 12:30-1:20 pm.
Brock Hall Room
200.unselling &
Resources Centre.
Workshop: (letting The
Point: Taking Good
Lecture Notes. 12:30-
1:20
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2/THE UBYSSEY
January 12.1993 NEWS
Undercover security guards
infiltrate Concordia campus
by Colin Nlven and Jennifer
Thomas
MONTREAL(CUP)—The classmate you borrowed a pen from last
week may not have been a student.
In fact, he or she might have been
a plainclothes security guard casing your class.
That sounds like fiction, but
Concordia University's security
director Michel Bujold said it is
not.
Bujold said it is common practice for security guards at
Concordia to go undercover, posing as students attending classes,
to get information about students
and others suspected of criminal
activity.
The security department is
using that kind of underground
information-gathering in its investigation of a recent assault case,
he said. Bujold and Montreal police are lookingfor a man who tried
to assault a Concordia student
outside a downtown building October 28.
The student said the man had
attended her sociology classes several times. But student council co-
president Charlene Nero says
campus security is not mandated
to do plainclothes surveillance.
"It's not within the scope of
the security services that are offered at the university," she said.
A task force on security matters was assembled last April to
review the services provided by
the security department following
a spate of threats against student
representatives.
Its report did not cite undercover investigation as a recommended function of the security
department. The task force report
said security services provided by
the university should include
regular building and ground patrols, emergency response, advice
and assistance to individuals and
groups requesting it, and education on public safety issues affecting the university community.
The report stated, "The mandate for the [security] department
needs to be re-written to reflect a
more positive and dynamic image,
i.e. that of 'guardian' rather than
'night watchman' or 'policeman.'"
Nero said the security department is not following the guidelines set by the task force.
"The department is called
C.S.S. (Campus Security Services)
not C.I.A.," she said. They're not
supposed to be in there trying to
collect intelligence.
Shoebox prisons under construction
Minimum housing size to shrink
by Jason Robertson
How woul d you like to live in a
shoebox?
Vancouver City Council voted
last Thursday to change a bylaw,
reducing the minimum space required for a rental apartment unit
from 320 to 275 square feet.
The motion was pushed for by
the Vancouver Land Corporation
(VLC), a developing company set
up by the city, which is currently
building an apartment complex at
1303 Seymour Street.
Sixty per cent ofthe units being built are under 320 square feet,
bathroom and kitchen included,
and the smallest unit is 280 square
feet.
The $500 per month "mini-
suites" are intended by Council to
be an affordable housing option to
meet the needs of those who require little space.
Butthe Tenants'Rights Action
Coalition (TRAC) points out that
the rental cost per foot is considerably higher than other forms of
housing—$1.25 per square foot for
the mini-suites versus $1.00 per
square foot for condominiums.
TRAC, which helps individual
tenants exercise their legal rights,
vehemently opposes both the mini-
suites and the new bylaw.
On Wednesday, the day before the council meeting, the coalition set up their own version of
a mini-suite on the lawn in front
of city hall.
TRAC volunteer Deborah
Gordon-Romero said, "Once you
account for the bathroom, stove,
fridge, and bed, there was room
only for a card table and two chairs.
There was really no room for any
personal belongings, and any guest
that came over would have to sit
on your bed."
The VLCbuiltthe suites before
the bylaw was passed, with no
opportunity for public input.
Gordon-Romero said the VIjC
must have made an application to
the city's Board ofVariance to make
an exception to the building bylaw and build the suites before the
law was changed.
A VLC brief says the target
market for the suites are service-
workers, seniors, students, and
people from out of town that need
a place in the city to sleep 2-3 times
per month.
"These groups are low-income
people, mostly women, seniors, and
to some degree students. Service
workers, mostly hotel and restaurant, are targets of these developments," Gordon-Romero said.
Forty per cent of new jobs being created in Vancouver will be
service industry jobs, leaving
people below the poverty line, Gordon-Romero said.
Rodney DeCroo, chairperson
of the Langara Students' Union,
said, "Fm specifically opposed to
the creation ofthe mini-suites because one of the target markets
are clearly students. When you
start creating these suites, the need
for public amenities increases ...
libraries, greenspace, etc.... You
really need some incredible planning."
VLC claims they will build
some kind of recreation facility in
the apartment complex, but Gordon-Romero said it will not be a
space where people can have any
privacy.
"People need a place where
they can live their life and have
enough private space where they
feel emotionally secure and be
happy," she said.
Although smaller suites exist
in Seattle and San Diego, their
floor area does not include the
bathroom and kitchen as it does in
the VLC mini-suites.
"There is nowhere in North
America that there are apartments
developed in this way.
"This new bylaw is precedent-
setting in Canada," Gordon-
Romero said.
She added that there is a real
danger that developers in other
parts of Canada will follow
Vancouver's example, and that
skyrocketing housing prices will
increase homelessness.
"We have the rector repeatedly telling us he doesn't want to
turn the university into a police
state, and we find that we have
undercover cops in our classrooms."
Nero said the undercover surveillance is a "knee-jerk" reaction.
She said students and faculty are
dissatisfied with the university's
response to the August 24
shootings that left four professors
dead. She said issues that would
not have been taken seriously six
months ago are now very serious.
"There is the absence of clear
guidance from the top down telling
the university what's being done
and what needs to be done," she
said.
Bujold said the security department took it upon itself to conduct covert surveillance of students
in class.
Max Barlow, an associate vice-
rector, said he knew of only one
incident in which security infiltrated a classroom in plainclothes,
because he read about it in a student paper.
Bujold said he reports directly to Barlow but they do not
discuss exactly how an investigation is to be conducted.
"There's alevel of trust there,"
Bujold said. "[Barlow] is made
aware of the case but not of the
operational procedure—he knows
I won't cross the line.
"I use my experience in security to judge what is morally right.
We pretty much have carte blanche
on campus."
Bujold said he always has
one or two on-going cases involving undercover personnel. "We do
monitor classes at regular intervals, but there has to be a motive
behind it."
He said some students who
feel threatened will ask for a guard
to accompany them to and from
class.
The guard may even stay with
the student in the classroom and,
to avoid drawing attention to the
student, the officer may not be in
uniform. Or a professor may feel
nervous because of threats of violence against him or her and request that a guard sit inconspicuously at the back ofthe class while
they teach, Bujold said.
In other cases, however, undercover security guards will infiltrate a classroom to get a "visual
description" of someone suspected
of a crime.
Susan Magor, director of the
Environmental Health and Safety
Committee that oversees security
matters, was also unaware that
campus security is doing
plainclothes surveillance.
But she said if security is going undercover "there must be a
damn good reason for it."
"Fm sure it's called for. We
have to trust the professionals to
do their job," she said.
But Nero questioned security's
competence to conduct "covert operations."
"How dangerous is it when
somebody with little training conducts such an investigation? What
guarantee do we have that they're
going to reach the right conclusions?" she asked.
Nero said students' rights to
privacy are being undermined.
"it's an intrusive violation of
people's privacy. It goes well beyond the kinds of powers we want
at the university."
Nero said she intends to bring
up the issue with theEnvironmen-
tal Health and Safety Committee
at its next meeting.
SFU to get
new president
by Mathiu Mauser
BURNABY(CUP)—John
Stubbs, president of
Trent University in
Peterborough, Ontario,
inherits the mantle of
power that governs SFU.
Stubbs will replace
William Saywell as president and vice chancellor
in the very near future.
The exact date of the
exchange is unknown,
but will be revealed sometime this summer.
Stubbs will be available once a successor can
be located and his duties
as president ofthe "small
Liberal arts and science
university" are discharged.
Fred Moonen, chair of
both SFU's board of governors and the
university's presidential
search committee, said,
"The search was a long
and arduous one, blessed
with many good candidates. We feel strongly
that in Dr. Stubbs we got
the best. He is an able
and experienced administrator and Simon
Fraser University needs
an individual with his
capabilities during these
very difficult economic
times."
Indeed, students are
not getting the courses
they need for their majors
and minors; courses are
being cancelled; place for
classes is severely restricted; the campus
needs new buildings,
and parking,
The new president is
inheriting all this and
more.
What does he have to
say?
"It's premature to say
what my priorities are,"
Stubbs said. "I know very
little about Simon
Fraser."
He admits he has a
lot to learn and he counts
on Simon Fraser's
"strong sense of innovation and energy."
January 12,1993
THE UBYSSEY/3 TRAVEL CUTS/VOYAGES CAMPUS
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STUDENTS!   BOOK   BEFORE   JANUARY   31ST
*$99 from Toronto or Montreal. All departures before May 12, 1993.
Some restrictions may apply. Seats are limited so book now!
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SPORT S
From the sports desk...
by Stan Paul and Mark Nielsen
Women hoopsters in third
but lose leading
rebounder
The UBC Thunderbirds moved
into third place in Canada West
women's basketball play with a
two-game sweep of the
Saskatchewan Huskies at War
Memorial Gym over the weekend.
But they've also lost their
leading rebounder Cheryl Kinton,
a 21 year-old native of Kitimat,
who has withdrawn from classes
at UBC for health reasons.
The loss of Kinton, a CWUAA
Second Team All Star in her rookie
season last year, is a big one for the
T-Birds, particularly since they'll
be facing the two best teams in the
conference over the next two weeks.
UBC dumped the Huskies 86-
60 on Friday night and 68-53 on
Saturday night.
Men's basketball split with
first-place Huskies
The UBC Thunderbirds came
within seconds of sweeping the
CWUAA leading Saskatchewan
Huskies this weekend.
Under Bob Heighton's lead,
with 14 points 10 rebounds and
two assists, the T-Birds cooled off
the Huskies 94-83 on Friday night.
On their final match on Saturday, the Huskies were leading at
the half 37-27 but the undaunted
"Birds came back to tie 75-75 at the
end of regulation.
With only three minutes left
in overtime, UBC took the lead for
the first time in the game. However,
Sask's Darrin Rask hit a three
pointer with 11 seconds left to give
the Huskies 83-81 win. Heighten
led the way for the Birds with 22
points.
UBC hockey avoided
the cellar
The T-Birds snapped an 11
game losing streak in conference
play by earning a 4-4 tie and a 3-1
win against the last place Brandon
Bobcats last Saturday.
While Mike Thom saved 37 of
41 shots, Mike Ikeda, Charles
Cooper, Brad Edgington and Jim
Inkster each scored a goal on Saturday.
Paul Hurl deflected 33 out of
34 shots on Sunday with scoring
from Jeff Dods, Mike Shemko and
Jim Inkster.
Thunderbirds must win
against Lethbridge this weekend,
while other teamsmust absorb key
losses if they hope to make the
fourth and final playoff spot.
JANUARY WORKSHOP SCHEDULE
All workshops are from 12:30 - 1:20pm
January 11
Get the Most From Your Unique Learning Style
January 12,22
Study Skills: Your First Step
January 14
Mastering Your Textbooks
January 14
Procrastination: Discover the Pace That's Right For You
January 15,19
Getting the Point: Taking Good Lecture Notes
January 18
Time Management: Juggling Your Priorities
January 21
Stressed Out? Your First Step
January 25
Stressed Out? Relaxation Techniques
January 26
Improve Your Concentration
January 28
Stressed Out? Harness Your Mind Power
January 29
Dual Student Couples
January FILMS
Wednesday 12:30 ■ 1:20pm
January 13
Stress Management
January 20
Journey Into Self Esteem
January 27
Be Prepared to Speak
* All workshops and films are free.
For more information and to pre-register call 822-3811
Thundeitohfte shoot for the stars
$7.50 / HOUR
AMS EXECUTIVE ELECTIONS
JANUARY 25 - 29,1993
MANY HOURS AND LOCATIONS AVAILABLE!
Sign up in SUB 246 on:
Thursday, January 14, 1993 11:30 - 2:30 p.m.
Monday, January 18, 1993 1:30-3:30 p.m.
Wednesday, January 20,1993 1:30 - 3:30 p.m.
Questions? Please contact:
Randy Romero, Elections Commissioner,
Grant Rhodes, Chief Returning Officer, or
Michael Maher, Deputy Returning Officer
in SUB 246, 822-2361
'93
ElectioN
4/THE UBYSSEY
January 12,1993 B I RDS
This week
in Varsity
Sports
Volleyball
Hockey
Women
Alberta
UBC
Calgary
Victoria
Sask.
MP MW ML SW SL Pts.
6
4
3
2
1
0
4
3
4
5
18
16
15
10
7
12
8
6
4
2
Regina
Sask.
Calgaiy
Alberta
Manitoba   7
UBC 4
W
12
11
10
9
Basketball
W L F   A   Pet. GBL
8   0 640 430 1.000 —
3 546 552   .625    3
4 561 545   .500    4
4 504 511   .500   4
6 469 548   .250    6
7 416 550   .125    7
Women
Victoria
lethbridge 5
UBC 4
Alberta 4
Calgary 2
Sask. 1
Men
W L   F   A   Pet. GBL
Sask. 6   2   668 621   .750   —
Calgary 5 3 664 610 .625 1
Alberta 4 4 676 657 .500 2
Victoria 4 4 647 645 .500 2
UBC 3   5   668 696   .375    3
Lethbridge 2   6   639 733   .250   4
•  This week - Both the men and the
women travel to Lethbridge.
Friday: Saskatchewan 3 UBC 2
Saturday: UBC 3 Saskatchewan 0 (15-
11, 15-6, 15-12)
• This week - UBC hosts the
Thu nderbird Invitation al Tournament
at War Memorial Gym this weekend.
L  T  F  A Pts.
2   2 84 55   26
4 1 83 71   23
5 1 72 64   21
5   2 77 57   20
7   2 62 69
11 1 60 73
Lethbridge 3   11 2 62 76
Brandon     1   12 3 51 86
• This week-UBC hosts Lethbridge at
the Winter Centre. Game times are
7:30 pm on Friday and 1:30 pm on
Saturday.
16
9
8
5
Men
Calgary
Sask.
Alberta
UBC
Victoria
This week in other sports
MP MW ML SW SL Pts.   •
1
1
2
6
6
17
16
16
8
7
6
10
9
21
18
10
10
8
4
0
Friday: Saskatchewan 3 UBC 0
Saturday: Saskatchewan 3 UBC 1 (15-
12, 12-15, 15-5, 15-4)
•    This week - UBC travels to the
University of California - Santa Barbara for a tournament this weekend.
The men's and womens track and
field teams travel to Seattle, Washington for the Huskie Indoor Meet.
The men's gymnastics team competes at the Spartan Invitational in
San Jose, California.
The women's field hockey team hosts
the UBC Indoor Tournament at the
Eric Hamber Turf this weekend.
The men's field hockey team plays
the Vancouver Hawks FHC 'A' this
Friday at Eric Hamber starting at 3
pm.
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UBC Junior Varsity goalie Greg Kozoris makes glove save In game
against Korea University Sunday. The JVs won 8-1.
SIOBHAN ROANTREE PHOTO
SECONDS & SAMPLE
SALE
100% Cotton Clothing
2 DAY CLEARANCE
Also:
BRIGHT SPARKS FOR KIDS
Samples and Seconds
Thursday, January 14th 10:00 A.M. - 9:00 P.M.
Friday, January 15th 9:00 A.M. - 9:00 P.M.
at
883 Hamilton St. Vancouver, B.C.
Cash and Visa accepted ALL SALES FINAL
Great Skin.
Great Price.
It's Clinique's
3-Step Giveaway
and its yours at no
extra charge when
you buy anything
Clinique.
Clinique's gift to you? Great skin.
Watch Facial Soap, Clarifying Lotion
and Dramatically Different
Moisturizing Lotion give you cleaner,
smoother, vounger-looking skin.
Often within a week.
Visit the Clinique Counter at The Bay
from Monday, January 11 through
Saturday, January 23. With any
Clinique purchase, receive a
complimentary skin-typing and vour
personal skin-lyped 3-Step Giveaway.
One bonus trio per customer,
while quantities last.
CLINIQUE
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January 12,1993
THE UBYSSEY/5 ■t&$&t£$§>
ON THE BOULEVARD
s300 off cuts
s1500 off perms
with presentation of this ad
5784 University Boulevard
• Hair Care Services
• Esthetician
Suntanning Special
10 sessions for   29'
Exp. Feb. 15/93
Phone 224-1922
224-9116
SUITS FOR WOMEN
Interviewtime? Want to make a good first impression?
SEMI-ANNUAL SALE!
up to 60% off selected suits and blouses
pinstnpos
Suits for Women
455    HOWE    STREET
(between Pender & Hastings)
Telephone: 683-7739
Monday - Saturday: 9:30 - 6:00
BEAT YOUR HUNGER
WITH A CLUB.
When your hunger just won't quit, beat it with a
Subway Club. It's loaded with ham, turkey, roast beef
and free fixin's. Look out wimpy burgers. Subway's
Club is the serious weapon against big appetites.
ANY
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ON THE VILLAGE)
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Offer Expires: Jan 2&93 Valid at this location only
Hon:
Mon/Tue/Thu/Sun:
10 am-Midnite
Wed/Fri/Sat:
10 am-2 am
J
III Hastings Express
*VUBC
J4 Hastings
(Sunday & Evenings)
31 Broadway Station
JAUBC
42 Spanish Banks
Chancellor
Effective:   September 7, 1992
Until further notice
Subject to minor adjustments
Transit fun
by E. Griffith
If you misseo the Number 14
last time, it's back. Granville
Island's Waterfront Theatre is
hosting the hilarious play that
glorifies a familiar scene unique
to Vancouver—the 14 Hastings/
Arbutus bus.
THEATRE
The Number 14
until January 23
Waterfront Theatre
There are a lot of familiar
faces here, from the snotty
business types doing their
bizarre morning rush hour dance
to the gross freak who sits by you
coughing phlegm all over.
There is humour in the
things that make us angry or sad
in real life: the sweet little old
lady who gets thrown around
violently when the bus squeals
its tires, the obnoxious overpaid
know-it-all who spews boring
trivia, and the ancient, wrinkly,
quivering old fossil who agonizingly inches his way to the fare
box only to ask, "is this the
number 16?"
Six people make up the
whole giant cast through the
clever use of expressive masks
ranging from minimal to elaborate full-face with moving eyes.
The skits at times lapse into
the absurd and fanciful, but stay
funny.
A group of passengers united
in their disgust at an annoyingly
loud person begin singing
snippets of famous songs,
unnerving an innocent bus rider
who has not shared the experience.
For students, the two-for-one
Saturday two pm show works out
to less than the cost of a movie.
AMS USED
BOOKSTORE
Last week to buy
your used books!
Why buy your used books from the AMS
Used Bookstore?
IKs run by students. By buying your used books from the
AMS, you are supporting students and their interests. Profits
earned, if any, support the many service organizations, clubs
and programs sponsored by the AMS.
Why go anywhere else?
Located on the northeast corner of SUB, Room 125.
inmsi
m
THE ALMA MATER SOCIETY
6/THE UBYSSEY
January 12,1993 Depardieu
is well hung
by Lucho van Isschot
Alain Corneau's award-
winning, sumptuous film about
17th century master Baroque
violist Monsieur de Sainte
Colombe is both boring and
superficial.
According to the press
release, the film is about the
complex master/pupil relationship between Sainte Colombe
(Jean-Pierre Marielle) and young
upstart violist Marin Marais
(Guillaume Depardieu).
It isn't.
The relationship between
the two is never explored in any
real depth, the film wanders
about without direction, and the
results are fundamentally
uninteresting.
FILM
Tous Les Matins Du Monde
Park & Royal Centre Cinemas
In Tous Les Matins Du
Monde we follow the young
Marin (Depardieu) on a personal,
spiritual odyssey toward artistic
enlightenment. By the end ofthe
film, we learn that such enlightenment can only be achieved
through tireless self-sacrifice and
silent meditation.
Sainte Colombe is held up as
the embodiment of this ethic. He
lives a dreary cloistered life:
dedicated only to his music and
to the memory of his dead wife.
He is the consummate artist.
Indeed, Sainte Colombe's
work is unhindered by the
constraints of political and
financial concerns. He doesn't
have to please an audience.
Unfortunately, his work also
seems to be 'unhindered' by the
'constraints' of relationships with
actual, living people.
He is always stoic, even
when he is depressed. He cannot
even offer his two daughters
emotional support. He tells
them: "I love you. And that is
enough."
Tous Les Matins would have
us believe that true art is an
intangible, spiritual thing, arid
that an artist can only receive
enlightenment through a dire-ct,
personal relationship with his or
her muse.
The film upholds a romantic,
anachronistic ideal ofthe artist
and ignores the ways in which
social, political and economic
realities inform artists' work.
Tous Les Matins fails to offer
any new or challenging insight
into the much mythologized
relationships that exist between
masters and their apprentices.
And then there is the matter
ofthe acting.
The beautiful young
Guillaume Depardieu is the
French equivalent of Keanu
Reeves—good looking, takes
himself too seriously, gets
miscast in serious roles, can't
act. He was anything but
convincing as the angst-filled
musician.
And then there is the matter
ofthe dialogue.
In one poignant moment,
Depardieu explains that he took
up the viol because he had
recently lost his choir-boy
falsetto. He observes: This thick
prick now hangs between my
legs."
HI bet.
I couldn't help but giggle to
myself. And when, in the very
next scene, we observe one of
Sainte Colombe's daughters
fondling the handle of a garden
rake, I couldn't help but laugh
out loud.
But, alas, a few chuckles
aren't worth the price of admission.
AWARDS
Have You Picked Up Your B.C. Student
Loan or Equalization Payment?
Students who applied last summer and fall for aid through the B.C. Student Assistance Program
and qualified for B.C. Student Loans are reminded that their loan documents (Certificates I) are
available for pick up in the lobby of the General Services Administration Building outside the
Awards Office (Room 101) on weekdays between 8:30 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. Schedules 2 for the
second disbursement of Canada Student Loans are available at the same location. Picture I.D.
must be presented. Loan recipients are urged to claim their Certificates I as soon as possible.
These documents must be taken to the bank for negotiation, a process which can require
several days.
Students who qualified for Equalization Payments should report to the Awards Section of the
Department of Financial Services in Room 101 of the General Services Administration Building
to claim their cheques. Photo I.D. will be required.
BSCAP applicants are also reminded to complete their Statements of Personal Responsibility
and return them to the Ministry of Advanced Education promptly. Failure to do so by the end
of the term could disqualify applicants for Loan Remission after graduation.
Second term tuition was due by January 7,1993. UBC awards for the second term (such as
bursaries, scholarships, and fellowships) were applied to fees on the night of January 4. If there
are any funds remaining after fees are fully paid, cheques for the balance will be available for
pick-up in Room 101 after January 15.
The Awards Office has made every attempt to defer the payment date for second-term tuition
fees until February 7 for students who have loan disbursements in January. Individuals can
confirm this by calling TELEREG, signing on as directed in the TELEREG Guide, and using the
M# command. The deferment should give all borrowers ample time to claim their loan
documents, cash them, and remit the full amount of second term tuition. All loan recipients
have signed a declaration stating that the first use of their loans/EP will be to pay tuition fees
owing to the educational institution.
\ /
»:•
UBC Aggies Present:
UG
AND THE
SLUGS
Friday, January 15th
SUB Ballroom
Tix $8.00 at SUB Box Office
GMAT
INFO
SEMINAR
WHEN
Wednesday, Jan 131
TIME
11:30 am
Where
Angus, Room 310
COST
Free
734-8378
MCAT
INFO
SEMINAR
WHEN
Monday, Jan 18
TIME
11:30 am
Where
Angus, room 426
COST
Free
734-8378
Live rock n roll 7 nights a week at 9pm - Doors 7pm
932 GRANVILLE • 684 - 7699
January 12,1993
THE UBYSSEY/7 Classic!!
Compaoy productivity increases.
***■
\Ui.a*l.ts»v* u   ,,-^Vftsfj  -.
The Apple® Macintosh"" Classical comes complete with monitor, keyboard, mouse,
microphone, and system software. The Macintosh Classic II is easy to set up, and even easier to use. Its
built-in networking connections let you effortlessly share files and printers. And the Apple
SuperDrive1'1 floppy disk drive is capable of reading both MS-DOS and Macintosh disks. What's
more the Macintosh Classic II includes full System 7 software capabilities, including Virtual Memory
and Balloon Help™.
Whether you're running a spreadsheet analysis or
writing a paper, check out the Macintosh Classic II. The powerful personal computer that's affordable, too! Come in today for
a hands-on demonstration. Sale pricing in effect until
January 15,1993.
Also, save $50 on any Apple laser printer with the purchase of any Apple computer. For more
details and other Apple computer packages available, visit or telephone the UBC Computer Shop.
The Macintosh Classic II comes with
• 4 MB RAM
• 80MB hard drive
• built-in monitor
• keyboard
• mouse
Only $1299
UBC
Computer   Shop
Tel 822 - 4748 • Fax 822-8211
E-Mail: computer @bookstore.ubc.ca
HOURS
Mon.Tues.Thur. Fri 8::
Wed 8:30 am-8:30 pm
Sat 9:30 am-5:00 om
0-5.1
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BOOKSTORE
6200 University Boulevard
W 822-2665 (UBC-BOOK)
Apple and tke Apple to%o are re^totered trade marko o! Apple Computer, In
M \-DOS u a re^tnerd trade mark oj Microsoft Corporation.
Apple SuperDnit. lulioon Help ad Maeittd ate tradt mari oj Apple (.ompute.. lv.  (Jaettc u a repntcnd
Authorized Campus Dealer
: mark Iteerjed to A.ptle Computer. in:
8/THE UBYSSEY
January 12, 1993 NxMxW.. S
Firefighters check out chemical spill
SIOBHAN ROANTREE PHOTO
Quebec tuition hike slammed!
by Katie Pickles
MONTREAL(CUP)—TheQuebec
government's six per cent tuition
hike last September is coming
under fire from many students,
including some who originally
supported the plan.
Last year, the government
proposed raising tuition at the rate
of inflation for the 1992-93 school
year. But the six per cent hike is
higher than this year's inflation
rate of two per cent.
It was the Federation
Etudiante Universitaire du Quebec
(FEUQ), a provincial student association, that proposed that the
government raise tuition by the
inflation rate as part of its "new
partnership plan* between students, business, and government.
"Our position is that we are
going to bargain with the government if we think that we can stop
them from increasing fees, or enforce lesser fees," said Frederic
Lapointe, president of a provincial
CEGEP student association that
is affiliated with FEUQ.
But Robert Martin, the president ofthe association of continuing education students at the
University de Montreal, a member *
of FEUQ, said the situation is getting worse for students.
"Before the fee increases in
the last few years, students studied full time," said Martin. "Now
55 per cent have to work two to
three days a week because they
don't have the money to pay for
their education."
Martin, who said that he was
in favour of free education, said
FEUQ's "new partnership plan"
could give the government the
green light to increase tuition even
more.
"Many times the government
makes a decision and doesn't consult students," said Martin. "If we
negotiate with the government we
have no way to stop them from
raisingfees to whatever they want.
"If we give permission to the
government to open the door we
have no way to stop them," added
Martin.
Even more vocal criticism has
come from the Quebec's other main
provincial student association,
l'Association Nationale des
Etudiantes et Etudiants du Quebec
(ANEEQ).
"FEUQ's new partnership
plan is not to the advantage of
students," said Mario Paquet,
spokesperson for ANEEQ. "The
government never keeps its word.
By promoting a small increase it
leaves the door open to raise tuition as much as they can."
However, Martin sai d that the
"new partnership" could be potentially useful, despite some of
its problems.
"It is not possible to build a
partnership and agree 100 per
cent. But the new partnership will
at least get different groups together," said Martin. 'It is not for
decisions, but for consultation. It
will make it less easy for the government to make a decision without consulting students."
Lapointe is optimistic about
the position ofthe FEUQ this year.
The position this year will
depend on many things. This year
students got united by the [constitutional] referendum, especially
in the CEGEPs. We can now speak
up more clearly," said Lapointe.
"Students are strongthis year. The
situation has changed, maybe we
will be more firm."
Ontario scraps student grants
by Monlque Beaudln
OTTAWA (CUP) — Ontario students are angry with the provincial government's decision to cut
most grants from its student aid
program.
Richard Allen, the minister
for colleges and universities, announced November 26 that the
province would cut grants from its
aid program, but make more money
available for loans.
The government is making
$800 million available for students
next year — up $130 million from
this year.
Students who qualify for
more than $5,570 in loans will get
a break. The government will only
require them to pay back that
amount after they graduate. Any
money owed over the $5,570 limit
will be forgiven.
Student leaders say that won't
be much of a break because last
year students received an average
of only $4,861 in grants and loans
combined.
Allen also announced that tuition fees would increase across
the province — by $60 at colleges,
and by $132 at universities. That
contradicts the government's 1990
pre-election promise to freeze tuition fees.
Ken Craft, chair ofthe Ontario
Federation of Students, said Allen
should resign.
"I wouldn't be heartbroken if
he left," Craft said. "This government seems hell-bent on disman
tling the post-secondary   education system in Ontario."
But Allen said the government;
has had to deal with a fast-growing
demand for student aid, and a
sharp decrease in government
revenue.
"In order to maintain an affordable student aid program, we
had to do some re-organization,"
he said in an interview.
And he said the tuition fee
increase—up seven per cent—
wont amount to a "hill of beans".
"That money represents two
per cent of a university student's
living costs for the year," he said.
"I don't think it's going to make
that much of a difference."
This spring, the B.C. govern
ment froze tuition fees for one year.,
something it promised when running for election.
Ontario Treasurer Floyd
Laughren announced Thursday
that provincial funding for colleges
and universities will be capped at
1992-93 levels for the next academic year. The government had
promised a two per cent increase!
in funding for the 1993-94 academic year.
Students across Ontario an;
already planning ways to let the
government know how they feel
about its decision.
At Nipissing University College in North Bay, students who
say they won't vote for the NDP in
the next provincial election are
signing a petition to send to
Queen's Park.
And at Ryerson Polytechnical
Institute, students are writing letters to Allen describing how the
grants cuts will affect them.
Dave Wells, student council
president at Brock University and
a member of the Ontario Undergraduate Student Alliance said he
thinks switching to predomi-
nantly-loans student aid program
will deter people from attending
colleges and universities.
"If -people perceive that they'll
come out with a huge, huge debt
load, there will be a decrease in
interest in attending college or
university," he said.
But Allen said when the government held meetings with focus
groups and consultants, they
found students would rather make
an investment in post-secondary
education than not have access to
it.
The decision to cut grants
came after months of agonizing,
said Richard Jackson, manager of
policy and communications for the
ministry of colleges and universities.
He said the government had
to decide between funding fewer
students, reducing the amount of
money available for each student,
or spreading the amount of money
available between more students.
"This was the best possible
balance between the needs of students, and the province's ability to
fund them," Jackson said.
GRAD
PARTY?
Fabulous
Food!
You've worked hard al
year... let us look after
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UNIVERSITY GOLF CLUB
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Sales & Catering
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Prx-\ subje: t to 1 S ■>■■. cjr.Uuity and additional Ux
B.CHydro
Scholarship Program
To support and encourage students pursuing a post
secondary education in British Columbia, B.CHydro is
providing several $1,000 scholarships in three: categories:
General Scholarship:
Several scholarships of $1,000 are available to students
currently enrolled in the following areas: Engineering,
Environmental or Resource Sciences, and Commerce.
Power Smart Scholarship:
A $1,000 scholarship is available to a student who has
completed a paper related to energy conservation.
U Ecole Poly technique Memorial Fund:
This category is in commemoration ofthe tragic deaths of
fourteen women students at L'Ecole Polytechnique in
Montreal in 1989. Several $1,000 scholarship are being
provided for women already enrolled, or planning to
pursue, post secondary education in an engineering or
technology-related program.
For more information, and application forms, contact
your Financial Aid Office, or our Employment Centre,
6911 Southpoint Drive, Podium C01, Burnaby, B.C., V3N
4X8, or telephone 528-1857. The deadline for applications
is 15 February 1993.
BGhydro
Dedicated to Employment Equity
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WITH VALID STUDENT LD.
(jf    7752 Dema* (at P*«MVJ 689-7772   ±
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January 12,1993
THE UBYSSEY/9 EDITORIAL
Institutionalized racism: Canada Uber Alles
The racist backlash
against non-European immigrants to Canada must stop.
We may not be witnessing racist riotingin the streets
of Vancouver. But that is only
because Canada is organizing
its ethnic cleansing pogrom
quietly—in offices, boardrooms, classrooms andhomes.
A recent "study" released
by the Vancouver-based
Fraser Institute argues that
immigrants are to blame for
the recession, the high unemployment rate and the rising
cost of living in Canada.
The study points out that
75 per cent of immigrants who
have settled in Canada since
1980 have come from non-European countries. The study
concludes that these new, non-
European immigrants are simultaneously stealing jobs
from "real" Canadians and
draining the welfare system.
The Eur<VBriti sh Aid Association, a newly-established
lobby group for increasing
European (especially British)
immigration, believes that
priority should always be
given to English speaking
whites who wish to immigrate
to Canada.
The association includes
prominent Canadians such as
former Vancouver mayor Jack
Volrich.
A member ofthe association rationalizes, "Who built
Canada? Who put all the work
and development into it?"
Actually, this country was
built primarily by non-European workers. This is especially true on the west coast:
our entire communications
infrastructure, and our lumber industry was built by
South Asian and East Asian
workers.
The CP railway—the
completion of which was required for the unification of
the Dominion of Canada—was
built through the Rockies by
indentured Chinese workers.
One worker was killed for every mile of track laid.
When these pioneering
workers came to Canada near
the turn-of-the-century they
too faced racism—slurs, poor
working conditions and
physical violence. Popular
racism was then institutionalized through government
legislation. Head taxes, quota
systems and the infamous
"Continuous Journey" law
were used to control and limit
non-European immigration to
Canada.
Years later, the racism
expressed by the Fraser Institute, the Euro/British Aid
Association and your next door
neighbor is still informingCa-
nadian law. Most significantly, Bill C-86 proposes
changes which would grant
immigration officials sweeping powers to decide who is
"fit" to enter this country.
It wasn't that long ago
that economic stresses in Germany were attributed to Jewish people and a "purge" ensued.
The plea for liebensraum
has gone mainstream in
Canada.
From average citizens to
populist politicians to esteemed intellectual institutions, the decline of capitalism is being blamed on
"them"—the newcomers, the
Other. Get a psychologist to
rationalize this thinking with
a study that discusses the levels of "intelligence" of different ethnic groups; get an
economist to blame unemployment on newcomers; get
the media to attribute moral
decay to non-white youths.
Who needs a propaganda
ministry? Hate mongering
propaganda is so prevalent in
Canada that it has become
normal.
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theUbyssey
January 12,1993
The Ubyssey is published Tuesdays and Fridays by the Alma Mater
Society of the University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are
those of the staff and not necessarily those of the university
administration, or of the sponsor. The editorial office is room 241K
of the Student Union Building. Editorial Department, phone 822-
2301; advertising, 822-3977; FAX 822-9279.
The Ubyssey is a founding member of Canadian University Press
Oh my God. Lucho van Isschot, the storyman, sat across from the
abyss reading "CinderumplestiltsKin* to a hypnotized Jason
Robertson, unaware of the great beast that Miranda Alldritt had
conjured from Martin Chester's unholy black address book. In the
garden, Yukie Kurahashi was playing a tuba, slowly blowing Denise
Woodley and Paula Wellings into blissful sleep. "Wake up, you
magnificent things," cried Siobhan Roantree, but the Chowman's
Kings remained steadfastly lethargic in la-la land. Stepping out
onto Sara Martin's skating rink to do battle with the dragon,
Frances Foran, glittering, in a shining suit of armor, whispered
"-'-- * lie, pretty youflg thing." Mark P. feverishly sketched the
scene as Mark Neifsen and Stan Paul harmonized and sang "Peace
is Flowing Like a River." Steve Chan (yes, THAT Steve Chan) flexed
his invulnerable abdominal muscles in defiance of 'that peace
crap," but Ela3ine Griffith was clearly not impressed. "Tell Rick
Hiebert to hurry up with that Special No.4, will ya?" commanc
Alex Dow, who nad a small elf-like creature tickling his sensit
Iks
ded
 ive
nostrils. Liz van Assum, well versed in the "Folksongs of the
Slightly Drugged Out on Mentholatum," knew the truth: the dragon
was really Nastassja Kinski. Jennifer Johnson, who realized how
hard it is to find good German actresses in Vancouver, could only
wipe away the hot tear of bitter irony.
Editors
Paula WeWngs • Lucho van Isschot • Yukie Kurahashi
Sam Green  .  Frances Foran
Chow eats out at the Ovaltine
by Steve Chow
A heavy, white moon
hangs over the cold
darkness of East Hastings.
Meanwhile, a crowd of
Vancouver's finest has
gathered outside the
Carnegie Library to arrest
some unfortunate lad, and
fire-engines are screaming
somewhere nearby.
CULINARY EXISTENTIALISM
The Ovaltine Cafe
251 East Hastings Street
Just past Main, the
green and pink neon lights
in the window ofthe
Ovaltine Cafe have
hypnotized those who have
given up the quest for the
food ofthe gods. Surrendering to the glow, I
stumble into warm air and
disinterested glances.
The six people on the
low orange stools all know
each other. Most are over
fifty and heavy-set, one
reads the Province with a
magnifying glass.
Near the back, an
elderly lady with a blue
hat sits alone, slowly sips
her coffee, rolls some
tobacco and whispers to
herself as she smokes her
messy cigarette.
Around the room are
sticky mirrors that reflect
coat rungs and dusty
paintings that have lost
their artist's vision.
The potted plants and
small trees appear real
only because they are
dying, sickened, perhaps,
by the elevator music
soundtrack that seems to
emanate from every
corner.
Hanging on the back
wall, the dirty clock framed
in a halo of orange neon
tells me it's ten o'clock.
"PLEASE PAY when
order is given" reminds me
to do so as I claim a stool
for myself and open a red
menu that boasts "established since 1943" and
"FAMOUS FOR FINE
FOODS" printed on its
cover.
The usual range of
soups, meats, burgers,
salad and sandwiches
dispassionately solicit
themselves to me.
Walking with a slight
slouch, a Chinese man who
looks as old as his cafe
asks me what I would like.
His words are so soft they
might have been telepathic. I stare at the
"Ovaltine Cafe" sewn in
red on the pocket of his
beige shirt and wonder
what my dad is doing at
that moment.
Three thin lamb chops,
a very small portion of
mixed vegetables, fries and
gravy and, of course, an
ovaltine is what I get for
about nine dollars. Staring
at my plate, I realized that
what I really wanted was
poutine and a coke.
10/THE UBYSSEY
January 12,1993 Try it STEAMY HOT!
Directions:
Pour in
microwave
safe mug
and heat to
desired
temperature.
Made from real
Italian espresso
coffee, whole
milk and sugar.
No Artificial
Flavouring,
Colouring or
Preservatives.
dinoccino!
MURRIN LECTURE SERIES
(all lectures at 12:30 pm in Buchanan D239)
Sister Donna Geernaert
Murrin Scholar in Residence 1993
Wednesday, January 13
"What's Happening in Canadian
Ecumenical Dialogue?"
Wednesday, February 3
"The Ecumenical Decade of Churches
in Solidarity With Women"
Wednesday, February 24
"The Role of Councils of Churches in
the Ecumenical Movement"
Wednesday, March 17
'Issues in Interfaith Dialogue
COLOUR
LASERS!
$1.45 1st copy
.95 each additional
copy
(8.5x11 Iromsame page)
UNIVERSITY VILLAGE
2ND FLOOR 2174 W. PARKWAY
VANCOUVER. BC
224-6225
FAX 224-4492
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK
M-TH 8-9 FRI 8-6
SAT-SUN 11-6
The University of British Columbia
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
James Reaney's
7 ,
'
the story of the Donnelly massacre
Directed by Sandhano Schultze
JANUARY 13-23    8pm
2 for 1 Preview*. Wednesday Jan. 13
Thursday Matinee: Jan. 21    12:30pm
RESERVATIONS: 822-2678
Support Your Campus Theatre
January 12,1993
Next Seminars:
GRE: Jan. 22 - 24
LSAT: Jan. 30-31
GMAT:      March 5 - 7
Call: 222-8272
Spectrum Seminars
Professionals in Test Preparation since 1984
rerm tfflucAioD
software
Kodak's new
Photo CD technology
Whya
Macintosh II vi?
$3169.
QuickTime
Explore the world of multimedia computing with the new
Apple Macintosh Ilvi.
Introducing the Apple way to enhance your productivity with the speed and flexibility of CD-ROM based computing — the
Apple® Macintosh1^ Ilvi computer.   An affordable personal computer that can help you work faster and give you access to a
world oj tieiv information through CDs.   Interactive games, books, educational software and music are just a feu- of the areas your
Jamily can explore with CD-ROM.   The Macintosh Ilvi has lots of storage space and, as always, the ability to grow with you.
The Macintosh Ilvi comes with Apple's
new internal CD-ROM drive -- one ofthe
fastest CD-ROM drives available — for
everything from computer-based education,
business information management, Kodak's
new Photo CD technology, to the brilliant
imagery of QuickTime.'™
The Macintosh Ilvi is ready to grow with
you because this computer includes the
AppleCD 300i internal storage device --
opening the door to the wealth of
information stored on CD-ROM disks. An
accelerator slot enables you to increase
performance later on.
UBC
Computer   Shop
Tel 822 - 4748 • Fax 822-8211
E-Mail: computer ©bookstore.ubc.ca
The Macintosh Ilvi
comes with:
• 5MB RAM
• 80MB hard disk
• 14" colour display
• Apple internal 300i
CD-ROM drive
• Extended keyboard
• Mouse
HOURS
Mon.Tues,Thur,Fri8:;
Wed 8:30 am-8:30 pm
Sat 9:30 am-51 pm
The colour oj less money:  When it comes to
appearances, the Macintosh Ilvi can display
32,000 colours on the Macintosh Colour
Display monitor. Sixteen million colours
and larger monitor support is available by
plugging in an  appropriate card into one
of tiie expansion slots.
Come in today for a hands-on
demonstration.   Sale pricing in effect until
January 15,1993. Also, save $50 on any
Apple laser printer with the purchase of any
Apple computer.   For more details and
other Apple computer packages available,
visit or telephone the UBC Computer
Shop.
M^t BOOKSTORE
6200 University Boulevard
Tel 822-2665 (UBC-BOOK)
Authorized Campus Dealer
Apple and the Apple logo are registered ira.le marks of Apple Computer, Inc.   AppleCD, Macintosh, and QuickTime, are trade marks of Apple
Com pui or, I ik .   Kodak is a registered trade mark of Kodak Canada Inc.
12/THE UBYSSEY
January 12,1993

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