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The Ubyssey Mar 23, 1973

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 Denny's court acfion seen
AMS to rescind motion
TWO PERSONS obviously enjoying the fleeting rays of the sun, and
obviously annoyed by the cloddish presence of a Ubyssey photog.
I —mark hamilton photo
! Moments later the two attacked him for casting his shadow on them,
an act regarded in many circles to be a bad omen.
Tokenism in arts proposed
By DAVID SCHMIDT
The ad hoc arts faculty committee on
student representation has
recommended one student from each
department be given full voting rights at
faculty meetings, but students have
different ideas.
With the present makeup of the arts
faculty, the faculty recommendation
would mean 23 student representatives.
The student- committee counterproposal reiterates student demands for
parity but notes because of the senate
action of Jan. 17 calling for appropriate
majorities where there is student
'representation, they have modified their
demands to parity minus one.
As it stands, all faculty is eligible to
attend and vote at faculty meetings, thus
giving faculty about 500 votes.
"What the faculty's proposal means
is that students get 23 votes against their
500," arts undergraduate society
president Bill Moen said Thursday.
"We consider this only token
representation.
"What they want is student input, not
student power. We want real decisionmaking power, not just input," Moen
said.
The student demand for parity minus
one extends to cover all faculty
committees and all departmental
meetings.
The faculty committee considered
the departmental level to be outside its
terms of reference so made no
recommendations for representation on
the departmental level.
The report states that
"approximately one-third of the
members of (standing or ad hoc
committees that make academic policy)
should be students."
It then defines these committees as
being the curriculum, curriculum
development, evaluation and
improvement of teaching and part-time
studies committees.
The report specifically notes students
shall not be represented on
" 'housekeeping' committees such as
those on calendar, language laboratory
and audio-visual services, and on
committees which apply existing
policies to indentified individuals, such
as admissions and standing, and
promotion and tenure."
The AUS says this is not enough.
"We want representation on all
committees of the faculty that aren't
expressly prohibited by senate," Moen
said.
The third recommendation of the
faculty committee deals with the
specifics of electing student
representatives.
The report specifies the elections are
to be conducted by the registrar and are
to be by mail.
The AUS opposes this, saying they
should have control over their own
elections.
In the counter-report, the AUS
suggests two alternative methods for
determining (student representatives.
Their first method is a structured
method       which       would       have
By GARY COULL
An Alma Mater Society council motion encouraging
students to walk citizen picket lines at Denny's restaurant on
Broadway may contravene injunctions issued earlier and result
in court action.
On the advice of AMS lawyer Brian Williams the executive
called an emergency meeting for 2:30 today to rescind the
motion thus averting possible contempt of court and damage
suits now being considered by the restaurant.
Denny's lawyer Don Munroe
said Thursday he has been in
contact with Williams, drawing
to his attention their opinion as
to the illegality of certain AMS
activities. Munroe said he
asked Williams to advise him
about council's plans.
"Any subsequent action on
Denny's behalf will come
subsequent to another
conversation with the AMS
lawyer," he said.
Williams said he had
received a letter from the
Denny's solicitor stating their
view that the resolution put the
AMS in contempt of court. The
AMS could also be sued for
damages incurred as a result
'of the motion, even if it is
rescinded, which could result
in serious financial losses, he
said.
AMS treasurer Stan Persky
said he was told by Williams
Denny's can't infringe upon
students' right of free speech.
"We have the right both
individually and collectively to
express our support for the
workers.
"This giant American
corporation has available all
resources of the present legal
system. They're making a
political move forcing us to
back down certain forms of our
support for the Denny's
workers."
"We intend to be totally
responsible to the AMS but will
continue our support every
legal way possible," he said.
However AMS treasurer
John Wilson said he does not
support the Denny's workers.
"If they had gone through
proper trade union relations
and then been given the run-
around I would support them.
"But to start off with civil
disobedience is wrong. I can't
support the Denny's workers in
this case."
Notice to rescind the entire
motion, which also urges
students to boycott Denny's
until all fired workers are
rehired, was given Thursday
by Wilson. Passage of this
motion would technically
though not morally withdraw
all AMS support for the
workers.
Wilson moved the same
motion at Wednesday night's
meeting but it failed, lacking
the necessary two-thirds
majority to rescind a motion
without giving notice. Since
notice has been given to
today's meeting the motion
will only require 51 per cent to
pass.
Bruce Housser, secretary-
treasurer of Denny's
Restaurant International, was
present at the meeting giving
their side of the dispute.
Although Housser made no
indication legal action was
pending, it was clear he was
giving council their last chance
to rescind the motion before
some action was taken.
Subsequent to the meeting
Williams  was   contacted   by
See page 2: WILSON
representatives chosen by both the
faculty and the students in their
respective departments and that the
selection of these representatives "be
left to the discretion of the concerned
parties."
The report also proposes that, with
student parity minus one, the maximum
membership not exceed 500.
The AUS also specifies the number of
student representatives from each
department be half the number of
faculty representatives from that
department with a minimum of two
students. The remaining student
members would be chosen by first and
second year students.
Their second alternative is an
unstructured method.
This method operates on the principle
that all students are equally eligible to
attend the meetings and would allow the
student vote to be distributed on a first-
come first-serve basis.
The AUS notes in its report that this
method would allow "more students to
take part in the decision-making process
of the general meeting" and would allow
"the most flexibility in varying the
number of student voters in relation to
the varying numbers of faculty
attending a given meeting."
The faculty committee report is to be
presented at the next faculty meeting,
which will be held sometime next week.
In the event that Kenny denies the
AUS a request to hold an open meeting,
the AUS will hold a special meeting next
week to determine new tactics. Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, March 23, 1973
Community chest
By ELAINE BLEISE
andARTARON
We all eat and we all buy food. Most of us are
aware that the food is less healthy, more
processed and adulterated, and more and more
costly than seems necessary. We have a
common need to meet our common hunger in a
way that is more wholesome. The supermarket
trip is a bummer for us. The shelves are
crowded with things we don't want. We feel
afraid about the safety of eating the fruits,
vegetables, dairy products and meat we do
want. And the atmosphere is one of gross
materialism and a complete lack of personal or
community feeling (gone the corner butcher,
the milkman, the baker). There is an
alternative. And it is one of those mini-
revolutions that feels right and works, because
it has grown out of people's real needs and done
by the people themselves. These are
Vancouver's food co-ops.
Tillicum was the first. It is made up of a
smaller units, each of which is composed of
households, families, communes, and cooperatives. Many new co-ops have thus grown
up and split away, as the emphasis is on each
co-op staying small while purchasing from a
central institution — all the advantages of
smallness yet the prices of a big, wholesale
buyer.
The key is co-operative labor. Everyone
contributes a little time. And working together
sorting orders is a lot more fun and far more
inspiring than the supermarket shuffle. The
food is generally unprocessed — often
organically grown — and is available at about
the same price as the unhealthy variety. The
order is placed Saturday and filled the next
Thursday night. Everything from meat to
noodles, cheese to squash. And incredibly
cheap. Plus there is no new party snack or TV
dinner being urged into your shopping cart.
Just good, healthy, life-giving food shared by
life-giving and life-loving people. Sorry,
Safeway. The people have found themselves.
If you want to start your own, or join an
existing co-op, you can phone Tillicum at 255-
3661.
There are two other organizations we would
like to mention, briefly, this week. First, there
is the important work being done by the B.C.
Civil Liberties Union. Some of the area they are
working on right now include the rights of
children, commitment of the "mentally ill,"
rights of prisoners, privacy, fairness in renting
and others. They don't need just anybody —
their work requires some sophistication
(though not necessarily legal knowledge), and
a great deal of commitment. If this is for you,
they need people to help do research, write
proposals, talk to people, approach politicians,
innaugurate new programs, and all kinds of
important work. Call Carol at 685-1843.
Second, for those of you who are single
parents, and also for those of you who are
interested in children or in helping single
parents, there is a Single Parents Self Help Coop in Vancouver. They are trying to help
themselves co-operatively with babysitting
swapping, housing, and social activities. But
they need help because the task of being the
only adult in a family can tax a person's energy
and resources to their limits. And the social
system is structured to make it extremely
difficult for anyone who does not fit into the
nuclear family slot. They need all kinds of help
— babysitting, transportation, ideas for cheap
entertainment, persons to help in the office,
handymen — you name it. They greatly
encourage single parents to become involved in
the group and share their problems, insights,
and energy, rather than struggling alone.
Phone 874-9658.
And now ... for our Scheme of the Week.
We have a couple of related ideas. There are all
those people who want to change things but do
not know what to do, and, all those
organizations needing people to get involved
and help all their good causes. Why not provide
a telephone exchange to get these people
together? At the same time, we have started
this column, but have a number of other things
we would like to try to organize, as well as some
training we need to get — all of which means we
would like someone to take over this column.
And this column could naturally expand into
such an "energy exchange." There could even
be short term jobs like cleaning up oil spills or
demonstrating somewhere or starting a
community garden, whereby a person free on a
Saturday could phone and be immediately
aware of where he could direct his energies for
a few hours.
So if you are interested in writing this
column (a very easy and positive action)
and/or operating such an energy exchange —
write us at The Ubyssey. People with energy
and ideals are wandering around feeling
powerless and defeated and alone. Let's change
that.
Wilson supports arbitration
From page 1
Munroe explaining Denny's
legal opinion.
Wilson also moved council
support arbitration in the
dispute but this was ruled out
of order by AMS president
Brian Loomes because he said
it was contradictory to the
previous motions supporting
the workers who don't want
arbitration.
Williams said if the
injunction order refraining
picketting is violated it eould
result in charges of contempt
of injunction carrying a heavy
fine or seizing of assets as wpII
as damage actions for
aggravation.
The Working Women's
Association, which has been
organizing citizen pickets, was
given a writ summons
Wednesday for unlawful
activities by their members
against Denny's. This is
similar to the first order
against the fired workers but
now  the  WWA urging  of  a
boycott against the restaurant
is illegal, as is any other
protest action for the workers
by them.
The AMS may also be in
trouble with students at UBC.
Vice-president Gordon
Blankstein said Thursday he
heard from "reliable sources"
a group of students have been
in contact with lawyers
concerning legal action against
individual members of council
for passing an illegal motion.
As yet this report is
unconfirmed.
"Jonathan Livingston
Seagull
and
Your True Self"
. . an unusual presentation
by GEORGE EMERY
12:30 Wednesday
Bu 204, March 28
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P.S. HAVE A GOOD SUMMER Friday, March 23, 1973
THE      U BYSSEY
Page 3
Senate, Gage delay student reps
Both administration and science faculty
members believe they are not responsible for
appointing students to a math head selection
committee until senate receives its second report on
student representation.
Because various departments, such as math, are
using the senate deliberations on the question as an
excuse to delay or deny student representation on
departmental committees, Alma Mater Society
council Wednesday night passed a motion urging
senate to bring down their report in the immediate
future.
So for the moment students will not be given
voting rights on the math committee but they are
invited to present briefs for consideration.
The committee believed it was out of its terms of
reference to make a decision on student
representation and referred the question to
administration president Walter Gage, said
Wladyslaw Opechowski, physics professor and
committee chairman.
"If the president wants a committee to make a.
decision on the question of student representatives
on search and hiring committees he should appoint a
special committee," he said Thursday.
Opechowski said students have voted on selection
committees for applied science dean and education
dean but never for department heads.
He said that the senate proposal for faculty
meetings allowing student representatives does not
cover presidential committees.
Opechowski believes it is too late for any new
members to join the committee because there were
no complete minutes kept and the new members
would be unable to review everything the committee
has done.
Adrian Belshaw, previous science undergrad
society president, said he was only informed of the
existence of the committee before Christmas on an
unofficial basis by a member of the committee.
Opechowski said Colin Clark, a member of the
committee,  approached  Belshaw  in  October  on
behalf of the committee but he was never heard
from.
The committee informed Gage its work was too
far advanced to take new members, either faculty or
students. SUS president Gerald Mitchell said a
member of the committee told him in early March
there was still room for students.
"The committee discussed the question of student
representatives in October and decided only
representations would be solicited," Opechowski
said.
"It was and still is the opinion of the committee
that while students are welcome to make any
representations to the committee they should not be
allowed to vote," he said.
Commerce dean Philip White, chairman of the
senate committee on student representation, was
unavailable for comment Thursday.
According to his secretary: "He will be at his
summer villa until Monday."
UBC senate to examine sports philosophy
By RYON GUEDES
The UBC senate voted to set
up a committee to examine
senate's philosophies and
objectives regarding
extracurricular activities.
At a meeting Wednesday,
senate supported student
senator Derek Swain's motion,
which stressed the need for
greater funding  of  sports
activities at UBC.
Education professor John
Dennison who seconded the
motion, told the senate the
proposed program was
important as a supplement to
the present athletic program.
"At the moment the
university sponsors 25 men's
and 12 women's intercollegiate
sports," he said. "This spreads
finances thin and prevents
great emphasis on one sport.
"I hope senate gives this
motion a positive statement
and recognizes its important
place in extracurricular
activities," he said.
Despite chemistry head
Charles McDowell's objection
on the ground the proposal was
irrelevant   to  the   academic
nature of UBC, the motion
passed.
"The senate should not be
confined to academic
matters," Swain told The
Ubyssey Thursday. "They
basically just aren't doing
anything to encourage
extracurricular activities.
"It is significant all
activities   are   left   up   to
PERSKY, STUPICH, WARREN . . . debating land commission act Wednesday before an overflow crowd.
Stricter controls of ownership seen
By GARY COULL
The provincial government plans
stricter controls of foreign ownership in
B.C., agriculture minister Dave Stupich
told an overflow crowd here Wednesday.
Asked why the proposed Land
Commission Act did not deal directly
with foreign ownership, he told 1,500
students in the SUB ballroom the
government recognizes a problem exists
but "we can't do everything in the first
session (of the legislature)".
Stupich said he knows of land where
foreign ownership concerns him but
gave no indication of what type of
controls the government would institute.
Also present at the meeting was B.C.
Conservative party leader Derril
Warren. He and Stupich have discussed
the proposed legislation in public for
several weeks and rehashed the same
arguments again Wednesday.
Students provided less heckling than is
the custom at UBC for political
speakers, but it was clear from the
applause a majority of the audience
supported Stupich and Bill 42.
Chairman Stan Persky, Alma Mater
Society secretary, asked the house if it
wished to pass a motion supporting one
side or the other. It didn't.
Stupich said Bill 42, the Land
Commission Act, gives the government
the authority and responsibility to
"husband resources so they will be used
for people today, tomorrow and in the
future.
"The essence of Bill 42 is that we have
the responsibility to get involved with
the action (of zoning B.C. farmland)."
Stupich said too much farmland has
already been lost. "Agricultural land is
like minerals — it's gone once we use it.''
Warren said he agrees with the
government's desire to preserve
farmland and encourage farming but
"this is not the singular object of Bill
42".
He said the bill gives a five-man
commission control over all land in the
province.
"I don't like it. . . it's not good
legislation."
Warren called on the government to
continue the land freeze for six months
allowing time to study and bring in
reasonable legislation to preserve farm
land.
He said the Conservative party has
collected names of 15,000 people opposed
to the act from 26 centres around the
province.
"The Gallup people say if you get one
half of one per cent of the voters you
have a good indication of public
reaction."
However Stupich claimed the
"legislation will be so good when it is in
effect no one will want to repeal it".
He said further amendments will be
introduced in the fall session after the
commission spends the summer working
with people and hearing what
amendments they want.
"The department of agriculture has
worked for three years to do this and
now for the first time it has a
government with the political guts to do
something about it."
Stupich was asked why he rejected the
right to appeal a decision of the
commission. He replied he thought it
implicit in the draft appeals would be
allowed and amendments are
forthcoming to make this clear.
Stupich also thinks compensation
should be given to developers who
bought farm land before the Dec. 20
subdivision freeze, intending to
subdivide it. He hesitated later to admit
this was a policy statement saying it
represents "my opinion."
Stupich also said he would agree to a
free vote on the bill — a vote according
to a members' conscience and not the
party line. But he said he was sure the 37
New Democratic Party members would
support it along with even a couple of
Conservatives".
students," he said. "This
shows how much interest the
university actually takes in
1 sports."
Swain cited intramural
sports as suffering especially
from student control.
"Intramurals are controlled
by the Alma Mater Society,
whose policies toward them
often change from year to
year," he said.
"Maintaining extracurricular sports cannot be left
[completely to the students,"
iSwain said. "Although the
I administration has contributed
[more funds to sports than the
[students have, we still do not
(have enough money.
"While the university's
budget has increased this year,
athletics' budget has
decreased, because it is
financed by students and there
has been a 2,000 drop in
enrolment," he said.
Workers
shut down
universities
MONTREAL (CUPI)- A
common front of five unions
has gone on strike, closing
down        three Quebec
universities.
The five unions, representing
secretarial, library and
maintenance workers, are
affiliates of the Confederation
of National Trade Unions and
the Quebec Federation of
Labor. They are pressing for
changes in the job
classification system in force
at present, increased sick pay
and salaries. The three
affected universities are the
Universite de Montreal,
Universite du Quebec a
Montreal and Universite
Laval.
The main point of dispute is
an attempt by the universities
to create a hierarchy among
the workers that would not be
based on equal pay for equal
work. For example, a dean's
secretary would be better paid
than a secretary working for
an assistant dean, even if the
work is the same.
The unions are proposing a
scientific evaluation of jobs,
with a job description and
precise criteria of
remuneration to avoid
individualism and
paternalism. The government
and universities oppose the
plan because it would lift the
employees out of the control of
their immediate superiors. Page 4
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It is to say the least, not particularly pleasing to see an
American corporate giant humble the Alma Mater Society.
Because of the danger of Denny's Incorporated taking
legal action which would not only bar AMS support of their
striking workers, but levy punitive fines as well, the AMS
will be forced to rescind their support for the workers.
The actual rescinding vote will come at an emergency
AMS council meeting but the executive has no choice —
fiscal responsibility will prevail.
The move will do nothing to change the moral support
the Democratic Students' Caucus members of the executive
have for the strikers, repulsive as their humbling may be.
Equally repulsive is the attitude of a number of
Students' Coalition councillors that the management of
Denny's is right.
"They are being reasonable," says AMS treasurer John
Wilson.
Of course they are. They are, after all, a large
American restaurant chain swatting a fly. They have made
no sacrifices and they risk nothing. Their workers on the
other hand are unemployed. But Wilson and friends seem to
think the workers are being unreasonable by asking for their
jobs back, while they wait perhaps for months, for an
arbitration board to decide who is right and who is wrong.
Wilson and others suggest the university really has no
concern in this kind of "off campus" dispute.
In other words "the working class can kiss my ass, I've
got my PhD at last."
Students would   like to delude themselves into blp"
lieving they are not really concerned with such things. Yet a
number of students; chemistry majors, commerce majors,
people with BAs and even former AMS executives have to
take jobs in the kinds of work the Denny's strikers did
before they were fired. Anyone who has knows it's not
particularly attractive, nor well-paying, nor convenient, nor
even interesting work, but it is a job. It is also obvious that \
unionization would help the conditions and the security andj
the wages of such simple "shit work."
Think about it: unless you happen to be one of the
fortunate few who already have that management position
all lined-up (just have to get an 80 per cent) you could be
working in a place like Denny's next summer.
Denny's secretary-treasurer Bruce Housser says his
company is, quite simply, anti-union.
We'd like to suggest that's all you need to know.
Letters
Money
The university is now facing
serious financial difficulties: there
is talk of moving books out of the
main library into cold storage,
while various programs, new and
existing, already approved by senate are being phased out. Administration president Walter Gage has
been quoted as saying: "We are
now taking a hard look at all our
activities to see where expenditures can be reduced." The purpose of my writing this letter is to
propose one area of expenditure
that could be abolished: university Open House.
As one of those who contributed their shares in making this
year's Open House a questionable
success. I feel justified enough to
make this proposition. Considering the fact that the university is
now moving into a period of
all-out retrenchment, let us ask
ourselves honestly: what is the
purpose of this tri-annual fair,
what are we thereby trying to
achieve? Are we trying to "sell"
the university by inviting more
students to register at a time when
enrolment is being curtailed? Does
Open House constitute the only
way whereby the university can
maintain contact with the community? Hardly! "Town-and-
gown" communication is certainly
not created by treating people for
two days every third year to a
propaganda show, which tells
them nothing about the real life
of the university.
These   Open   House   fairs   are
nothing but a waste of thousands
of dollars and countless man-
hours, that students and teachers
should be using for their legitimate academic pursuits, especially
at a time of the year when examinations lurk around the corner.
To sum it up: no more university Open House!
Rene Goldman
Asian studies prof
Scoop
Come back Clark Kent,
wherever you are, your typewriter's waiting.
You aren't fooling anyone
with that ridiculous pseudonym
you're using at the Vancouver
Sun — whoever heard of a real
person with a name like Fotheringham?
Sincerely,
Perry White
Editor
The Daily Planet
The Ubyssey welcomes letters
from all readers.
Letters should be signed and, if
possible, typed.
Pen names will be used when
the writer's real name is also
included for our information in
the letter, or when valid reasons
for anonymity are given.
Although an effort is made to
publish all letters received, The
Ubyssey reserves the right to edit
letters for reasons of brevity,
legality, grammar or taste.
r
THEWSSEY
MARCH 23, 1973
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university year by
the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial
opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS or the
university administration. Member, Canadian University Press. The
Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review.
The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located in room 241K of the
Student Union Building.
Editorial  departments, 228-2307; Sports, 228-2305; advertising,
228-3977.
Co-editors: Jan O'Brien, John Andersen
This has to be a short masthead. Short and sweet. But funny, So here
goes. First, the names: ^.
Len Johnson, David Schmidt, David  Mars, Gary Coull, Mike Sasges,
Vaughn Palmer, Lesley Krueger, Jan O'Brien, Ryon Guedes-
Now for the punchline:
Q: Got a match?
A: Yeah, your breath and a buffalo fart. Friday, March 23, 1973
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
Queen's to release women's report
KINGSTON (CUP) — The principal's
committee on the status of women at
Queen's University is drawing its
conclusions and predicts its report will
be published sometime this summer.
The four women and two men on the
committee have been researching areas
of discrimination against women at
Queen's at the levels of the faculty,
administrative staff, and student
population. They have been acting
partly on their own initiative and partly
in response to complaints outlined in
briefs they have received.
The committee met most deans and
admissions committee directors in its
examination of the admissions policies
and the procedures of the various
faculties.
Committee members have been
gathering statistics on the rates of
advancement and tenure of the faculy
and on the promotion and fringe benefits
of administrative and support staff to
find areas in which complete equality
between men and women does not exist.
Their research has revealed certain
administrative and support jobs have no
set classification, or are difficult to
classify.
In the past women were usually
ignored as candidates for promotion.
The committee has also learned of an
extensive socialization process which
conditions women from a very early age
not to enter fields like engineering,
traditionally masculine interests. Thus
many girls enter mathematics when
they have the aptitude and desire to be in
engineering. The committee is groping
with the question of whether the
university has a play in "desocializing"
these attitudes.
The committee must also decide
whether it should provide daycare
facilities and to what extent.
Armed forces to stop sending
men fo tivilian universities
OTTAWA (CUP) — The
Canadian Armed Forces will
send officers and men to
military colleges rather than
civilian universities, under two
sponsored undergraduate
training programs this fall.
Defence minister James
Richardson, who also acts as
president of Canada's three
military colleges, announced
recently up to 60 armed forces
personnel may be enrolled in
Royal Roads Military College,
Victoria, B.C., Royal Military
College in Kingston, Ont. and
College Militaire Royal de
Saint-Jean in St. Jean, Quebec.
The programs, University
Training Plan Officers and
University Training Plan Men
were formerly associated
mainly with civilian
universities.
UTPO provides academic
upgrading for officers to
degree standing. Only officers
wno can ootain a degree witnin
two years are chosen. Because
Royal Roads Military College
offers only the first two years
of the four-year academic
program, the UTPO is not
applicable there.
UTPM gives selected men
the opportunity to get both a
degree and a commission. The
department of national defence
pays the entire academic cost.
The-military colleges are
authorized under existing
charters to grant degrees in
arts," administration,  science
and engineering.
All but single UTPM
students are expected to live
off-campus. Just so the
academic class divisions are
kept clear, students in the two
programs will wear the
Canadian Forces green
uniform, not the regular
uniform of the military college
officer cadets.
at
4S60 W 10th.
919 Robson St.
1032 W Hastings
670 Seymour
duthie
BOOKS
Provost warns Brock staff
to prepare for cutbacks
ST. CATHERINES (CUP) — The provost of
Brock University has warned senior
administrators to prepare for massive
cutbacks in a few years.
In a letter to all department chairmen, Alan.
Earp indicated the current financial crisis left
the university no alternative but to fire faculty.
His warning was the first time a Brock
administrator had admitted the gravity of the
situation.
The university is currently giving the
departments time to consider ways to
implement the firings to do "the least damage
to the quality of education."
Earp hinted Brock is considering similar
measures to those proposed in January by
Trent University president Thomas Nind. Nind
proposed massive faculty cuts in certain areas
and the abolition of several academic
programs.
The Brock administration is giving its
departments the choice of making across-the-
board cuts for all departments, a reduction of
course offerings in all departments, or the
elimination or amalgamation of some
programs and departments as Nind suggested
for Trent.
The Brock senate and departments have,
responded negatively to Earp's letter. But the
administration appears adamant in carrying
out its plans. Students are still active within the
cutbacks committee and the crisis committee
formed during the occupation of administrative
territories last January to protest faculty
firings.
The occupation ended when the
administration agreed to rehire the five full-
time professors scheduled for dismissal but
refused to rehire 11 part-time teachers. The
student-faculty crisis committee recently
called for deficit financing to handle the
university's money trouble and avoid cuts. The
administration will likely ignore the
recommendation.
Contractor foots
UWO opening
LONDON (CUP) — The official opening of the University of
Western Ontario's $11.5 million social science complex and the
accompanying special convocation will cost an estimated
$20,000.
But one generous contractor is paying the bill.
Ellis-Don Construction Ltd., builders of the SSC and
numerous other campus buildings, agreed to provide the funds
if the opening was an "academic affair".
"This is not costing the taxpayer any money," Western
president D. C. Williams said.
Besides the special convocation ceremony, a four-day study
session will be held with many distinguished scholars coming to
present papers on the social sciences in Canada.
The money will go towards bringing the visitors here and
towards the publication of a book containing their papers and
study session results.
"This is what they (Ellis-Don) wanted their money spent
on," Williams said.
"We're getting lots of value for our money," he said. The
special study session, more than ten months in planning, is not
unprecedented for Western. When Middlesex College opened in
1962, a member of the board of governors provided funds for a
similar event.
Williams rejected the rumor the funds were a form of
"payola or kickback."
"Western asked for the funds," he said.
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THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, March 23. 1973
Foreign students need
special work permits
KINGSTON (CUP) — Foreign students will
have a hard time finding summer jobs this year
because of changes in immigration regulations
announced last fall by the federal government.
Under the regulations, all visitors to Canada
(people who are not Canadian citizens or
landed immigrants) must obtain special work
permits before they are allowed to get a job.
The decision was intended to cut off the flow of
illegal immigrants to Canada, but foreign
students were caught by the change of rules.
Foreign students must now go through a
complicated procedure before being allowed to
work for the summer in Canada. They must
find an employer willing to hire them, oh their
own initiative. The prospective employer must
write a letter stating a job is available for the
student and giving a detailed description of the
job. The student must then take the letter to a
Canada Manpower office which surveys the
labor market in the area where the student
wants to work. If the survey indicates qualified
native Canadians or landed immigrants are
available to work in that area, the department
will not issue a work permit, and the student
must start the search all over again.
Foreign students can increase their chances
by emphasizing their skills on the application
for a work permit, thus narrowing potential
Canadian competition for a job.
Their position is made even more difficult
by the law forbidding Canada Manpower
centres from helping them look for work. The
federal government also has a legal hold over
many foreign students, who signed a statement
before they came to Canada saying they had
sufficient funds to enter the programs they
were about to start.
Even if a work permit is obtained, it is
worded so specifically that any change in the
nature of the job, whether in position or
duration, invalidates the permit. If a student
quits a job, the student must get a new work
permit before starting another job.
Economists behind times
KINGSTON (CUP)—
Contemporary economists are
obsolete, former federal
cabinet minister Eric Kierans
told Queen's University
students recently.
Addressing the second
annual Queen's commerce
banquet, Kierans wryly noted
professors of economics must
be finding it difficult to explain
the current predicament of
European and Japanese
money markets through the
traditional elasticity of trade
curves. It illustrated "that we
are not taking into account
sufficiently how economic
realities have changed," he
said.
Kierans contrasted modern
economists unfavorably with
those of "the best economic
period in history." He called
the classical economists
"realists" who were concerned
with the emergence of
mercantilism, monopolies and
trade surplusses which
characterized their world.
Unlike economists of today
who are faced with similar
conditions, they set out to
change their world, proposing
a radical new philosophy of
individualism "which tore the
old world of monopolies to
shreds," he said.
He said the ends of economic
activity lay not in military
power, but in raising the
standard of living through the
play of the free market, rather
than through the planning and
government controls prevalent
today.
Kierans hastened to assure
his audience he was not
advocating a return to
"laissez-faire" which had
emerged from that period. He
emphasized the classists
understood their world and
changed it for the better and
that many of the same
problems are currently about.
The classical was was
distinguished from the present
world by the rise of the
corporations as the dynamic
institution. Yet economists
have been slow to recognize
and take into account this
development and its
implications, he said.
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WARNING: Swearing, nudity and violence.
—R. W. McDONALD, B.C. Director
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Spring cleaning
Page Friday is what UBC students make
of it. In my opinion it should be viewed,
(recent accomplishments being seen in a
highly critical fashion) as an absolutely
essential part of the UBC intellectual
community. Education in universities is
not confined to classrooms and formal
encounters. An intellectually and
artistically stimulating milieu is what
ultimately makes a university. The idea
that UBC is a place where one merely rips-
off a marketable degree is a pernicious one.
A public magazine or journal succeeds at
many universities and should succeed to a
greater extent at UBC in enriching and
deepening the intellectual experience of the
university. In doing so, it strengthens and
intensifies the identity of students with the
community.
In The Ubyssey masthead Page Friday is
described as "a weekly commentary and
review", but that description hardly
conveys its exciting artistic and
intellectual possibilities. Ideally Page
Friday would contain not just critical
reviews but cultural, educational, political,
social and scientific commentary;
interviews with visiting professors and
noteworthy people; poetry, acts of plays,
short stories, humour; and creative
photography, art and cartoons. Page
Friday should articulate our sense of what
is really being taught and learned on this
campus. It should capture the intellectual
and moral controversies at UBC.
Students from every discipline must feel
drawn to contribute. An interdisciplinary
approach to art, books and ideas in Page
Friday would demonstrate the absurdity of
the many false divisions among disciplines
at UBC which clearly militate against a
focused, passionately intellectual approach
to education. There is no reason why the
whole reservoir of talent, genius and
energy of UBC students should be poured
almost exclusively into private papers and
essays and dissipated in insane and absurd
attempts to come to terms with the
outrageous demands of five or six
professors and courses.
A highly critical but devoted readership
of Page Friday would be necessary. High
critical and artistic standards could be
maintained and continual vitality would be
assured if readers were more active than
they presently are in correcting errors of
fact and judgment and writing dissenting
articles and interpretations.
These are my scattered, but serious,
thoughts on how Page Friday can both
reflect and encourage a vital intellectual
and artistic community at UBC.
Robert Perry
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Page Friday, 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, March 23, 1973 Movies
Robert Redford . . . burly and beautiful
Indians, cheap thrills
Jeramiah Johnson should have been a stirring
movie about the adventures of a mountain man.
Not surprisingly, the plot is unspeakably
predictable.
Jeramiah Johnson, directed by Sidney Pollack,
based on the novel "Mountain Man" by Vardis
Fisher, starring Robert Redford and Delle Bolton.
A young man deserts the ugly world of
"society", its cities, its wars, and heads out into
the Colorado Rockies to make a real life for
himself. He almost starves, but is rescued by an
eccentric, friendly old trapper who teaches him
the tricks of the trade. He sets out on his own and
pretty soon a series of adventures nets him the
daughter of an Injun chief. The maid (played by
Delle Bolton who looks like she may actually be
part Indian) is lovely (by white standards) and
the strong mountain man, who was originally
tricked into the match, falls in love with her.
Unfortunately, she is killed and he sets out to
avenge her.
Panning a western because its plot is
unoriginal is hardly valid. It is just that the
humdrum plot of Johnson is troublesome because
nothing else in the film diverts our attention.
This is another of those films that was
murdered in the cutting room. Whoever put the
film together apparently sacrificed the possibility
of a tightly paced adventure story for a try at
metaphorical significance. It does not come off.
The various episodes are filmed in a disjointed
clumsy way that makes them look dull and
pointless, rather than significant. Also, the climax
of the film occurs about half way through and the
half-hour denoument is even less interesting than
the first half.
However,   there   are   some   compensations:
Robert Redford is as beautiful as ever
throughout; a couple of the minor characters are
quite engaging; the relationship between Redford
and his bride is well developed; and all the action
is set in the breathtaking beauty of the Rocky
Mountains.
D.M.
Back before Robert Altman made it big with
Mash, he directed a film made right here in our
own Vancouver called That Cold Day in The Park.
It starred Sandy Dennis and it used Tatlow Park,
Images, written and directed by Robert Altman,
photography by Vilos Zsigmond, starring
Susannah York, and Rene Auberjonois.
the adjoining luxury apartments, and the "peace
house" on Cornwall for sets. Cold Day did not go
over very well with the paying customers and it
quickly disappeared.
Apparently Altman thought his basic idea in
Cold Day was worth another go. Images is
essentially a rewrite on that earlier film.
Both are psychological studies of a woman.
They attempt sophomore analysis of the woman's
condition; try to create an aura of mystery by
filming the events in a deliberately confusing
way; and they both have cheap endings.
Make no mistake. Altman has learned a great
deal about film-making since Cold Day. Images is
a much better film. It is more cleverly conceived,
faster and more entertaining. Unfortunately, it is
just as superficial and, ultimately, just as
disappointing.
Images concerns the schizophrenia of young
wife, Catherine (Susannah York), and her
attempt to free herself of her "evil" second self.
Her husband Hugh (Rene Auberjonois) is a
boyish, rich photographer who is tolerant of his
wife's eccentricities, but is not very helpful. At her
insistence, they move from their sumptuous
Dublin town house to Catherine's isolated family
home, set in the beautiful Irish West country.
Catherine is a writer of children's fantasy
books and it is in this world of make-believe that
she feels most at home. However, she also suffers
from her dependence on fantasy so she attempts
to free herself from it. Her struggle involves
confrontations with two former lovers, one of
whom has been dead for three years, a black and
white dog who symbolized the bad aspects of her
childhood, and her alternate self. One by one she
kills off these imaginary spirits that are making
her life an unstable hell. I don't think I am giving
anything away by revealing that her struggle
ultimately has tragic consequences.
Initially the film is quite effective. No
cinematographic clues (soft focus, eerie music,
etc.) show us the difference between reality and
fantasy. Thus Catherine's imaginings appear as
real and concrete to us as they do to her. We are at
first confused and mystified, but once we get the
idea, our interest wanes.
The film is being sold as a thriller, which it
certainly is not. Once the mystery of what is going
on becomes clear, Altman tries to keep our
interest with a lot of violence and blood. From
here on in the film gets worse. Rather than trying
to give an insight into the human mind, Altman
opts for cheap thrills. His "trick" ending reduces
the film to the level of an Alfred Hitchcock T.V.
half-hour.
Susannah York, is, as everybody is saying,
very good. Her performance and Zsigmond's
radiant photography of the Irish landscape almost
make the film worth seeing. Almost.
David MacKinlay
Friday, March 23, 1973
THE      UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 3 Poetry
Poetic Songs
Most of have forgotten that poetry is
music.
We have been taught to look for images
and symbols, but Tim Lander thinks poetry
is to be heard, sung or spoken. A poem is a
two way thing for him, and the audience is
part of it. Appropriately he opened his
performance last Monday with his flute.
Lander invents his own rhythm, and in
parts of his long poem Faces, the words
have an incantory quality that envelopes
you with sounds.
Tim Lander is not an intellectual poet.
You do not have to stretch your mind to
understand him. His poems are made of the
things all of us know. Such is the special,
inverted atmosphere of the poet's personal
view, from The Meditations of Caliban:
Well theres one ways
and theres other ways
theres this ways
and there thatways
theres always
some days
you crying to the moon
but it don't see you
you always come round
my place
with a smile ony'r lips
you come
with a flower
or a piece of twig
stuck in your fist
you're always here
and always there
and some days someways
I'll catch you out — you're the queen
of raindrops, you're the prince elect
of mud and puddles, you are the
waterglobe hanging on the thorntree
you're the angel of thunderclouds
cheribim
of all those dry months waiting
for a train to take you to the seaside
you sea sick seagulls off heat pigeon
the last of squirrels
the lost soul of aquirrils
the found bone of sticks
and stones
Tim Lander likes to hitch around B.C.,
especially the Kootenays and North
Kamloops area. When he's not on the road
you may find him downtown wandering
around Gastown or in Chinatown with his
family.
Tim Lander and guitarist Michael
Klenac will appear at the Vancouver Art
Gallery April 18 at 8,30.      Jennifer Alley
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Times may change. The world.
The Church. But one thing never
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The sick, the poor, the despondent are with us still but the Dominican Sisters of the Sick Poor
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wilh their own gifts.
Their mission is to nurse the
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It isn't easy to be a Dominican
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If you feel the need of a change,
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The Prince George School District Recruiting Team will interview
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VICTORIA - The Imperial Inn - March 19-21
Interested applicants may arrange for appointment by writing the District
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VANCOUVER - The Holiday Inn
March 21 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
March 22 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
March 23 9:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.
VICTORIA - The Imperial Inn
March  19 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
March 20 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
March 21   9:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.
D. P. Todd
District Superintendent of Schools
School District No. 57 (Prince George)
1891 6th Ave., Prince George, B.C.
'JOHN KNOWLES' CLASSIC BESTSELLER BECOMES A CLASSIC
MOTION PICTURE"
"'A SEPARATE PEACE' •**,/2*"
— New York Daily Newj
"ONE OF THE BEST FILMS ABOUT
YOUTH EVER MADE. I HAVE SEEN
IT THREE TIMES, AND I DARE SAY
I HAVE A FEW VISITS LEFT IN ME."
— Rex Reed, New York Daily Newi Syndicated Columnist
"/ LIKE THIS FILM VERY MUCH...
BRILLIANT, HEARTWARMING,
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Harpers Bazaar
ENGROSSING!" -8<"boro Go,d'"""'-
PARAMOUNT PICTURES PRESENTS
A ROBERT A GOLDSTON - OTTO PLASCHKES PRODUCTION    A LARRY PEERCE FILM
ASErWWE PEACE
Screenplay by Based on the novel by Produced by
FRED SEGAL   JOHN KNOWLES   ROBERT A. GOLDSTON
Directed by LARRY PEERCE Muse Scored b, CHARLES FOX
GENERAL ENTERTAINMENT
FINE ARTS
CINEMA
Starts
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1117 W. GEORGIA  685-7821
EVES. 7:25, 9:20, SAT.
-FROM 12:15, SUN. FROM 2:00.
Page Friday, 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, March 23, 1973 Friday, March 23, 1973
THE      U BYSSEY
Pag* 11
.V£<,v S -^
Hot flashes
sru
future
Simon Fraser University will
sponsor a conference on futurology Saturday in lecture theatre
9001 in the academic: quadrangle.
Futurologists will take a look
at B.C. between 1985 and 2000.
Four UBC profs will be among the
speakers.
Abort report
Delegates to the second crosscountry abortion law repeal conference in Toronto last weekend
will report on the Trotskyite meet
today.
The report, sponsored by the
Young Socialists, will be at 8 p.m.
at Vanguard Bookstore, 1208
Granville.
Forest sports
The British Columbia Institute
of Technology forest resource
students are hosting the first
annual wood loggers sports competition today and Saturday.
Events include log birling, axe
throwing, pole climbing and
power and hand saw bucking.
Competitors include students
from Washington, Montana and
Oregon as well as students from a
number of B.C. community and
technological colleges.
Colleges and universities will be
competing for the "King of the
Woods" trophy, while individuals
will be competing for the "Top
Loggers Cup".
The events will take place in
Tween
classes
TODAY
YOUNG SOCIALISTS
Report on abortion law conference
in Toronto, 8 p.m., 1208 Granville.
WESTWATER RESEARCH CENTRE
Irene McAllister on the Stockholm
conference, 3 p.m., IRC 1.
SATURDAY
SKYDIVERS
Student meet at Chilliwack airport,
9 a.mm., Monday.
MONDAY
CONSERVATIVE CLUEI
General meeting, noon, SUB 211.
TUESDAY
ALPHA OMEGA
Annual meeting, 7 p.m., SUB 205.
GSA
Graduate   assembly,   1   p.m.,  GSC
ballroom.
the loggers sports arena at the
Pacific National Exhibition, starting at 1:30 p.m. today.
Admission is free.
The competition will end with
a Shinbarker Ball Saturday, hosted by BCIT students.
Environment
"The alternative to Stockholm" is the title of a presentation by home economics
professor Irene McAllister at 3
p.m. today in IRC 1.
Seven alternate conferences to
the Stockholm conference on the
environment were organized last
summer by 30 Swedish groups to
put pressure on the United
Nations.
McAllister will give a slide
show of these conferences and
will be joined by Lois Boyce,
executive director of the B.C.
Environmental Council, for a
question period.
Save wfiafes
An evironmental group is sponsoring a save the whales petition.
Petitions are circulating around
campus, but if you can't find one
start it yourselves and send it to
Project Jonah, 6 Charles Street
East, Toronto 5, Ont.
Aux Brines
gets bird
PANGO-PANGO (UNS) —
Myopic ornithologist Jena Aux
Brines, co-lame duck of this
island community announced
Thursday, the first bird
sighting of the spring season; a
Wallow-Bellied Seersucker.
"In past years at this time all
I've ever seen are the
Magnanimous Frigit and the
Seldom-Bested Nox-Nox but
the sighting of the Seersucker
makes up for all that," Aux
Brines said. "I've also heard
the cry, though I have yet to
see, the Milquetoast Sausage
so we can take heart if both he
and the Seersucker are about.
Now if the Oscar-Moller Wino
would only show up," Aux
Brines was heard to mutter.
2002 W. 4th Ave.
(at Maple)
TEL. 732-7721
ANNUAL
BOOK SALE
STOREWIDE - 20% to 80%
Friday, March 23rd
to
SATURDAY, MARCH 31st
PEOPLE'S CO-OPERATIVE
BOOKSTORE
341 West Pender Street
Vancouver 3 - 685-5836
Ubyssey quits
Clubs and normal students
across campus are reminded the
last two published dates for this
year's blockbuster version of The
Ubyssey are next Tuesday and
Friday.
Anyone wishing to insert hot
flashes, letters, and tween classes
notices should bring them to The
Ubyssey office, room 241K, SUB,
by Thursday noon.
Brecht at SFU
The Simon Fraser University
spring arts festival is giving a free
production of "A Man's a Man"
by Bertold Brecht from March
28-31.
Michael Fletcher adapted the
play for the festival.
It will be presented 8 p.m. in
the SFU theatre.
Fathers opera
The Opera Theatre will present
"School for Fathers," an operatic
comedy in three acts written by
Carlo Goldini in 1760 and put to
music in 1908 by Ermanno Ferrari.
The production, running from
tonight until Monday in the old
auditorium at 8 p.m., is staged by
French Tickner of the music department.
y^jf*jwt'^s^^^^HW*^^Bt^y^i^ygwyiwy>iii
BRITISH
SPORTS CARS
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733-8105
Authorized
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SALES-SERVICE-PARTS
ROYAL BANK
THE HELPFUL BANK
TRANSFER OF ACCOUNTS
ARRANGED TO ANYWHERE!
GENERAL BANKING SERVICES
University Area Branch - Dave Stewart, Mgr.
10th & SASAMAT 224-4348
COURSES IN FILM MAKING
STARTING APRIL 7
16 m.m. workshops in shooting and editing, including an advanced film
making techniques workshop for those already familiar with film
production.
VANCOUVER SCHOOL OF CINEMA (1972) Ltd.
736-6711 (Days) (872-2851) Eves. orWkends.
M*& &m^^3^^j<l%$im*mk^ 8ml 25c; -
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.C£tf0ei{&\m'!iit*. mst^.tyKkptone art antpayoNe ht
ANNOUNCEMENTS
11
DANCE WITH STRONGHOLD —
Saturday, March 24, 8:30 p.m., SUB
Ballroom.  Full facilities.
Lost fc Found
13
FOUND, BLACK & TAN FEMALE
Cross:Lab.   Ph. 228-0739.
LOST ON WED., SILVER TIE
clip.   Keepsake.   Reward.   228-2535.
REWARD TO FINDER. BEIGE
Terrier Cross. Lost March 7. UBC.
Chain collar scar on rear. Phone
731-7440.
Special Notices
15
RENT WHISTLER CONDOMINIUM
near gondola. Day/wk. Ph. 782-0174
evea. or before 8 a.m.
COURSES IN FILM MAKING.
Starting April 7. 736-6711 (days)
or 872-2851  eves,  weekends.
DANCE WITH STRONGHOLD —
Saturday, March 24, 8:30 p.m.,
SUB Ballroom.  Full facilities.
SAILING: RACING OPPORTUNITY.
Want additional crew for Cal-29.
Must be experienced and willing
to turn up every race. Phone
922-0406.
Special Events
15A
DR. BUNDOLO ARRIVES ON CAMPUS this Thursday, March 29, 12:30
in the SUB Movie Theatre. Don't
miss him. It's FREE!!!
NOW $75 FOR 25c
40 Bonus Coupons In This
Year's Bird Calls
BUY YOURS TODAY!
— Bookstore and SUB —
Travel Opportunities
IS
TRAVELLING OVERSEAS
ON A LIMITED BUDGET!
— THEN ATTEND A SPECIAL.'
evening sponsored by the Canadian,
Youth Hostels Association to be
held at the Vancouver Youth Hostel at the foot of Discovery Street
on Tuesday, March 27th at 8 p.m.
Advice will be given on all aspects
of low-budget travel and free check
lists will be available to all potential travellers. Those requiring
more details of the meeting or its
location should phone 738-3128.
CONTACT AOSC FOR COMPLETE
travel services Including scheduled
and charter flights, railpasses, car
rentals-purchases, tours. International Student ID, etc. AOSC Rm.
1MB,  SUB, TJBC.  224-0111.
MUST    SELL:    VANCOUVER    TO \
Amsterdam unused half of youth
fare. Valid to July. 876-0179. Jack.
AUTOMOTIVE
Autos For Bala
21
1967 VW FASTBACK. GOOD CON-
dition. $1000 or best offer. 228-
8836.
MUST SELL THIS WEEKEND '68
850 Fiat Spyder S.P car. New
everything.   Good   price.   936-3918.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Photography                           36
u t|e Hens, anb gutter
¥f       Cameras
^L-    ZENIT E
JM W    The   Low   Cost Camera
*^ ■*■     with the feature of high
cost   S.L.R.   Cameras
Still at the old price, $64 95
with   Leather Carrying Case
SMELL IT !
3010 W. Broadway
Nets *)ur New Phone No.
736-8375
Scandals
37
DANCE! WITH STRONGHOLD —
Saturday, March 24, 8:30 p.m.,
SUB Ballroom.  Full facilities.
Typing
40
FAST ACCURATE TYPING OF E8-
sajra and thesis. Reasonable terms.
CaU Mrs. Akau, days (88-6286 —
weekends and evenings, 2(8-4028.
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING.
My home. Essays, thesis, etc. Neat
accurate work. Reasonable rates.
263-681T. '
EXPERT IBM SELECTRIC TYPIST.
Experienced Thesis Typist. Specialize in Formula and Math. Bsason-
able Rates. Mrs. Bills. 681-883*.
ESSAYS, THESIS, PAPERS. FAST,
efficient, accurate. Near 41st sad
Marine Drive. 8(6-1068.
TYPING—GUARANTEED ACCUR-
ate.   Fast   service.   50*   per page.
Andrea Green, 688-8261 or 278-2043
(after 5). ^___
TYPING OF ESSAYS, ETC.. DONE
efficiently. 36c per page. Phone
224-0385 after 5:30 p.m.
Special Classes
62
SOCIALIST LABOR PARTY STUDY
class, 2 p.m., Sundays. 609 East
12th Ave. Box 2566. Vancouver 8.
Free literature.
Speakeasy SUB Anytimel
228-6792 - 12:30-2:30
TUTORIAL
CENTRE
For Students and Tutors
Register Nowl 12:30-2:30
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
18' SAILBOAT, CEDAR HULL, S.S.
o.b., dacron head. $2,500. 738-4936
evenings. Ready to sail.
RENTALS fc REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
ACCOMMODATION AVAILABLE
for May and June at Delta Kappa
Epsilon Fraternity House, 5765
Agronomy Rd. Reasonable rates,
cooking facilities, washing machine, colour TV, etc. Ph. 224-9691
after 5:00 for details.
Room & Board
82
FREE RM. & BD. FOR LIGHT
duties. No children. Avail. April
15.   733-2070.
Furnished Apis.
SUBLET MODERN BACHELOR,
fully furnished near VGH and city
hall. May 1-August 31. $165 per
month. Phone 874-8877.
Accommodation
Other Cities
87
CHEEP—CHEEP! Furnished rooms
this summer. Singles $17, doubles
$12/person. Good home cooked
meals at Campers Co-op — 395
Huron,  Toronto. Tel.  964-1962.
Use Your
Ubyssey
Classified Page  12
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, March 23, 1973
Delightful Food Restaurant
Genuine Canton Chinese Food
Hong    Kong   Barbecue   and   salt
baking    chicken;    Chinese    crisp
roasted duck and Won Ton Mein
High Quality
277 E. Pender
Low Price
684-1916
BINGO
EVERY TUESDAY
at 7:45 p.m.
Prizes in Excess of $2300.
At 10th Ave. & Camosun
FANTASTIC CO. of 40 From Africa
VTHE NATIONAL
DANCE COMPANY
OF SENEGAL
"Must not be missed." . . . N.Y. TIMES
"Kaleidoscope of color.. . Vibrant Life" . . .
EDINBURGH FESTIVAL
TUES., MAR. 27, Q.E.T., 8:30 p.m.
Tickets $5.50, $4.50, $3.50, $2.75
Vancouver Ticket Centre (683-3255)
#AH Eaton's stores (use your charge account) and outlets,
A WALL
IN
JERUSALEM
—directed by Frederic Rossif
("Todie in Madrid")
—starring Jerusalem
Campus Invited
members 50c
non-members 75c
Sat., March 24
8:30
at hillel house
CRAPS!
DON'T FORGET to
make your appointment
for your FREE COLOR
GRADUATION PORTRAIT
3343 WEST BROADWAY
VANCOUVER 8, B.C.
Phone now for your appointment — 732-7446
Oil
By LEN JOHNSON
In all likelihood, oil tankers will sodn
be using the Strait of Juan de Fuca to
deliver oil to a refinery at Cherry
Point, Wash.
In the face of a United States court of
appeals ban on the construction of a
pipeline from Prudhoe Bay on the north
coast of Alaska to Valdez on the south
coast and despite mounting Canadian
protest, U.S. undersecretary of state
Whittaker announced March 16 the
U.S. still plans to use the Pacific Coast
route to ship oil.
The ban on the pipeline construction
is due to a legal technicality which can
soon be altered. Under existing
legislation, passed in 1920, a pipeline
may have a right of way of only 25 feet
on either side of the line.
This means if the pipeline is four feet
wide the environment may be
tampered with inside an area of 54 feet.
Given the size of present-day
machinery and the special problems
extant in the Arctic, it is not possible to
construct a pipeline within this confine.
Meanwhile, the decision has been
appealed to the supreme court and a
motion to amend the law has been
introduced in Congress.
David Anderson, leader of the
provincial Liberal party and an
ecology expert of some repute, says the
legislation is likely to go through.
Congress "damn fast" in view of the
strength of the oil lobby in Washington,
D.C.
Anderson says the oil is going to be
moved one way or another, and the
problem is to attempt to have it moved
by the route which is going to be the
least   damaging   ecologically.   He
exped
estimates, somewhat optimistically,
the chances of the oil being moved by
any other route than the Prudhoe Bay-
Valdez-Cherry Point one are 60-40
against.
Anderson says of several projected
routes, only two are feasible, those
being the Alaska pipeline-tanker route
and the proposed Mackenzie Valley
pipeline route.
The Mackenzie Valley route involves
laying pipe for 1,600 miles from
Prudhoe Bay, through the Mackenzie
Valley to Edmonton, where it would
connect with the Interprovincial
Pipeline System to serve the midwest
U.S. and the west coast.
Premier Dave Barrett's plan of
shipping oil through B.C. via rail
Anderson dismisses as unrealistic. He
says the Americans would be unwilling
to commit such important resources to
a government which has already taken
an an ti-American stance.
And to transport by rail means
running the possibility of delivery
being held up by strikes — not only by
railway workers but by others who deal
with them.
Other proposals, such as shipping
directly from Prudhoe Bay to either the
east or west coast are also impractical,
says Anderson. Ice off the north coast
of Alaska forms a barrier which is
difficult to penetrate without an
icebreaker and time-consuming with
one.
Although studies have conclusively
shown the Mackenzie Valley Pipeline
to be the most feasible of the two main
choices for both economic and
environmental reasons it is not likely
the Americans will opt for this route.
rsf
Strait of Juan de Fuca, Puget Sound, Georgia Strait Friday, March 23, 1973
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 13
iency versus ecology
ANDERSON . .. oily dreams
The Mackenzie Valley Pipeline has
the advantage of being potentially less
dangerous than the Prudhoe Bay-
Valdez-Cherry Point route and would
be able to deliver oil directly" to the
American midwest, where the shortage
is being felt most keenly, for less
money.
However, it would take at least two
years longer to build the pipeline
through the Mackenzie Valley than to
ship oil to Cherry Point via the Alaska
Pipeline and the Americans need the
oil now.
Also, the economic benefits resulting
from construction of the Mackenzie
Valley pipeline would accrue mainly to
Canada. Alaskans and Washingtonians
are counting heavily on the secondary
industry which the Alaska Pipeline
would afford.
The oil companies are also in favor of
the Alaska Pipeline because revenue
gained from shipping would benefit
them greatly. They are unconcerned
the route down the coast is more
expensive — any increased costs
incurred by them can be passed on to
consumers.
What are the relative ecological
aspects of the Alaskan and Mackenzie
Valley Pipeline routes?
In the first place, any attempt to
build a pipeline will upset the
environment to some degree. Ideally,
the oil would be allowed to remain in
the ground.
Lamentably, it is unrealistic to take
this stance if one is aware of the power
of the oil lobby in the American capital
or if one realizes how desperately the
U.S. will need the Arctic oil reserves.
Therefore the choice is to decide
which route is least damaging to the
ecology. Both pipelines incur as yet
unsolved problems with regard to
permafrost. The oil will be transferred
through the pipe at 158-176 F. and
engineers and ecologists are worried
about the possible effects of the heat on
the per ma frost.
If the pipeline is not properly
insulated the perma frost will melt
causing the line to buckle and break,
releasing thousands of gallons of oil
upon the Arctic permafrost tundra.
In an environment where the imprint
of a two-tracked vehicle is enough to
alter drainage and waterflow systems,
the results of even installing the
pipeline could be extremely damaging.
The effect a pipeline could have on
animal migratory patterns and the
disturbance of vegetation and soil
along the proposed routes is also a
major concern.
In particular, the pipeline's effect on
caribou migration is being studied by
ecologists. When the pipeline is above
ground it creates a barrier which
migratory herds will not pass even with
the aid of walkways over them; if the
pipeline is underground, a track along
the ground is created which caribou
tend to follow.
These are problems common to both
pipelines.
The Alaska pipeline has a special
problem, however. Central and
southern Alaska are both in areas of
very high seismic activity, part of the
earth's most active seismic feature,
the circum-Pacific seismic belt, which
also includes the Aleutian Islands.
In 1964 an earthquake, reading 8.5 on
the 10-point Richter scale,
accompanied by a tsunami — a tidal
wave on earthquake causes — wiped
out Valdez and other towns on the south
Alaskan coast.
In 1957 an earthquake of 7.3 reading
occurred in central Alaska causing
cracks in lake and river ice, craters up
to 20 feet across and six feet deep and
many ground cracks and mud flows.
Because the Alaskan terrain is much
more rugged than the Mackenzie
Valley, the Alaskan pipeline would
encounter many more mountains,
rivers, and streams in its 750 miles
than would the other in its 1,500 miles.
Therefore, the Mackenzie Valley
line, although far from problem-free,
seems to be the preferable alternative.
The greatest disadvantage of the
Alaska pipeline scheme, as far as
Canadians are concerned, is what
happens to the oil after it reaches
Valdez — transferral by ship to Cherry
Point.
The problem with Cherry Point is
that it offers both the best and the worst
at the same time.
No other American port on the west
coast is capable of handling the 120,000-
ton tankers which will be transporting
the oil. Therefore, if the Americans are
going to use tankers to ship oil they
must enter the Straits of Juan de Fuca.
Unfortunately, the shipping lanes
through the straits are extremely
hazardous and difficult to navigate.
The lanes are currently used by
freighters bound for B.C., fishing boats
and a large number of pleasure craft.
Thick logs in summer and early fall are
a hindrance to visibility, while winter
gales at the entrance to the strait have
driven dozens of ships onto the rocky
coastline of southwestern Vancouver
Island.
In winter, southeasterly gales
blowing out of the Strait meet with
southerly gales from the open ocean
causing a dangerous cross sea. The
problem is compounded by the
topography of the area.
The 5,900-foot Olympic Range and
the 2,000-foot Seymour Range on
Vancouver Island form a funnel which
intensifies the effect of the wind.
Fog is prevalent from July to
October and often extends a long
distance seaward. Warm air from the
Pacific meeting the cold air current
usually found around the west coast of
Vancouver Island causes this.
The action of the northwest wind,
prevalent in summer tends to move
this fog further into the strait. The
behavior of the fog, however, is always
inconsistent and, represents a
formidable obstacle to navigation.
As a ship moves east in in the Strait
of Juan de Fuca it can encounter heavy
rip tides and eddies — the constricted
topography and the inconsistency of
the ocean floor in this area cause this.
Of course, there are numerous
navigational and technical aids
designed to overcome almost any type
of natural hazard which may occur.
The   trouble   is,   buying   all   the
equipment necessary to cope with
difficulties which might crop up is
expensive.
Legally, ships are required to carry a
certain amount of electronic
equipment on board. However, the
equipment is only checked after the
ship has reached its destination. It is
not unusual to find much of the
equipment not in working order. Even
if it is, most accidents which have
occurred were a result of human error,
not mechanical error.
While advanced equipment may cut
down the possibilities of human error,
it still remains the major factor in
marine accidents.
All normal problems of navigation
are compounded by the fact that the
tankers from Alaska will be much
larger than any which have previously
been used in the area, hence more
unwieldy.
Their increased size makes them
more susceptible to wind and currents.
In an area where safety depends
largely upon manoeuverability, this
factor could be critical.
Various schemes have been
suggested to regulate traffic to try to
prevent collisions. The most widely
accepted one is one which advocates
forming sea-lanes in which traffic
would travel in one direction only.
Each lane would be two miles wide and
separated by a two-mile no-traffic
corridor.
All ideas to adapt safety measures to
shipping are fine in principle.
Unfortunately, they are rather difficult
to put into practice, due to an old
concept called freedom of the seas.
There is no effective international
body which can control either safety
equipment requirements or enforce
specific safety procedures. If the
airways concept — where air traffic
regulations are strictly supervised —
could be initiated the problem would be
well on the way to being solved.
What is needed is a high degree of cooperation between Canada and the U.S.
concerning safety regulations. The
Canadian government has so far been
unwilling to approach the Americans.
As Anderson says, to do so would be
to admit the tanker route is inevitable
— something he believes would be a
gross error.
The estimates of the number of
collisions over a span of time varies.
Anderson estimated eight collisions
over 10 years, while in a report done for
the Society for Pollution and
Environmental Control the estimate
was 2.5.
The point is, however, one collision or
one grounding is too many.
Oil tankers are divided into separate
compartments which hold, on the
average, about 10,000 tons of oil. If in
the collision or grounding in the Strait
of Juan de Fuca one of these
compartments leaked, the oil would
almost certainly end up on Canadian
shores because the tidal currents run in
a counter-clockwise direction.
To get an idea of how much oil 10,000
tons is, it is necessary to reduce to
concrete figures.
One ton of oil is about 300 gallons. If
you have a 15-gallon tank in your car,
10,000 tons of oil would fill it up 200,000
times. That's a lot of oil, and it's almost
better not to think about the
consequences of that amount
appearing on our water and on our
beaches.
A spill of that proportion can go a
long way to wiping out the food supply
necessary to maintain the salmon
industry.
Ships can be built with safety
features like double bottoms, but this is
not only more expensive — hence
added cost to the consumer — but it
makes the ships even more unwieldy
and inefficient.
Where does that leave Canadians?
One hopeful spot is the decision
against the Alaska pipeline was based
on a technicalty, not on the validity of
the pipeline concept itself. Anderson is
fighting the case in the American
courts, and says the chances of
succeeding are greater now than a year
ago.
Overall, however, the picture looks
grim. Should the worst occur,
Canadians must press for the
establishment of strict maritime
regulations on the westcoast.
It's not the best, but we can try to
prevent the worst.
'/LAD€Lr»IA
Alternate routes for Alaskan oil Page  14
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, Morch 23, 1973
SPOR TS
To fake up judo
'Emma Peel inspired me'
[The Ubyssey recently interviewed Wendy
Parlow, a third year psychology major who is one of
three women on the UBC judo team.]
THE UBYSSEY: What made you take up judo?
PARLOW: It probably came from reading too many
spy stories — and TV shows like The Avengers with
Emma Peel tossing people all over the place. I liked
that.
QUESTION: And now you've turned into another
Emma Peel?
ANSWER: No, I lost that idea somewhere along the
line. Judo's changed me in other ways. For one thing,
you're working out your frustrations two or three
times a week, which helps; and you're getting
exercise, which makes you feel better; and finally, I
think you've got more self-confidence. And
something else. If I'm in a tournament, there's a
moment just before it starts when you're totally at
peace. You're prepared to do your best; and no
matter what happens, you're going to do your best;
and you can't do anything else. A couple of times
that's happened to me, and it's a really wonderful
feeling.
PARLOW
Judo...
QUESTION: Do you think taking judo makes you
more aggressive?
ANSWER: No, it's the same aggression you always
have, only you have a sanctioned outlet. Girls usually
get slapped down for being aggressive. A pushy
woman, for instance, is considered far worse than a
pushy man. People admire a pushy man for his go-
getting spirit — he's right out there getting into
things. But a pushy woman, to those same people is
just a bitch. In judo it's great for a girl, because you
get a pat on the back for being aggressive and going
out and thumping somebody. Where else would you
get the chance?
QUESTION: You get a pat on the back, you say.
Does that mean your coach, Doug Rogers, supports
women's liberation?
ANSWER: Actually, I don't get any special
treatment one way or the other. In judo you can put
as much effort into it as you want. So I don't have to
work as hard as the men if I don't want to — but
that's a personal choice, it's not Doug trying to take
it easy on me.
QUESTION: Do some men put you down for taking
judo — kid you about it?
ANSWER: You get that from a lot of guys. You
know: "Oh! Keep away from me! Don't hurt me!"
Usually I just laugh it off. I regard it as a phony
attitude.
QUESTION: Do you think there's a certain kind of
personality that goes out for judo?
ANSWER: I think there must be. Because you get
very definite reactions. Either people really get off
on judo or they don't like it at all. It may have
something to do with the fact that in judo you're
fighting alone, instead of having a whole team
around you. Most of the people in judo are quite
gregarious — but I think they may be more
independent than the normal run of people. That's
about the only generalization I could make. Because
there are people of all different kinds in the club.
There's such a range of faculties alone: political
science, forestry, commerce, English, dentistry, a
couple of professors . . .
QUESTION: But mostly men, I gather. Do you fight
with men?
ANSWER: A lot of the time.
QUESTION: And don't you feel awkward about that?
ANSWER: It doesn't bother me, except that I lose all
the time. At the beginning of a fight — a practice
fight, of course — the guy isn't usually very much on
the ball — because I'm a girl. So I'll get in one good
technique, which will throw him. Then there's an
Soccer Birds kick-off
The Norburn Soccer club has the dubious
honor of hosting the Birds in an interlocking
game, 1 p.m. Saturday at Empire Stadium.
Both teams are in fourth place in their
respective leagues: Norburn in the Inter-City
League, and the Birds in the Pacific Coast
League.
The Birds ar.e favorites to win with an 8 win 4
loss 1 tie record against Norburn's 5 win 6 loss,
3 ties (5-6-3) but predicting a winner from the
win-to-loss ratio of the two competing teams
has not always worked out, as was the case in
Monday's game when UBC blanked highly-
rated SFU by a 4-0 score.
Coach Joe Johnson's Birds have five more
games in league play and hope to collect eight
points from the upcoming encounters.
The Birds have previously beaten two of
their upcoming opponents, two are Inter-City
clubs and their last game is against Victoria
West United, current holders of top spot in
Pacific Coast standings.
The future for the Birds looks promising
with a third or second place in the final league
playoffs possible. Johnson won't predict the
team's possible finishing position but the other
teams in the league are watching the Birds
closely as they progress upwards.
Norburn will be watching this Saturday.
.. releases aggressions
immediate change in his style. He stops
underestimating me, and my techniques stop
working.
QUESTION: I hear the women's studies group at
UBC has created a judo course just for women, to
teach self-defence.
ANSWER: Fine: but I think anybody who goes into
judo looking only for self-defence is a fool. If you
want that, go straight to self-defence. Don't look to
judo, because judo's a sport. It can help you in self-
defence, of course, because you're a lot more at
home in a physical situation where you have to react
accordingly. You know about armlocks and chokes.
And you're certainly familiar with all the weak
points on the body: you've seen what happens to
other people when they make a bad move, you know
what happens to you when you turn your ankle the
wrong way . . .
QUESTION: Pretty rough sport, eh. What injuries
have you collected?
ANSWER: Urn ... I think I twisted a toe once.
Coming events
SOCCER
At Empire Stadium
SATURDAY
1 p.m. Norburn vs. UBC
Postponed, SFU  vs. Sporting Club
SUNDAY
1 p.m. Olympics vs. Pauls Taylors
3   p.m.   Sporting   Club   vs.   North
Shore
2  p.m.
SFU
At Queens Park
SUNDAY
New Westminster Blues vs.
MEN'S ATHLETICS
Applications are now being
accepted for president, vice-president,
secretary, and member-at-large of the
men's athletics association. Submit to
athletics director R. J. Phillips, Room
208, War Memorial Gym by noon
Wednesday.
Elections will be held 12:30 p.m.
Wednesday in the SUB council chambers. Friday, March 23, 1973
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 15
LION AND LAMB gymkhana takes place 8:30 a.m. Sunday in D lot.
Scenes above depict highlights from last year's version of the annual
UBC sports car club event which pits cars of varying power and
handling ability against each other. This year will feature a classic
re-match between the engineers' Hawley-Smoot Slugfire VII and the
Artsy-Fartsy Special, a 1922 Pucemobile Flitabout. Winner receives a
free set of dingle balls for the back window of his
chopped-and-channeled boss '57 Chevy with the chromed reverse
wheels.
Summer Employment in Recreation
with S.F.U. Dept. of Recreation
Children's Summer Recreation Program
Instructors needed in the following areas:
Swimming Gymnastics Arts & Crafts
Track & Field    Games activities     Outdoor Recreation
Program Format 150 children - Ages 8 -14 years
Duration of Work     July & August, Weekdays
(15 hrs. per wk.)  9.30 a.m. -12:30 p.m.
Pay $300 per month
Please submit
Resume  including  qualifications,  related  work  experience  and   present
address and telephone number to:
Dept. of Recreation,
Mr.  Alan   Carter,     Simon Fraser University,
Burnaby 2, B.C.
Application Deadline     March31,1973
FOUR SEASONS
General Manager Terry Kelly Says
HAVE WE GOT THE
SKI   PEALS
KOFLACH CRLEUDB
FOAM MODEL reg. $110°°
CLEARANCE
$79
EETiTOMzfflM
MADE IN
ITALY
PLASTIC 5-BUCKLE
SUPER HIGH SHELL BOOT
WITH SELF
MOULDING LINING. MANUFACTURER'S SUGG.
LIST- $175.00.
Slashed to
98
88
r
DELUXE 900/2000
Reg. 49.50    $00.88
CLEARANCE
38
STEP-IN BINDINGS
1 Most Popular 90/100
Reg. 37.50        $A A. 88
CLEARANCE £D
t
1973 fibreglass ski magic
1500 MODEL M.S.L. $130
CLEARANCE
$88
VIP STAR RS
RACING TEAM RS
WHITE STARRS
RED STAR RS
CUP STAR RS
MAGIC 500
M.S.L.  CLEARANCE
$250     $219.88
199.88
$225
$215
$185
$150
$90
159.88
139.88
128.88
69.88
HUBER
SKI POLES
Large direct purchase
CANADIAN MADE
Top quality
Mfr's. Sugg,
list $10.00
CLEARANCE
$4
44
ANKA
LEATHER
SKI MITTS
Ladies all sizes
Manufacturer's suggested List $8.00
CLEARANCE
$2
39
Weekdays 9-9
• TERMS • NO DOWN PAYMENT •CHARGEX
"Deal with us and bank the difference"
FOUR SEASONS
LEISURE WORLD
Weekends 'til 6
1503 KINGSWAY
873-2481 Page  16
THE      UBYSSEY
Priday, March 23, 1973
Unlimited growth and the AMS
By PAUL KNOX
Last of three articles
Student council this year has the
opportunity to discharge an unpaid
debt to several years of UBC students.
Twice in the past five years, we have
rejected Alma Mater Society executive
requests for more student money to
feed the ravenous polit'ical-
bureaucratic AMS machine.
On both these occasions, the student
bureaucrats who had the political gall
to ask for a fatter treasury have whined
that the defeat of their requests will
mean a cutback in services. This has
not happened, simply because the
percentage of student funds which is
actually spent on services and which
actually reaches the students has
always been so small it could hardly
become smaller without vanishing
entirely.
The Ubyssey has consistently told
these student politicians that the defeat
of fee raise referendums is UBC
students' way of telling them
something.
The message is that they must
reorganize the AMS bureaucracy so
more money is actually translated into,,
action, into services, into politics —
into the kinds of things that students
are interested in. So this parasitic
organization removed from the reality'
of students' lives, is broken down.
AMS executives have refused to
listen to this message — which is the
students', not The Ubyssey's — and
have come up with ruses such as the
extraction of fees from all graduate'
students, and even from those taking
extension courses who do not use the
student union building. This is the real
significance of the passage last week
by the AMS general meeting of
extended coverage of the AMS fee levy.
It is obvious that this sort of patch-up
job cannot go on forever.
Why in terms of reform is this year
different from any other?
Because this year we have a 4-3
majority on the executive elected as
members of the Democratic Students'
Caucus. This group seeks reform, in
varying degrees, of structures in the
university and in society. Its members
believe students have a political role to
play in both, and that the AMS and
SAVIORS OR SUCKERS
undergraduate societies whose elected
positions its members have contested
have a co-ordinating part to play in
students' definition of their political
role.
It is these people — president Brian
Loomes, secretary Stan Persky, coordinator Diane Latta and internal
affairs officer Joanne Lindsay — from
whom we can expect some attention to
a situation which is going to get worse
before it gets better.
They must attend to it, for the
capacity of the AMS to develop
programs aimed at fulfilling students'
non-academic needs, or to give
political leadership and co-ordination,
will be diminished in precisely the
measure that the organization becomes
permeated with the unlimited-growth
ideology that gave us SUB, and, in the
larger society, the Pacific Centre.
Those elected AMS executive
members who profess to stand against
the ideology of growth must begin now
to fight this trend, to smash the
bureaucratic monster with its potential
and real personal empire-building and
its staggering cost.
I am aware that this is what was
tried two years ago, when the Human
Government attempted something
along this line. The general assessment
Loomes, Latta, Persky, Lindsay
of its members' failure says they
became so caught up in the AMS
machine they couldn't attend to the
political goals which they thought
students had expressed in electing
them.
This theory is reflected in the line
taken by the DSC candidates in this
year's elections. They presented
themselves as candidates concerned
with "politics" as opposed to
"services", they will try to inject
political discussion into the more-
intelligently-stagnant-than-usual campus.
Some of them even say they are
content to "let the liberals concern
themselves with the services, and we
will concern ourselves only with
politics." Because the way the AMS
spends its money reflects the political
priorities of us students.
If as students we really want to say
something about the racist,
imperialist, capitalist society we live in
— as I am sure the DSC executive
members and those who elected them-
do — is not our own student society the
place to start?
There is a political statement to be
made — to ourselves, to future students
and to the world — by saying we reject
in the management of our own affairs
the ideology of finance and of unlimited,
growth, progress for its own sake, that
has justified and helped to fuel the
social order against which many of us
wish to rebel.
There is nothing but a political
contradiction in a policy which protests
oppression and wastefulness in our
society and yet blindly allows the same
practices to go on within the
organization of its proponents.
This is one reason why radical
student politicians at UBC have been so
isolated from the majority of students.
The endless resolutions on everything
from the Indochina war to Denny's
restaurant, while valid in their own
right, do not constitute a complete and
coherent political program. To be part
of such a program they must be
coupled with a program of reform in
the structure of the Alma Mater
Society itself.
*      *      *
Readers looking for miraculous
solutions will be disappointed at this
juncture, for I have none. In these three
articles I have tried to suggest that
reform of the AMS' organizational
structure is needed, and to outline the
philosophy around which that reform
should be built.
For the precise details of how a
"people's AMS" might be organized,
we must look to the people we have
elected. None of our elected
representatives in past years has ever
given a moment's thought to changes
informed by the kind of philosophy I
have claimed we need. Now, as we
have seen, there is a possibility this
may begin to be considered. If the will
is there, the means will not pose too
great a problem.
But there is more than a possibility.
There is a necessity. In a couple of
years, if the mindlessness of unlimited
growth in the AMS is allowed to
continue, the situation will be
impossible to remedy. A generation of
students will have been mortgaged to
the gods of finance and capital, right
under the noses of the student radicals
of the last five years. The real test of
the present generation will be their
ability to comprehend the structure
they have inherited, and to begin to
change it.
-WV-^.fc-J-M^W
i-X~Vi*'^;.
■ v?^«*e; Affv
'-^--V1?
Millett - outside 'star' fails to inspire
The following is a personal account of
Kate Millett's recent speech at UBC.
Response is invited.
By JAN O'BRIEN
I went to Kate Millett's women's
studies lecture Tuesday expecting to be
inspired.
However, the author of Sexual
Politics looked tired, acted
uncomfortable and gave a rambling
talk to the 1500 people crammed into
the SUB ballroom.
Millett, as she threatened at the
beginning of the informal talk on
Woman as Writer, related "a number
of horrible, _ ignorant, generalized
statements.""
She was most confident when she
read sections from her unpublished
novel although she was defensive and'
found it necessary to apologize before
reading.
Through the passages of the novel it
became easy to understand why Millett
was uncomfortable in front of a mass
audience. She is not a Germaine Greer
or a Norman Mailer. She is not the type
of person who can -cope with the
lionization and pressure the media
exerts on one.
To this end tape recorders, cameras
MILLETT  .. 'start with yourself
and t.v. equipment were banned from
the lecture.
However, Millett was still unable to
relax before the large crowd and would
have been far better in a seminar
situation.
Reading from a section called Rocket
which describes "the time when the
capitalists tried to make a star out of
me," she said: "At first it's flattering
to have people write down what you say
then it's silly, then it's mocking and
finally it's torture."
She described the schizophrenia of
being a media star: "a prisoner of that,
monster created in my name and I'm
asking what will she do next."
Mocking the audience Millett also
read a passage describing a dreadful
debate at McGill where she had to fight
her way through a crowd and share the
stage with part of the audience.
Her advice to women writers: "Start
with yourself but it's a no-no."
"Women sublimate experience, they
are a victim of society. They are left
out of it, not there. Women are always
some sort of appendage, either wife,
mother, girlfriend or bitch.
"Women were- important in
Shakespeare and Greek tragedy but
look at the actual condition and there is
no real resemblance to social position.
"Women have been outside history.
"The male writer is outside society
often but not outside history."
She went on to say that if Kafka in
The Trial had written about a women
rather than a man she would have only
been considered neurotic.
"The final reason you write is you
must. If you don't you go crazy. You
die," said Millett.
On politics she said, "I was caught
between the left and the right. I went
bananas. The left said you are elitist,
die. The right said you are a dyke, a
pervert."
Making some unqualified statements
Millett said: "Non-violent change is the
only change. The more I work the more
I believe in revolution. I think
revolution will be gay and feminist.
"We've got to learn to make our
anger move things, not turn it inside
and destroy ourselves.
"We have to become the people we
want to be or it won't happen."
I had hoped to hear something new
about the women's movement.
Something that would help my friends
and I get out of the doldrums women's
liberation has .fallen into lately.
In hoping this I fell into the very
media trap Millett was trying to escape
from. It's obvious the despair some,
women including myself are feeling
over the women's movement cannot be
alleviated by a shot in the arm from
some outside star.
However, I still desperately wanted
some stimulation rather than a
nihilistic, victim oriented talk.

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