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Array § Winter break 2013
Welcome back (part two) // Page 2
WHAT'S ON i    THIS WEEK, MAY WE SUGGEST..
MONDAY   06
TERM 2 BEGINS
ALL DAY® EVERYWHERE
School starts again... buses full
again ...the routine begins again....
We expect lots of people will fall
asleep in class because they can't
adjust to school life.
TUESDAY ' 07
FREE BROWNIES
11 A.M.-5 P.M. @SUBCONCOURSE
UBC Student Environment Centre
wants campus to be aware of
where food comes from and how
it's made. Go to their booth and
watch a short video to claim your
free Sprouts brownie.
WEDNESDAY' 08
THE SECOND FIRST PIT
NIGHT
9 P.M.® THE PIT, SUB
Their Facebook page boasts
in caps "new draft beers and
awesome cocktails." It's the new
year; why don't you give the old
watering hole a try? It won't be
long before you are bogged down
by assignments and papers.
We wanted to show that the glitz and glamour of the holidays are done. Welcome back
to learning. Itdoesn'thavetobeas dreary as we pictured it. Photos by Carter Brundage
andFlickr.
Want to see your events listed here?
Email your events listings to
printeditor@ubyssey.ca
t*-
^|THE UBYSSEY
JANUARY6,2014 | VOLUMEXCV| ISSUE*
EDITORIAL
Coordinating Editor
Geoff Lister
coordlnatlng@ubyssey.cs
Managing Editor, Print
Ming Wong
orlntedltor@ubyssey.es
Managing Editor, Web
CJ Pentland
webedltor@ubyssey.es
News Editors
Will McDonald +
Sarah Bigam
iews@ubyssey.es
Senior News Writer
Vacant
Culture Editor
Rhys Edwards
eulture@ubyssey.es
Senior Culture Writer
Aurora Tejeida
atejelda@ubyssey.es
Sports + Rec Editor
Natalie Scadden
sports@ubyssey.es
Senior Lifestyle Writer
Reyhana Heatherington
"heatherlngton@ubyssey.es
Features Editor
Amo Rosenfeld
features@ubyssey.es
Video Producers
Lu Zhang +
Nick Grossman
vldeo@ubyssey.es
Copy Editor
Matt Meuse
eopy@ubyssey.es
Photo Editor
Carter Brundage
ehotos@ubyssey.es
Illustrator
Indiana Joel
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Webmaster
Tony Li
webmaster@ubyssey.es
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cal@ubyssey.es
STAFF
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LEGAL
The Ubyssey is the official studentnews-
aaper of the University/ of Rrmsh Cn-
umbia. It is publishe
andThursdaybyTheUbyssey Publications Society. We are an autonomous,
democratically run student organization, and all students are encouragec
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Editorials are chosen and written by the
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opinion ofthe staff, and do not necessarily reflect the views ofThe Ubyssey
Publications Society or the University
of British Columbia. All editorial content
appearing in The Ubyssey is the property ofThe Ubyssey Publications Society. Stories, opinions, photographs anc
artwork contained herein cannot be re-
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OUR CAMPUS//
ONE ON ONE WITH THE PEOPLE WHO MAKE UBC
wrsi
PHOTO CARTER BRUNDAGE3THE UBYSSEY
Andrea Palmer never planned to study engineering, but she went on to become EUS president and lead a robotics team.
Andrea Palmer captains
both man and machine
Natalya Kautz
Contributor
Robot wrangling was not
in Andrea Palmer's original
career plan.
The path was set: she was
going to go to Montreal and study
at McGill, graduate with a degree
in math and science and then become a teacher. But then her mom
persuaded her otherwise.
"I told my mom [my plan] and
she was like, T think you should go
to UBC and study engineering.'"
Without that push from her
mother towards engineering,
Palmer said it's unlikely she
would have ended up in the faculty, taken charge as captain to
a team of robots and eventually
become the current Engineering
Undergraduate Society (EUS)
president.
Palmer is majoring in mechanical engineering in the mecha-
tronics option, which is a combination of computer, electrical and
mechanical engineering.
"I chose robotics because it
does combine three disciplines,
and it studies how the systems
interact with each other, and so
it's not just by itself but more of a
'bigger picture' thinking."
Originally from Ottawa,
Palmer moved to the West Coast
at the age of six. Her family
settled in Port Moody, and she
attended school in Maple Ridge.
Now in her fifth of a planned six-
year degree, Palmer has made the
most of her time at UBC.
Even before stepping up in the
EUS, Palmer had been involved
with the engineering community. She was technical captain of
Thunderbots, the engineering
team of autonomous, soccer-playing robots, and was involved
in Engineers Without Borders.
Outside of school, she made time
to practice kickboxing.
"You find time for the things
you're interested in. School hasn't
always been my top priority, but I
still get through it."
Palmer chose to enter the
engineering co-op program, and
opted to do extra work terms
through the program. Now back
in school, Palmer is well into her
term as EUS president, and has
been kept busy since assuming
the position in April.
"There's been a lot of change.
We had a new dean in September, and so over the summer we
had a lot of planning," she said.
"There's been a constant supply
of things to do. It's been challenging, but it's been very rewarding so far."
It seems choosing engineering
over science has been the right
choice for Palmer so far.
"There's also just a lot of girls
who apply to science, maybe not
knowing about engineering or not
seeing engineering as the right
fit, so they choose science instead
whereas they would probably do
extremely well in engineering. I
almost did that."
Stereotypes ofthe standard engineer being male can contribute
to this female deficit in a faculty
where only one in four entrants
are female.
"There are stereotypes in all
levels of education, as soon as
you get into elementary school
as well as when you graduate
high school and you talk to a career counsellor about what you
should go into. I know that mine
never suggested engineering as
an option to me."
Palmer said she's looking forward to the rest of her time in the
faculty, and the rest of her term
as president.
"We have a good support
community and the guys who are
in engineering aren't there to kick
the girls out or anything like that.
"Everyone's just trying to get
through school and help each
other get through [it]." XI
Design,
layout,
Pusheen cats
email editor
MingWong
printeditor@
ubyssey.ca
Volunteer for The Ubyssey
What are you interested in?
Arts,
entertainment,
sophistry
Qj
Lights,
camera,                ^
rt|T^\
Toope,
AMS elections,
current events
selfies                  \
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iS^j^.
email editors
1 WillMcDonaldanc
' Sarah Bigam
n e ws @ u bys s ey. ca
Investigative pieces,     ^^w
lonaform journalism. >^^V
Varsity sports,
athletic reviews,
milkshakes
pizza
email editor
NatalieScadder
sports© ubyssey.ca
email editor
Arno Rosenfeld
features©
ubyssey.ca // News
EDITORS WILL MCDONALD + SARAH BIGAM
MONDAY, JANUARY 6,20
COMMERCE UNDERGRAD SOCIETY
BR/
AMS reveals new
$8K logo
=ILEPHOTOGEOFFLISTEF3THE UBYSSEY
The Sauder School of Business barred the Commerce Undergraduate Society from hosting licensed events while they investigated the CUS FROSH chants.
CUS drinking events put on hold after FROSH chants
Sarah Bigam
News Editor
In response to the Sauder
FROSH chants, the Commerce
Undergraduate Society (CUS)
was barred from hosting events
requiring a liquor license for
most of October, The Ubyssey
has learned.
"The hold was put in place
during the fact-finding process
after the events of FROSH when
it was discovered there was
underage drinking involved,"
said Sauder School of Business
associate dean Pamela Lim. "The
school wanted to complete the
fact-finding process and work
with the CUS to ensure that
future events would be held
respectfully and responsibly and
ensure safety of students, before
further events that require liquor
licenses were approved."
CUS president Sean Fleming
said two to three liquor license
requests were rejected during
that time.
The hold was lifted in late
October, when the CUS received
approval from Sauder for a liquor
license for an annual party they
intended to hold in the Faculty of
Science's Abdul Ladha Building.
However, the Faculty of Science
turned down the CUS' request to
host the party there.
"This was not the first time a
booking request had been denied
because of prior behaviour of a
student group," said Paul Harrison, Science associate dean,
students, in an email statement.
"From time to time, student
behaviour gets out of hand and
certain privileges are not granted
until issues are dealt with,"
he said.
"While some may feel that it
was not fair to treat the students
in that faculty as one body, the
public perception both on and off
campus was that Sauder students were in need of a change of
attitude."
Harrison said the dean of
Science was informed that space
for student events was available
in the Henry Angus Building
around the time requested.
"If the dean ofthe Sauder
school wanted to sanction a
licensed event, there was no need
to allow it to take place in the
Ladha Science Student Centre
until a satisfactory and public
resolution was reached on the
promised review," Harrison said.
Sauder approved a liquor
license for an event the CUS held
on Nov. 22 in their own building,
the Henry Angus Building, according to Lim. Before approving this, Sauder met with the
event organizer and both parties
signed an agreement on training
for event staff and restrictions on
alcohol consumption.
Now CUS events will be
approved by Sauder on a case-by-
case basis, rather than in groups
as before.
"Every time that an application comes up, we will meet
with the organizers ofthe event
to ensure that we're going over
the checklist [of rules] and that
they're going to abide by it." said
Lim. "The approval of future
events will depend on the success
of the former events." XI
NEWS BRIEFS
UBC grad found dead two years
after disappearance
Vancouver police have identified the
remains of Matthew Huszar, ending
the two-year search for the missing
25 year-old.
Police found Huszar's remains at
a marina on False Creek on Dec. 31.
They said his death does not appear
to be suspicious.
Huszarwas last seen leaving
an office Christmas party on Dec.
16,2011 near Water and Abbot
Street in downtown Vancouver.
After his disappearance, Huszar's
family launched a search, offering a
$10,000 reward for information on his
whereabouts.
Huszar is originally from Lethbridge, Alfa, and graduated from
UBC with an honours degree
in geology.
Study casts doubt on current
understanding of gravity
Ateam of scientists, including a
UBC professor, have found that a
system of stars could call Einstein's theory of general relativity
into question.
The team of five scientists have
found that a system of three stars
that may behave in a way that contradicts the current understanding
of gravity.
"Finding a deviation from the
strong equivalence principle would
indicate a breakdown of General
Relativity and would point us toward
a new, revised theory of gravity,"
said UBC astronomer Ingrid Stairs.xi
SPORTS »
First phase of
athletics review
under way
Sarah Bigam
News Editor
The first phase of UBC's much-discussed sports review began
last month.
UBC released the final criteria
for the upcoming sports review
Dec. 9. The criteria and weighting categories are "essentially
unchanged" from a draft presented in November, according to
a media release.
Data will be reviewed by an
assessment team which will
include two additional alumni in
"an effort to expedite decisions
without jeopardizing the integrity ofthe assessment," the release said. The university should
announce the initial decisions in
late January.
A second stage will follow for
the unconfirmed teams, allowing
them to develop a framework for
meeting the criteria for varsity
status. The final decision for
those teams will be made at the
end of February.
Using these criteria, teams
will be judged based on five
categories, with different weight
assigned to each.
Thirty-five per cent is allocated for competitive success, competition and progression; 15 per
cent for supports for competitive
success; 20 per cent for community support and tradition; 10 per
Toope addressed rumours about the athletics
cent for partnerships; and 20
per cent for fit with the university's mission.
Teams that want varsity
status, including the 29 existing
varsity teams and interested
AMS clubs, will provide data on
these criteria to an assessment
body in early 2014. Some of these
teams and AMS clubs will be
shifted into a new category called
"competitive sports clubs," which
will still receive some support
and funding from the university.
After the draft criteria was
released on Nov. 8, UBC held a
second round of consultation,
which garnered 280 responses,
according to the media release.
"Of those who provided feedback on the criteria in the second
round of consultation, there was
FILE PHOTO WILLMCDONALD3THE UBYSSEY
review at a press conference.
broad support for the proposed
framework," said Ashley Howard,
managing director of UBC Athletics and Recreation, quoted in the
release. "The input we received for
improving our measures was very
helpful. This feedback resulted in
minor changes to improve clarity
of language and ensure the assessment advisory team will get the
information they need."
Teams will be asked to provide
data on these criteria for a minimum of five preceding years, but
they can choose to provide data for
additional years as well.
No funds are being cut from the
athletics department's budget in
the review.
The changes from the review
are scheduled to come into effect
in September 2015. XI
ams
EST. 1915
Student Society
of UBC Vancouver
MAGE COURTESY AMS
The AMS designed the logo with the New
SUB in mind.
Brandon Chow
Senior News Writer
The AMS has come up with a
new logo as part of a rebranding
campaign in the new Student
Union Building.
The new logo cost around $8,000
to develop.
"With the new building
that's going to be opening, it's
a really great time for us to be
looking at our brand and the
image that we're presenting to
students," said Abby Blinch, AMS
communications manager.
The AMS contracted the graphic
design company Glasfurd & Walker
about a year ago to come up with
a new logo. According to Blinch,
their proposed design was met
with "lukewarm" feedback from
council members.
"We considered our options moving forward, which could be to keep
our current logo, [use] the Glasfurd
& Walker logo, or to do something
new," Blinch said.
Last Wednesday, AMS Council
voted unanimously to approve an
altered but very similar design to the
Glasfurd & Walker proposal as their
new logo.
"What we decided to do instead
of starting from scratch — because
we didn't want to spend a lot of
money on it — was just [tweak] what
Glasfurd & Walker did, because they
came up with something that was
pretty great and there were a lot of
things that people liked about it,"
said Blinch. "We wanted to work
with it, and that way we also weren't
wasting what had been previously
done by them."
Blinch said about $7,000 was
spent on contracting Glasfurd &
Walker to come up with the initial
designs, and around $1,000 will be
spent licensing certain AMS computers with the typeface that the
new logo will be using.
"[The Glasfurd & Walker deal]
was a part of a larger contract," she
said. "We were doing a few things
with them and I think the amount
spent on the logo was $7,000, which
was a very large discount from what
they would normally charge and because they were doing a fair amount
of other work with us as well."
The Lucida typeface being used
in the approved design is much
cheaper than the typeface proposed by Glasfurd & Walker, which
may have cost between $10,000
and $15,000 to license, according
to Blinch.
The new logo is set to be used
whenever development ofthe New
SUB is finished. XI 4    I    NEWS    I    MONDAY, JANUARY 6,2014
Rodents:
132,815
j*  jgt  j*  M   M  M M
M  M  M  J*   J*  M A
Fish:
67,534
Reptiles and
amphibians:
22,975
UBC releases animal
research data for 2012
Sarah Bigam
News Editor
Animal research is on the rise at
UBC, according to data recently
released by the university.
In 2012, 227,362 animals were
involved in UBC research, up 2,319
from 2011. Ninety-eight per cent of
these animals were rodents, fish or
amphibians. Sixty-seven per cent
were involved in either Category B
or C research, which causes "less
than minor or short-term stress"
such as observance or tagging
wild animals.
"We're really saddened that
they've increased their numbers,"
said Laura-Leah Shaw, director of
Stop UBC Animal Research.
Eighty-five animals were involved in Category E experiments,
26 more than in 2011. The Canadian
Council on Animal Care defines
Category E as "procedures which
cause severe pain near, at or above
the pain tolerance threshold of
unanesthetized conscious animals."
All animals involved in Category E
research in 2012 were given anesthesia during surgical procedures,
under veterinary oversight and with
"an approved pain management
plan," according to a media release.
The use of animals in most
species groups has decreased since
last year, except for fish and large
mammals, due to a study which
occurs every two years surveying 11,000 fish in the wild and a
series of animal welfare studies
which involved a large herd of
dairy cows.
"Every single animal [studied] has to be accounted for and
tracked," said UBC Associate VP
Research and International Helen
Burt. "When you're using large
numbers offish and so on, the
numbers are going to go up ... but
I don't believe that [the numbers
going up] represents any kind of
trend."
UBC did not disclose numbers
on specific species used. "The
reason for that is ... keeping our
studies confidential," said Burt.
"It's important to remember that
this is all published on completion
ofthe work. It's always available to
the public through the medium of
publications."
In 2011, Stop filed a series of
access to information requests
regarding research protocols,
statistics on specific species
used for research and the source
of primates used in research.
Categories of invasiveness
A. Experiments on most invertebrates or live isolates
B. Little or no discomfort or stress
C. Minor stress or pain of short
duration
D. Moderate to severe distress or
discomfort
E. Severe pain near, at, or above
the pain tolerance threshold of un-
anesthetisized conscious animals
n/a
Birds:
1,783
Small
mammals:
996
/■
Large
mammals:
908
Marine
mammals:
351
1 =-10,000
peranimal
GRAPHICSMINGWONG^HE UBYSSEY
UBC did not share
this information on
the grounds that it
contained research
information of UBC
employees, which
is not included in
the B.C. Freedom
of Information
and Protection of ^""^li,
ofammals
Privacy Act. used in UBC
The information       research
and privacy commissioner for B.C.
ordered UBC to
continue processing
the requests that did
not contain research
information of UBC
researchers, including
the source of primates
and the names and affiliations of members
ofthe UBC Animal
Care Committee. This
information has not
yet been released.
"You can trace [cattle] from
the supermarket shelf all the
way back to the farm where they
originated at, or the place of
their birth. We should be able to
have the same information on a
research animal," said Shaw.
0.04%
4
k   1.02%
k.   1.01%
1
f   increase
M
f   increase
CM
*■
*■
10
o
O
ro
10
m
rC
vH
CM
CM
iH
CM
CM
2010
2011
2012
Years UBC has released animal research statistics
Source: 2012 UBC animal research statistics
This is UBC's third consecutive
year releasing animal research
statistics, and the first year they
have released a virtual tour of one
of their facilities. The virtual tour
ofthe Centre for Comparative
Medicine, which opened in March
2012 and cost $40 million, includes views of training, scanning
and surgical facilities, as well as
views of housing units for rabbits
and geese.
"The public rarely get to see
what kinds of facilities we have,
and I think this demonstrates
quite nicely the state-of-the-art
facilities UBC now has for conducting research," said Burt.
UBC controls 21 animal research facilities, and between six
and eight of these are on campus,
according to Burt.
A 2010 report by the Canadian
Council on Animal Care recommended more "appropriate
management" of their facilities
by centralizing them and increasing supervision of animals
used in research. The report
also found one facility, the name
of which was redacted, to have
"deficiencies." The report also
said UBC has "made excellent
progress in its animal care and
use program."
Over the past eight years, UBC
has invested $160 million in new
animal facilities on this campus.
According to Burt, about 10 facili
ties have been closed over the last
eight years.
Shaw expressed concerns
about the new Djavad Mowaf-
aghian Centre for Brain Health,
set to open on campus in early
2014. Research at the centre
may include primates, according
to Shaw.
UBC does not have plans to
end animal research.
"The fact is that we're doing a
lot of research and we will allow
research that meets the ethical standards to go forward. So
provided that UBC continues to
be so successful, we will keep allowing studies that use animals,"
said Burt.
"When other institutions
in other parts ofthe world are
reducing and eliminating animal
research, here's UBC increasing
it," said Shaw. She cited China,
India and Norway as examples
of countries cutting back on
animal research.
"We don't want to stop the
research," Shaw said. "We understand the research is important,
but there's ways of doing the
research without both the pain
and suffering of animals and the
extremely high cost in taxpayer
dollars of using animals."
According to a press release,
UBC is the only Canadian university that publishes its animal
research statistics annually. XI // Sports + Rec
EDITOR  NATALIE SCADDEN
MONDAY, JANUARY 6,20
FEATURING
BEST TEAM
OF FIRST ^
SEMESTER?
ITING ^L
MOST
DISAPPOIN
TEAM?
I
I
I
I
WHO WILL BE THE BEST
TEAM DURING THE
REMAINDER OF THE
YEAR?
THE UBC WOMEN'S
VOLLEYBALL TEAM
WILL LOSE A GAME
WHEN...
WHERE IS THE MENS
SOCCERTROPH
Show me a person who
doesn't think UBC men's soccer is the best and I'll show
you a liar.
Women's soccer gave up
two goals over their first 11
games, gave up three in their
12th and eventually missed
nationals again. The song
remains the same.
Women's volleyball and
women's swimming will win nationals, guaranteed. I don't see
any Canada West team beating
women's hockey, either.
Nike, the Greek God of Sport,
and Victoria, the Roman
eguivalent, round up their
palsto makeasuperteam
and finally prevail in a tense
fifth set.
It's been my theory all along:
the football team (who moonlights as Pit security) stole it,
so it's probably in Thunderbird
Stadium somewhere.
WHAT'S THE BEST WAY
FOR ATHLETICS TO
INCREASEATTENDANCI
AT GAMES?
WHAT'S THE BE
RECREATION
ACTIVITY O
CAMPUS?
THE MOST
UNDERRATED
WINTER OLYMPIC
SPORT IS
Andrew Wiggins.
Being sad that there is no knoll
to slide down when it snows.
Debating who makes the Canadian Olympic hockey team.
Men's soccer. They really
earned their trophy this year
(and may be the last team to
get it).
Football. Between close
losses at home and getting
knocked out in the first round
ofthe playoffs, the team was a
real let down.
Women's volleyball. Things
look good for a seventh
straight national championship.
The men's soccer trophy
turns up.
Ask the women's
volleyball team.
Offer cheaper drinks for
students.
The cleaning team at Irving
Barber when it was open 24
hours a day. Their teamwork
kept the building fronnsnnelling
too much like stale students.
The AMS exec team because
not enough controversies.
And also not giving 110%.
The Honour Roll sushi team
for supplying the demand for
rolls during the lunch hour
rush.
I playforthem.
Men's soccer. Back-to-back
championships, 'nough said.
Football — win more home
games please.
Women's volleyball, and
they might set a CIS record
for [consecutive] championships, too.
UBC goes NCAA.
It's in Peru.
Wouldn't you like to know?
Urban golf.
Biathlon. The athletes are
trained killers.
Copy and paste attendees. Or
free food.
People watching, because it
reguires finesse.
Luge, because it's not just
about going down a long and
windy slide. It's about staying
really stiff while you're sliding.
Hiring a student promotions
team instead of more staff.
The ropes course.
Skijoring. It's like waterskiing
behind a horse, but on snow.
[A demonstration sport at the
1928 Olympics.]
The one with those guys. You
know.
The Dibley Mallards. Their
match against Arsenal FC last
year was a travesty.
The one that wins the most
games, presumably.
They decide to, of course.
It's in our office. Our News
Editors stole it so that we
would always have something to write about. Plus
it's a handy storage vessel.
[Kidding, of course.]
Some new branding might be
the trick. "UBC Athletics: We
will make all of your wildest
dreams come true."
Raccoon-baiting. Look at
those little fellows go.
Bare-knuckle lumberjack
duelling, xi 6    I    SPORTS + REC    I    MONDAY, JANUARY 6,2014
SKIING »
ML Baker Ski Area is located 50 miles east of Bellingham, Washington and offers 1,000 acres of skiable terrain.
=HOTO GEOFF LISTEF3THE UBYSSEY
Mt. Baker provides U.S. option for UBC shredders
Ski area has plentiful backcountry access, receives highest annual snowfall in the world
Natalie Scadden
Sports + Rec Editor
Essex Prescott may live in Whistler for a good chunk ofthe year,
but the head of the UBC Freeride
Team — what he calls the "shred
side ofthe Ski and Board Club" —
hasn't missed an opening day at
Mt. Baker in five years.
Many UBC students may be
familiar with Mt. Baker. Its glaciated cone rises high above the
surrounding mountains in the
Cascade Range. It's a striking,
beautiful symbol of a clear day in
the Lower Mainland, but the ski
area itself is lesser known.
Located about 50 miles east of
Bellingham, Wash., Mt. Baker is
about a two-hour drive from Vancouver, depending on the border
lineup. It can't compete with the
over 200 runs and 8,171 acres
of skiable terrain offered up at
Whistler, but it doesn't really try
to. While Whistler has become a
four-season resort and a booming
tourist destination, Baker has
kept a much more laid-back, local
feel.
However, the area has a
thousand acres of skiable terrain
— about as much as Cypress,
Grouse and Seymour combined
— and there are often little to
no lineups to get on any of the
eight chairlifts.
"I think it's pretty refreshing
to go [to Baker] just because it's
a lot different," said Prescott,
who grew up in northern Idaho.
He's spent a lot of time at Baker,
including over 10 days there
last season.
"It's definitely just a raw skiing experience," he said. "There's
no accommodation on the hill,
[and] there's really not any
accommodation in [the nearby
town of] Glacier either."
Despite the lack of an apres-
ski scene at Mt. Baker, what
keeps Prescott coming back is
its plentiful backcountry skiing
opportunities, easily accessible
from the top of several chairlifts
— provided you have the necessary equipment and skills.
"It's different because most
of the backcountry in Whistler
is alpine, above the treeline,
[whereas] most ofthe back-
country at Baker isn't alpine,
so everything's just a lot closer
together," Prescott said.
Mt. Baker also enjoys the
highest annual snowfall of any
ski resort in the world. During
the 1998-99 season, a world
record 1,140 inches of snow was
recorded, and over the past eight
seasons, there's been an average
of 727 inches of snowfall. By
comparison, Whistler Blackcomb
lists their average annual snowfall as 462 inches.
Skiers and snowboarders
love to find fresh powder and
Baker gets loads of it, but with
this heavy snowfall comes an
increased avalanche risk, some
thing Prescott was quick to warn
about.
"The thing about Baker is it's
so dependent on being able to
read the forecast well, of when
it's going to be good there and
when it's not going to be good,"
he said. "It's not like Whistler,
where pretty much regardless of
the conditions you can get to an
elevation that's going to be OK,
or you can get to a spot that's
going to be OK. Baker's pretty
finicky, and especially with the
amount of snow they get, they get
pretty heavy avalanche danger
sometimes."
He also noted that the back-
country line called Shuksan Arm
is one ofthe most dangerous
spots. "Last year they had one
ofthe biggest slides ever. It was
something like 10 feet of snow
that slid, which is crazy. I think
[the backcountry skiing at Baker]
is good and it's accessible, but
you've got to know where you're
going for sure and you've got be
careful."
For those who wish to ski at
a more recreational level, Mt.
Baker offers 31 runs mostly
sectioned into easy, intermediate
and advanced areas. Lift tickets
are $50 on weekdays and $55 on
weekends, and gear rentals are
$36 for the day. Plus, draft beer
is sold for $3.50 at the White
Salmon Day Lodge.
Needless to say, it's worth the
trip. XI
=HOTO GEOFF LISTER/THE UBYSSEY
A backcountry skier drops in off of Shuskan Arm at Mt. Baker. MONDAY, JANUARY 6, 2014    |   SPORTS + REC
BASKETBALL»
Harleen Sidhu happy to be back on home court
The power forward joined UBC after playing 3 years at University of Nebraska
Casey Watamaniuk
Contributor
For the first time since high
school, Harleen Sidhu is truly
playing on home court.
As one ofthe latest additions
to the UBC women's basketball
team, she is a power forward to
be reckoned with. Given her first
pair of basketball shoes before
she could even walk, basketball
has always been a part of Sidhu's
life. Inspired and motivated by
her basketball-playing father, she
started playing competitively in
Grade 4 and her love for the sport
has kept basketball centre court
in her life ever since.
Sidhu said that whenever her
family watches her play, pride
and excitement is written all over
their faces. Especially proud is
the father who gave his daughter
her first court shoes.
"After every game, I go up
to him and give him a big hug
because I know what it means to
him [to watch]," Sidhu said.
Thanks to the support of her
family, intense determination
to perform and an early start
on preseason training, Sidhu is
not only at the top of her mental game, but also at the top of
UBC's stats. She's tied for the
most minutes played per game
(31.7), second only to the reigning
Canada West MVP Kris Young
in points scored per game (15.4)
and has nabbed by far the most
rebounds (98) through 10 regular
season games this season. She
has also started every game so
far. It's no wonder UBC head
coach Deb Huband has always
had her eyes on Sidhu.
Coming out of high school
with top B.C. provincial status,
Sidhu was signed to the NCAA
Div. 1 team at the University of
Nebraska, where she played off
and on for three years through
some injuries. Balancing a
pre-professional degree in
nutrition sciences, an intensive
basketball regimen and all the
stresses that come with being
so far from home, it was almost
inevitable that she would start to
feel a little burnt out.
"I hadn't had self time in a
really, really longtime," Sidhu said. Her involvement in
basketball had barely allowed
her enough time for a university
degree, never mind time to create
concrete plans for after graduation. She was left in a strange
limbo between basketball and
the ever-approaching "real life."
It was a difficult decision for
Sidhu to go on hiatus from the
game she loved, but taking a
break was necessary. Her mental
game was off, so Sidhu took some
personal time while still maintaining an involvement in coaching. "The much-needed year off
gave me a little bit more clarity,"
she recalled. "It helped me decide
whether basketball was something
I really wanted to do."
The decision to return to her
roots in the Lower Mainland
wasn't solely based on UBC's
diverse course selection; the
emotional and physical challenges of being away from her sport
left Sidhu with an overwhelming
hunger for another chance at her
basketball career. Sidhu's year off
confirmed how much the sport
meant to her. Back on home turf,
it was time for her to shoot for
the Thunderbirds.
Sidhu is now experiencing an
all-time career high in her desire
to play ball. Her entire motivation has changed, and that may
have something to do with her
cheerleaders. While she'll always
cherish the memories she made
in Nebraska, nothing compares
to the feeling she gets when she
sees her family in the Thunderbird stands, cheering her on and
pumping her with confidence.
"To have them up in the
stands, every game here ... that
means the world to me," she said.
"I missed that... when I was in
the States."
Surrounded once again by her
close family — her sister Jasmine
is the team's new manager — Sidhu is comfortable and confident.
Despite playing with new teammates and under a new coach and
starting at a new university with
her eyes on medical school, she's
finally back home.
It's as if she's never left the
Western Canada basketball
scene, save for a few free throw
rule discrepancies — which Sidhu says she has struggled with,
continuing to leave the line on
release rather than wait until the
ball hits the rim. She's so determined that she rushes the ball.
But given that she's missed just
four of 35 free throw attempts
— second best in the conference
— there aren't too many rebounds
up for grabs anyway.
Due to her previous trouble
with injuries in Nebraska, Sidhu
still has two of her allotted five
years remaining to play university-level basketball, of which
she'll no doubt make the most
of it with the Thunderbirds.
Constantly improving and
growing stronger in her game,
Sidhu will be an integral part of
carrying the blue and gold back
to nationals.
Though she's still undecided
when it comes to choosing a path
for her future, Sidhu is certain
that she loves basketball, and will
keep it up for as long as she can.
Right now, with the seven wins
the women's basketball team
has so far this season, all we're
certain of is this: Harleen Sidhu,
the Thunderbirds are glad you're
home. XI
UBC basketball will play their
next home game on Friday against
Alberta. The women's game tips
off at 6 p.m., with the men's game
following at 8 p.m.
=HOTOWILLMCDONALD3THE UBYSSEY
Harleen Sidhu, a transfer from the University of Nebraka, has been a key component of UBC's 7-3 record so far this season.
HARLEEN SIDHU
BY THE NUMBERS
31 •#   Minutes per game
15.4 Points per game
•4/0  Field goal percentage
• OOO Free throw percentage (31 of 3E
FISU
WINTER
UNIVERSIADE
WOMEN'S HOCKEY
UBC's Christi Capozzi and
Tatiana Rafter helped Team
Canada to it's third straight
gold medal at the 2013
FISU Winter Uniw
Trentino, Italy in December.
Canada went undefeated
over seven games at the
WOMEN'S HOCKEY
3C began 2014 with two
lore victories to add to
ieir Canada West-leading
ally. The T-Birds triumphed
i Calgary with 4-2 and 1-0
Regular season record so far for UBC
tournamen
t, outscoring tne
opponents
by a 77-2 ove ral
margin. Rafter finished the
:ourament
with seven goals
while Capo
zzi added one.
Rafter was
also influential in
Canada's s
lutout of Russia
the gold m
sdalgame, assis
na on thre
!1Iit1735TSTs1E^H
Saturday respectively,
hanie Schaupmeyer had
goals on Friday, while
na Rafter scored her
ue-leading 12th goal to
/theteam on Saturday,
improved to 14-3-1 this
on, and will return home
lunderbird Arena this
ing weekend to face the
ersity of Regina Cougars. II Culture
RHYS EDWARDS
MONDAY, JANUARY 6,20
Eat your words
Four new year's resolutions for a healthier diet
=HOTO CARTER BRUNDAGE3THE UBY
A healthy diet isn't just about eating nutritious food; it involves being good to yourself, and your body, through conscientious decision-making.
FOOD
Jessica Christin-Hametner
After the indulgence and luxury of
the festive season, January is, for the
most part, a period of penny-pinching and privation. Having eaten just a
little too much, the New Year marks a
time when we often pledge to eat less
and exercise more.
Naturally, this is easier said than
done. While I support healthy eating
after the Christmas food extravaganza, I reject the idea of dieting in
favour of developing better eating
habits by adding nutritious foods to
your diet.
For me, the key to eating healthier
is focusing on a lifestyle change rather than depriving oneself of the foods
one loves. It's about balance. It's
about taking small steps that make a
big difference in the long-term. But
what, then, should you eat?
l. Go green
It is widely known that generous
helpings of vegetables help improve
your health and prevent cardiovascular disease, but are you getting the
recommended daily amount (two and
a half cups) of your greens each day?
Dark leafy green vegetables
are antioxidant powerhouses. As
suggested by RawBC, a volunteer
run non-profit organization that
promotes a raw plant-based diet,
these greens are rich in vitamins and
minerals that provide nourishment
to optimize health and well-being for
the body. Protecting cells from stress
or injury, helping maintain a healthy
body weight and providing that feel-
ing-fuller-for-longer-feeling are just
some of these benefits.
Start small by adding one new
green vegetable to your diet each
week. For instance, skip Subway and
combine kale, Swiss chard or spinach
with turkey or tuna by making a
homemade, inexpensive and healthy
wrap or salad. Cheap and cheerful.
2. Fight the fizz
Ditch the Diet Coke in favour of plain
water. Carbonated drinks are sugar-laden, high in caffeine and often
contain added colours and flavours,
which can increase body weight and
the risk of cardiovascular disease. A
recent study conducted by the University of North Carolina at Chapel
Hill found that overweight people
who chose healthier alternatives to
fizzy drinks, such as water, were able
to lose four to five pounds over a six-
month period. Furthermore, Harvard
University researchers have discovered that swapping sugary drinks for
water aids weight loss and lowers risk
of Type 2 diabetes.
Aim to drink about 1.2 litres of
water per day to boost your body's
metabolism, burn off more calories
and increase brain activity.
3. Savour your
favourites
When the clock strikes 12 at midnight
and a New Year begins, overambi-
tious New Year's resolutions often set
many up for failure, simply because
we still have the same habits on Jan. 1
as we did on Dec. 31. When depriving
oneself of the foods one enjoys, temptation will soon prove to be simply
too great to resist.
For me, the idea of banning the
naughty stuff is something I simply
do not believe in. When craving a
slice of sumptuous cake or a scoop
of creamy gelato, savour it guilt-free
and enjoy every mouthful. Choose
quality rather than quantity.
For instance, visit your favourite
French bakery, restaurant or Italian
cafe, and treat yourself to a delectable dessert of your choice once in a
while. I like Faubourg in downtown
Vancouver, which offers an authentically Parisian culinary experience
complete with French pastries and
macaroons.
4. Experiment
When it comes to eating healthier
in 2014, do be adventurous and try
new foods. Put your culinary skills
to the test, and in lieu of focusing
on what you can't eat, concentrate
on what you can. Begin by experimenting with a variety of colours,
flavours and textures in the kitchen
that create dishes bursting with
wholesome goodness.
Someone once told me that there's
no need for New Year's resolutions;
instead, one should choose a word or
theme, such as love, money or mindfulness. Indeed, choosing "health"
rather than "losing weight" might be
the best way to promote better eating
habits. %
PROCRASTINATION
STATION
THE HOBBIT
AND FEMINISM
Are warrior-women a token gesture or a
potent feminist symbol?
Chicks with guns are out; women with
bows are in.
Currently, The Hobbit: The Desolation of
Smaug rests at the top of the the U.S. box
office charts. Along with quicker pacing,
fans credit the film's success to another
factor: the inclusion of UBC international
relations graduate Evangeline Lilly (better
known as Kate from Lost), who plays
Tauriel, a brash, bow- and dagger-wielding
wood elf captain.
Fans who pick up a copy of the original
Hobbit will not find Tauriel among its
pages. Writers created her specifically for
the film in an effort to address the absence
of women in Tolkien's 1937 text.
Tauriel is the latest iteration in a phenomenon that has developed popularity in
recent years: the representation of women
as warrior-hunters in pop culture. The fad
isn't exactly new; the association between
femininity and hunting can be traced
back to ancient Greece, in the form of the
goddess Artemis (renamed Diana by the
Romans).
However, the archetype experienced
renewed interest throughout 2012 and
2013. In cinema, Disney Pixar's Brave and
The Hunger Games 'Katniss Everdeen
both brought powerful female archers to
the big screen; and in videogames, two
oflastyear'sblockbustertitles.Eidos'
Tomb Raider reboot and Naughty Dog's
TheLastofUs, also featured hunting
females in lead roles. As testaments to the
effectiveness of the warrior-hunter motif, all
fourof these titlesfeatured images of their
respective stars posing with bows in their
marketing campaigns.
The resurgence of the warrior-hunter as
a feminist symbol adds a new dimension
to narrative worlds which traditionally emphasize hunting and fighting as masculine
exercises—that is, in fantasy worlds, such
as those featured in Brave or The Hobbit,
or in dystopian worlds, such as those in
TheLastofUs and The Hunger Games.
Since these genres so frequently dominate
pop culture, the warrior-hunter symbol
provides audiences with an alternative way
to access these stories.
However, there is a flip side to the popularity of the warrior-hunter: the reinforcement of stereotypes. Ratherthan being
permitted to inhabit a world on the same
terms as a male character—that is, to be
concerned about things which have nothing to do with gender— the warrior-hunter
is defined in terms ofthe qualities other
women supposedly lack: through her
weaponry, aggression, fighting prowess
and leadership.
Further, even though Tauriel's inclusion
in The Hobbit is a positive gesture towards
gender equality, she isn't exempt from
a cinema trope that often mires female
characters: despite Lilly's wishes to the
contrary, studio executives included a love
triangle subplot for her character during
reshooting.
Nevertheless, The Hobbit's relative
progressiveness in mainstream cinema
portends a positive trajectory in pop
culture: one where women are neither warrior-hunters, nor even women, but simply
people. %
-Rhys Edwards,
Culture Editor
■  ■*
MORE ONLINE
Read other Procrastination
Station columns, and web
exclusives, at ubyssey.ca/
culture.
fe MONDAY, JANUARY 6, 2014    |    CULTURE
MUSIC »
High brow, low budget
MuzeWest Concert company makes classical
music accessible to the public
PHOTO COURTESYBROOK JONES
Jennifer West, an education graduate, and Diana Chan, a fourth year music major who plays the oboe, co-founded MuzeWest.
Alice Fleerackers
StaffWriter
"Welcome to the geek squad,"
laughed Jennifer West when I
told her that I, too, am a fan of
composer Johannes Brahms.
"Brahms is my homeboy," she
continued, smiling. Already, my
meeting with the co-artistic
director of MuzeWest Concerts,
an organization aimed at making
classical music more accessible
within the Lower Mainland, is
nothing like what I expected.
My surprise only grows when
she introduces me to Jan Bislin
and Jonathan Chan, the accomplished violin duo set to perform
in MuzeWest's upcoming concert
on Jan. 9. Enjoying the evening's
hockey game with a burger and a
beer, Bislin and Chan look more
like a pair of college Canucks
fans than renowned classical
musicians.
Although they may not look it,
all three of my companions are
deadly serious about one thing:
music. "We're a big believer
that everybody loves music,"
said Chan.
Bislin agreed: "Well, of course,
music is freedom, right?"
This shared belief — that
music is a vital part of life — is
the driving force behind MuzeWest. West, who founded the
organization with fourth-year
music student Diana Chan,
and who herself holds both a
bachelor's and master's degree
in education from UBC, explained that it has two goals: to
increase awareness about the
importance of music education,
and to inspire audiences. To
achieve these goals, MuzeWest
hires professional musicians
to perform affordable classical music concerts, as well as
free outreach shows at local
elementary schools.
This outreach, she emphasized, is vital to MuzeWest's
mandate. "It's just part of our
philosophy," West explained,
"because we all believe that the
music that we grew up listening
to... has done something in our
life."
Overall, MuzeWest's community involvement has been rewarding. MuzeWest's first outreach
show at West Point Grey Elementary, West said, "confirmed
PHOTOS COURTESY BROOKJONES
Johnathan Chan, left, and Jan Bislin, right, are playing at this Thursday's recital, which
will combine classical styles with modern day hits.
[my] belief that young people can
be transformed by music." Even
months after pianist Alexander
Karpeyev visited the school,
West said the "children are still
humming the theme from Stravinsky's Firebird."
Although their first concerts
were a success, West admitted
the organization faces several
challenges. Raising the funds to
hire quality musicians and concert space is difficult, especially
when trying to keep ticket prices
low. She recalled, for example,
one day "walkpng] for three
hours in a business district and
[getting] zero dollars" in sponsorship. Although crowdfund-
ing campaigns on websites like
IndieGogo have been helpful,
fundraising still remains an issue
for MuzeWest.
In addition to these financial issues, MuzeWest is also
struggling to overcome cultural
stereotypes about how to enjoy
classical music. "We find it
hard that classical music has
got that kind of elite [attitude],"
explained Chan. "It targets a
certain audience." He, West and
Bislin want to break through this
stereotype, providing a musical
experience that even non-traditional classical audiences can
enjoy.
For this reason, Bislin and
Chan plan to dedicate the second
half of their upcoming recital to a
number of classically-influenced
pop music covers. These covers,
West hopes, will "invite people to
enjoy music in a different way."
Indeed, "different" might
understate what audiences can
expect from the upcoming recital. Bislin and Chan remained
elusive about their playlist, but
hinted that it will include 2013
hits in addition to well-known
classics. The pieces will be largely improvised, drawing inspiration from bluegrass music, Bach,
and Jimi Hendrix. As Bislin aptly
put it: "you never know what
could happen."
Jan Bislin and Jonathan Chan will
performing in concert on Thursday,
Jan. 9 at 7:30 p.m. at the West Point
Grey United Church, 4S9S West
CLUBS»
IRS A sponsors new charity for gala event
W    -NIGHT-   1
Of A
THOUSAND 1
niuurnr 1
=HOTO COURTESY UBC INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS SOCIETY
Karlson Leung, the president of IRSA from 2012-2013, presented at the fundraiser lastyear.
Aurora Tejeida
Senior Culture Writer
For the past 10 years, the International Relations Students Association (IRSA) has been dedicating
their annual gala, Night of One
Thousand Dinners, to the Canadian
Landmine Association.
After deciding they had already
focused on the issue of landmines
for long enough, this year the association has decided to switch partners
and dedicate the gala to the Canadian Harambee Education Society.
"We wanted to focus on a
semi-local issue and we thought
this was a good organization to
partner up with because they help
empower girls in Tanzania and
Kenya," said Brenda Nguyen, the
gala coordinator.
The Canadian Harambee Education Society is dedicated to ensuring girls have access to education,
providing them with scholarships,
dormitories, libraries and schools.
The society is also focused on
improving living conditions for girls.
"All the money from this event
will be going to the girls, 100 per
cent," Nguyen said. "None of it
will be used for administration
because the people who work for
the [Harambee] organization are
volunteers."
According to Nguyen, the first
year the gala was held, the student
association raised $5,000. But
every following event only brought
in a couple thousand dollars.
This year's theme is "Empowering Girls, Inspiring Futures,"
and the organizers are hoping
the change will help create more
involvement.
"There are more changes this
year that are aimed at engaging
the community," Nguyen said. "We
have a photo booth and a cocktail
reception before the event. Last
year it was very formal, so we're
hoping people can socialize more."
About 300 people, mainly
community leaders and university
students, attend the event every
year. This usually provides a good
opportunity to learn more about
international issues and how they
have worldwide impact.
This year's guest speakers will
include Imbenzi George, a Kenyan
foreign and public policy analyst,
and Lorrie Murkirazi, a Canadian
Harambee scholar recipient.
But since this year's gala is
focusing on empowering girls
through education in two specific
countries, the main concern has
been how to expand on this.
"Maybe next year we can focus
on empowering girls in Asia or in
other parts ofthe world to make it
more global," said Nguyen.
Focusing on a different organization each year can have
its benefits. Organizers hope the
gala will draw attention to these
projects, so that attendees with a
special interest in certain issues
can continue their support after
the event.
"This way more people can get
involved. When we focused on
the Canadian Landmine Association, a lot of people already knew
about them. However, not a lot of
people know about the Canadian
Harambee Education Society,"
said Nguyen. %
Night of a Thousand Dinners will
take place at Performance Works on
Granville Island, 1218 Cartwright
St., on Jan. 8 at 7p.m.
CALL FOR NOMINATIONS
UBYSSEY
BOARD OF
DIRECTORS
NominationscloseJan10,2014andelectionsrun
Jan 27-31,2014. Nomination forms are available
at SUB 23. This is not an editorial position.
Members ofThe Ubyssey's Board of Directors
areresponsibleforoverseeingthefinancesofthe
newspaper. Responsibilities include attending
board meetings, tending to business as it arises
and overseeing personal projects.
Forfurtherdetailspleaseemailbusines II Opinions
ams
old and wise
The runner-up for the new AMS logo cost a little less money to make.
LAST WORDS//
A BULLET HOLE FOR THE
AMS LOGO
The AMS has spent $8,000 on their
new logo as part of a rebranding
campaign for the New SUB.
It makes sense that the AMS
would want to be rid of their old
logo, which was ugly, but it does not
make sense that they chose a new
logo which is also ugly.
And it's not just ugly; it's weird.
While it's supposed to be a take
on the AMS' existing "sun" logo —
because UBC is known for being so
sunny, presumably — it looks like
what you would find after a bullet
passed through a sheet of metal.
This issue was brought up at
the AMS Council meeting when
the logo was approved, but AMS
President Caroline Wong said
they decided it looked less like a
bullet hole than another logo that
was considered.
ams
student society
The current AMS logo. The new AMS logo
is pictured onpageB.
As for the money spent, the price
"Your Student Society" paid for
professional design is likely not out
of line with similar jobs taken on by
the company they hired. However,
there was absolutely no reason the
AMS needed to pay a company to
come up with their new logo.
For a student government that
prides itself on being in touch with
students, the AMS could have
found a student to come up with
a new design for free. Hopefully,
when they go through another
rebranding campaign in the next
couple of years, that is what the
AMS will do. But given that its been
decades since their last true rebranding, it looks like we'll be stuck
with this one for a while.
For a student
government that prides
itself on being in touch
with students, the
AMS could have found
a student to come up
with a new design
for free. Hopefully
when they go through
another rebranding
campaign in the next
couple of years, that is
what the AMS will do.
All we can say is thank goodness the AMS stopped when they
did, rather than spending another
$10,000 to $15,000 to license the
font originally proposed to accompany the logo.
SPORTS REVIEW FINALLY
UNDERWAY
UBC began the first stages of
their sports targeting review last
month, kicking off a process that
many have been dreading. But
while UBC President Stephen
Toope confirmed that the number
of varsity teams will decrease from
its current number of 29, there is
little reason to worry that UBC's
major teams are in danger.
UBC said from the start no
teams were guaranteed varsity
status, and several people took this
to mean that sports like football
and hockey were on their last legs.
This is, to say the least, an outrageous assumption.
While a team's impact on
campus isn't the only factor by
which teams gain varsity status,
it's pretty obvious that sports like
football, hockey and basketball
are important to UBC as a whole.
UBC men's basketball is slated to
host nationals in 2016 and athletic
director Ashley Howard praised
the football team at their recent
gala and listened to suggestions
from wealthy alumni and busi-
nesspeople — the future of UBC's
biggest teams seems safe.
As for smaller teams with
tiny budgets, they will probably
get moved to "competitive club"
status, where they will still be
Thunderbird teams and still
receive funding from UBC. These
teams don't get much funding in
LLUSTRATIONCJ PENTLAND3THE UBYSSEY
the first place — Nordic skiing, for
example, doesn't have a full-time
coach, while football has 16 staff
— so they won't appear to suffer.
Rob Ragotte, player-coach ofthe
Nordic skiing team, even said
being a competitive club "might be
a better fit" for them.
The results will be announced
over the next few months, but
the end result of how this new
model affects UBC won't be seen
for a few years. Overall, though,
it seems to be shaping up to be a
positive one.
HAPPY NEW YEAR?
Last term was rough for UBC.
Scandal at the Sauder School of
Business over a rape cheer during
FROSH week; unsolved sexual
assaults making campus feel unsafe; a bit of drama over activism
stemming from those issues; and
finally, a tragic car accident that
took the lives of two UBC students.
The sole piece of good news in
The Ubyssey's top stories ofthe
term was that Koerner's Pub reopened. Do with that information
what you will.
In any case, while last term kept
us at the newspaper busy, we —
like all of you — are hoping for a
happier second term.
There's only so much you can
do to make next term better for
your university — unless you like
singing about rape or groping
women, in which case please stop
— and we know some of this comes
down to random chance. Still, be
friendly, get involved with cool
campus events and be there for
your friends.
Happy New Year. XI
Is your new
years
resolu
to get
involvt
Volunteer
Hoping for more
diversity in the AMS
with us!
COME BY THE UBYSSEY OFFICE
SUB 24, FOLLOW THE SIGNS
KIRAN MAHAL
CAROLINE WONG
Letter
There is a lack of diversity in
AMS executive positions, and this
needs to change. The upcoming
AMS elections remind us of this
pattern — a pattern prevalent in
broader society and reflected here
on campus.
As two current and former
AMS executives, we have not
only experienced the benefits of
serving in student government,
but have also noticed the worrisome lack of diversity in AMS
executive profiles.
At UBC, women make up 54 per
cent ofthe total student population, and over half of students at
UBC identify as minorities. Yet I,
Caroline Wong, am the first female
AMS president in the past nine
years, and only the second Chinese
president since the 1980s. And I,
Kiran Mahal, was the first female
VP academic and university affairs
in the past eight years, and the
first South Asian VP academic and
university affairs in AMS history.
The AMS has never had a fully
female executive team in its nearly
100-year history.
Since 2000, only two women
have represented students at the
Board of Governors, the highest
governing body at UBC overseeing
the university's fiscal management
and operations.
In B.C., 22.6 per cent of elected
provincial and federal seats are
held by women, which is slightly
above the national average of 21.1
per cent and a global average
of 21.3 per cent. According to
the Inter-Parliamentary Union,
Canada ranks 47th globally in representation of women in national
government. These numbers are
not only reflective of women running for elected office, but also of
women in senior leadership roles
across all sectors.
This is not just about diversity
statistics that are run off; these are
systemic issues that impact the effectiveness of our private and public sectors. According to the 2011
Global Gender Gap Report by the
World Economic Forum, "diverse
leadership is most likely to find
innovative solutions to tackle the
current economic challenges and
to build equitable and sustainable
growth."
There is no doubt that the
university and the AMS are facing
big decisions in the next few
years, financially, operationally
and pedagogically. Accessibility
and diversity are on the top ofthe
agenda for post-secondary education and AMS leadership needs to
reflect the diversity ofthe student
body we represent.
According to research by the
Center for American Women and
Politics, a key difference between
men and women who were contemplating running for elected
office was that women were less
likely to receive the suggestion to
run for office. Such suggestions
were high predictors of whether
a potential candidate considered
moving ahead.
So let us give you some suggestions:
Run because you want to.
Run because you know you can
do a great job.
Run because the AMS needs
great leaders.
Run because we are only as
strong as the diversity ofthe opin-
FILE PHOTO HOGAN WONG/THE UBYSSEY
Caroline Wong is the first female AMS
president in the past nine years and the
second Chinese president since the
1980s.
ions and backgrounds that inform
our decision making.
It's not about having all the
answers or knowing every detail of
every project going on in the university or the AMS. Your qualification
comes from your capacity to learn,
work hard, and most of all, serve in
the best interest of students. Information can be learned on the job;
passion and dedication can't.
This is not just about
diversity statistics
that are run off;
these are systemic
issues that impact
the effectiveness of
our private and public
sectors.
Need a nudge or a question
answered? Join us for an informal
networking event with some
past AMS executives and a few
fantastic leaders from the UBC
community and beyond. The event
will take place on Wednesday,
Jan. 8 at 5 p.m. in the SUB. Please
RSVP at http://tinyurl.com/
kvlas5y. Whether you're thinking
of running in the AMS elections or
not, come and connect with a great
support network.
Kiran Mahal is a former AMS VP
academic and university affairs and
two-term student senator-at-large;
she can be contacted at kiran.ma-
hal@alumni.ubc.ca. Caroline Wong
is the current AMS president and
former VP administration; she can be
contacted atpresident@ams.ubc.ca.
=ILE PHOTO HOGAN WONG/THE UBYSSEY
Kiran Mahal former VP academic and
university affairs. II Scene
TWEETS
OF THE WEEK
Back to school edition: cheers, jeers and no more U-Passes
^■B   Navpieet Ganda    NavpreetGanda                                                                3h
~MoL    No U-passes left in the SUB   UBC
■•  ^W 9 from Greater Vancouver, British     ♦> Reply  tt Retweet   * Favorite   ••• More
^^■t Jenna Gigantelli   iennagigs                                                              3h
B^H Everyone at the Calgary airport is wearing UBC hoodies.. Where are
^KJ my SFU people at?!?   Rivalry #SFU #UBC
Expand                                          ♦> Reply  tl Retweet  * Favorite   ••• More
C"V       Eric  -JerryBluntz                                                                                       4h
U..    Too sick'hungouer to ferry back to UBC
^^^     Expand                                          *. Reply   »Retweet  * Favorite   ••• More
■TB Mike Ferguson   Ferguson 22                                                           5h
1 Back to the grind. #UBC
WH&&   Expand                                             4* Reply   tl Retweet   -k Favorite   ••• More
A_«|  Niklas    niklas1395                                                                                   1h
L B g| Trying to scope out the other UBC students on this flight.
^^^W  Expand                                          ♦> Reply  tl Retweet  * Favorite   ••• More
^^^ Diandra edlandrol
1  1 am so out of it right now that 1 logged into ubc vista instead of
^^^B  connect wondering why none of my courses weren't up yet
Expand                                          *■. Reply  tl Retweet  * Favorite   ••• More
TBI  Eva Mariey   esmarley                                                                      20h
r n FliSnt t0 UBC's cancelled so why not live tweet our harrowing
iiiSt attempts to defeat this snowy SOB? First stop: O'Hare.
#snowpocalypse2014
Expand                                          ♦. Reply  tl Retweet   * Favorite   ••• More
Jf^fl   Otis SandhU    Osandhu                                                                                 20h
1 jwM Missing the campus life   onemoreday #ubc #rez
l".A*iif  Expand                                        +.Reply  t*Retweet  * Favorite  ••• More
NEW YEARS
RESOLUTIONS
Guess which Ubyssey editor
said what!
"Getting the garbage smell out of my
apartment. We don't clean very much."
"In orderto get in better shape, I'm
going to start biking to school three
days a week. This is the first step in
passing my friends' Fat Camp. I don't
know what the second step is."
"I don't have one."
"My resolution this year is to force the
opinion and print editors to publish
as many obtuse, polysyllabic words
as possible. Hacceity! Truculent!
Perspicacious! Tenebristic! Paregon!
Polychromatic! Gesamtkunstwerk!
Heterological! Autodidactic! Apotheosis! Byzantinium! Petrichor! Meretricious! Exegegis! Phenomenological!
Primogeniture!"
Q  "I want to buy a pair of three ways."
Q  "If I can think of one I'll do it!"
"I've instituted a one-hit snooze
button rule. Also, I'm going to keyword
everything. Even my fridge contents.
That way I'll always be able to search
forthings and find them."
TOP 5
STORIES
of December 2013
O
A bend in the road
e
New AMS logo
e
o   e
UBC winter fashion
New Board of
Governors members
Sauder dean gets
coal for Xmas
5| JANUARY 2014
yq)       programs
January 8 Women 8e Queer Night
6-9pm. a safe-space program about bikes!
January 15 Member Night Social
6-9pm. come socialize and. fix your bike!
January 22 Bikes 101: intra to cycling at ubc
6:30-8pm. learn maintenance and. cycling tips!
January 29 Green Shift Recycling Party
6-9pm. strip bikes, sort parts, recycle! yay!
REGISTER r visit us at
ONLINE Ibikecoop.ca
Wi      1 bit.ly/UBCBike
■ ■      I twitter.com/UBCBike
We have
Facebook
Get the scoop on the latest stories online.
Check us out at facebook.com/ubyssey 1
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Horrendously bored by the games on this
page? Disgusted at the graphics used in this
so-called 'newspaper"? Talk to Ming Wong at
printeditor@ubyssey.ca to voice your
opinions.
Notice of Development Permit Application - DP 13034
Public Open House
Orchard Commons | Vantage College
You are invited to attend an Open House to view and comment DP 13034: Orchard Commons |
Vantage College - a mixed use student housing and academic project.
Date:
Place:
day,January20, 2014 3-5 PM
jm, Fred Kaiser Building, 2332 Main Mall
^rO\      Meeting
^/     Location
Beaty
Biodiversity
Plans wil
project.
be displayed for this
Representatives from the project
team and Campus + Community
Planning will be available to
provide information and respond
to inquiries about this project.
For more information on this
project, please visit:
www.planninq.ubc.ca
For inquiries, please direct
questions to Karen Russell,
Manager Development Services
karen.russell@ubc.ca
604-822-1586
This event is wheelchair accessible.
This notice contains important information which may affect you. Please ask someone to translate it for you.
0| #*l^ 9&« n|S =r Sife #£S!-3a7|-#0i SJsM^K
&■&!# ^N =L 5!« fis|*rfe a|-bi-# -£°|srA|7| UriMr4.
a place of mind
THE   UNIVERSITYOF   BRITISH   COLUMBIA
campus+community planning

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