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The Ubyssey Mar 12, 1968

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Array Do Vancouver
police
THE UBYSSEY
have a
Perskycution
complex ?
jjffr& UiBfr4/^324.3916
Vol. XLIX, No. 56
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, MARCH  12, 1968
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ONLY UBC's illustrious department of physical plant would
.- order lawns to be watered on a day when good old Mother
Nature is already doing the job.
New city government
formed to aid hippies
To meet the needs of an expected large influx of young
people into Vancouver this summer, local aid groups are forming one central organization.
Called the city government, its acting head, or mayor, is
arts undergraduate society president Stan Persky.
Member groups include the free schools, cool aid, and university student governments. More than 75 people now occupy
city government posts.
"We agreed amongst ourselves that the situation this summer would be very bad," said Persky. "We are trying to coordinate our efforts to feed, house, and give medical aid to
everyone who will need it."
The city government will consist of the usual civic departments — justice, health, food, for example — as well as a few
extras, such as ministries of peace, drugs, and philosophy.
By casting itself as a parallel government to the one in city
hall it will be a huge joke, said Persky. By being a joke it will
"help criticize the present government's inadequacy.
Town fool Joachim Foikis was the group's first appointed
mayor, but he resigned. "No fool would accept the job of mayor
of Vancouver," Foikis said.
The city government would not represent only hippies, but
also Indians, students, and the poor.
It has proposed a system of coffee houses with no admission charges as meeting places, and is negotiating with the
parks board to hold be-ins in parks throughout the summer.
"Out of this proposal may come a civil bill of rights," said
Persky. "One is being worked out now by the ministry of justice
of the city government."
Students build on own
First year architecture students who have boycotted their
classes since March 1 are going ahead with structural design
projects of their own.
The first example will go on display Friday on the music-
quad, between the auditorium and the armory.
Called a flexible hexagonal space frame, it is about fifty
feet long and twenty high.
Structurally, it resembles a geodesic dome with the added
advantage that it can be formed into almost any shape.
Ronald Resch, from the university of Illinois, who designed
the structure for his master's thesis, is acting as advisor on the
project.
Police
in
aire
fountain
cre>
purge
By NORMAN GIDNEY
Sixteen persons arrested Saturday for alleged
loitering near the Vancouver courthouse — including former UBC arts president Stan Persky
—. Monday were remanded for trial to March 18
and 19.
Persky, 27, and Joseph Richardson, 19, will
appear for trial March 18 as a test case, civil
liberties association lawyer Joe Wood said
Monday.
Depending on the outcome of the March 18
trial the other 14 will appear in court March 19.
Wood said he and Sidney Simons, another
member of CLA, are representing all of the
defendants. They plan to test the validity of
the regulation and  the informant.
The regulation of the Public Works Act of
B.C. under which the 16 were charged says that
they allegedly "unlawfully did loiter on the
areas appurtenant to a  Government building."
"We had received complaints from provincial
government officials and citizens about hippies
loitering," deputy police chief John Fisk said
Monday. Fisk declined to name the officials.
Police said they warned the group of 200
persons Saturday afternoon they were violating
a public works regulation which prohibited
loitering near government buildings.
At the time, they moved through the crowd
asking the names of certain people. About an
hour later they came out of the courthouse with
warrants and arrested 16.
Peter Jenson, a Kamloops lawyer, was arrested when he asked to see the warrants. He was
charged with obstruction of a police officer.
The arrests at 2 p.m. Saturday in the area
around the fountain were witnessed by a crowd
of almost 200 persons, including businessmen,
shoppers, students and housewives.
An orderly demonstration of more than 40
persons was held from 5 p.m. on outside the
Public Safety building, 312 Main until the first
A civil liberties spokesman disagreed.
"The warrants were illegal and improper,"
said lawyer Joe Wood.
Other complaints were that the bail of $50
was excessively high. Erasmus said police in
the jail told him he could get $500 and six
months for the alleged offense when in fact the
act specifies a maximum fine of only $25.
Erasmus also said the 16 were physically
stripped and searched for narcotics.
The police action came in for strong protest
by the B.C. Civil Liberties Association.
"The B.C. Civil Liberties Associaton strongly
protests the harrassment of citizens who peacefully use public places," it said in a Sunday
statement.
"The use of questionable legal' procedures to
drive these people or any peaceful people from
the public places which they may frequent is a
denial of their equal rights under law, constitutes
a discriminatory use of the law for purposes of
prejudice and brings the law itself into disrespect.
"More generally, the law is not an ass, but
twisting it this way and that, in an effort to
respond to the prettiest, most passing aggravations will make it look like an ass, and will
undermine the respect which it must command
from the people.
"Harrassment of peaceful people, whose sole
offense is their dress or manner of living,
opens our city and its law enforcement agencies
to ridicule," it stated.
UBC associate law professor Tony Hodge said
there is a strong objection to the method of using
warrants which do not name the defendant.
He quoted section 22 of the Summary Convictions Act of B.C. which says a "warrant shall
either name or describe the defendent." The
warrants used Saturday were reported not to
name or describe the defendents.
Protestors march in front of Vancouver Police headquarters.
were released on $50 bail each at
defendants
6:30 p.m.
UBC English prof. Dr. Fred Stockholder and
his family, chemical engineering prof. Dr. Norman Epstein, Simon Fraser Englsh prof. Dr.
Leonard (Minsky and Alma Mater Society executives-elect Tobin Robbins, Jill Cameron, Carey
Linde and Ruth Dworkin paraded in protest
of the arrests.
They carried signs reading Public Places for
People and End the Fascist Persecution of Canadian Citizens.
Many of the protestors raised bail money for
those arrested. AMS vice-president-elect Carey
Linde collected $120 from students and faculty
and bailed out UBC zoology graduate student
Udo Erasmus among others. Former arts vice-
president Harley Rothstein managed to raise another $500 from friends.
"It's nonsense for students to think they're
not involved as citizens," Linde said that evening.
"As far as the police are concerned all people
are John Does who can be arrested on John Doe
warrants."
The alleged loiterers were arrested on so-
called John Doe or blank warrants which do not
name the accused. Fisk said there was nothing
unusual about the procedure.
"It would appear that no particular warrant
applied to any person," Hodge said.
It is permissable to have a warrant in which
the person is not named but Hodge said they
are not used often.
"It is also arguable that instead of using
warrants the police could have used summonses.
"To set bail at $50 when the maximum fine
for the offense is $25 seems remarkable," Hodge
said. He knew of no other instances when bail
exceeded the maximum fine for the offense.
An open meeting including speakers Harry
Rankin and Stan Persky will be held in Buchanan
lounge at noon today.
.*«*<_>
J*S?£
WHAT'S  INSIDE?
Ma meets Mate. page 6
Candidates   .   .   page 5
First person account
of hippie bust. . page 8 Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 12, 1968
CO-ORDINATOR-ELECT
OBJECTS  STRONGLY
Revision cuts duties
By MIKE FINLAY
Ubyssey Council Reporter
Alma Mater Society co-ordinator - elect Jill
Cameron Monday night strongly protested a
drastic council change in the role of the coordinator.
Council has passed a constitutional revision
reducing the co-ordinator's duties to being responsible for the co-ordination and booking of
all AMS functions and events.
Previously the co-ordinator was also chairman of the Brock management committee. With
the transfer of student activities to SUB, this
duty was eliminated.
However, the co-ordinator will not be the
chairman of the SUB management committee.
Miss Cameron said Monday the revision was
a negation of the platform she was elected on.
"I was elected on the idea that I would do
things with SUB as chairman of the committee,"
she said.   "This was the will of the students.
"This change is going against the wish of the
students because it takes SUB out of the coordinator's hands."
AMS president iShaun Sullivan, in answer to
a question, said he did not see himself as a
member of the committee.
In other business, council approved in principle a plan calling for a referendum to decide
if the $5 of the $29 AMS fee devoted to athletics
should be collected separately by the men's
athletic association.
Under the proposed plan, student council
would no longer have control over the budget
of the MAC. The plan will be considered by
the society's lawyers before it is finally approved.
On a motion by AMS first vice - president
Don Mutton council voted to prohibit The Ubyssey from incurring expenditures for off campus
distribution without the approval of council. He
referred to the distribution of the Feb. 23 Ubyssey education issue to lower mainland high
schools.
Ubyssey editor-in-chief Danny Stoffman said
after the meeting The Ubyssey has no intention
of abiding by the ruling.
"This is an arrogant infringement of a basic
editorial freedom — the freedom of distribution.
Stoffman said the extra expense for the education issue amounted to $70 out of The Ubyssey's total budget of $67,000.
"We will ignore this motion," Stoffman said.
"Any attempt to enforce it will mean student
council must find a new staff to put out the
paper."
In a final motion, council censured Vancouver
city police for their arrest of 16 persons in front
of the court house Saturday.
KITIMAT
Teaching Opportunities
Modern, well-equipped schools; progressive educational
programme; active support for professional in-service programme; summer school assistance of $50.00 per unit after
probationary year; internship programme for May and
June; full credit for equivalent teaching outside B.C.; moving
and travel allowance; housing assistance—rental and purchase; group life insurance and medical plan—cost shared
by  the  Board.
E.C. $4162 - 4986
E.B. $5005 - 7210
E.A. $5615 - 8457
P.E. (P.C./B.Ed.EI.)
$6346 - 9776
S.C./P.C. $2622 - 9582
S.B./P.B. $6831 - 10959
S.A./P.A. $7439 - 12114
Persons interested in teaching in School District No. 80 (Kiti-
mat) are invited to contact district representatives through
the Office of  Student Services (Placement),   U.B.C.
INTERVIEWS on U.B.C. Campus will be held 9 a.m.-5 p.m.
WEDNESDAY,   MARCH 13
THURSDAY,      MARCH  14
FRIDAY, MARCH 15
WORKSHOP ON  LEADERSHIP
Thursday, March 14, 7 p.m.
International House
INTERNATIONAL  HOUSE  AND  THE
COMMERCE UNDERGRADUATE  SOCIETY
PRESENTS DR   VANCE F   MITCHELL
REV. G. F. McGUIGAN
DR. LARRY F. MOORE
Everyone Welcome
Alma  Mater  Society
OFFICIAL  NOTICES
STUDENT COURT
AND DISCIPLINE COMMITTEE
Applications will be received up to March 13 for
positions on the Students Court and the A.M.S. Discipline Committee.   Submit applications to:
President,
Law  Students  Association
Box  No.   65
A.M.S., Brock Hall
Committee Members
Applications are now being received for Committee
members for the following Joint AMS—Administrative
Committees:
Academic Symposium Committee
Brock Art Committee
Student Union Building Clients Committee
Winter Sports Centre Management Committee
Applications for the above positions must include a
letter outlining qualifications, reason for applying, and,
where applicable, a proposed program. Eligibility forms
are available from the AMS Office and must be completed by the Registrar's Office before making application.
Letters of application and eligibility forms must be
submitted to the secretary, Box 54, Brock Hall by Noon,
March  11.
Committee Chairmen
Applications will be received up to Noon March 11
for the positions of Cairman of the following AMS
Standing Committees:
Academic Activities
Canadian University Services Overseas
Frosh Orientation
High School Conference Committee
Intramurals Committee
Performing Arts
Speakers
Symposia
World University Service
Applications for the above positions must include
a letter outlining qualifications, reasons for applying,
and a proposed program. Eligibility forms are available
from the AMS Office and must be completed by the
Registrar's Office before making application.
Letters of application and eligibility forms must be
submitted to the secretary, Box 54, Brock Hall.
EFFECTIVE
RAPID
READING
can help YOU
There's still a lot of reading to be accomplished, understood and remembered.
The Reading Dynamics method GUARANTEES to at least triple your reading speed
while retaining or increasing your present comprehension.
ENROLLMENT IN READING
DYNAMICS WILL ENSURE
THE FOLLOWING
You are guaranteed a three fold increase in reading
speed
You will also acquire greater comprehension
You will enjoy our modern up-to-date class rooms
You will meet our top rated teaching staff
You will be impressed by our detail and personal
attention
No classes have more than 26 people
During your classes you will meet and get to know
some interesting people
Your fee is tax deductible
On graduation you receive life time membership and
without cost receive additional tuition at any
Reading Dynamics office throughout the world.
LEARN THE MOST RECENT STUDY PROCEDURES
AND RECALL SKILLS
ATTEND A FREE
DEMONSTRATION
Tonight—8 p.m. Coach House
Motor Inn, N. Van, Salon C
Demonstrations can be arranged
during business hours for any University student unable to attend one
of our regular demonstrations.
To make an appointment call 685-
2374 or contact one of our campus
representative.-.  .   .   .
PERRY  SEIDELMAN  261-1809
or   leave   a   message   in   the   Student
Mai?   Box   in   the   Law   Building.
MIKE MENARD 266-5574
JIM  RUST 266-0403
They'll   tell   you   how   effective   Reading  Dynamics can  be.
REGISTER   BY   MAIL
Mail this application now ta reserve the class of your choice, to:
EVELYN WOOD READING DYNAMICS INSTITUTE,
602-1075 Melville St., Vancouver 5, B.C.
Please accept my application for admission to the Evelyn Wood Reading Dynamics Institute.
Enclosed is my deposit (minimum $10) to reserve space in the class Indicated below. (Refundable if class of my choice is not available.) Please forward to me the standard form so
I may complete my enrolment by mail.
NAME  	
ADDRESS
CHECK THE CLASS OF YOUR CHOICE:-
( ) TUES., MAR. 12-7 P.M.
( ) THUR., MAR. 14-7 P.M.
TELEPHONE
( ) WED., MAR. 13-7 P.M.
( ) SAT., MAR. 16-9:30 A.M.
Sve/jm mod READING DYNAMICS OF B.C. LTD.
60«-ID7S MELVILLE STREET.VANCOUVER B, B.O.       PHONE •BS-2a*7**» Tuesday, March 12, 1968
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
Sii__^<rt.ed^ Views aired at open  meet
Point production
Alma Mater Society president Shaun Sullivan tried
to recruit Ubyssey staffers to work on the Point.
The Point is a four page newspaper published by the
Society for the Preservation of Council Activities and was
distributed on campus Monday.
Richard Blair, arts 4, a former managing editor of
The Ubyssey, and staffer this year, said Sullivan approached him Thursday and asked him if he would help out the
Point.'
Sullivan, as AMS president, is publisher of The
Ubyssey.
"Shaun was really pushing the Point," Blair said
Monday.
He said Sullivan told him the Point really needed
help and arranged a meeting between Blair and Point
editor Al Waite.
"Out of curiosity, I went over to the engineering
undergraduate office where they were working on the
paper. I took one look at the type of copy going in and
decided I didn't want anything to do with it."
Sullivan told The Ubyssey last week he was not in
any way associated with the SPCA.
In a unanimous vote March 4, student council voted
to give the SPCA $375 to publish the Point.
In the Point, the SPCA says the purpose of the paper
is to educate students on the importance of student government.
DEAF EDUCATION OPEN
Canada's only university program for training of teachers to
instruct the deaf will be offered by UBC next September.
The one-year course, offering a diploma in education of the
deaf, is open to graduate students in the faculty of education.
Heading the program will be Dr. Bryan Clarke, an Australian-
born educator with 27 years of experience in teacher education,
15 of them in specialized programs involving education of the
deaf.
Dr. David Kendall, head of the special education department
of the faculty of education, said his first aim will be to enrol
six to 12 graduate students.
They will be required to take 12 units of classroom work
in the anatomy, physiology and psychology of deafness as well
as courses in teaching speech and language to the deaf.
Also required will be 180 hours of practical teaching experience at the provincial government's Jericho Hill School in
Vancouver.
Shrum hum glum
Noise and* electrical interference threaten the psychiatric
unit of UBC's health services center, due to open in six months.
A B.C. Hydro sub-station at the corner of Agronomy Road
and Wesbrook Crescent is so close to the new building that head
of psychiatry Dr. J. S. Tyhurst says the unit may not be able
to operate without its removal.
His chief objections are that the hum from the station's transformers will hinder proper treatment of patients, and that the
electrical field will upset delicate instruments in the center.
UBC director of informaiton Arnie Myers said Monday a
report on the situation by International Power and Engineering
Consultants Ltd., commissioned by B.C. Hydro has been given
to UBC physical plant for consideration.
However, the board of governors has not yet considered
the report, Myers said. When it does, it will give its recommendations to the health services management committee.
Two years ago, the management committee decided to proceed with construction of the health services center on the assumption that the sub-station would be removed.
Dr. Gordon Shrum, now SFU chancellor and chairman
of B.C. Hydro has said that relocation of the station should be
undertaken by the university, because it directed the location
of the station at the time of its construction.
Completion of the center is set for July. Patients are
expected to occupy it by September.
More than 300 students turned out Monday
noon to hear five candidates for the position of
Alma Mater Society president speak in Bu. 106.
Andy McConkey, law 3; Maureen MacDonald,
ed. 4; Jack Christopher, arts 4; Michel Lalain,
arts 3, and Dave Zirnhelt, arts 4, each gave
short speeches before beginning a panel discussion.
Wednesday's election was called when the
previous election Feb. 7 was declared void after
He suggested book costs could be cut if more
pocket books were used and if the AMS took
the initiative in handling second hand books.
Zirnhelt, world university service committee chairman, said he was in favor of forceful
confrontations between students and the provincial government.
"This includes having a student strike if
something like a fee raise occurs," he said. "We
Candidates discuss issues during meeting.
winner Stan Persky was found ineligible to
hold office by student court Feb. 12.
Miss MacDonald, UBC music society president, said the AMS is in a state of organized
confusion and proposed several actions aimed
at building a better student government.
"I will press for an open senate, increased
dialogue between UBC and the public, more
housing, more study facilities, more cafeteria
space and greater communication between the
council and students," she said.
"An unbroken line of male presidents seem
to have bungled the job."
McConkey, men's athletic association vice-
president, said student council must be restructured to give more representation by
population.
"I also see a need for cutting costs to get
more housing and more study space, maybe in
Brock," he said. "I think it is feasible that we
can get a pub in SUB as well."
Christopher, a member of the UBC Thunderbirds football team, said the main issue is getting an active student government.
"Platforms are not an issue," he said. "I
would like to dispel the rumor that I am running on an athletic platform.
"I don't want to see any more funds directed
to athletics unless called for in a student referendum."
Lalain, chairman of UBC's literature symposium, emphasized the need for lower costs
in housing and books.
"We've got to lobby the federal government
to eliminate the 11 per cent building tax and
the six per cent mortgage if we're going to get
lower housing costs," he said.
have to protest those things that are not in the
interest of students."
He said there was a need to pull all the
groups on campus together and revise the structure of student council.
In a question and answer period, Persky
asked the candidates where they were during
the Feb. 7 election.
Miss MacDonald and Christopher said they
did not want to run against Persky. Lalain work-
on Persky's campaign and Zirnhelt did not run
for personal reasons.
McConkey said he did not see the need to
run until the election mess was handled by
council.
Thing of the past
that Brockburger
Brockburgers will be a thing of the past
next year.
UBC director of information Arnie Myers
said Monday that the Brock cafeteria will close
when student food services move into the new
student union building.
The SUB cafeteria will seat 1400 persons.
(Brock Hall will probably be converted into
study space, although plans are not yet final,
Myers said. Arts, education, and law faculty
offices, library book space for undergraduates,
and seminar rooms are also proposed. The cafeteria will remain open at least until the end
of term.
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*-' tW HI6NAME WAS AKEN DRUM I THEUBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the editor and not of the AMS or the university. Member,
Canadian University Press. Proprietor, Ubyssey News Services (UNS). The
Ubyssey subscribes to the press services of Pacific Student Press, of which
it is founding member, and Underground Press Syndicate. Authorized second
class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa, and for payment of postage
in cash. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and
review. City editor, 224-3916. Other calls, 224-3242: editor, local 25; photo.
Page Friday,  loc.  24;  sports,  loc.  23; advertising,  loc.  26.  Telex 04-5224.
MARCH 12, 1968
Public places
"Public places for people."
So read some of the signs in a demonstration outside the public safety building Saturday night. Those
carrying them were protesting the arrest Saturday afternoon bi 15 persons on charges of loitering near a public
building.
"Hie first question aroused by this unusual police act
is this: What are public places such as the courthouse
square for ? To look at but not to enjoy ?
Toronto character Richard Needham distributed
flowers in the square two weeks ago until he was stopped
by a uniformed public official. The square, it would
appear, is not being managed for the pleasure of the
people but rather for the convenience of public officials
who are disturbed by the unusual.
More important, however, is the clear fact that
Saturday's police arrests are an example of group discrimination. The police did not arrest loiterers — more
than 200 were relaxing in the square while only 16
were arrested. Those arrested were simply people whose
appearance did not meet police standards of conformity.
The situation was best summed up by the B.C. Civil
Liberties Association — an organization which deserves
everyone's support and gratitude:
"The law is not an ass, but twisting it this way and
that, in an effort to respond to the pettiest, most passing
aggravation, will make it look like an ass, and will
undermine the respect which it must command from
the people. Harrassment of peaceful people, whose sole
offence is their dress or manner of living, opens our
city and its law enforcement agencies to ridicule. And
what more demeaning, more ludicrous sight than a
wealthy North American city, beset with the most
serious kinds of problems, diverting its energies and
intelligence in an apparent campaign to 'keep hippies
in their place' or to 'keep them out of sight?'
"It is difficult not to conclude that this recent capricious and mischeivous arrest is only part of a larger
pattern which has developed in our province which
purports to give the sanction of the law to what are only
the whims, prejudices and arbitrary judgments of men
who should be responsible public officials."
Swedes and us
Sweden is a small country with a population of less
than ei^ht million people. Why then is Sweden able to
mount a foreign policy so much more independent than
that of huge Canada, a nation far stronger both in resources and population ?
Swedish Prime Minister Tage Erlander last Saturday repeated his stand that it was "fine" for a Swedish
cabinet minister to have marched in a parade last month
in support of the National Liberation Front. Erlander
made his stand in the face of American pressure, including recall of the U.S. ambassador. The Americans
have other reasons to be angry: Sweden has withdrawn
its diplomats to the U.S. puppet government in Saigon
and has established an open door policy for American
military refugees.
The Swedes believe U.S. policy is wrong and are
acting on this belief. Meanwhile, official Canadian policy
remains far closer to that of Lyndon Johnson than to the
views of even such conservative U.S. critics as Walter
Lippman. When Liberal Walter Gordon spoke the obvious — that the U.S. attack on the Vietnamese is immoral
— many Canadians shivered and screamed.
It is apparent that the Swedish attitude to foreign
policy has only two things that the Canadian attitude
lacks — independence and dignity.
■"■Pir^^
EDITOR:   Danny   Stoffman
City       Stuart Oray
News       Susan Gransby
Managing       Murray  McMillan
Photo     Kurt Hilger
Senior     Pat Hrushowy
Sports       Mike  Jessen
Wire      Norman Gidney
Page Friday     Judy Bing
Ass't. City       Bo-ni  Lee
"Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend
me an ear,*' cried Irving Fetish.
Paul Knox made a corny reply.
Judy Young went looking for a cabbage and came back with a walrus
wearing a crown. "You've made your
point,"   said   Miles   Star-dish.   Norm
--'•■"     "* '-*<$<!$:*,
Gidney entered a grapevine and came
up with some sour ones. Lawrence
Woodd knocked everyone out with a
chestnut he found on the ground.
Steve Jackson brought a pumpkin.
Mike Finlay rummaged in his gunny
sack and produced a bunch of carrots. "That should top it off nicely,"
said Sidney Greenstreet.
"But we can't use everything in our
soup," cried Irene Wasilewski. So
they scratched Dave Salmon's head of
lettuce.
Jocular Bob Banno whitewashed the
fence around his rutabaga patch,
while Jim Maddin led seed drill in
the barnyard. John Twigg traded his
cow for a handful of beans.
Lawrence Woodd won first prize in
the local pickle portrait contest with
a dUly.
THE STUDENTS READ THE UBVSSEV AND VOTED THE RADICAL CWIlP\
ATES INTO SENATE;   75%  OF THEM VOTED TO   STAV  IN CU5; \
THEV VOTED FOR STAN PERSKV AND THE OTHER MXCALS; 65% \
SUPPORTED THE REFERENDUM To flAKE RERSKV ELIGIBLE ;IDlWT I
VOTE FDR ANV OF THESE THINGS-* 50 I DECIDED TO PUT OUT THIS /
PAPER  "TO REPRESENT THE M/VQGtTyOF STUDENTS, /
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LETTERS TO THE  EDITOR
Name  change
Editor, The Ubyssey:
There has lately been an
attempt to throw suspicion
upon my personal honesty,
and in this way upon the
honesty of my platform, by
questioning the reason for my
change-of-name. Though I
feel this to be entirely irrelevant in this campaign, I wish
to present all crucial issues as
openly as possible. After the
loss of my natural parents
during the last war, I was
adopted here in Vancouver. I
kept this adopted name until
finally last year I had it legally changed back to my true
name.
The past month has witnessed a variety of personal
accu s a t i o n s being made
against myself and my supporters. The same people
would like you to believe
that I am not serious and intend to resign to let Stan
Persky run in the fall.
UTTER NONSENSE. And
nor do I represent simply one
faction.
This kind of political game-
playing is just what I would
like to eliminate from AMS
government next year.
MICHEL   LALAIN
A paper came out Monday—
a one shot effort. The Ubyssey,
apparently, is expected lo devote its columns lo kickbacks
from injured students. The
first two follow':
Misquote
Editor, The Ubyssey:
I am very happy to note
that The Ubyssey is not the
only campus paper that has
the facility of misquoting
and misinterpreting my statements. I refer specifically to
a "quote" of mine in the Point
in regard to charging admission to students for games.
Under the current board of
governors policy and grant
this can not be done. This
grant was asked for and obtained by MAC for the same
reasons we are trying to pass
this referendum.
Gate receipts and revenues
from them, and a well planned
stable   program   can   not   be
established without stability.
Two. In regard to student
control of this committee. It is
rare that all faculty members
attend. For these reasons if the
student members could get together and act in concert they
could effectively control athletic policy without having to
go to the drastic step of curtailing a program necessarily
planned years in advance by
removing the funds necessary
to run it.
ANDY McCONKEY
law 3
Point?
Editor, The Ubyssey:
What's the point? It seems
to be a critical, and I do mean
critical, analysis is of campus
activities, whatever they are.
I'm sure that even if the publishers of the point knew what
the point was which is a ridiculous concession in itself,
they'd manage to make it so
vague as to destroy its real
meaning. The trouble with
Point is that it almost does
come to the point. It isn't
quite vague enough. The point
is that all the people who stood
up in front of the SFU students in their mall, were all
activists. I'd say this "was a
reasonable assumption, considering that the non-active
people never bother. I think it
was completely pointless of
you to call John Cleveland,
"an activist leader" and to
make Rob Walsh out to be
anti-activist when I'm sure the
actions of the two in recent
weeks ■would have the activists
at SFU, if such a monolithic
group exists, support Walsh
rather than Cleveland. I think
pointed criticisms of The Ubyssey are necessary, but your
issues seemed like a collaboration between fairy tale writers
and undercover agents for the
"other side" , in other words
your point was not well taken
and quite dull as a matter of
fact. If you really think that
activities are all that bad and
that The Ubyssey is so biased,
display a little more competency next time, and people
might not ask: What's the
point? STEPHEN BLOCK
arts 3
Brock  fan
Editor, The Ubyssey:
This is in answer to Concerned Comm. Anyone who
has a complaint about food
should go to see the lady in
charge and not hide behind a
letter to the editor. As for the
bun being cold, did it ever
cross your mind that you
touched it to find that out and
in the future keep your dirty
little fingers off the food. I
eat at Brock and I find the
ladies alright, I am sure the
growlie lady puts up with a
lot of growlie buns. I also
notice you didn't have the guts
to put your name.
J. A. SIMMS
comm 2
Wog speaks
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Your editorial on March 7
(Who's British?) can hardly be
taken too seriously but nevertheless I think it deserves a
reply. If Canadians ever
wonder why they are criticized by European immigrants,
or why the latter stick together in a town like Vancouver, they ought to consider
some of the frustrating aspects
of Canadians. On average
Canadians tend to be politically immature (eg the recent
'crisis' of confidence in Ottawa
—let's down the government
for any excuse) socially immature eg. the anti-drinking campaign, no beer on campus —
golden age of 21 arrives and
vast drunkeness outside beer
parlors on Sat. nights, etc.)
and irresponsible for their decisions (I don't mean just you
engineers).
In particular students here
are some way behind their
European counterparts as far
as personal independence goes.
Well this is not new but the
point is that Canadians have
an inferiority complex about
Canada and this editorial is
just an example. Why don't
Canadians put aside the paranoia about their own status
learn how to live with Gt.
Britain and the outside world
(from Alberta on)?
D. J. CROSSLEY
grad studies Tuesday, March 12, 1968
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
Election platforms
Presidential   hopefuls   present   reasons  for  running
Statements of candidates and
seconders for Wednesday's presidential election appear below.
Seconders' statements preface
the contestants'. All five hopefuls submitted statements
which appear with all their
original grammatical errors.
Christopher
Jack Christopher is not a
politician but a human being.
Currently enrolled in fourth
year arts, he has combined a
high scholastic record with an
•-    active    involvement    in    UBC
team participation.
Intelligent and hard-working, he has always demonstrated an honest and responsible interest in his fellow
students.
You may be assured that
his "no-nonsense" approach
will reflect the student voice
through the exercise of his
obvious capabilities. He is em-
•-, inently likeable and has the
outstanding quality of thinking problems through before
making decisions.
I strongly invite your reasoned support for Jack Christopher as AMS president.
DINO  MILOS
law 3
"fr      "fr      "fr
The student government to
my way of thinking should
directly reflect the personality
and feelings of the president.
Without this, student council
becomes nothing more than a
mere machine running the
mechanics of government. It is,
therefore, up to the president
to give positive and active
leadership to the council.
I believe that the basic issue
in this election is that of an
active student government. Up
to this time, the past councils
may have had this in mind but
have not exhibited it in their
actions. Obviously, from the
controversy and action that
arose over the last presidential
election, the university population does want to see the
results of its council's actions
and does want to have a voice
in student affairs. To achieve
this, the president must take
the initiative and put forth a
program that calls for council
awareness and action.
The normal procedure in a
campaign statement is for the
candidate to enumerate his
platform. However, in this
particular election, I don't
believe   that   the  platform   is
* the key factor. You all know,
from years of listening to repetitive campus political
speeches, what the main issues
are — such as constitutional
revisions, more undergraduate
faculty representation on council, more money for university
education, more council involvement in student housing,
the bookstore, food services,
enrollment cutbacks and of
course athletics. You have all
read the previous issue of The
Ubyssey and may wrongly
assume that my interests on
council will be solely directed
: towards athletics. I would like
to clear that up now by stating that I do not want to see
any more funds directed toward athletics than are already
allocated unless this is directed by student referendum. I
want you to know that I am
concerned about these issues
and I feel that they will be
realized if council works as
one cohesive unit.
Therefore, I feel that the
voice and feelings of the student government should be
felt not only by the university
administration but also by the
general public and the government.
To realize this one all-important goal — that of unifying council — more than the
mechanical functioning of government must take place. A
coalescing of the president and
his council must occur. The
president must be able to work
with and guide council in order
to have an active and vital
student government.
If you choose to elect me, I
will do all in my power to
unify council into one cohesive
body which will act as a single
leader of campus government.
JACK CHRISTOPHER
arts 4
Lalain
A seconder's statement is an
affirmation in the person
being seconded of trust and
belief, a trust that grows from
a human relationship, not one
merely jumping up from
second hand political recommendation. Michel has my personal trust, and it is on this
ground that I am his seconder.
As our president, Michel
Lalain will lead, and not be
led by, the active council you
voted in last month.
After all the voting in the
past weeks it turns out that
tomorrow's is the most important. I ask you please to be
sure and vote. Your participation in government is needed
by all.
CAREY  LINDE
law 1
iftr    it    -&
I address this statement particularly to those of you who
were unable to attend yesterday's all candidates meeting,
or who have been unable to
talk to me personally when I
have been going to residences
and classes.
Until we achieve active involvement I must rely on this
impersonal candidates page to
indicate at least the tone and
skeleton outline of what I
stand for.
I feel I should insist on:
• publication grants to encourage extensive evaluation
calendars and undergraduate
newspapers;
e a much stronger commitment by the AMS in the
field of academic  affairs;
e full advantage be taken
of the new computer center to
cut costs and time in administration, surveys, anti-calendars,
etc.;
• a forceful approach to
negotiation with the administration and other authorities
on the following proposals: full
tax deduction on book expenses; elimination of the 11
per cent federal building tax
on student residences; promotion of the trimester system to
effectively reduce accommodation fees with the advantages
of 12 month revenue; cooperation with CUS and the Canadian Book Sellers Association
to   lobby  consumer  affairs  in
an effort to get a 40 per cent
margin on text books.
As your AMS president I
will begin to effect the changes
that students have been voting for all year, and begin immediately
MICHEL LALAIN
arts 3
McConkey
Andy has always strove
for increased student involvement and democratization of
university organs.
For example, as a constitutional revision committee member, Andy pushed proportional
representation of faculties in
the student council.
And as men's athletic council vice-president, Andy made
available to students the minutes and budgets of all MAC
meetings.
His measures for reform in
student affairs have often
been rebuffed by a stagnant,
unresponsive  council.
But as AMS president, Andy
can, and will provide strong,
active leadership.
BOB BANNO
law 3
-wr    -yV    "fr
I have been at UBC for seven
years and have been involved
in student activities of one
type or another for most of
that time. Most of it though
has been spent at the lower
levels of administration or
policy making, leaving me no
opportunity to change the
structure to enable students to
function effectively in making
the decisions that determine
their role and position in student life.
This year as one of the members of the constitutional revisions committee, I aided in
an attempt to make council representative of student opinion
through a rep by pop concept
of more representatives in
larger faculties. Council didn't
agree — as they didn't with
Charlie Boylan's plan the year
before and others this year
We still have small faculties
tied to their vested interests
ruling over student affairs. We
have all seen the constitution
used this year to represent the
desires and fears of a few.
As president I will do all
that I can to establish a system
that allows the voice of all
groups to be heard and acted
upon including inquiry of vested interests other than through
faculties.
Most of my efforts during
my undergraduate years has
been involved with extramural athletics and the administration of that program.
I have a keen interest in this
athletic program and expect
to continue this interest as
well as attempting to find
more money for the intra-mural
program. But I don't feel it
will bias me in striving for
greater student say in their
own welfare, nor do I feel it
will pre-empt my time or efforts to the exclusion of other
aspects of student concern such
as SUB fees, housing, open senate, and board of governors,
The Ubyssey, education action
programs, CUS, BCAS, university grants and further sources
lo Page 9
See: MORE CANDIDATES
GSA MEMBERS
ANNUAL
GENERAL  MEETING
THURSDAY, MARCH 14~****~12*45
THEA KOERNER HOUSE
Lower Lounge
Important business: elections
GRADS
'68 GRAD CLASS GENERAL MEETING
BU 106
Wednesday, Noon, March 20th
THIS IS AN IMPORTANT MEETING TO
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II
II
International House & the Commerce Undergraduate Society
Presents
WORKSHOP ON LEADERSHIP
THURSDAY, MARCH 14, 7 P.M.
at International House
SPEAKERS:
LARRY F. MOORE,  D.B.A.—University  of Colorado.  Assistant Professor  Industrial Administration at  U.B.C.
"INFLUENCES ON  LEADERSHIP"
REV.   G.   F.   McGUIGAN,   Ph.D.—University   of   Laval—Associate   Professor   of
Economics   at   U.B.C.
"PROBLEMS OF GROUP ORGANIZATION AND THE HUMAN PERSON"
VANCE   F.   MITCHELL,   Ph.D.-University   of California,   Berkeley  -   Associate
Professor   of   Organizational   Behaviour   at   U.B.C.
"MOTIVATION AND ORIENTED BEHAVIOUR" Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 12, 1968
Mrs. Margaret Murray, editor of the
Bridge River - Lillooet News, wrote
seething words about The Ubyssey in
an editorial last fall. The editorial, all
of which was factually wrong, attracted
widespread attention. On her recent
visit to campus, Ma visited the object
of her wrath—-The Ubyssey staff—in
The Ubyssey office. She was interviewed—chiefly by Gabor Mate whom she
did not know was Gabor Mate.
MATE
Ma Murray's three most outstanding qualities seem
to be—at least as far as one can tell from a sixty-minute
interview—her unshakeable conviction in the absolute,
time-tested correctness of her opinions, her genuine
kindness, and her friendly, folksy, but sly humility.
The latter exhibits itself in her repeated "Shucks,
I'm only simple country-folk, I don't know all them big
words" kind of statements—while at the same time she
knows that she considers herself perfectly capable of
expressing opinions on almost all topics.
Ma: Then that's just your tough luck, Bub.
Mate: Well, can we still put out a newspaper not
believing in God?
Ma: I suppose you can still put out a thing that
has all the characteristics and looks of a newspaper,
but you can't do very much with that newspaper
because you have no depth in that newspaper.
Mate: In other words, in order to have depth in a
newspaper the editor has to believe in God.
Ma: Well, you don't have to believe in God, you
have to believe in something besides yourself. You
are a pretty weak deal you know, you just need to
stub your muddy little toe or stub yourself so you
bleed some place or the other, and you know how
you bend. So you yourself, the human creature, is
a pretty weak deal when he has to depend on himself — and that's the reason the human creature
was made, he was created by something or somebody, and don't ever underestimate it. That's my
opinion, but of course my opinion may not be worth
very much.
Mate: Well, let's talk about that. You are the
editor of a small newspaper up north, and yet your
opinions are listened to all over the province.  Why
And I know quite a bit about sex and what it does
to kids. Once they begin with sex, they've had it
insofar as their usefulness in that trade or anything
else is concerned. They are set back at least two
years.
Mate: So you think young people should stay
away from sex.
Ma: Well, they certainly should. That kind of
thing is with you all the time — that's standard
equipment. You are not finding anything new. Sex
has been on the go for a hell of a long time — as
long as civilization, and it will be on long after we
are gone. And they are all going to be working on
it, and they are never going to wear it out, either.
So it's something you don't need to get excited
about, and you don't need to ruin yourself about it,
either.
Mate: To get away from sex then, when The
Ubyssey criticizes a lot of the things that we see
around us you say that's also bad, because it's too
destructive.
Ma: I criticized it because I thought page after
page wasn't necessary. You have a privilege, being
a university paper, that I haven't got.   I am a tax-
Ma Murray meets
'You have a privilege, being a  university paper, that
Despite the vehemence of her opinions as they
appear in print, she does not seem in person to be too
carried away by them. Often a flow of invective from
her lips is followed by a gleam in her eyes and a quick
smile or a laugh.
Conscious as she is of her role as the crusading
country editor, she also seems genuinely interested in
establishing friendly, human relationships with everyone
she meets. Above all, she relishes being surrounded by
young people — as she was in The Ubyssey office —
soothing their city-tortured minds with the Kickapoo
Joy Juice potion of her folk-wisdom.
A few days after her visit several of us received
packages from her containing letters and copies of her
recently-published scrap-book. She invited a couple of
us to come and see her. Maybe we will, very soon.
Mate: Could you please tell us what exactly you
criticized The Ubyssey for in your editorial a few
months ago?
Ma Murray: I criticized you because I thought
you were wasting good time and not getting any
place. I couldn't see where you could get any place
at all with the stance and the aim that you had.
Mate: What exactly do you mean?
Ma: Well, there is so much more for you to write
about, there is so much for you to uplift. Nobody
can stand to wreck anything unless they build something and you started in on a sort of wrecking deal
on the status quo and you didn't give anything to
take its place.
Male: What do you want us to write about then
instead of what we are doing?
Ma: I don't want you to write anything, my dear,
its a free country. There is so much out here at
the university, there is so much with youth, there
is so much with the education that you have today
that you didn't have to criticize.
Mate: Can you be more specific—The Ubyssey
does write about education, it does write about youth,
what exactly do we not write about that you think
we should write about?
Ma: You are writing about education, and you
are writing about a prosaic thing — but when you
are writing sensationally about sex or about attitudes
or about manners and that sort of thing, about promiscuity and that kind of thing, one word when you
do that will draw more attention, draw out the
base side of human nature than a thousand words
will of the other kind.
Mate: Are you referring to the Playboy pictures
The Ubyssey reprinted?
Ma: I was talking about all of it, anything that
downgrades human nature. You must remember
human nature is the implementation of the Creator,
and we are the highest creates. We were made in
God's image and whenever you begin to downgrade
that in the eyes or the ears or the respect of anybody else you are treading on very dangerous ground.
Mate: Some of us don't believe in God. Can we
still put out a newspaper, not believing in God?
do you think that is?
Ma: Well, why is it? Because I've lived a long
time and I have kind of lived a half-decent life and
I have lived a life that has more or less an objective
and an uplift.
Mate:  You have lived a long life, you said you
were here for the opening of Brock Hall . . .
Ma: Yes I was.
Mate: If you look at university students then and
today, what difference do you see?
Ma: They are very much confused at the present
time. I don't know, probably it's my fault, my generation's fault that they are.
Mate: Do you know what they are confused
about, and what can be done to help them?
Ma: Probably it's the system, it's that we have
gone about in the wrong way. People are confused
today because they have too much leisure, they have
too much largesse. They are pampered, there is too
much stuff that's cut and dry before they ever get as
adults.
Mate: One reason people are confused is that
there are some things they do not understand, some
pretty important things like sex and sexual mores
— this is one of many things — but When The
Ubyssey brings up questions about it ,you criticize
us for it. Now how can we possibly get answers if ...
Ma: Well certainly I criticize you for it, because
it was brought up at the wrong time. There is
always a time for everything.
Mate: When is the right time to bring up that
kind of question?
Ma: I don't know when the right time would
be, that that was certainly the wrong time in my
opinion.
Mate: Why?
Ma: Well, why? Because they couldn't do anything about it with printer's ink and white space
anyway.   And what is sex after all?   Sex has got to
People are confused today
because they have loo much
leisure, they have too much
largesse. They are pampered,
there is too much stuff thafs
cut and dry. . . .
be felt, it's got to be acted. The least you talk about
it, the more beautiful it is, and the more interesting
it is.
You are living ahead of your time. I, my boy,
have had fifty boys and girls through my hands in
my  lifetime,  teaching them  the  printing business.
payer, I have to hire people, pay wages, make deduction, — I have to live up to a code or I am fired.
But you can do this kind of thing and get away
with it. Don't you think you would have been ready
to criticize somebody in the same circumstances?
Mate: Well, the Ubyssey editor almost got fired
this year.  He has to do a certain job too.
If they want to take mari\uana,
thafs all right, but they destroy themselves. And nothing
iustities you in doing one grain
of harm to your standard
equipment, to dull your beautiful senses that God put into
your minds with any of this
craperoni.
Ma: He ought to have got fired. That Gabor Mate,
he ought to be strung to . . .
Mate: I don't see -why  ...
Ma: ... to write that unnecessary craperoni he
writes and puts in that Ubyssey.
Male: I think he is not a bad guy . . .
Ma: I don't care what you think about him,
maybe he isn't a bad guy, but he don't know nothing.
Male: Can you tell me precisely what you don't
like in his articles?
Ma: Oh, I don't like any of the Commie stuff
that he writes. I don't like any of that, I don't think
we need that in this country at all.
Male: You said it was a free country. What does
it mean to have a free country?
Ma: Yes, who made it free. Not Gabor Mate. By
damn rights somebody made it free that suffered and
bled for it and not that guy who does nothing but
mouth about the weaknesses of other people.
Male: Well, he is too young; he hasn't had a
chance yet.
Ma: No, he's not too young. He is twenty-seven
or twenty-eight . . .
Male: Twenty-four . . .
Ma: How old have you got to be when you have
a little bit of sense. You don't have to be very old,
Bub, if you have the right kind of training or you
want to do the right kind of thing.
Male: Well, if you were running this paper what
kind of attitudes would you put forward?
Ma: First of all, I think I would go to work and
I would try to write something that would encourage
these young people in cultivating a vision of what to
expect and what they are going to have to do when
they get out of here. Tuesday, March 12, 1968
»  THE     UBYSSEY
Page 7
Mate: What is that vision?
Ma: The damn be all and end all of their lives
is not in this place here. You are just getting ready
to earn your living and battle with the world, and
• you sure as heck ain't going to earn your living and
battle with the world if you are oversexed and that's
all you think about when you get out of here.
Mate: All right then, let's get away from this
university. What do you think is good in this province right now and what do you think is bad?
Ma: Well, I can't think there is anything bad
in this province.
Mate: How about Bennett?
Ma: Bennett is not bad, the poor fellow: he did
the best he could with what he had — he didn't
have very much to do it with. But Bennett is just
exactly like The Ubyssey. He's been at it too long
with the same kind of tools that he has been working with.
^ Here you are: you don't look into the future,
you don't give them leadership, you can't see anything beyond Ihe end of your nose.   Here's Mr. Ben-
about Saigon,  anything  about  the conditions over
there   unless you have been over there to see it?
Mate: Johnson has never been to Saigon.
Ma:   Well,  he has  had  enough  emissaries   over
there to do it. And he has been there — maybe they
Here's Mr. Bennett: he gets out
a speech from the throne, he
has six thousand words in that
speech and there isn't one
bloody futuristic thing in that
whole speech.
didn't let him land, but he has been there.
But he has lived,   and he can't help but know
something because he is at the head of the greatest
enough wits in my head to observe? Don't you think
I can see what damage is done to them? If they want
to take marijuana, that's all right, but they destroy
themselves. And nothing justifies you in doing one
grain of harm to your  standard equipment.
Stoffman: Would anything justify doing harm to
someone else?
Ma: Well, I wouldn't say that anything would
justify that.
Stoffman: What then would justify spraying a
whole village with napalm?
Ma: Well, nothing would justify that, I don't
suppose. But if that's the only way you could get
rid of that village and that village was infested with
trouble and with corruption and there couldn't be
anything else done about it, then it would be justified to do it.
Stoffman: Perhaps we should do that to the legislature in Victoria . .  .
Ma: Why, do you think the legislature in Victoria
is corrupt? Then you're corrupt too, because you
are part of the legislature. Don't think for a minute
that you can sit there in that Chair and speak judgement on those fellows who offered themselves to go
The Ubyssey
I haven't got.   I have to live up to a code or I am fired/
nett: he gets out a speech from the throne, he has
six thousand words in that speech and there isn't
one bloody futuristic thing in that whole speech.
Male: Can I ask some brief questions about some
other things now?
Ma: Sure, go ahead.
Male: What do you think about Vietnam?
Ma: Well, I don't see how Johnson can do anything else. You are either for a thing or against it.
Wise people long before me said its either hot or its
cold — if it's lukewarm, it's fit to be spewn from
the mouth.
I've been in Saigon, Iv'e been in Cambodia, I've
been out to the Far East. I have seen the Mekong
Valley. I know that there isn't all the wealth in
that Mekong Valley that is worth one regiment of
American soldiers, or Canadian soldiers. But our
way of life is being threatened, our democratic way
of life. We like free enterprise, we like to be able
to say our peace.
I do not see how Mr. Johnson can pull out of
Vietnam until there is a proper peace on both sides.
You cannot allow one side to crow over the other,
because human nature, such as it is, will take advantage of the other side.
Male: So Johnson is defending our way of life,
'is he?
Ma: He certainly is, and you may not know it.
But he is.
Male: If Johnson is protecting our way of life,
should it not be our duty to go help him in Vietnam?
Who made this country tree?
Not Gabor Mate. By damn
rights somebody made it free
that suffered and bled for it
and not that guy that does
nothing but mouth about the
weaknesses of other people.
Ma: It certainly should.
Male: So Canadian troops should be sent to Vietnam, do you think?
i
Ma: Well, I don't think Canadian troops should
be sent to Vietnam — there are other things that
we can do. I take a bloody dim view of the youth
and people who don't know what they're talking
about who create such a situation out of the whole
thing.
How does anyone in this room know anything
republic, the greatest one-man deal in the world.
There is nothing to compare with the magnitude of
the United States and what they undertake to do.
You fellows, if you were smart and if you knew
anything, would either keep your mouths shut or
go help him.
Mate: All right, what do you think about the
drug problem, with so many young people taking
drtigs?
Ma: What would a person who has been able to
fight my way along through all the vicissitudes up
to this age in life and never had to resort to anything
except my good standard equipment, what would I
think? What would I think of anybody who would
dull their beautiful senses that God put into their
minds with any of this craperoni? I am naturally
against it. lam naturally opposed to it.
I have nothing against these poor kids, I feel
sorry for them. Their parents, or the system, or
something or the other has slipped to ever allow such
a condition to arise.
Stoffman: Have you ever taken drugs?
Ma: No, I never have. Well, I took chloroform
when I was having babies, I suppose that's a drug.
Stoffman: You said on Vietnam that unless you've
been to Saigon you can't know anything about it.
Would not the same logic apply to marijuana?
Ma: Do you think that I have to take it -when I
see other people taking it?  Don't you think I've got
over there and  didn't turn  out  to be   what  they
thought they could be.
Stoffman: Well, suppose the legislature was corrupt and we all shared the blame — would that
justify dropping napalm on the whole province? I
am trying to pursue the logic of your Vietnam argument.
/ take a bloody dim view of
the people who don't know
what they're talking about
Vietnam who create such a
situation out of the whole
thing. How does anyone know
about the conditions over
there unless you have been
over there to see it?
Ma: There is no logic in dropping napalm on
the whole province. You would'nt have enough napalm to do it with. You couldn't get enough equipment up there to drop it with either — so don't be
illogical. You are being illogical.
Ma Murray meets Mate Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 12,  1968
Being busted is fun
They went through our smelly socks and underwear checking for dope
By STAN PERSKY
A new wrinkle in the style of civil disobedience since Henry Thoreau's day is that after
they booked us they took us upstairs and stripped
us and went through our smelly socks and underwear and everything else to check for dope. It's
as if they went through Thoreau's pockets looking for a bit of dried seaweed out of Walden
Pond.
Having built an educative ethic into our city,
Ray, the minister of welfare in our new city government, requested a
lecture on the narcotics
control act or whatever
it's called while more of
his six and a half feet
appeared in the flesh.
The officer explained
that the police had the
right to do this search to
anyone, anywhere, without a warrant, except in
your own home.
"You can strip me
right on the street?"
"Within limits," mumbled the officer. The city
jail was within limits.
It was a nearly perfect
bust. We were sitting in
the fountain square,
when the police warned
some of us. Then they PERSKY
retreated up the  courthouse   steps   into   their   fortress   to   phone   for
instructions.
The sun disappeared. It was too cold. The
courthouse doors opened and a dozen police came
eagerly bounding down the steps serving blank
warrants on the sixteen of us they had decided
on. They hauled in one lawyer by accident and
when they found this out at the booking desk
they were unhappy. One cop paced back and
forth, pounding his fist into an open palm, saying to himself, "(Fuck! . . . fuck! . . . fuck!" in
muted explosive rage. It spoiled their perfect
bust.
After the view cage, we're put into a larger
room, booked at the desk, stripped upstairs, and
then shifted into a group cell downstairs. The
walls are lemon tile, the windows frosted and
screened, the toilets behind a half partition.
There's a grey metal table and metal double
bunks.
I keep explaining that we're political prison
ers. Actually we're absurd prisoners. The art
student and the unemployed citizen who had
strings of beads played checkers wth pennies on
a board that's been scratched out of the grey
paint on the metal table. Udo Erasmus, minister
of labor in the new government and UBC science
grad student, and I talked about politics and
being citizens. If the scene was meant to remind
us of what we were being deprived of and if
you're a person who doesn't have any desire to
buy any of the junk offered in the world, then
you're neither impressed or frightened by the
arrangement.
While it's fun the first time around, and
we're digging the romantic imagery of city
jail, when we go back for a second, third and
nth times, it'll be a bore. They fed us. We're
served by two zombie-like trustees in baggy
clothes. There's a little hamburger patty with a
couple of ghostly strands of cooked onion on it,
some potatoes, a couple of cut green beans, bread
and a tin mug of sugared and creamed tea. We
get a spoon and a pig-iron partitioned tray. We
still  think it's pretty funny.
I get called up to see our lawyer. I realize a
lot of our friends are scrambling around outside, amused and worried. There's a picket demonstration outside the public safety building.
We're on our way homes, more or less. The
lawyer starts getting us out. Somebody from
downstairs has sent up a copy of Thoreau for me
in case it takes a while.
Downstairs I bail out. All my friends are
there. They really emanate an air of citizenry.
Elmore, the minister of health, is wearing a
huge purple velvet gown, carrying a book of
statute law as a bible. On the steps of the jail
more friends, who have been marching with
signs. Flashbulbs pop. It's night out. We've
been political prisoners for about six hours. It's
funny. And okay. We've been in the civic
drama, in the absurdity of it, and the realness
that backs 2,500 years of men actually trying
to figure out how to be citizens.
Twigs  elect Webb
Derreck Webb, forestry 3, a Ubyssey photographer, has been elected forestry undergraduate
society president by acclamation.
Third year students Chris Andersen, Fran
Gregory and Gordie Barton were elected first
vice-president, second vice-president and treasurer respectively.
The elections took place at noon Thursday
in the MacMillan building. About 120 of the 220
forestry students turned out to vote.
FILMSOC PRESENTS
"WHO'S AFRAID OF
VIRGINIA WOOLF"
with
Elizabeth Taylor Richard Burton
George Segal Sandy Dennis
THURS., MAR. 14 - AUD. - 50c
12:30, 3:30,  6:00, 8:30
YOU   ARE CORDIALLY  INVITED TO   GEORGE  &   MARTHA'S
ABSOLUTELY NEW FOR
SPRING
Glenayr
Without this label
V'Fisherman
f     Knit"
1   "/SWEATERS
Picture yourself in this
delightfully chunky
"Fisherman Knit" pullover
(or cardigan.) So
casually smart, and warm
as only a Kitten can be,
this long sleeve. 100%
pure Irish wool sweater is
full-fashioned, and
eatures a zippered mock
turtle neckline, raglan
shoulder. Continental
band and cuffs. In a rich
cream shade only to
complement perfectly any
of your Kitten slims or
skirts. A MUST for
every wardrobe. At
all fine shops
everywhere.
it is not a genuine KITTEN.
t&toL&
C.U.S., SPECIAL EVENTS, AND THE U.B.C. PARLIAMENTARY COUNCIL
present
11
PRESS  RESPONSIBILITY
an Open Students' Meeting with
THE VANCOUVER PROVINCE and THE UBYSSEY
it
MAIN SPEAKERS
-PADDY SHERMAN   -GABOR MATE
Editor, the Province Representing the Ubyssey
Moderator-DENNIS HUTTON
StucknlA. ahst tequsLbisixL Ja. Apsiak JhmJc vi&wA.
THURSDAY, NOON FREE ADMISSSION
BROCK HALL Tuesday, March 12, 1968
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 9
MORE CANDIDATES
from Page 5
-of money for AMS programs.
As a member of the MAA, and
sitting on the AC this year I
have obtained the release of
|he athletic budget to team
managers for the first time,
and am working to have immediate release of the AC
Jninutes to the MAA so they
have information upon which
to voice student views on athletic policy. This is being done
in meetings held weekly for
the first time in years that I
have instituted for this purpose. I will work to obtain the
same rights for students from
senate and the board.
All but the president of next
.year's executive is elected, and
has started planning next
year's course of action. I will
try to compliment their work,
encouraging them in places,
moderating in others but working with them without creating a split in the executive.
Such a split could only result in another year of chaos,
and a lack on constructive
action. Under the right leadership next year should provide
students with a chance to responsibly guide their campus
life.
I feel I can provide that
leadership.
ANDY McCONKEY, law 3
it    -fr    #
MacDonald
. I have know Maureen for
three years, and this year have
seen her work as president of
Mussoc, a task that required
excellent administrative skill,
and a task that she performed
in a most efficient fashion. But
most important of all, Maureen
is quite rightly concerned
about the lack of communication between the AMS and the
average student; with the lack
of adequate financial aid for
the university from Victoria;
and with the acute housing
shortage facing students. If you
want a president who is concerned and who will work for
the interests of all students,
join me in supporting Maureen
MacDonald as AMS president.
Put a woman in your life!
BOB  ALLEN
aits 4
The Alma Mater Society is
presently in a state of organized confusion. What it needs
is a strong president who is
willing to spend long hours
finding out the needs of the
students and acting according
to these needs.
The vital issues at this time
are: open senate meetings; increased dialogue between UBC
and thei outside world—especially the provincial government;
more study and library facilities; more cafeterias; and more
communication between the
students and the student's
council.
An unbroken line of male presidents has succeeded in alienating the student body from
their chosen executive. Perhaps some feminine charm
would straighten things out. As
j|our president, I would try to
serve you.
So — get involved in your
own affairs again.
Vote Maureen MacDonald
for president.
MAUREEN L. MacDONALD
ed. 4
Zirnhelt
Throughout the dilemma of
the last election, it was Dave
Zirnhelt that kept students informed. As spokesman for the
Society for the Preservation of
Council Activities, Dave initiated public rallies and moved
politics into the public forum.
Dave's platform is two-fold:
• Campus solidarity, and
• A students' government
that will toe aware of students'
opinions.
Dave has shown himself to
be an effective administrator
and policy-maker as UBC
chairman and western regional
representative of WUS of Canada (World University Service). He brings experience,
level-headedness, and new ideas
to a new council and I urge
your support.
MARK WALDMAN
grad studies 3
fr      T-f      -&
I propose vigorous action by
council on:
• effective participation in
decisions affecting students
e.g. curriculum, housing committees;
• leadership in academic reform;
• envigorating BCAS as a
provincial lobby, e.g. against
enrolment cuts and fee increases;
• initiating task forces to
promote needs of higher education throughout the province;
• the executive taking student government to the students by rallies on important
issues and undergrad general
meetings;
• streamlining council procedure.
My involvement with student affairs and administration:
• club president for two
years;
• residence don and residence executive;
• chairman of World University Service Committee;
• WUS Western Canadian
regional representative;
• knowledge of council
through attendance at many
meetings.
I have the expressed support
of all faculties and encourage
your support to unify students
behind student council.
DAVE ZIRNHELT arts 4
\\
COMPANY OF YOUNG
CANADIANS
ti
talk by HOWARD JOHNSTON
Social Credit M.P. from  Okanagan-Revelstoke
NOON TODAY - BU 204
ANNOUNCEMENT
ALL U.B.C. STUDENTS
Are Invited To Take Part
in a
RECEPTION PROGRAMME
FOR   400  NEW  FOREIGN   STUDENTS
Contact International House
For More Information
FILMSOC PRESENTS
ELIZABETH  TAYLOR &  RICHARD  BURTON
in
"WHO'S AFRAID OF
VIRGINIA WOOLF"
THURS., MAR. 14 AUD. 50c
100%
HUMAN HAIR
WIGS
21.95, 31.95, 41.95 & 61.95
WIGLETS
$9.95
BEAUTIFUL  FALLS
$29.95
SALES
10%
Discount to
U.B.C.   Students
& Personnel
SERVICE
"GONE WITH THE WIG"
49 W. HASTINGS ST. ,lEiEP-H0NE
Between Woodward's and A. & N. o88*-I1201
VOLKSWAGEN
SPECIALISTS
Large Stock of Parts on Hand
CERTIFIED MECHANICS
UNIVERSITY SHELL SERVICE
4314 W. 10th 224-0828
224-5352
DISTINCTIVELY
NOW
FASHIONS
4409 West 10th Avenue
"Just Off Campus"
IT'S MORE FUN TO
SEE WITHOUT GLASSES
Vent-Air lenses have no frames to slip or slide. They're virtually unbreakable while worn. They have four air vents for
better circulation of the eye's natural moisture and air so
necessary for proper wear. And best of all, they don't "hide"
your eyes.
NOW BY POPULAR DEMAND!-with every original pair of
Vent-Air contact lenses you Will receive a spare pair at no
extra charge . . . tinted grey, blue, green, or brown as
desired. LOW MONTHLY PAYMENTS.
Vent-Air lenses are available only in our offices. Come in
for your no-obligation demonstration today. .. you may
see without glasses tomorrow.
AVAILABLEONLY AT
KLEAR VISION CONTACT LENS CO.
HOURS
CALL
MU 3-7207
9 A.M. to 6 P.M. daily incl. Sat.; Mon. to 8 P.M.
Suite 616, Burrard Bldg. Tmr „..„
1030 W. Georgia Street UBC i/u
Vancouver, B.C. MU 3-7207
Please send me your free illustrated booklet
and the cost of invisible lenses.
Address-
-Zone State..
OFFICES THROUSHOK-f U.S.*. AND CANADA Page 10
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 12, 1968
'TWEEN CLASSES
South  East Asia eyed
SOUTH EAST ASIA
PROJECT
Dr. Bill Willmott discusses
the 1954 Geneva agreement
and the second Indo China war,
today, noon, Ang. 110.
Dr.    Paul    Ivory    discusses
China as an economic  model
for   underdeveloped  countries,
Wednesday, noon, Ang. 110.
ARTS  I
Symposium at Rosario Beach
March 15 to 17. Application
forms available at NAB office.
$9 fee payable before Wednesday.
ANGLICANS
Celebration    of   holy    communion,      Wednesday,      12:35
p.m., ATC chapel.
VISITING  LECTURER
Prof.    Michael    Scriven    of
Berkeley discusses insight and
understanding in science, Wednesday,  noon,  Bu.   106.
LSM
Fr. Gilles Bordeau, French
Catholic priest and Quebec
student speaks on separatism
— an alternative; Wednesday,
noon, Bu. 104.
ALLIANCE  FRANCAISE
Free  film  today, noon,  Bu.
2238.
ARTS US
Special meeting to discuss
anti-calendar, lockers and
civil liberties — with Stan
Persky and Aid. Harry Rankin,
today, noon, Bu. lounge.
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
Karl Burau and Andy Schneider participate in a forum
on psychology, today, noon,
Bu. 203.
RIDING AND RODEO CLUB
General meeting Wednesday, 7 p.m., forestry-aggie
lounge.
GERMAN CLUB
Kommen   Sie und   sprechen
Sie Deutsch, heute mittag, IH
402.
FILMSOC
Annual general meeting today, noon, Brock ext. 357.
SOCRED CLUB
General  meeting   and   elec-
tiosn, today, noon, Bu. 222.
SOCRED  CLUB
Howard Johnston, Socred
MP for Okanagan-Revelstoke
speaks on the Company of
Young Canadians, Wednesday,
noon, Bu. 204.
DEBATING  UNION
Annual meeting today, noon,
Bu.   217   for   the   election   of
next year's  executive  and reports.
ONTOLOGICAL SOC
A   presentation   and   discussion  on sexual  fantasy,   Wednesday, noon, Bu. 223.
PRE   LIBRARIANSHIP
General meeting Wednesday,
noon, Bu. 225.
PSYCHOLOGY  CLUB
Film:   LSD  and   alcoholism,
Wednesday, noon, Ang. 207.
RADSOC
Presidential     candidate
speeches,    Wednesday,     noon,
Bu. 217.
SPECIAL   EVENTS
Last minute tickets for the
playhouse stage two available
at the theatre half hour before show time.
CUS
Discussion of press responsibility with Paddy Sherman,
editor of the Province and
Gabor Mate of The Ubyssey.
Thursday, noon, Brock lounge.
NEW AMS EXEC
Anyone interested in campus
communications, public relations, or academic reform, give
name and phone number to
Ruth Dworkin, internal affairs
officer elect, or leave it in the
AMS office by Friday.
SKYDIVING  CLUB
Elections    Thursday,    noon,
chem. 150.
FILMSOC
Who's   Afraid    of   Virginia
Woolf,   Thursday,   12:30   p.m.,
3:30 p.m., 6 p.m. and 8:30 p.m.
Admission 50 cents.
NEW DEMOCRATS
Clyve Lytle speaks on wage
controls,  Thursday, noon,  Bu.
203.
UBC CO-OP
Meeting   to   draw   up   constitution,    Thursday,    noon,
Brock conference room.
SCIENCE US
Support   course   evaluation.
Black and Blue  Review questionnaires    available    in    the
science common room.
EL CIRCULO
Meeting to elect new executive, Thursday, noon, IH 402.
EDUCATION  US
General   meeting  Thursday,
noon, education lounge.
MEDITATION  SOCIETY
Introductory talk on transcendental meditation, Thursday, noon, Bu. 106.
27
DEPARTMENT OF THEATRE
&
" Waiting Jw fyfot "
by SAMUEL BECKETT
with
Robert- Clothier Gregory Reid
Lee Toylor
Directed by Stanley Weese. Designed by Richard Kent Wilcox.
MARCH 22-30, 1968
Student Tickets $1.00
(available for all performances)
— Special Student Performances
Monday, March 25th    7:30    p.m.
Thursday, March 28th 12:30 p.m.
m
Tickets: Fredric Wood Theatre Room 207 or 228-26
Support Your Campus theatre
——■FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE——
/i
BUY LINE 683-3111
. . . your direct telephone line to fast, efficient
service for ordering items from Eaton's.
For other store business: Downtown 685-7112,
Park Royal 922-3325, Brentwood 299-5511
and New Westminster 526-6766.
EATON'S
LUNCHEON STEAKS   $1.19
Luncheon    Steak    Dinner,   anytime—5   oz.   Sirloin
Baked   Potato,   Tossed   Salad   and   Garlic   Bread1
1
NOW
NEAR   CAMPUS
4489 West 10th Ave.
CLASSIFIED
Rate*: Students, Faculty 8c Clubs—3 lines, 1 day 75*. S day* §1.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00, 3 days fS.50.
Publications Office, BROCK HALL. UNIV. OF B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Danees
11
THE GRASS HARP LIGHT SHOW
and dance, Sat., Mar. 16, 9:00 to
1:00, Brock, Girls |1.00, Guys $1.25,
Couples  $2.00.        	
THE SHOCKERS AT THE SHAN-
gri-la Fri., Mar. 15, evening $2.00
per person, 6104 Marine Drive, Burnaby, phone AL 3-0413 or 522-5635
for   reservations.
Greetings
12
H.   B.   GAIL.   VIA   BOODA-BOODA-
Booda.   Kids!
Lost fc Found
IS
THE PUBLICATIONS OFFICE HAS
three watches found on campus
plus several glasses. Owners should
identify   and   claim.
LOST: LOOSELEAF BINDER WITH
notes for all my courses. Please return   to   Math,   office.
LOST MANS GOLD WATCH, SWISS
make. Lost in Feb. Phone Barry at
327-5034.
LOST: BLACK DIAMOND STONE
from Man's Ring. Finder please call
224-1545.
FOUND — A WAT TO BLISS
through transcevdental meditation.
Introductory talk by Eileen Heroyd
Thurs.  Noon  Bu.  106.
FOUND MEN'S GLASSES IN BLACK
vinyl snap close case in "C" Parking lot Monday. Owner please claim
at  Publication   Office.
LOST. BLACK WALLET 3rd.
Stacks. Sunday Nite. Reward. Gary
733-2707.
Rides & Car Pools
14
Special Notices
18
UBC BEAUTY SALON. EXPERT
styling and cutting. No appointment necessary. 5736 University
Blvd.
"WORKSHOP ON LEADERSHIP"
at International House. Thursday
March 14, 7 p.m. Everyone welcome.
"DON'T PROCRASTINATE . . . SEE
ad in this paper for the Foreign
Student  Reception  Programme."
I'M LOUD AND I'M VULGAR BUT
I'm not a monster, I'm not. Find
out  Thurs.   Mar.   14 in  Aud.  50c.
Travel Opportunities
It
U.K.    3   CHARTER   SEATS   AVAIL-
able 22 July to 22 Aug. ph. 731-2398.
TRIP OUT TO HAPPINESS. LEARN
Maharishi Mahesh's technique of
Transcendental Meditation. Introductory talk by Eileen Leroyd
Thurs.  Noon  Bu.  106.
Typing (Conl.)
TYPING — 25c PAGE — DOUBLE
spacing, legible work — call Mondays to Thursdays and Sundays
after 10 a.m., 738-6829.	
ESSAY    AND    THESIS    TYPING   —
Electric   Campus   Pickup.   434-9558.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Female
•1
RELIABLE UNIVERSITY GIRL TO
care for 3 school age children while
mother is in hospital for a week in
mid-May. Phone Mrs. Munn 224-
9375.
Help Wanted—Male
u
LIFEGUARD & SWIMMING IN-
structor wanted. The Village of
Lillooet requires the services of a
lifeguard & swimming instructor
from May 15, 1968 to Sept. 1st, 1968.
Salary range to $500 per month,
depending on qualifications. Interested persons please contact the
undersigned before April 15, 1968,
stating qualifications and salary expected. G. A. Wiley, Village Clerk,
Box  610,   Lillooet,   B.C.
Help W'led—Male or Female    53
WANTED BOTH MALE AND FE-
male summer resort help on Alaska
Hwy. Work with other students.
Phone   Pat   224-3777.
INSTRUCTION
Instruction   Wanted
•1
Tutoring
FIRST YEAR MATHEMATICS AND
sciences other undergraduate subjects to fourth year. Canadian Tutorial   Centre,   736-6928.
ENGLISH 100 & 200 STUDENTS:
Experienced tutor available, $4.00/
hour  (single or group). Carol Clarke
224-5460.
'I'LL BEAT YOU AT YOUR OWN
Game Martha." You haven't got the
Guts." See all Thurs. Mar. 14 Aud.
50c.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOB SALE
fl
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
UBC TEXTS BOUGHT AND SOLD.
Best prices, Busy "B" Books, 146
West   Hastings,   681-4931.	
TEXTBOOK WANTED — YOUNG
J.Z. Life of Vertebrates, phone Bob
731-5640,  late  evenings.
AUTOMOTIVE fc MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
11
I960    FIAT   WITH    NEW    LICENCE
plates.   $100.   Phone WA  6-1640.
Automobile Paris
23
Motorcycles
26
BUSINESS SERVICES
Miscellaneous
32
UBC BARBER SHOP, IN THE VILL-
age,  open  6 days a -week.
Orchestras
33
Scandals
tr
SELLING YOUR TEXTBOOKS? TRY
The Bookflnder. 4444 West 10th
Ave. 228-8933.
LEARN THE TRUTH BEHIND THE
Maharish Scandals. Hear Eileen Leroyd speak on Transcendental Meditation,   Thurs.   Noon   Bu.   106.
YOU ARE CORDIALLY INVITED
to George and Martha's for an evening of Fun and Games Thurs. Mar.
14  Aud.   50c.  4 shows.
Typing
EXPERT   ELECTRIC   TYPIST
Experienced   essay   and   thesis  typist
Reasonable Rates TR. 4-9253
TYPING —   ELEC.   MACHINE
Phone   738-7881
THESES   TYPED
Elec machine—fast service. 738-7756.
—  OLD  TOTEMS  FOR  SALE  —
1963.  1965 & 1966 issues 50c.
Campus Life's  25e.  Publications Off.,
Brock   Hall
SOLIGOR FL 135 MM TELEPHOTO
lens for reflex camera. F2.8, Manual. $30. Phone 266-4630 after 6 p.m'.
ZENITH TRANS - OCEANIC RADIO.
Excellent condition. $180. O.N.O.
Phone:   921-9449   after   6   p.m.
OFFICE TYPEWRITER, HI-FI REC-
ord player. Rollerskates & boots.
"Great  Books"   as  new  733-7744.
,357 S&W MAGNUM REVOLVER.
New with many extras. Phone Phil
433-7668  after  6:30.
MUST SELL! 1965 PROOF COIN
Sets from Royal Mint. Also Silver
dollars.   Phone   263-9679.
NEW LINES AT THE DISCOUNT
House' of tape-players, tape recorders, all sizes in transistor and electric radio's, watches, luggage, binoculars, jewelry and gift items.; 1500
latest style ladies bathingsuits to
choose from, wholesale prices on all
merchandise. 3235 West Broadway.
Phone   732-6811.
TYPEWRITER    POR    SALE.     LIKE
new   condition.   Offers?   731-1540.
RENTALS fc REAL ESTATE
Rooms
•1
WALKING DISTANCE TO CAMPUS
Near Village and Meal Services.
224-9662.  $40 mo.  2250 Wesbrook.
ROOM FOR TWO STUDIOUS BOYS,
private entrance. Shower, fridge.
stove.   Please  phone  224-6266.
Room fc. Board
Furn. Houses fc Apan
WANTED GIRL TO SHARE TW«
bedroom suite near 10th and Alma
during April only. iQuiet. Phone Pat
224-3777.
FOR RENT. TWO BEDROOM SUITE
near 10th & Alma. May-Aug. Phone
Pat   224-3777.
Unfurn. Houses fc Apia.
Houses & Apts.*—-other cities    87 Tuesday, March 12, 1968
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 11
Rugby Birds discover
points don't make a win
Scoring    the    most    points
doesn't    always    mean    that
you'll end up a winner.
Take the case of the UBC
rugby Thunderbirds.
Saturday they beat the
University of Western Washington 12-3 in Bellingham to
finish their play in the Pacific Northwest Intercollegiate
Conference.
The Birds scored 86 points
in five conference games
with a record of three wins,
one loss and one tie.
But the University of Oregon won four and lost one
■while scoring only 58 points
and allowing 42, putting UBC
second.
Dodson leads UBC
to  golf  victory
UBC's Len Dodson was the
low scorer as the UBC varsity golf squad toppled the
University of Victoria 20-16
after the two days of individual match play which ended
Saturday.
Dodson, low man of both
teams, carded rounds of 71
and 69 for a 140 total, one
over par for the Uplands and
Victoria  golf  courses.
The UBC Jayvees lost 26-
10 to UVic's junior varsity.
Lack of space forces a Public
WHOLESALE
DISPOSAL
of over 700 new & used
TYPEWRITERS
and other office machines
114   New   Portables   from   _.__  $49.50
532   Standards   from     $29.50
67   Electrics   from    $79.50
Adding   Machines   from    $37.50
Every    machine    reconditioned,
Guaranteed  and   Price  Tagged.
Terms:    Cash    or   Cheque
Trade-ins  Will   Be  Accepted
Dealer   inquiries  welcome
Poison Typewriters
2163 W. 4th Ph. 731-8322
Open   Daily   and   Sat.   9-6   (Fri.   9-9)
Saturday the Birds were
guided to victory by the toe
of Don Crompton. UBC took
a 6-0 half-time lead on a penalty goal by Crompton and a
drop goal by Reid Owen.
Crompton added two more
penalty goals in the second
half. Washington scored a try
in the dying minutes of the
game.
UBC played most of the
game with only 14 players.
John Puddicombe was injured early in the first half. He
returned in the second frame
but then Ken Robinson was
injured and he left the game.
On Saturday the Birds meet
the Simon Fraser varsity
squad in an exhibition game
at 2:30 p.m. in Thunderbird
Stadium.
In    other    weekend rugby
action the Braves lost 17-3 to
Trojans   I   while   the Totems
lost 6-5 to Trojans II.
Birds beat Indians
The   UBC   field   hockey
Thunderbirds defeated India   "A"   2-0   Saturday   to
remain in second place in
the     Vancouver    field
hockey league.
The Birds have now won
14   and   lost   three   while
first    place    Hawks    "A"
have won 16 and lost one.
Each   club   has   only   one
game remaining.
Hawks' only loss was administered by the Birds last
week when UBC won 2-1.
EDMONTON, ALBERTA
Urban Teaching Positions September 1968
Representatives of the Edmonton Public School Board
will be interviewing applicants for teaching positions on
the Edmonton staff at the office of Student Services on
Thursday and Friday, March 21-22.
Applicants must be eligible for Alberta Teacher certification requiring 2 years teacher (university) education beyond
B.C. grade 13 as a minimum and 4 years teacher (university)
education beyond B.C. grade 13 for graduate status on salary
schedule.
Applications from experienced and inexperienced teachers are solicited in the following areas:
(1) Division of Personal Services
(a) School Psychologists, Social Workers,   Remedial
Specialists (Masters degree or equivalent).
(b) Special Education.
Teachers  of  mentally retarded,  emotionally disturbed or physically handicapped youngsters.
(2) Division of Elementary Education
(a) Grades 1, 2, 3.
(b) Teacher Librarians.
(3) Division of Secondary Education
(a) Junior High — grades 7, 8, 9.
English, Modern Math, Fine Arts, Girls' Physical
Education, Teacher Librarians.
(b) Senior High — grades 10,  11, 12.
English,  Mathematics,  Physics,   Chemistry,  Fine
Arts, Girls' Physical Education, Teacher
Librarians.
(4) Division of Vocational Education
(a) Qualified teachers in most vocational fields.
(b) Industrial Arts.
For appointment interview and information apply:
Office of Student Services, University   of  British  Columbia.
STORAGE?
CALL
224-3111
MOORE'S / ATLAS
TRANSFER                               VAN LINES
Also
Moving — Shipping
The   Canadian   Armed   Forces
PLAN (Roip)
TERMS
(a) Free tuition plus pay while obtaining a degree either
at a Service or Civilian University,
(b) Your obligation is to serve in  the Canadian Armed
Forces for at least 4 years after obtaining a degree.
ELIGIBILITY
(a) Junior Matric and age 16-19 or, Senior Matric and
age 16-20 (add one year to age limit for each year
of university (completed)  beyond Senior Matric).
(b) Canadian Citizen, single and  medically fit.
PROMOTION
On obtaining a degree you would be promoted to the
rank of Lieutenant. In general, promotion opportunities
in the Armed Forces are good but, as in civilian life,
depend on the individual. The minimum rank expectation of a career officer with a university degree should
be that of "MAJOR" for which rank the normal retirement age is 47 years.
SERVICE BENEFITS
(a) Medical and Dental Care.
(b) 30 days leave each year.
(c) Travel.
(d) Retirement with a good pension at a relatively young
age. For example, a Major retiring at age 47, and
with 25 years of service, would receive a pension of
approximately $6400 per year.
COMMENTS
* Com minion ad from the) ranks
MONTHLY PAY RATE TABLE
(OFFICERS)
RANK (Equivalent)
INCENTIVE PAY CATEGORY
OFFICERS
Batk
1
2
year*
3
yean
4
5
yean
6
yean
7
yean
8
yean
10
yean
12
yean
14
16
yean
Offieer-Cadel (ROTP)
187
192
2nd Lieutenant
369
Lieutenant
563
603
618
Lieutenant (CFR)*
672
692
712
732
752
Captain
727
752
777
802
827
852
877
Major
931
961
991
1021
1051
1081
L i **-u te na n t-Co lo ne 1
1130
1165
1200
1235
1270
Colon al
1404
1449
1494
PILOTS
Lieutenant
716
L    LI ™i ...1
™l    1   II   1 M
Lieutenant (CFR) •
842
867
902
937
972
Captain
892
.   922
962
1002
1042
1082
1122
1142
1162
M.K,r
1117
1147
1177
1207
1237
1267
LI e ut« no nt-Co lo n • 1
1286
1321
1356
1391
1426
Colonel
1482
1527
1572
AIR NAVIGATORS
Lieutenant
694
759
774
Lieutenant (CFR)*'
779
804
839
874
909
Captain
633
863
903
943
983
1023
1063
1083
1103
Major
1009
1039
1069
1099
1129
1159
Lieutenant-Colonel
1208
1243
1278
1313
1348
Colonel
1482
1527
1572
MEDICAL OFFICERS
Captain
920
960    1020    1085    1133    1181
1229j 1276j           Illi
Maior
1232
1280
1328
1376
1424
1473
Lieutenant-Colonel
1428
1476
1524
1572
Colonel
1564
1605
1647
DENTAL OFFICERS
Captain
920
954
988
1026
1064
1121
1169
Major
1077
1125
1173
1221
1269
1316
~
Lieutenant-Colonel
1329
1377
1425
1474
Colonel
1419
1467
1515
1563
LEGAL OFFICERS
Lieutenant
607
Captain
727
739
752
764
777
805
Major
931
946
961
983
1021
1081
1120
1175
„
Lieutenant-Co lone 1
1198
1246
1294
1342
1422
1471
Colonel
1562
1657
1752
The pay scale to the right is self-explanatory. While attending university you would be paid as an officer cadet,
that is, $187-$! 92 per month. In addition to free tuition
plus pay, you are provided with a uniform and with a
book allowance of $125 per year. Summer months are
spent in Service training.
Applications for the forthcoming academic year should be made not later than  1  July to
THE CANADIAN ARMED FORCES RECRUITING CENTRE
547 Seymour St., Vancouver (phone 684-7341) or, 1002 Wharf St. in Victoria or, 2908-32 St. in Vernon
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, VISIT, WRITE OR PHONE Page 12
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 12,  1968
JWS      *ra__BI_-HH_fe_ ,«-_f_SS&&- -WIMJigtft-i***. jgSSlBSRSBfflBBBB       .-^aBBfe, «_8ff
PORTS
— derreck webb photo
UBC's GARY THOMPSON heads the ball past South Hill's goalie for one of his three goals. The
Birds won  9-0 in   Province Cup  action  played  in Thunderbird Stadium Saturday.
UBC swim squad sets records
By JIM MADDIN
The Aqua-birds flew into Vancouver on Sunday after one of their more successful swim
meets last Friday and Saturday.
The tBirds competed in the Canadian Intercollegiate Athletic Union Championships in
swimming and diving at McMaster University in
Hamilton, Ontario.
Coach Jack Pomfret said all team members
swam extremely well, and the results bear him
out, for the boys brought back six individual vie-
Hoop team meets
its Waterloo but
wins consolation
By BOB BANNO
UBC 81, Waterloo-Lutheran 82 (Friday)
UBC 74, Carleton 71 (Saturday)
It was an ignominous finale to a so-so season
for the UBC basketball Thunderbirds.
Coach Peter Mullins would rather call it a
nightmare, or a horror show.
With 53 seconds remaining Friday, the
tournament favorite Birds held a relatively
secure six point bulge over Waterloo-Lutheran
Golden Hawks.
Then before the unbelieving Mullins, the
UBC quintet fell apart, wilting before the eastern club's press and losing possession repeatedly on a succession of bad passes and steals.
Paced by Pete Misikowitz, Waterloo-Lutheran finally grabbed a one point lead.
But that's not all.
Fouled while shooting with two seconds left,
UBC team captain Ian Dixon had two chances
at the line.
Twice the ball twirled round the hoop before
falling out.
Neil Murray performed valiantly in the losing cause, leading UBC scorers with 23 points.
Center Frank Rotering added 13 for the Birds.
Misikowitz tallied 25 points for the victors.
The Birds managed to win the consolation
round with a 74-71 triumph over underdog
Carleton Ravens Saturday.
Forward Murray and guard Phil Langley
scored 15 points each for the Birds. Guard Bob
Molinski added 13 for UBC.
High man for the game was Carleton's Dennis
Schuthe with 19 points.
The tourney was a disappointment for Dixon,
last year's Most Valuable Player. The UBC ace
hasn't been effective since he pulled knee ligaments three months ago.
tories as well as eleven new UBC and championship records.
UBC's second place overall paced the Western Canadian Intercollegiate Athletic Association
team to a second place finish in the conference
standings. The west was beaten by the Ontario-
Quebec conference by a mere six points, 605-599.
The spark plug of the team was the oldest
member, diving coach Tom Dinsley who showed
the rest of Canada how by winning both diving
events.
He won the one meter by sixteen points
over runner-up Claude Casaubon from Montreal,
and the three meter event by fourteen points
over runner-up Tony Shidlo from Saskatchewan.
Another good performance was turned in by
one of the younger members of the team, as
frosh Phil  Dockerill won two events.
He picked up a Canadian intercollegiate record in his 200 yd. breaststroke victory, which
he won easily. The next day he added the other
win in the 100 yd. event, where he finished a
mere one second off the old record.
The other dual winner for the Birds was
veteran Jim Maddin, who notched victories with
two hard fought battles in the 200 and 400 yd.
individual relays.
Veteran Phil Winch, who had a very successful season, was just edged out at the wall to
place second in both the 500 yd. freestyle,
where he was beaten by Mark Morrow from
Saskatchewan, and in the 100 yd. breaststroke,
where team-mate Dockerill inched him out.
Winch also contributed points to the cause by
his fine third place finish in the individual 200
yd. medley relay, where teammate Maddin won
a narrow victory over Mike Lackowitz from the
University of Guelph.
Frank Dorchester had one of the best meets
of his university swimming career when he
finished sixth in the 50 yd. freestyle event and
seventh in the 100 yd. butterfly.
Frank's brother Ted, a frosh member of the
team, also swam well as he placed fifth in the
100 yd. backstroke and eighth in the 400 yd. IM.
Another frosh Terry Lyons, entering championship intercollegiate swimming for the first
time, did himself proud by placing twelfth in
the 100 yd. free event and eighth in the 50 yd.
event.
As a team the Birds also did well. Their
4001 yd. backstroke medley relay team came
second, giving the University of Toronto team a
real run for their money, eventually finishing
three seconds behind. The team members all
improved personal best times.
The time, as it was, was a UBC record anyway and Maddin, the lead swimmer, also got a
UBC record in the process, by swimming the
first one hundred yards in 58.5 seconds.
Soccer Thunderbirds
need two cup support
The UBC soccer Thunderbirds are on their way to two cups.
The Birds ran over the hapless South Hill Luckies 9j0 in
weekend Province Cup action in Thunderbird Stadium. They
led 2-0 at half time but came alive in the second half with
seven goals.
Coach Joe Johnson juggled his Unes at the half sending
defenceman Jim Berry to forward. Berry came through with
two goals as he sparked the offence.
His performance has set Johnson to thinking that Berry
may start at forward in next weekend's important game against
Columbus.
Scoring for the Birds were Gary Thompson (3), Ken Elmer
(2), Berry (2) Keith Brookes (1) and Dave Kotula (1).
With their victory over South Hill, the Birds are one step
closer to winning the single-knockout tournament which attracts
most of the big clubs in the Province. Johnson thinks his team
has as much chance of winning the cup as they have of winning
the PCSL.
Because the Birds were idle in Pacific Coast League action,
the Victoria Oaks were able to move into a tie with the Birds
for first place with their win over North Shore.
The Birds are the proud possessors of the best goals average in the league and this could be a big factor if they end up
tied with  another team.
The Braves also advanced in their quest for the Seggie Cup
as they defeated Columbus Juniors 2-1 Sunday in Thunderbird
Stadium.
SALE
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Tel. 681-8621
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all 4000 well-equipped Youth Hostels are ready
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