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The Ubyssey Jan 26, 1982

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Array Blatk Tuesday Edition
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXIV, No. 40
Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday. January 26,1982
<Hi'- ■     -:-> IS
228-2301
'Black today' Arrives At UBC Campos Today
Day Of Mourning Held For
Lost Quality And Accessibility
By DOUG SCHMIDT
Today is Black Tuesday. It's a
day of mourning for the loss of
quality and accessibility of
university education.
It's the day UBC's board of
governors acts on administration
recomendations for 30 to 33 per
cent tuition fee increases. It's the
day students wear black.
Students are asked to meet in
SUB 207/209 at 1 p.m. for a
silent vigil. A funeral procession
will then leave from SUB to
wind its way across campus to
the old administration building,
where the board meets at 2 p.m.
to set tuition fees for next year.
Students will carry a coffin
symbolizing the death of adequate education and it will be
laid to rest while board members
meet.
George Hermanson, a campus
chaplain will perfo'm the service, said Stephen Learcey, a
Students for an Accessible
Education, spokesperson.
He said students must stand
up against administration proposals to increase tuition fees in
the face of massive cutbacks in
courses and services. Black
Tuesday is designed to deliver
that message to the soard.
"We need the board to stand
up lo the government and its
policy of underfunding," Learey
said. He added that if students
believe   in   accessible,   quality
education, participating in the
vigil would show their support.
Learey said students are
unhappy with administration
policies and the mood is right for
proiest.
While the vigil takes place,
student representatives plan to
tell the board that students do
not want increased tuition and
decreased quality.
Student board of governor
representative Chris Niwinski
said students wrote more than 50
letters to the board condemning
the proposed fee hikes.
"The board has never gotten a
response like this before. People
obviously care, and it's going to
have an effect on the board's
decision," Niwinski said.
Alma Mater Society external
affairs officer James Hollis said
he will concentrate on the
philosophical aspects of funding
cutbacks. He said he will decry
the "reprehensible nature of
(UBC president Doug Kenny's)
retrenchment report."
"Kenny has acted completely
blind of any student input,"
Hollis said.
SAE will provide black armbands for students who wish to
protest fee hikes at an information booth in the SUB foyer.
K-^1
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or
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BLACK-BANDED KENNY. . .will there be mourning after?
Channin Won't Get Squeezed Out By Cuts
By CRAIG BROOKS
Students might be learning in
a dirtier university after fiscal
cuts are made today, but they
will still be able to squeeze the
Charmin.
A retrenchment committee
recommended Jan. 13 that
$990,000 of physical plant's $11
million operations budget be
slashed as part of a series of cuts
designed to meet UBC's current
budgetary shortfall of $7.2
million.
Physical plant director Neville
Smith said Friday the money will
largely come from the cleaning
and preventative maintenance
sections of his budget.
"The cleaning level (in campus buildings) will drop
significantly,"    Smith    said.
"People will very definitely
notice (the cutbacks). There is
no way to disguise them," he added.
"We won't cut back in paper
products (toilet paper)," Smith
said.
"We cannot let i. get to a
point where sanitation is a pro-
See page 9: CUTS
Senators Lament Lack
Of Student Voice
By NANCY CAMPBELL
Student senators are appalled
at what they consider to be the
total bypassing of senate input
on administration retrenchment
proposals.
To Arts senator Lise Hebert
said Monday because there is no
input from senate there is no input from students on president's
retrenchment committee recommendations. "(Administration
president Doug Kenny said at
the last senate meeting that it
was 'not necessary' for the
senate budget committee to meet
with the board since the retrenchment committee is meeting
with it," she said.
"1 was just appalled. There is
no input from the academic
representatives of this university, even though the retrenchment committee is supposed to
deai with academic matters and
not tuition."
But UBC spokesperson Jim
Banham disagrees. "If there are
matters which require senate's
-approval flowing from the
retrenchment committee report
then it will go to senate," he said
Monday. "But there's nothing
in the report."
Students senators are concerned because there are no students
sitting on the retrenchment committee. But committee chair
Michael Shaw, an administration vice president, told students
Nov. 2 they would have a chance
to become involved when the
recommendations went before
senate and the board of governors, both of which have student
representatives.
When senate was by-passed,
one level of student involvement
was lost.
The senate budget committee
is currently reviewing the retrenchment committee's recommendations, though it hasn't
presented its findings to Kenny
or senate yet.
Banham says the senate
budget committee will advise
Kenny on the drafting of the
budget, due April 1. But tuition
fee increases, the current focus
of the controversial recommendations, are not covered by
senate's mandate, he added.
See page 9: BYPASS
Jobs Triumph Over Books
By JULIE WHEELWRIGHT
While students at  UBC don
[black and bear a coffin to their
administrators,    mourning   the
death of quality education, other
student   and   faculty   organizations   throughout   the  province
|are planning protests
"The concern of faculty is of
course in cutbacks in education.
The ministry of education is supporting  those  programs  which
(are employment-orien'.ed at the
expense of those which are less
x employment oriented," Gordon
iBryenton,   College-Institute
Educators' Association president said Monday.
According to Bryenton
CIEA's regional representatives
met Sunday to plan protests in
all the provincial ridings where
colleges and vocational institutions are located.
Colleges and institutions not
only face cutbacks but the
1 ministry of education is purposely underfunding the liberal arts
programs to meet needs in
technical faculties set by the
private sector, he said.
See page 2:INDUSTRIES Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 26, 1982
Industries
get support
From page 1
"More and more they give support to those kinds of programs
which are being dictated by the
industry," he said, adding that
technical training is given a funding
priority followed by adult education, university transfer courses and
then student support services such
as libraries and daycare.
Bryenton said his association also
plans to mount a public action campaign with the Canadian Federation
of Students in every centre of the
province to "really put pressure on
the MLAs to say 'you'd better
know what you're doing' when they
vote on budget priorities in Victoria."
When the legislature convenes in
March, CIEA members plan to
mount a protest in the legislature
where they will approach both
ministers and MLAs about education funding.
And at Simon Fraser University,
students will meet today to ask the
board of governors to pressure the
provincial government for adequate
funding.
SFU currently faces a $1.5
million shortfall in its 1981-82
operating budget and administration president George Pedersen last
week announced the elimination of
25 employee positions, cancellation
of the football and track programs
and closure of the reading and
study centre.
"The students are really angry
and concerned about it," SFU student    society    president    Rhonda
NOTICE OF
ELECTION
A.M.S. Executive Election
S.U.B. Renovation Referendum
B.C. P.I.R.G. Referendum
Polls: Tues., Jan. 26-Fri., Jan.
10 a.m.-4 p.m.
29,
C.E.M.E.
Computer Science
Sedgewick Library
MacMillan
War Memorial Gym
S.U.B.
Angus
Woodward Library
Law
Buchanan
Scarfe
Advance Polls: Mon., Jan. 25,
5-7 p.m.
Totem Park Common Block
Place Vanier Common Block
Walter H. Gage Common Block
Poll locations and times are subject to change.
Ballot:
A.M.S.
PRESIDENT
FRANK, Dave
FULKER, Chris
GATES, John
A.M.S.
VICE-PRESIDENT
COMER, Gordon
STEWART, Cliff
AMS DIRECTOR
OF FINANCE
COPPING, Margaret
HOLLIS, James
PINKNEY, Alan
A.M.S.
DIRECTOR OF
ADMINISTRATION
COX, Terry
PERLMAN, Dana
A.M.S. COORDINATOR OF
EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
MENZIES, Charles SOUTHARD, Cynthia
S.U.B. RENOVATION
REFERENDUM
"Whereas there exists a need for additional space in the Student Union Building, especially for additional club offices,
meeting rooms and recreational facilities; and
Whereas the Alma Mater Society has a proposal for
renovating SUB to help meet this need; the SUB Conversation
Lounge/Unfinished Basement proposal at an estimated cost
of $345,000.00.
Be it resolved that the A.M.S. levy $10.00 per active member
per year until the debt is retired.
YES    D
NO    □
B.C. P.I.R.G. REFERENDUM
"Whereas B.C. P.I.R.G. is a society funded and controlled by
post-secondary students in B.C. and
Whereas each student who has paid the P.I.R.G. fee shall
have full membership rights in B.C. P.I.R.G., and
Whereas each student who has paid the P.I.R.G. fee shall
have the right and the opportunity to obtain a refund.
Be it resolved that the AMS request the UBC Board of Governors to levy an additional AMS fee of $3.00 per academic year
and that all monies thus obtained by the AMS be transferred
to B.C. P.I.R.G. upon receipt.
YES    □
NO    □
Lavigne said Monday. "We want
the board of governors to take an
advocacy role and push for adequate funding."
But Lavigne said the provincial
government has implied even further budget cuts are slated for next
year and the board of governors
traditionally ignores student input.
In Halifax, the Maritime Provinces Higher Education Commission recently recommended that tuition fees make up a larger percentage of college and university
operating budgets.
The MPHEC recommended
higher tuition to allow institutions
to be more independent of a single
dominant funding source and
therefore more responsive to
students.
A weekend with
MATTHEW FOX
January 28-31
Sponsored by UBC Campus Chaplains
Thurs., Jan. 28 - SPIRITUAL CRISIS
7:30 p.m., Lutheran Campus Centre
Fri., Jan. 29 - NEED FOR WISDOM
12:30 p.m., SUB 207/9
Fri. to Sun - RETREAT AT SQUAMISH
"A Spirituality Called Compassion"
BEGINS 8:00 p.m. FRIDAY
For registration details, call:
224-3722/1614
ONLY AT
FELUNI'S
WILD
ELEPHANT'S
FOOT SOUP
(When available)
•GREAT SANDWICHES
• FABULOUS CHEESECAKES
• CAPPUCCINOS • ESPRESSOS
• NANAIMO BARS
Located at the back of the Village
on Campus
/■
Hairlines gives
students a break!
1f\0/    OFF our regular prices
ii /0 Monday - Wednesday only
(Student  I D   required)
hurtJiuri
%
Combining top professional hairstylists
with a very comfortable atmosphere.
Cuts        Men S15 00     Women S22 00
Perms        Men S35 00     Women S40 00 and up
St leaks, co lor. hennas and conditioners also competitively priced
2529 Alma St   at Broadway Mon-Fri      -9:00-7 30
elephone: 224-2332 Sat   --  9:00-5 00j
\i
FIRST AID
FOR MATH
DEFICIENCIES
DOSAGE: Take once per week for the term.
Your obvious objective each term is to pass every subject so you can move
on to the next term in good shape. If however, you're having difficulty with
Math 100 or 101, it would make sense to get help now . . . from The Math
Clinic. The Math Clinic's qualified instructors can't write your exams for
you, but we can improve your comprehension of math to ultimately upgrade your
marks. As a student at The Math Clinic, you'll join a small group on a weekly basis.
Our Brainstorm Sessions are split into three segments: a lecture period, then problem
solving by your instructor, followed by problem solving by you with your instructor.
You'll receive individual attention. Intensive direction. And specific instruction.
Our Brainstorm Sessions are not meant to be an easy way out . . . they're hard work.
They're effective math counselling w ithout the year end cram. Call us and learn more.
MXfH
CLINIC
A Division of P.inl Murphy Tutorials
2-2140 West 41st Avenue Vancouver266-1178 Tuesday, January 26, 1982
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Native culture destroyed
By BRIAN JONES
White  society  has  destroyed  a
culture in the name of expansion
and progress, a native rights activist
and a civil-liberties lawyer from the
United States said Friday.
"We're dealing with a white settler society, in your country and in
mine, which moved in and pushed
out the aboriginal peoples for one
reason — greed," William Kunstler
told 200 people in Fisherman's
Hall.
TRUDDELL ... not afraid
Kunstler, who was an attorney at
the Chicago Seven and Wounded
Knee trials, and former American
Indian Movement leader John
Trudell, spoke at a forum concerned with the problems faced by indigenous people in our society.
"The symbolism of the 1890
massacre (at Wounded Knee) was
that it marked, in Caucasian eyes,
the end of native resistence," said
Kunstler. "The occupation in 1973
was a revitalization of something
the whites thought was dead. Since
that time the native people have
been fighting to hold on to the spirit
of Wounded Knee Two," said
Kunstler.
The native peoples are subjected
to constant abuse and persecution,
much of which is instigated by the
Canadian and American governments, said Kunstler. "The attacks
on the American Indian Movement
have grown through the years,
especially since Wounded Knee in
1973," he said.
"I came to Vancouver to testify
for Dino Butler," said Kunstler,
referring to the trial of Dino and
Gary Butler, who were charged with
the attempted murder of two Vancouver policemen (they were subsequently convicted of the lesser
charge of possession of firearms).
"This trial is just another expression of what started on February
27, 1973," Kunstler said. "There's
no doubt in my mind that the Van-
TAU contract
vote nears
By GLEN SANFORD
The Teaching Assistants' Union's
second collective agreement appears
close to ratification after more than
five months of bargaining.
The union and UBC's administration signed a memorandum
of agreement last week when the administration agreed to allow TAs
control of union option forms. The
TAs will also receive a 15 per cent
wage increase.
The agreement goes to UBC's
board of governors today for approval, and goes to the union
membership Thursday.
"I hope it will fly and the union
will go for it," said UBC's
employee relations director Bob
Grant. "We didn't move much
from our original position, but we
made accomodations to make it
agreeable to the union."
He added that considering the
agreement finally reached, "we
could have settled this thing in
December."
Negotiators signed the memorandum of agreement Wednesday, two
days before a one-day strike was
planned.
Union spokesperson Mike Burke
said   the   strike   was   called   off
Laos recovering
couver police that afternoon (of the
arrests) were motivated by nothing
other than the recognition of Dino
Butler. Dino is a marked man."
When last week the presiding
judge at the trial would not allow
the Butlers to bring their sacred
pipe into the courtroom, the Butlers
terminated the services of their
defence lawyer and sat silent, refusing to defend themselves. "Dino
and Gary decided they would not
participate in a trial where they
didn't have the same rights as a
Caucasian," said Kunstler.
"The logic of not permitting the
pipe into the courtroom escapes me,
although the racism of it does not."
John Trudell who will speak at
because the union made substantial
gains on union security.
"We have control of membership
option forms, we can go to the
orientation meeting, we can give
out information sheets and we get
copies of notices of appointments,"
Burke said.
But former union negotiator Bill
Tieleman said Wednesday the union
essentially made no gains because
filling out the option form for
membership is not a condition of
employment. Tieleman resigned
from the negotiating team and
steering committee because "the
TAU completely capitulated under
pressure from the university."
Burke denied the claim, saying,
"Given the proposal accepted, condition of employment is not an
issue."
Contract talks began in
September, and by December union
security and wages still stood between the two sides. The negotiating
team finally accepted the
university's wage offer, and a
watered down form of security.
Grant said the wage increase will
be retroactive to Sept. 1.
The union's first contract
negotiations also took half a year.
By ANITA PETKOVIC
More than half of the bombs the
American military used in Laos
during the Vietnam war had been
banned by the United Nations, two
Quaker representatives charged
Monday.
Jacqui Chagnon and Roger
Rumpf told five people in the SUB
party room that Laos' most crucial
problem is still recovering from the
effects of the illegal bombing.
The two Quakers, representatives
of the American Friends and Service Committee, who recently
returned from a three year project
in Laos, said reconstruction is a major problem.
According to Chagnon and
Rumpf, the American military used
automated warfare where they
never saw their victims but dropped
thousands   of   small anti
personnel" units, bombettes, filled
with shrapnel and pellets, that
explode on contact.
They still remain hidden in
bushes and soil, and thousands of
farmers are annually injured by
striking them accidentally with farm
equipment, they said.
"Were trying to raise funds to
buy shovels less likely to cause explosions for the farmers," said
Chagnon.
But she said the national policy
of the Pather Lao, the socialist
government that took over in 1975,
has worked to rebuild the country.
"At least they have their heads
screwed on right."
"The majority likes the government ... the programs are geared
towards helping these people.
There's a high priority on education
— it helps the people to understand
one another."
UBC Wednesday also condemned
the judge's decision to bar the use
of the pipe.
"Our religion is our way of life.
To tell Dino that he cannot have his
pipe is to take a part of him away,"
said Trudell. "If it is the way of the
Canadian government to take away
our right to pray, then we don't
recognize their justice," he added.
"They use criminal accusations
to hide political persecution,"
charged Trudell. "We are not
afraid to respond to the criminal accusations against Dino and Gary.
They were tried by the media before
their trial even began."
Trudell also attacked the oppression indigenous people face in white
society. "We have had to fight with
whites, because they have locked
themselves into a system. They do
not have the right to impose it upon
us," he said. "We do not want to
be a part of that world. So we resist.
"For the last 500 years every day
has been a struggle to survive. Today the war is as real as it was 100 or
200 years ago," said Trudell.
"The police forces in this day and
age are no more than corporate
cavalry. Anyone who has stood up
for their rights against the police
knows this," he added.
Trudell will be speaking at UBC
on Wednesday at noon in SUB
207/209.
s^?ff|j:
rt
— craig yuill photo
GRIPPING CONTROL, stick, future Canadian astronaut hopeful attempts to play grown-up like space shuttle
pilots Richard Engle(left) and Dick Truly (right). Visitors from far land, in town to support Canadian arms, were
forced to wear red jackets as act of submission to communist-oriented, red-loving undergraduate society.
Shuttle diplomacy hits UBC
By HARRY HERTSCHEG
Tired of mooning around
Houston, two American space shuttle astronauts landed ai. UBC Monday morning to complete a month
long tour, and advertise the
Canadarm project.
Joe E^ngle and Dick Truly spoke
to a capacity crowd n the SUB
autitorium about their recent
adventures piloting tiie two-day
space shuttle night launched last
Nov. 12 but cut short by three days
because of a fuel cell problem.
"The two main aspects of the second flight were to demonstrate
the world's first reusable spacecraft
and to test the Canadarm," said
Truly.
And according to Engle, who did
not mention possible military uses
until a later press conference, the
space shuttle's purpose is to make
space travel more economical and
accessible. "There's so much we
don't know that we're not even sure
what space can be used for yet. The
possibilities are endless."
Truly said at a later news conference that more Western European countries will get involved in
the project because the shuttle program is intended to benefit all of the
"free world."
And Engle did not completely
discount the shuttle's potential
military uses but said its uses will be
determined by what is in the best interests of the "free world."
Both astronauts said the
Canadarm worked almost perfectly
and admired the Canadians involved in the project. "It worked real
good," said Truly.
Students hissed and booed Kenny
as he approached the podium, and
said the Canadarm project was "a
great event which has elevated high
technology in Canada, and has
brought pride to all Canadians."
Alma mater society president
Marlea    Haugen    thanked    the
astronauts but brought cheers from
the audience when she announced
that she was not seeking re-election,
the astronauts received a standing
ovation when engineering
undergraduate society president
Lance Balcom presented Engle and
Truly with red jackets.
Vote once, vote again
Not many students are participating, but UBC is caught up in neck-to-
neck races for student political positions.
It. appears a close race for the Alma Mater Society executive is underway,
while the race for student board of governor and senate positions last week
saw two contests won by less than five votes. About 1,800 students voted.
Dave Dale, commerce 4, easily topped the poll for student board of
governors position with 8:56 votes. However his partner, Francis Janes, applied science 3, lost by two votes to Ron Krause, medicine 2.
The ballots are being recounted today at 1:30 p.m.
Krause was running as part of a 'progressive' slate that had two other
candidates run for senate at large, one candidate for science and one candidate for graduate studies. With the exception of science candidate
Horacio de la Cueva, the entire slate was elected.
De la Cueva, science 4, lost by five votes to William Milosevic, who won
with 109 votes. Ballots from that vote are also being recounted.
Nursing student Sharon Provost got most support in the senate at large
election with 1,103 votes. Slate candidates came next with Michael
Shepard, arts 3, tallying 1,071 and Bob Summerball, arts 3, tallying 806.
Incumbents Chris Fulker, arts 4, and Stephen Henderson, arts 4, were
elected with 706 and 697 votes respectively.
Mark Thompson and Wild Ratzburg lost with 616 and 528 votes. Kerry
Armstrong, physical education 4, shared defeat with Janes in the board
election, getting 659 votes.
In the graduate studies senate race Ken Freeman defeated incumbent
David Kirshner 49-33.
Student elections, part II, take place around campus this week as candidates for AMS executive vie for votes. Polling stations will be around
campus until Friday.
Students can also vote on two referenda: one for funding a Public Interest Research Group, the other for funding renovations to SUB. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 26, 1982
Why do SO many Because they can't be bothered
-     .      - . .   -» to bring razors to the
students wear beards? ,. ^    0
line-ups.
Black out
/ see the fee hikes coming
and I want to turn them back
my education's going
and I want to wear some black — sung to the tune of paint it black.
It's indeed a time for mourning at UBC. And as the Rolling Stone song
suggests, it's also a time for anger.
Students attending UBC this year have the wonderful opportunity to
witness first hand the death of accessible education at UBC. While tuition
fees skyrocket, the quality of education — already questionable — is being
dramatically cut.
It's an amazing spectacle. Before our very eyes degrees are turning to
worthless ashes and dust. And it's costing us more.
It appears the administration has already made up its mind to bash us
with a 30 per cent tuition fee hike. But at least students can register their
protest today.
By wearing black, attending the silent vigil at 1 p.m. in SUB, and laying
the coffin of accessible education to rest, students can let UBC administrators, the government and the public know they are not happy with
the tragic death of reasonable education.
Watching student politicians deal with the cutbacks issue is like watching manequins in a department store window. They have done almost
nothing, or worse than nothing, to curb the crash course UBC is on.
It's also a good time for students to assess the commitment of hopefuls
for Alma Mater Society executive positions. Students at the vigil should
keep an eye open for who is there and   who is not.
It's very appropriate that Black Tuesday should descend in the midst of
an AMS election campaign.
Wear black
Check out a hack
Give 'em flack
If they don't fight back
— sung to no apparent tune
We can learn from 500 years of resistance
The brief liberation of UBC's anthropology museum this winter by a
group of concerned indigenous
peoples seemingly failed to arouse
much interest or concern among
members of the university community. Only a slight commotion
ensued as administration president
Doug Kenny joined museum director Michael Ames in welcoming the
indigenous peoples to our campus.
Museum staff even procured some
coffee for the liberators, who
publicly claimed they had no quarrel with either the museum or the
university. The liberators simply
felt that a cement tomb filled with
artifacts stolen from their ancestors
was a suitable place to protest the
continued denial of their basic
human rights, especially their collective rights as peoples to self-
determination, by the federal and
provincial governments of Canada.
The main concern enunciated by
the museum liberators was that the
founding nations of this continent
(i.e. ihe indigenous peoples), should
retain the right to veto any new constitution drawn up by the settler nations (i.e. the English and the
French). As it stands now, however,
prime minister Trudeau's deformed
baby will likely evade abortion in
England to be delivered in person
by the Queen to Canada sometime
next month. If drastic corrective
surgery is not then performed —
with the consultation of the indigenous peoples of this land — the
baby will become the adolescent
monster with a 'final solution to
the 'Indian problem'.
Fortunately, the indigenous
peoples already have 500 years of
experience in methods of resistance
against various 'final solutions'
perpetrated by European colonialism. Their resistance will certainly continue.
In the past, a few settlers (or
descendants of settlers) offered
'humanitarian assistance' to the
resistance of indigenous peoples.
The lives of a few individual indigenous persons may even have
depended on such assistance. This
time, however, the context of the
not-so-new 'Indian Wars' demands
active solidarity from all of us,
whether we be yellow, black, brown
or white. We have much to learn
from the resistance of the indigenous peoples of the western
hemisphere. They have faced the
fiercest, most sustained racist attack ever experienced by any
peoples on this planet. The oppression of blacks in South Africa —
although borrowing, among other
methods, the 'reserve' or 'ban-
tustan' system from North America
— has been far less effective, by no
means genocidal.
The forces attacking the indigenous peoples of the Americas
have now surpassed the crime of
genocide. The world is now
threatened with 'omnicide', the extermination of all life as we know it.
The continuing insanity of 'violent'
nuclear fission begun at Hiroshima
and Nagasaki was preceded by the
continuing insanity of 'peaceful'
nuclear fission on or near 'Indian
reserves' in New Mexico and
Washington states. The barren
'reserves' onto which the remnant
of a once proud peoples were herded are now found to contain 50 to
80 per cent of all known uranium
deposits in the USA. The 'nuclear
age' meant an escalation of the 'Indian Wars' not only in the USA but
also in Canada. Witness the
displacement and poisoning of the
Dene people by the massive
uranium exploitation in northern
Saskatchewan. Further escalations
of the 'Indian Wars' in the
Americas have been triggered by
discoveries that huge profits could
be made from extractions of coal,
oil, gold, forests and finally water
from the meager lands still occupied
by the indigenous peoples of the
western hemisphere.
But just as Custer died for a
mountain of gold, so now does the
FBI agent die for a mountain of
uranium. And so do the indigenous
peoples 'pay' for these deaths a
hundred-fold, with massacre after
massacre.
Now, however, the water also
dries up under the white rancher's
fields. Now, however, the uranium
spreads its poisons blindly without
racial prejudice. The 'reserves' may
get it first, but the cities will get it
worst. We will reap what we have
sown. The war is finally our own.
But we have much to learn from
the 500 years of resistance offered
by the indigenous peoples of this
land.   Members   of  the   university
community have the opportunity to
begin to do so tomorrow, Wednesday, Jan. 27 in SUB 207-209 where
John Trudell, past national chairman of the American Indian Move
ment presently associated with the
Society of the People Struggling to
be Free, will give a noon-hour talk.
Alar Olljum
environmental interest group
Budding Haley slammed
It seems inflation is evidently at
work on your collective egos (collective, because it seems the paper
was written by one author, a sort of
secular gospel?) as well as on our
economy but with self righteous attitudes like yours, faults are evident only in the opposition.
1 am writing, in response, to the
"apropos of nothing" speech (re:
Sanford, letters, Jan. 15, 1982) by
your would-be Alex Haley, Glen
Sanford, journalist raconteur and
functional illiterate (a perfect
credential for journalism), our harbinger of the new Hyphenated
Canadian dream of varigated,
liberal society which of course has
no room for dissension, real or imagined.
1 am amazed, nay I am
disheartened to find an institute of
learning which allows intellects as
much reflected in the pages of your
(not UBC's) student paper to decide
how we must think, which illustrates a basic difference between
the North American and
Totalitarian Regimes; the latter are
told not to say what they think, here
we are told what to think.
It seems that according to your
editorials, articles and letters to the
editor, racism (bigotry, discrimination, fascism, Neo-Nazism, etc.) is
the be all and end all, the answer to
all man's evils; in other words a
cause instead of an effect, an action
If your letter is not published
right away, it may be because it
wasn't typed, triple-spaced, on a 70
space line. Typewriters are available
in The Ubyssey office for this purpose.
Pen names will be used when the
writer's real name is also included in
the letter for our information only,
and when valid reasons for
anonymity are given.
instead of a reaction.
But if any left wing, liberal
humanist would discard the emotionalism (similar to the Save the
Harp Seals diatribe) and think (not
react) objectively, they might begin
to understand their less tolerant
brothers before this country implodes into our first and last civil
war.
Look at the facts. Perhaps as
many as 1.5 million Canadians are
unemployed (NDP stats), besides
record inflation, recession and high
interest rates while we have a dilettante sitting on the throne in Ottawa, our Jesuit Robespierre,
Trudeau, whose suicidal immigration policy will admit over 450,000
immigrants in the next three years.
Glen Sanford tries hard to restrain
his anger, while his compatriots are
shouting death to fascists, kill the
racists. Meanwhile Clifford Olson
gets his blood money, and an all expense paid ticket to a Charles Man-
sonish, demented folk-hero status,
a poor misguided man, but at least
he's not a racist.
Who cares about the Parti
Quebequoise's legislation of Racial
Purity in Quebec, we need more
rights for minorities. We are told to
forget the Plains of Abraham while
La Bell Province has "Jeme sou-
viens" on her license plates. The
liberals cry, boycott and destroy
South Africa because of her Apartheid policies, while Israel resettles
her Arab citizens and annexes the
Golan Heights.
So you try and build your brave
new world, based on Humanist,
Darwinian, Marxist theories which
can't feed the masses, only destroy
them, all the while condemning
Christians who base their credos on
something a trifle more substantial,
remember Ex nihilo nihil fit. From
nothing, nothing is produced.
William Slater
arts one
THE UBYSSEY
January 26. 1982
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout
the university year by the Alma Mater Society of the
University of B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the
staff and not of the AMS or the university administration. Member, Canadian University Press. The
Ubyssey's editorial office is in room 241k of the Student
Union Building. Editorial departments. 228-2301; Advertising, 228-3977.
Paul Washington walked into The Ubyssey office and volunteered, fancying himself as Clark Kent or
at least Jimmy Olsen. Mark Leiren-Young, Pat McLeod and Scott McDonald yelled "Don't be a fool!
Get out of here while you still have a chance!" Deb Wilson, Anita Petkovic, and Sue Vohanka exclaimed, He's to ugly to be a reporter." But Arnold Hedstrom, Craig Brooks and Eric Eggertson felt sorry for
the lad and so reluctantly let him join, forcing him to memorize the style guide backwards. Craig Yuill,
Keith Baldry, Christine Roberge and Julie Wheelwright then initiated him into the secret ritual of cam
pus journalism. Bruce Campbell, Brian Jones, and Doug Schmidt made vain attempts to instruct the
greenhorn in their terminological gobbledegook. Kate Andrew, Harry Hertscheg and Nancy Campbell
threw up the-r hands however, when it became clear the newcomer could type no more than four
words an hour. Discouraged, our novice made for the door, thinking his career in journalism was finished. Just then, forgetting all the insults he had so recently hurled at the new staffer, Glen Sanford
shouted "See you Wednesday, eh Paul?" Tuesday, January 26,1982
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
THE UNRETRENCHABLES - Dog Kennel and Morbid Pshaw celebrate Black Tuesday
Thanks, Morbid, for your cutback proposals.
But we're going to have to cut just a little bit more.
m***""'''"'""'''^'
liSSSSfllBl
We're going to save about $65,000
by terminating your job as of today.
— arnold hedstron* photos
LptvfrAY,s
JLfW   \J   \J\mt X.     W
ii
Radicalism not for trade unions"— TAU
As some of those responsible for
the contract settlement accepted by
the TAU negotiators, we do not accept The Ubyssey's romantic and
extravagant condemnation of the
union's "loss of nerve."
"No guts, no glory" is a motto
for an army on its way to heroic
suicide, reminicent of World War
One. It is not a practical policy for a
trade union.
If The Ubyssey wants to see the
campus stirred up, it should encourage students to go on strike
against the fee hikes, or Canadian
policy in Central America.
The TAU's job is to act in the interest of its members. A strike is a
bargaining tool. We were ready to
strike for a better contract. This put
pressure on the administration to
negotiate with us.
r
Gears don't endorse PIRG
I would just like to correct a possible misunderstanding that may
have arisen from the UBC-PIRG letter of Jan. 21. B.C. PIRG has
not received endorsement from the Provincial Association of Professional Engineers or the Engineering Undergraduate Society. I don't
believe there was any intention to mislead on the part of the four
PIRG members the fact that they are all engineers may have led
some to think this the official policy on the quoting of the P. Eng.
Code of Ethics as giving endorsement.
What a boring letter for an EUS president to write. Hang tough.
Engineering week is Feb. 1 to 6. There's excitement in store.
Lance Balcom
EUS president^
WEN-DO
Women's Self-Defense
CLASSES STARTING
A) Wed Jan 27 4:30 - 7:00
B) Thur Jan 28 12:30 - 2:30
Register st WSO
Brock 203
SPONSORED BY UBC CENTRE
We managed to reach an eleventh
hour settlement which contained a
substantial improvement on union
security. We were convinced that
we would get nothing better after
the one-dav strike. So we called it
off.
No sane union wants a strike. It is
a costly and exhausting drain on its
members and supporters. A
24-hour picket around a huge campus in a snowstorm is no joke. Two
hundred of us were willing to spend
six-hour shifts standing in the snow,
and we'll be ready again next year if
we can't get a better contract.
The TAU did what was best for
its members and for the members of
Free
coupon.
That's right! This coupon
is absolutely free! Yours
to keep for life. Think about
it-at P.J. Burger & Sons.
15 classic burgers and other
great stuff. 11:30 on- 7 days
a week, it's yummy. 2966
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other campus unions — who had a
day's pay, or more, invested in this
contract.
The Ubyssey cannot expect the
unionised workers at this university
io sacrifice themselves on the altar
of campus radicalism. In a fight lo
the death between the TAU and the
UBC administration you know who
would win.
I'm sorry that we can't form the
vanguard of the student revolt this
winter, but we got a better deal at
the negotiating table than we
thought we'd get on the slreets.
Nexl year it might be different.
Robin Visel,
Malcolm Kennard
Rana Sodhi
Yorgos Papalheodou
Teaching Assistants
Union members
FARECARD
TEMPORARY PHOTO BOOTH
JANUARY 28 & 29
From  10 a m   to 4 p m
UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
(Student Union Building, Main Concourse)
There is a charge of $2.00 for the photocard.
MONTHLY PASS AVAILABLE
For further information, please contact:
Jane Duncan, GVRD Transit Department
734-4846, local 236.
-SEMI
GREATER VANCOUVER TRANSIT SYSTEM Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, Ja
RC. PIRG
REFERENDUM
1. The referendum requests a $3 levy in support
of the British Columbia Public Interest Research
Group.
The $3 will be an additional A.M.S. fee paid
annually with tuition.
2. B.C. PIRG is a recently established student
society.
B.C. PIRG is governed by a constitution and
bylaws registered under the Society Act of
British Columbia. All students paying the B.C.
PIRG fee have equal and full rights of
participation. These rights include voting rights
in the election of the student Board of Directors.
3. B.C. PIRG facilitates student research on
public issues and student action based on
research findings.
Research includes term projects for credit,
summer research jobs for students and research
done independently of course work. Action can
include public education, representation before
administrative bodies, presentations in public
hearings and perhaps litigation.
4. B.C. PIRG is requesting an annual fee of $3
per student. Funds will be used to:
• provide research grants to students;
• publish and disseminate research findings;
• hire a small research and administrative staff;
• hire students for summer research projects;
• establish an on-campus resource centre open
to all students.
5. The B.C. PIRG fee levy is refundable.
The refund mechanism provides direct
accountability to students. If the refund rate
exceeds 50% in two consecutive years, the $3
fee will be removed.
mrg
british Columbia public interest research group
VOTE JANUAR
at War Memorial, Sedgewick, Angus, MacMillan, Woodward, Buc
Poll locations are subject to t
NOTE: These referenda require a u vf     mwm< i ii i
•^^^^^^^P**-*-"^^-^**1*^*"!---*""**
iary26,1982
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
RENOVATIONS
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CONVERSATION
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(9)
SILBU^Y.
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/PRCSENT
U.'
.STENING LtJVttCi/
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REMOVABLE _
LOUNGE SPACE
■■PARTY ROOM
REMOVAIM.E ?T n
WALL 3
PARTY  RM 1 MO M. (I.
PARTY  RM 2 785 M. ft.
PARTY  RM 3 IMS «q. II.
COMBINEO
PARTY  ROOM 2S10 nit.
i
LOUNGE/PARTY   ROOM   DEVELOPMENT
mwriimwr-n "»a/i r '. au
Conversation Lounge
The shortage of large bookable space in
SUB is critical. These rooms, which are
available to all AMS members, are almost
impossible to book unless groups plan months in advance.
The Conversation Lounge Proposal will
create a large Party Room on the main floor
of SUB where the Listening Lounge is now.
It has a floor area of 2,910 square feet,
slightly larger than our present party room,
and can be subdivided into three smaller
rooms by means of removable walls. This
new area has been designed so as to retain
its present use as a conversation/meeting
area during the day. There will be 6 ft.
revolving door panels which will be left
open during the day and closed in the evening when the Party Room is in use.
Estimated cost: $110,000.00.
The Unfinished Basement
There are presently over 160 AMS clubs vying for approximately 35 club offices. This
situation will only become worse as more
clubs are constituted weekly. The Unfinished Basement Proposal will create seven
large workroom type offices and colour
dark room facilities in this presently unused
area. This will alleviate some of our overcrowding problems. Estimated cost:
$235,000.00. This includes the cost of a
new fire exit (bottom right) which is required by fire codes.
CELI
®    —I
THUNDERBIRD
SHOP
PIT
J'!
J L
WASHROOMS
:t_n
'—'--J7
PROPOSED
CLUB  ROOMS
UNFINISHED  SPACE
BOWLING    ALLEY
<*■ • ^rrf*.
PLAZA
GROUND     FLOOR   PLAN:   CLUB   ROOM   DEVELOPMENT
The referendum is asking students for a
fee levy of $10.00 to be paid each of the
next two years or until the debt is retired.
The projects themselves would be completed in two to three months, hopefully
by September '82.
f 26,27,28,29
lanan, Computer Science, Ceme, Law, Scarfe, Grad Centre, Sub
ie availability of Poll Clerks.
least 2250 "YES" votes to pass. Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 26, 1982
Mr. Reimers and friends do not know Jesus
Mark Reimers seems to reject all
orthodox Christianity in his letter
on Christian "fundamentalism" in
your Jan. 19, 1982, issue. 1 note his
comments on guilt, wrath, and a
saving relationship with Jesus, the
person among the ideas not exclusive lo fundamentalists.
He bases his discussion on his experience as an immature (by his
own admission) convert lo a
simplistic but perhaps too common
version of the faith. He seems to
have passed from shilling responsibility for his own thoughts and actions onlo God to dropping this
responsibility onto a fundamentalist "Them." "They" made me
think I was guilty and had been saved, etc.
Mr. Reimers finds no evidence of
the relational quality of Christian
faith ("a personal relationship with
Jesus Christ") in the New Testament. I'd suggest that those interested read John's gospel,
chapters 14-17. In table talk at the
last Passover supper before his arrest, crucifixion, and resurrection,
Jesus says thai he will reveal himself
personally (14:21) io those who truly love him by obeying his leaching.
". . . My faiher and I will come to
him and love with him." (14:23).
"My commandment is this: love
one another, just as 1 love you. The
greatest love a man can have for his
friends is to give his life for them."
(15:12-13).
The "whole set of spiritual concerns" and the prescriptions for
dealing with them which Reimers'
letter says "fundamentalism gave
me" remain largely unclear. It's
surely always more comfortable to
spend time with people who share
your interests — be they God, skiing, or bluegrass music — than with
those with whom you can find no
common ground. A narrowing,
"cloistered" tendency is likely to
arise around any consuming interest
unbalanced by other enthusiasms.
There is an inconsistency between
what your correspondent says
about lack of responsibility for his
own actions and intense guilt. The
pardon won by Jesus' blood is not
automatic: it must be claimed by
returning, by commitment of your
whole being to the service of God.
Jesus' words and life say that this
dedication can be expressed
through service in his name to even
the least deserving of his Father's
children. In human relationships
ihe divine Relation becomes actual.
It's hardly surprising that those
who have so far rejected the open
offer of a personal relationship with
the Source of being itself don't see
the hand of God in the "seren-
dipities" of life. They seem usually
to credit lhat bitch-goddess, Lady
Luck. It isn't that God is necessarily
"adjusting the universe" to our petty preferences — this kind of
mistaken thinking is all too com-
NEED A LIFT TO
THE TOP?
We're an innovative and diversified western-
based financial services company — possibly
the lastest-growing trust company in Canada —
and we know we need new, well-educated
talent to help us get where we're going. That's
why we provide career opportunities designed
to keep even super-achievers on their toes
If you're a business data processing ace, and
want to be part of a team that's on it's way to the
top, check us out. You might just land the position
of Associate Programmer Analyst. Your campus
recruitment office has the particulars.
FtestCdFTkusl
It pays to know where you're going
TEACHER
INTERVIEWS
School District 88 (Terrace)
On campus interviews will be conducted March 8-10 with
graduating teachers for positions in the Terrace District effective September 1, 1982. Attempts will be made to correlate
the interviews scheduled with the number of vacancies expected in particular field and/or grade levels.
Vacancies expected in rural, isolated, and "in town" with
openings expected at all levels and in most specialities.
Special interest in teachers of music and French immersion.
To obtain an appointment please submit a completed
B.C.T.F./B.C.S.T.A. application form. Copies of practicum
reports, letters of reference and a detailed resume may be
given with the application or at the interview. Applications
will, preferably, be submitted through Canada Manpower on
Campus by January 29 but may be sent directly to Terrace to
arrive not later than February 12, 1982.
Mr. M. Bergsma,
Assistant Superintendent of Schools,
Box 460,
Terrace, B.C.
V8G 4B5
mon in some of the most visible
parts of "media Christianity,"
despite Jesus' clear promise of
much trouble and sacrifice — but
rather that we praise him for
everything, because nothing would
be without him. 1 believe he does
place us and prepare us for his service.
1 know that without the relation
to God, whose Spirit is revealed in
all truth and beauty, and most
especially in all love, my own situation would be well expressed by Neil
Young's "After the Goldrush." "I
was lying in a burned-out basement,
with the full moon in my eyes . . .
There was a band playing in my
head, and I felt like getting high. 1
was thinking about what a friend
had said, and hoping it was a lie
Well, mother nature is still on the
run in the nineteen-eighties — she
may even be getting tired and starting to stumble. But 1 still have
some friends who love me and don't
lie; my wife is one. As Bruce
Cockburn has sung, "Jesus was
here and he's coming again, to bring us all to his Festival of
Friends," and in the meantime 1
can know him. As the letter 1 John
(6:16) says, "God is love, and
whoever lives in love lives in union
wiih God and God lives in union
with him."
1 can express this relationship of
Spirit by working at Jesus' work:
carrying the news of the Kingdom
of God (both present and future) to
the poor, helping to release the captives, placing my life in the hands of
the Lord to help in his ministry of
healing and transforming to this sad
world, of so much broken beauty.
My achievements may be small; 1
may lay tracks for the Slow Train
that is coming only in my own life,
or in microscopic ways around me.
But Jesus promised that however
much seed failed, some would
grow, for a great harvest. That's the
thing I live for, because I've seen in
the small deeds of people what it
means to be loved when I don't
deserve it. To grow to be like him is
my deep dream. 1 have prayed that
Mark Reimers and his fundamentalist friends might come to know
this Jesus, the Palestinian
carpenter, and the King, and my
God become my brother, alive in
human flesh. James Irving,
M. Div. program,
Regent Coll.
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SANDWICHES,
FABULOUS
CHEESECAKES,
CAPPUCCINOS,
ESPRESSOS,
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Located at the back of the Village
on Campus
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
THE CECIL H. ^.IDA GREEN
VISITING PROFESSORSHIPS
1982 SPRING LECTURES
Lawrence Stone
Dr. Lawrence Stone is a professor of history and director of the Shelby Cullom Davis Center
for Historical Studies at Princeton University. He is best known as a distinguished historian
of Tudor and Stuart England, but his areas of expertise include the history of education, the
history of families, English art and architecture and a wide range of socio-historical topics.
He has a reputation as a lively and effective public speaker. His lectures should interst people
in a variety of fields, particularly those in the areas of history, education, sociology and
family sciences.
The Modern Family and Its Origins
Saturday, January 23
In Lecture Hall 2, Woodward Instructional Resources Centre, at 8:15 p.m.
(A Vancouver Institute Lecture)
Money, Sex and Murder in
Eighteenth-Century England
Tuesday, January 26
In Room 106, Buchanan Building, at 12:30 p.m.
The Sociology of the English Country House,
1480-1750 (illustrated)
Thursday, January 28
In Room 106, Buchanan Building at 12:30 p.m.
ALL LECTURES ARE FREE
OCCASIONALLY LNADVERTISED SEMINARS ARE PRESENTED.
Please call Mrs. R. Rumle*. at Local 5675 for information. Tuesday, January 26, 1982
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 9
Gay club denied formation
WATERLOO (CUP) — The
Wilfred Laurier University student
council has refused club status to a
campus gay group.
After the council denied status to
the group by an 11-3 secret ballot
vote on Jan. 18, vice-president Kate
Harley said: "We have a paternal
responsibility to decide the issues in
the interest of the students."
Among the reasons councillors
gave for their decision were wishing
to continue the Lutheran tradition
of the university, and fears that
club members would be persecuted
by other students.
Representatives of the gay group,
who wished to remain anonymous
for personal reasons, disagreed with
the council. "Since this is a conservative campus, there seems to be a
need for a group like this to bring
about more awareness that all people are human."
Another representative added:
"It's too bad (the council) wants
to continue wasting their time and
ours with more rankling over our
basic human rights. We aren't asking for much. And to have to keep
fighting just to survive, when we
could both be doing something
more useful, is unfortunate."
Campus gays have been lobbying
for club status since earlier in the
school year, when members of an
informal gay group on campus applied for club status.
The campus operations management board, which usually decides
such matters, was unable to reach a
consensus and referred the issue to
council,
Three members of the gay group
presented their case. One told council the group would function mainly
as a support group. "Gay people
have different problems that other
people can't relate to and they need
a support group."
They estimated a potential mem-
Polish government harsh
By BRIAN JONES
The declaration of martial law in
Poland has been one of the most
harsh decrees ever, by any government, a UBC professor said Monday.
"The military is in control of
Poland the way an occupying force
would be," Bogdan Czaykowski
told 75 people in Buch. 102.
"Martial law is an attempt to roll
back Poland, not to before August
1980, but before 1956. It is the second attempt to Sovietize Poland,
since the first attempt failed," said
Czaykowski.
The Polish government never intended to reach a peaceful settlement with the trade union Solidarity, charged Czaykowski, and had
started as early as March 1981 to
plan for the imposition of martial
law.
"Had the authorities negotiated
in good faith with Solidarity a compromise could have been reached,"
he said. "Contrary to Soviet accusations, Solidarity was not planning a coup," he added.
The aims of the Polish government were twofold, said
Czaykowski — to preserve the
political power of the communist
party and to safeguard Soviet
domination. The effect of martial
law is to maintain the power of a
minority who are themselves
subservient to a foreign power, he
added.
"The Polish people learned of
martial law on Sunday, Dec. 13 at
six o'clock in the morning. By then
most Solidarity leaders had already
been arrested, along with intellectuals, students, and other
activists," Czaykowski said.
"The crackdown came after an
intense media campaign against
Solidarity and Lech Walessa," said
Czaykowski. "Walesa was told he
was not being arrested but was being taken for talks with the government. This pretense is still being
maintained," he added.
BLACK
TUESDAY
Protest
Tuition Increases
WEAR BLACK and JOIN
FUNERAL PROCESSION
leaving SUB 207/209
at 1 pm
TODAY
BLACK PATCHES
WILL BE AVAILABLE
AT S.A.E. TABLE
IN SUB FROM 10 am
MOURN
THE DEATH
OF AN
ACCESSIBLE
EDUCATION
"In late November Solidarity
leaders knew of a coming confrontation with the government, but
they did not think of il in terms of
martial law," said Czaykowski.
"The crackdown came as a complete surprise to the Polish people
and Solidarity leaders. The element
of surprise worked, of course, in
favor of the government," he added.
But the imposition of martial law
has not quelled the dissension of
Polish workers, said Czaykowski.
Home Ec still leaning left
Construction on UBC's most
crooked building resumed yesterday, but results of an investigation
into why the building has the tilt are
still not known.
An analysis is currently being
done on a several centimeter tilt of
the new home economics building,
spokesperson for Bird Construction
said Monday. "We are waiting to
see the results of this analysis,
which we will pass on to the architects and the owners."
With the safety of the building in
question, construction workers
were sent home last week, but were
back on the job Monday.
Said UBC information officer
Jim    Banham:    "University   does
not inspect the building. At this
time the matter is the responsibility
of the contractor.
The university has no reason to
believe the building is unsafe. UBC
wants a building that is safe and will
not accept a building that is not
safe."
The new building, just south of
the old home economics building
and main bus stop, will cost $5.3
million, and was originally scheduled for completion this May.
The old home economics
building, built in 1949, will be
demolished to make room for a new
physics and chemistry wing.
Gorilla
wrestling
Yes, it's a very popular sport
in the small emerging
African nation of Heywhats-
happeninman? But you won't
find it at P J. Burger & Sons.
Nope. Just 15 incredible
burgers; huge salads; chicken
and other great stuff
Open 7 days a week from
11:30 a.m. till really late.
Furs optional.
ONLY AT
FELLINI'S
HAVE YOUR
COFFEE CUP
READ
(OR BLUE OR WHITE)
• GREAT SANDWICHES
• FABULOUS CHEESECAKES
• CAPPUCCINOS • ESPRESSOS
• NANAIMO BARS
Located at Ihe back of the Village
on Campus
Lake O'Hara Lodge
Yoho National Park
Requires summer staff.
Please write for application form to:
Lake O'Hara Lodge
Box 1677
Banff, Alta.
TOL OCO
bership of 30 to 50 for the club.
And they made a projection, based
on statistics on the proportion of
gay people in society included in the
Kinsey study on human sexuality,
that "there may be 150 to 175
homosexuals on campus."
The representatives also
distributed a five-page presentation
to councillors, titled "Everything
you never wanted to ask about
homosexuality, though were interested to know."
But student councillors were not
convinced. One of them, Elwood
McKenna, asked: "What's the
function of the club — renting hotel
rooms, or what?" A gay representative answered that "it's not a
pick-up service, but a support
group."
Other councillors asked whether
the gays really needed club status,
and were told that gays are unable
to use campus facilities without
such recognition.
And council members said they
were concerned about harassment
of  gays   by   other   students.
Bypass 'necessary'
From page 1
Instead it is the board's
responsibility to set tuition, and
the fee increases will be decided
today at 2 p.m. At the board
level there are only two students
who can participate.
"I agree that in the short term
senate has been bypassed, partly
by necessity, but I don't think
it's true for the long term
priorities," student board
member Chris Niwinski said
Monday.
He could see no harm in the
senate budget committee advising Kenny on tuition fees, but
said the time constraints probably contributed to the lack of
consultation with senate.
"But the student senators are
dead right that it is in the realm
of the senate where some of
these decisions are being made,"
Niwinski said.
"I don't want to belittle the
reaction of student senators
because I think it's quite
legitimate, but I think the long
term priorities can be addressed.
It's not just come and gone."
But the big question still remains: how far can the retrenchment committee recommendations go, with their implicit value
and priority judgements, before
the administration finally
decides that financial cutbacks
can be examined by senate?
Cuts 'sure thing'
From page 1
blem," he said. After this point
is reached, grounds maintenance
and landscaping will be cut,
Smith explained.
He predicted the recommended cuts, including $1 million in
research funds and $500,000 for
the arts faculty, will be accepted
by the board when it meets today. "I have a feeling about the
outcome. I expect it to stay in
place." Smith added he had
been preparing for the cuts for
several weeks.
Physical plant has been reducing staff through attrition
(retirement) over the past few
months, Smith said.
"I anticipate there will also
have to be some layoffs," Smith
suggested. "In excess of 40 positions will be deleted, either
through attrition or layoffs," he
said.
This will virtually eliminate
any hourly or seasonally
employed staff. Smith said.
Many students currently work
part-time for physical plant.
ATTENTION:
Undergraduate Society
Presidents
The deadline for applications for $4.00
refunds per graduating students has been
extended to January 29, 1982. Application
forms are in the AMS General Office.
Please submit to SUB Box number 118
Celebrate twe
fivib'ttoriviwi
►W
Del
ttyi
.1
iCiOWS   V>)iV\ese   food      lUvw-2pm
^*ve« "feo.   \ ^*"ovtvw\e  "Cookie Page 10
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 26, 1982
Tween Classes
]
TODAY
LAW STUDENTS LEGAL
ASSISTANCE PROGRAM
Law students provide legal advice or lawyer
referrals for legal problems, 12:30 p.m. to 2 p.m..
SUB 111.
BCPIRG
Final meeting, noon, SUB 115.
LSM
Dinner   and   discussion   on   liturgy,    6   p.m.,
Lutheran Campus Centre
UBC ASTRONOMY CLUB
Slide show, no time given, Geophysics 140.
COMMITTEE AGAINST RACIST AND
FACIST VIOLENCE
Literature table, noon, SUB foyer.
PSYCHOLOGY STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
General meeting, noon, Angus 214.
CYCLING CLUB
Cycling film,  scenes from the  1976 Olympics,
noon, Buch 102.
UBC JAPAN CLUB
Food experience II, noon, SUB 212.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Planning meeting, noon, SUB 215
IMS
Mystery event, ASAP, Kerrisdale TM centre.
WEDNESDAY
FILMSOC
Texas Chainsaw Massacre. 7 p.m., SUB
auditorium.
CHINESE CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Luncheon, noon, SUB 111.
HISTORY STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Meeting of all fourth year history students to
discuss grad fee, history lounge, noon, Buch.
Tower, 12th floor.
ISLAMI STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Pizza night, 5:30 p.m., SUB 213.
AMS EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
John Trudell speaking on Ecology of Freedom,
noon, SUB 207 209.
VOC
General meeting and presentation on cabin proposals, noon, Chem, 250.
SOCIAL CREDIT
General   meeting,   no   time   jiiven,   SUB   224.
Discussion of last weeks secret visit to UBC by
Pat   McGeer,   which   we   decided   not   to   tell
anybody about.
HEALTH SCIENCES
STUDENT'S COMMITTEE
Dr.   Percival Smith  will   talk  on   contraception,
noon. IRC 6.
ENGLISH DEPARTMENT
English   department   players   reading   exiles   by
James Joyce, 4 p.m., Asian Studies Auditorium.
At noon, John Hulcopp and Lorraine Weir of the
English department speak on feminist approaches to Virginia Woolf, Buch 100.
UBC WOMEN'S CENTRE
Wendo, women's self defense classes, register
at the women students' office, 4:30 to 8 p.m.,
Brock Hall, room 302.
INTRAMURALS
Final registration for men's Buchanan badminton
tournament, 3:30 p.m.. War Memorial gym,
room 203.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Booze, bowling, pizza, meet in the Pit at 4:30
p.m. for beer and in the games room at 7 p.m.
for bowling.
THURSDAY
COMMITTEE AGAINST RACIST
AND FACIST VIOLENCE
Literature table, noon, SUB foyer,
CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR CHRIST
Answering some tough questions, noon,  Hebb
12.
VOC EIG WILDERNESS CONSERVATION
Wilderness conservation lecture and discussion.
Dr.   Freeman on the Stein valley,   noon,  Geog
100.
TOASTMASTERS - LAW SCHOOL ADVOCATS
Everyone welcome, 1 p.m., SUB chambers.
NDP CLUB
Forum with NDP candidates for next provincial
election, noon, SUB 207.
AMNESTY UBC
General meeting, noon, SUB 119.
HOME ECONOMICS
Vi Fodor speaking on the Psychology of Eating,
noon, Woodward, IRC room 6.
ENGLISH DEPARTMENT
Elliot Gose speaking on James Joyce as a comic
writer, noon, Buch. 100.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION
Prayer and bible meeting, noon, SUB 212.
NEWMAN CATHOLIC CENTRE
Special    guest    speaker,    Father    Mugford,    a
specialist on cults, noon, St. Marks.
IVCF
Campbell Henderson speaking, noon, Chemistry
250.
INTRAMURALS
Co-rec volleyball, everyone welcome, 7:30 p.m.,
War Memorial gym. Grouse Mountain slalom ski
challenge, all day. Grouse mountain.
GAY AND LESBIANS OF UBC
General meeting, noon, SUB 125.
BSU
Come to celebrate, noon, Angus 215.
STAMMTISCH
German conversation evening, 7:30 p.m., International House.
STUDENTS FOR PEACE AND
MUTUAL DISARMAMENT
Guest speaker Mike Wallace   nnnn, Angus 412
FRIDAY
GRADUATE STUDENT ASSOCIATION
GSA folk night, 8:30 p.m.,  Graduate Student
Centre.
LSM
Worship,   Eucharist   with   Rev.   Ray   Schultz,
noon, Lutheran Campus Centre.
THUNDERBIRDS
Swimming  vs.   University  of  Puget  Sound,   7
p.m.. Aquatic Centre.
Hockey   vs.   Saskatchewan   Huskies,   8   p.m.,
Thunderbird arena.
BAHAI CLUB
Coffeehouse,    everyone   welcome.    Informal
discussion,   music,    cheap   refreshments,   4-7
p.m., SUB 212.
ECOLOGICAL RESERVE UNIT
14th   annual   meeting   of   the   B.C.   ecological
reserve   committee.   Open   to   any   interested
students,  9:30 a.m,  to mid p.m., faculty club
salons A, B and C. Continues on Saturday, same
time, same place.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Several   comical  and   lyrical   dance  film   sorts.
$0.50 admission for non-club members,  noon,
SUB auditorium.
MUSLIM STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Muslim Juma (Friday prayers). All Muslims are
requested to attend, noon, International House
STUDENT LIBERALS
Party and dance, the glorious young leader Mr. T
will pay a short visit, 7:30 p.m., SUB 207.
INTRAMURALS
Final    registration    for    women's    floor    hockey
league,   3:30  p.m.,   War  Memorial  gym,   room
203.
SATURDAY
THUNDERBIRDS
Swimming vs Pacific Lutheran University, 1
p.m., Aquatic Centre.
Rowing Crew walkathon, 9 a.m., starts at Vancouver Rowing club. Carry a 200 lb. 55 foot long
rowing shell from Stanley Park to UBC and back
again.
Hockey vs Saskatchewan, 8 p.m., Thunderbird
arena.
UBC BRIDGE CLUB
Informal duplicate bridge tournament, $6/pair
entrance fee, 6 p.m., SUB 205.
CSA
Downhill Skiing, 7:30 a.m., Mt. Seymour. Sign*
up and more information at CSA's office. Steve
Podborski will not be present.
SUNDAY
UBC SAILING CLUB
Broken centreboard regatta, 11 am., Jericho
Beach Sailing club.
Hot Flashes
Cutbacks dirge
set tor today
Things will seem pretty dead at
UBC today if the Students for an
Accessible Education get their way.
A funeral procession will march to
the board of governors meeting in
protest against cutbacks and tuition
fee hikes. It starts at 1 p.m. in SUB
207-209. Wear black and come to
this silent vigil (?), because that's
what it's going to be. Come as the
grim reaper, if you like. Scythes optional.
Best bet
All right, kids, here's a good one.
No, no, not the hot flash — the
event! Heard this fellow last week,
and let me tell ya it's great stuff —
definitely not the kind of thing they
teach you in poli sci. Write this
down or tear it out. John Trudell, a
past leader of the American Indian
Movement, will speak on the Ecology of Freedom at noon Wednesday in SUB 207-209.
Animals leave
Bluto would not be pleased.
The Gammas and Deltas and all
those otherfraternities and sororities
have decided to leave the comfy cli-
quishness of their animal houses
and enter into a brave new world.
The UBC sororities and fraternities are presenting Mardi Gras '82
to raise money to combat multiple
sclerosis.
They will be hosting a variety
show 8 p.m. Wednesday in the
SUB Ballroom (tickets $1 I.Thursday
at noon they are holding a keg roll
along main mall. If you get there
early enough there may still be drippings from the kegs. In their infinite
wisdom and generosity they will
allow students to use the main mall
free of charge.
Saturday they are holding the
mardi gras ball at the Commodore.
Tickets   are   $7  and   the   band   is
Montego Shine.
They will also be selling raffle
tickets everywhere and anywhere
with the grand prize being a trip to
Reno.
Christ retreat
The Co-operative Christian Campus Ministry of UBC wants you to
retreat. That is, they invite you to a
retreat with Matthew Fox, a
theologian from the Creation Centre of Spirituality in Chicago. This
event will take place at Easter Seal
Camp in Squamish, from Friday,
January 29 until noon Sunday,
January 31. For information you
can phone 224-3722.
masses invited
The winner of the 1975 Kindness
to B.C. Woodworkers Award will
visit the campus briefly on Feb. 5.
Yes folks. Fat Little Dave Barrett
will speak to students, academics,
professionals and maybe even
some workers (besides the kitchen
staff) at an exclusive dinner
engagement sponsored by the UBC
Alumni Association. Barrett, leader
of the opposition and of the provincial Liberal, oops, I mean NDP party, will speak following dinner
(cocktails first, of course).
It costs $6 (that might keep the
masses away) and tickets can be
bought at the Alumni office in the
Cecil Green Park mansion (which is
where D.B. will speak). Dinner is at
six. Workclothes optional.
JMore masses
Getting back to the political beat
again, some of Barrett's associates
will also be visiting this bastion of
conservatism (UBC you dummy).
NDP candidates for the next provincial election will attend a forum
Thursday in SUB 207. They will no
doubt be happy to answer questions from any right-wing reactionaries and left-wing politicos.
TWENTY-FIVE VOLUNTEERS
ARE NEEDED TO COMPLETE A
STUDY OF THE SIDE-EFFECTS OF A
NEW BIRTH CONTROL PILL
The pill contains less of the female hormone
estrogen than some current low-dose contraceptive pills. The pill has been used in humans and
effectively prevents pregnancy.
Volunteers will be asked to keep a diary of any
side-effects and a blood sample will be taken
every six months.
Contact:
Dr. Robin Percival-Smith,
STUDENT HEALTH SERVICE
228-7011
:% URCSoiimq cut
present^   ~. *■
BROKEN  C£NTR£
.hot joO'
fiOO  per  person-;aLL Studfil-J
contact 5u6 20S (noon) or
THIS WEEK at HILLEL
Tues. Jan. 26 - Shefa Dairy Lunch - 11:30-2:00
- discussion on cults led by Rabbi
Daniel Siegel 12:30 p.m.
Wed. Jan. 27 - Free Lunch - sponsored by B'nai
B'rith Women 11:30-2:00
Thurs. Jan. 28 - Shefa Dairy Lunch 11:30-2:00
- Zionist Seminar 12:30 p.m.
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: Campus — 3 lines, 1 day $2.00; additional lines, 55c.
Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $3.63; additional lines
55c. Additional days $3.30 and 50c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m.  the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room 241, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
5 — Coming Events
65 — Scandals
Bahai Coffeehouse
Everyone Welcome.
Informal Discussion:
World Unity, Racial Equality, The
Essential Harmony of True
Science and True Religion.
Home-Made Music (folk;
multicultural).
Cheap Refreshments including
Coffee, tea.
FRIDAY, JAN. 29
4-7 p.m.-SUB 212
WOTTA DEAL . . . The next GSA
Folk/Night is on Friday Jan 29th at 8:30
p.m. In the Grad Centre Garden Room. It
only makes sense.
HAVE YOU HEARD about the E.E.'s who
lost their balls?
70 — Services
10 — For Sale — Commercial
INEXPERIENCED, enthusiastic, gigolo
looking for work. Reasonable rates. Send a
photo and resume to #30-5785 Agronomy
Rd.
MODE   COLLEGE of   barbering   and   hair
styling.    Student hairstyle,   $8.50.    Body
wave $17.00 and up. 601  W.  Broadway,
874-0633.
COMMUNITY SPORTS: A store full of ski
wear, hockey equipment, sleeping bags,
jogging shoes, soccer boots, racquets of all
kinds, and dozens of other items at very at
tractive prices. 3615 W. Broadway.
11 - For Sale - Private
15 — Found
COMPLIMENTARY HAIRCUT. Have your
hair cut and styled by students under expert
supervision. Phone 733-7795.
85 — Typing
SQUASH RACKET found near the hospital
January 5. To claim call 228-3977.
FOUND GOLD bracelet in 'F Lot'. Call after 6
p.m. 224-1149.
20 — Housing
ROOM FOR FEMALE no smoker in Point
Grey Co-op $165 per month. February 1
228-8541
ESSAYS,   THESE,    MANUSCRIPTS,   in
eluding technical, equational, reports, letters resumes. Bilingual, Clemy, 266-6641.
YEAR ROUND expert typing these and
essays. 738-6829 from 10:00 a.m. to 9:00
p.m.
MICOM WORD PROCESSING $10.00/hr
Equation typing available. Pickup and
delivery. Phone Jeeva 826-5169 (Mission)
FAST, ACCURATE TYPING to individual
specification: Essays, Reports, Thesis,
Resumes, etc. VARIABLE IBM TYPESETS.
Call 324-6328.
25 — Instruction
EXPERT    TYPING    available    close    to
university. Call 732-1745.
30 — Jobs
NEED A HOUSEKEEPER, housecleaner or
babysitter. Call Maria 228-0438.
36 - Lost
LOST burgandy purse, wallet Thursday
Jan. 14 near Gage. Appreciate return. S.
Walker 261-0304, Brock Lost a Found.
40 — Messages
50 - Rentals
60 — Rides
"HAVE MORE TIME for other valuable
tasks, let me handle your typing." 732-3647
after 6 p.m.
EXPERT TYPING: essays, term papers,
factums, letters, manuscripts, resumes,
theses. IBM Selectric II. Reasonable rates.
Rose 731-9857.
TYPING: $1 per page. Legible copy. Fast,
accurate, experienced typist with IBM
Selectric. Gordon, 873-8032 (after 10 a.m.).
TYPING SERVICE for theses, correspondence, etc. Any field. French also available.
IBM Selectric. Call 736-4042.
90 - Wanted
99 — Miscellaneous Tuesday, January 26, 1982
the;  ubyssey
Page 11
T-Birds split b-ball series
By SCOTT McDONALD
It is still the same, and it is going
to be for the whole season — hot
one game and cold the next.
The UBC Thunderbird's basketball team split a pair of Canada
West Universities Athletic Association games with the University of
Alberta on the weekend by following their season long pattern.
On Friday night at War
Memorial gym, the 'Birds, in particular Bob Forsyth and Pat West,
were hot and downed Alberta
78-60. The next night Forsyth and
West were still all right, but the rest
of the team had gone sour and UBC
lost 73-63.
UBC coach Peter Mullins said he
does not know why his team clicks
off and on, but he just juggles the
lineup until he comes up with five
players who can "do the job".
Friday night this worked because
Mullins did not make a substitution
in the second half and UBC steadily
pulled away from a 34-32 halftime
deficit. Forsyth was the top scorer
with 27 and West added 20. Mullins
said it was Forsyth's best game of
the year.
Mullins said he is very pleased
with West's play. "He has been improving all season and on the
weekend played two good, solid
games."
But on Saturday Mullins could
not find the five players to do the
job, and UBC's shooting percentage dropped from 50 to 39. Said
Mullins: "If you shot like that, you
might as well forget it."
On Saturday, Alberta's Leon
Bynoe was the top scorer with 24
points, while UBC's West had 19
and Forsyth 15. UBC turned the
ball over 23 times compared with
nine on Friday.
The split leaves both teams with
identical 2-8 records, and with half
the season gone there is no realistic
hope of finishing in a playoff spot.
Mullins said in the second half of
Americans
drown 'Birds
By BRUCE CAMPBELL
The UBC swimming teams are
likely very glad they do not always
have to compete against American
colleges. The 'Birds, who have been
swimming well lately, dropped two
meets to their American counterparts on the weekend.
On Friday night, the 'Birds
played host to the University of
Washington Huskies. In the
women's division Washington
defeated UBC 63-48.
Rhonda Thomasson led the UBC
women with wins in the 50m
freestyle, 100m freestyle and in the
200m individual medley, making
Canadian Intercolligiate, Athletics
Union qualifying times in all three
events.
Kim Austin dominated the 200m
breaststroke, her time 15 seconds
under CIAU qualifying times.
Austin also made CIAU qualifying
times in the 200m backstroke and
200m individual medley, placing second in both events. Flavia Cor-
bella also qualified for the nationals
with a second place finish in the
200m freestyle.
In the men's division, the 'Birds
lost 81 to 31. For the second
straight meet, Kevin Stapleton was
the only swimmer to win an event
for UBC. Stapleton won the 400m
freestyle by an amazing 11 seconds
under CIAU qualifying times.
Team captain Mike Blondal placed second in the 500m freestyle and
third in the 100m freestyle, making
CIAU  qualifying   times   on   both
events.
Saturday afternoon, the UBC
women's swimming and diving
team hosted the Oregon State
University Beavers. The meet was
very close, with the Beavers winning
on the last race of the meet. The
final score was 72-68.
Kim Austin led UBC with wins in
the 200m breastroke, 50m
breastroke, and the 400m individual
medley, making CIAU qualifying
times in all three races. Rhonda
Thomasson also swam well for
UBC with wins in the 100m individual medley, 200m butterfly
and 100m freestyle.
Cathy DeGroot won the 800m
freestyle with her best time in two
years. Shelly Morgan placed third
in the 200m butterfly, but added her
name to the list of UBC swimmers
making CIAU times this year.
In the diving competition, UBC's
Nancy Bonham scored first place
finishes in the one and three metre
events. Andrea Bakker had her best
performance of the year, placing second behind Bonham in both
events.
UBC coach Jack Kelso was pleased with his team's performance
against the Huskies who were
seventh in the NCAA last year. On
Saturday, Kelso felt his team could
have won the meet, but simply fell
one event short of the win.
Next action for the 'Birds is
January 29, when the women host
the University of Puget Sound 'n a
dual meet.
the season UBC would continue on
playing the same kind of basketball
but he is hoping that as players like
West and guard Lloyd Scrubb gain
experience the cold spells will
become fewer.
At the end of the school year
Mullins will take a sabbatical year.
At the moment the athletic department does not know who it will
replace Mullins with. But Mullins is
only going away for next season
and said he will be back coaching
the next year.
The weekend ended like all others
have for he women's team. Friday
UBC lost to Alberta 71-45 and on
Saturday the 73-55 score was a little
closer but still in Alberta's favor.
Peggy Donaldson led UBC Fri
day night with 10 points and Cathy
Bultitude added nine, and on Saturday Bultitude went wild and hit 67
per cent of her shots for 27 points.
The women are now 0-12 in
league play, which leaves them 8
losses away from tieing last year's
record.
Both the men and women will be
in Calgary this coming weekend.
■*•■!*-;rtS**'\" '^i^™**-**
— craig yuill photo
I CAN NOT do it any more. I am sick of writing these little captions. I am going fucking nuts. Okay one more. This
is Glen Harder and he is a very good gymnast, but do you care. No. You didn't even know UBC had a men's gymnastic team. There is a women's team too. But it did not play on the weekend.
c
»
Bird droppings
J
Intrasports  )
The intramurals and UBC ski team's first annual Grouse Mt. slalom ski
challenge, slated for Thursday, Jan. 28, is full.
The 135 openings for the event, put on in cooperation with Grouse Mt.
and Labatts, were filled only a few days after registration opened.
But there is a waiting list for those who would like to participate in the
dual slalom event or attend the beer garden, ski movies, dinner and dance
afterwards.
The event is designed to attrack skiers of all levels as the categories range
from novice (those skilled in snow plow to stem cristy) to experienced competitors.
There will also be a chance to challenge the members of the UBC ski
team individually in a dual slalom event. Those without tickets can always
pay for a lift ticket up the hill and then try to snivel into the festivities
disguised as a Ubyssey reporter or a UBC athletic director.
In other intramural events, the Bookstore 3-on-3 basketball tournament
swings into its final week of play. In Division I, B-Lot faces Kappa Sigs in
the championships after defeating Arts and EUS I respectively in the semifinals.
In Division II, Alpha Dells play Phi Delts in the final after victories over
Dekes D and Dekes A. Phi Delts play Dekes for the Division 111 title.
Hockey
Ron Paterson came up with his
hottest weekend as he backstop-
ped the UBC hockey team to a split
with the University of Alberta in
Canada West University hockey action in Edmonton.
Paterson, a member of the 1980
Canadian Olympic team, stopped
45 shots Saturday night as UBC
defeated Alberta 3-1. On Friday
Alberta won 4-3 with Paterson turning aside 42 shots. Paterson was
named the first star in both games.
Bill Holowaty scored two goals
and Jim Allison the other in the
win. Halowaty with two more and
Tom Ouchie with one were the
scorers Friday.
UBC now has 3-11 record while
Alberta's is 7-7. The next games for
the 'Birds are this Friday and Saturday when UBC hosts the University
of Saskatchewan at Thunderbird
Arena. Gametime both nights is 8
p.m.
Skiing
Rain postponed the third Northwest Collegiate Ski Conference
meet at Crystal Mountain,
Washington, this weekend, but not
before UBC had taken the lead.
Although meet standings will not
be known until the cancelled crosscountry events are made up at the
next meet, UBC is the likely winner.
John Hilland led the team once
again with first place finishes in
both the slalom and giant slalom.
The women were led by Darcy
Estabrooke, who placed second in
the women's slalom, and Beth
Cosulich, who placed third in the
giant slalom.
If the alpine events are not
enough to secure first place, UBC
can rely on its strong cross-country
side. Both the men's and women's
cross-country racers took top place
at the last meet at Mount Baldy,
Osoyoos.
Wrestling
The  UBC  wrestling  team,  with
the first place performances of
Martin Gleave and Gary Hirose,
captured second place with 42
points in the University of Calgary's
"Dinosaur Classic" on the
weekend. Calgary was first with
75. Gleave won the 65 kg division
and was named outstanding
wrestler of the tournament. Hirose
took the 86 kg class, which is the
heaviest division.
Wendell Cornwall (80 kg) and
Geoff Lee (61 kg) had second place
finishes and Francis Lauer placed
third at 68 kg.
Gymnastics
The UBC men's gymnastics team
topped the University of
Washington 176.35 to 154.20 at
UBC Saturday. The UBC squad
took the top three places with Glen
Harder finishing first with 46.05
points, followed by Tom Carlson
(44.50) and Kevin Seburn (43.85).
Next meets are at San Jose State
Friday, and at the University of
California at Berkley on Jan. 30. Page 12
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 26, 1982
Tired of Cramming?
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Cut your study time by 2/3!
We'll show you how — FREE
□
Would you like to:
□ Read 3 to 10 times faster, with better concentration, understanding and recall.
Raise your grade average without long hours over
texts.
Learn effective study skills.
End all-night cramming sessions.
Have more free time to enjoy yourself.
Evelyn Wood works — over 1 million people including students, executives, senators, and even
presidents have proven it. A free 1 hour demonstration will show you how to save hundreds of hours of
drudgery this year (as well as how to increase your
speed immediately with some simple new reading
techniques).
It only takes an hour, and it's free. Don't miss it.
SCHEDULE OF FREE SPEED READING- LESSONS
You'll increase your reading speed
up to 100% on the spot!
LAST 3 DAYS
5:30 p.m. or 8:00 p.m.
STUDENT UNION BUILDING
ROOM 205
EVELYN WOOD READING DYNAMICS
1982 S   CROMPTON

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