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The Ubyssey Sep 19, 1986

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Array d
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXIX, No. 4
Vancouver, B.C. Friday, September 19,1986
Excellence fund not for arts
"•j^»
2301
By EVELYN JACOB
Since the fund for excellence in
education was introduced last
February, the provincial government has contributed a total of $7.7
million to specialized university
programs designed to either directly
or indirectly boost B.C.'s sagging
economy.
Funds will go to UBC's biotech
laboratory program, the commerce
department's international business
program, the law faculty's North
Asian legal program, the computer
department, and forestry and
teaching hospitals.
There is no money for the arts.
In an interview  in  July,  UBC
president David Strangway said he
was pleased with the $4.6 million
allotted to UBC this year for
specialized programs but was disappointed that the arts did not receive
only additional funding.
According to arts dean Robert
Will, proposals for three arts programs were presented to the provincial government for consideration
this summer but all were rejected.
The programs included an arts
administration program — a variation of the MBA designed to train
people for arts management positions, an extension of UBC's film
studies in the department of
theatre, and an extension of the
Pacific Rim studies program.
The frustrating thing about the
government's rejection of these
programs, said Will, is that the arts
faculty has no idea why they did not
succeed.
"And so we don't know what to
do when we re-submit these program for next year," said Will.
Strangway screened the programs
which were presented to the provincial government, and Will said he
believed the president strongly
backed the Pacific Rim and film extension programs.
But post-secondary education
minister Russ Fraser said in a
telephone interview that the
ministry asked the universities to
priorize their requests to the excellence fund.
"We suggested areas of funding
.t*v
■ *.1^'K
' >
— steve chan photo
PANICKED FRENCH EXCHANGE student is caught in an Applied Science project gone awry as superpowerful
electromagnets catch his fly and freeze him to the structure. He is now attempting to find the phrase "Help! I am
stuck here!" in his French-English phrase book.
New B-lot creates chaotic lams
The new parking system at B-lot
continues to be the subject of complaint at UBC.
Martin Cocking, AMS director
of administration, has had an increasing number of complaints
about the new gate system since its
implementation this summer. Most
complaints are about long line-ups
during morning rush hour.
Cars must pull right up to the
gate to see the "lot full" sign. If the
lot is full, the driver must then back
up and all the cars behind it as well,
creating a chaotic traffic jam on
campus.
Cocking said a solution to the
problem would be to re-assign the
decal system to some lots to avoid
line-ups, and to keep the gate
system in remaining lots for
students who use B-lot only a few
days a week to pay 25 cents day
rate.
UBC vice-president of finance
Bruce Gellalty said Cocking's proposal would not be any more effective than the present system.
"There would again be the problem of record keeping and
monitoring as under the decal
system, said Gellalty.
But, Cocking said under the present system, drivers can avoid paying 25c every time they exit the lot
by driving out bumper to bumper.
"The arm stays up until the last car
is clear," said Cocking.
The new way to cheat has already
been officially dubbed the "centipede effect."
The gate system was introduced
to the campuses' seven B-lots this
summer to reduce the cost of
employing security officers to
patrol the lot under the old decal
system. Students must pay 25c
every time they exit the lot.
but clearly they did their own work.
We didn't say you could only do
this ... we said they could apply for
anything they wanted," said Fraser.
Fraser added the ministry does not
put the arts on a lower priority:
"We do a lot of funding for the
arts. I think they're very
important."
Simon  Fraser  University's  film
department will receive $240,000
over the next three years from the
excellence fund.
Grant Strate, director for the centre for the arts at SFU, said it is the
first time the film department has
received a large amount of money
from the provincial government
which will go specifically into
feature film research.
Strate said UBC may have not
received any money for its film
department because it is a duplication of funding.
"The government was not going
to fund three universities for the
same purpose," said Strate, adding
SFU's grant will be used to the advantage of other film departments
in B.C.'s colleges and universities.
Will however, said he is still in
the dark as to why the programs
submitted were rejected.
"We were led to believe there was
a shortage of artists in the film
department," he said.
Will said UBC's film department
is smaller than it should be because
of the growing demand for trained
people in the field. At present, the
department accepts only 12 students
per year.
The arts faculty will launch a
capital drive for private support in
the near future. An official starting
date is uncertain. But according to
Will, "small gifts to the arts is like
icing on a cake."
Although Will is unhappy the
arts did not receive additional funding from the excellence fund, he
doesn't think the arts department
was treated unfairly.
"It would have been nice if we
got some money — the only way we
can get any money these days is
from the excellence fund. "We tried
but we didn't win, and so we'll try
harder next time," he said.
Will said the arts faculty will
reassess the programs which were
rejected this summer and will resubmit them to the government for
consideration next year.
Roll'em
The film industry is booming
in B.C.
In 1980, $140 million was
spent on film production in
Canada. In 1985, $140 million
was spent in film in B.C. alone.
There were nine feature films, 11
television dramas, three
documentaries and five television series shot in B.C. last year.
UBC film department head
Joan Reynertson who has been
an instructor since the program
began 12 years ago, said if the
government wants more professional artists to contribute to the
expanding area of film in B.C.,
her department must be given
more funding to create more
film courses and to replace
equipment.
"The department is running a
bare-bones operation at the moment," said Reynertson.
Reynertson said she does not
understand why the arts did not
receive anything from the excellence fund. She said UBC has
a strong arts program, and film
in particular pumps money into
the economy which has a spinoff effect in different areas of industry.
In 1985, $70 million from film
production was injected into the
B.C. economy, creating approximately 6,000 jobs. Reynertson
said Strangway visited the film
department personally and was
sympathetic to the problems facing the program.
"The choice of who to give
money to was from outside the
university," said Reynertson.
She   said   the   department   is
considering private funding but
it   would   take   years   to   raise
enough   money  for  those  who
yneed training now.
Glitch delays loans
By DARRYL JACKSON
Students who applied late for
their student loans may be facing an
unexpected wait this year.
"Students who applied after the
July 1 deadline are on their own —
except in cases of a disaster," said
Dan Worsley, the assistant to the
director of financial services.
Worsley said hundreds of loan applications filed between July 15 and
August 1 were misfiled in a
keypunch backlog at the ministry of
education office. Student loan applications were assigned a lower
priority than other office keypunching, the result being unexpected
delays for hundreds of students
who applied late for their loans,
said Worsley.
In previous years, keypunching
for student loans was done in the
ministry of post-secondary education's office in Victoria but since
the recent provincial cabinet shuffle
the ministry of education has taken
on the responsibility for keypunching student loans.
"We have negotiated with the
ministry of education to have the
problem taken care of," Worsley
said Wednesday.
He said students must wait four
to six weeks from the date of their
assessment notice to receive their
loans. He added many students who
applied before the deadline have
not received their loans but have
been issued fee deferrals or
emergency loans until they receive
their loans in the mail.
For students that applied late for
their loans, emergency loans are
available from the financial awards
office, only after the six week
period from the date of their
assessment. A late payment fee of
$40 will apply.
According to financial awards
director Byron Hender, the provincial government has increased the
basic educational costs section of
the student loan application which
means student loans may increase
by up to a hundred dollars this
years.
Hender said the average student
loan may have actually decreased
this year. "Students may have had a
better summer than in the past. Earnings may be up, and so need may
have gone down . . . but it is really
too early to tell," he said. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, September 19,1986
Ontario retrained
TORONTO (CUP) — The Ontario government's new $100
million job training program is a
free ride for business, a heavy
burden on taxpayers and a hit-and-
miss way to deal with the province's
training problems, charges New
Democratic skills development
critic David Warner.
"We were pleased to see that the
government is recognizing the importance of retraining in Ontario,"
said Warner. "But the public and
the community colleges are still
footing most of the bill to give
businesses highly skilled workers."
The new program — called Ontario's Training Strategy — includes $15 million for a Training
Consulting Service for small and
medium-sized businesses; $34
million for direct costs of instruction for-training and upgrading; $4
million for an updating program for
skilled trades people; $32 million to
provide access to the program
through subsidies for daycare,
transportation and literacy training;
and a new $6 million Institute for
Skills Training.
Businesses can voluntarily participate in the program and must
pay 20 per cent of the cost of
upgrading and retraining their staff.
, The Ontario government will pick
up remaining costs.
Skills Development minister Greg
Sorbara said in a statement the program will "help train a million Ontario workers in the next five years,
making the companies where they
work more successful and competitive. The success and produc
tivity of thousands of businesses
will be affected."
Warner feels these businesses
should shoulder more of the cost of
that success.
"Unless we come to an apprenticeship agreement whereby
business, labour and government
share evenly the cost of apprenticeship, Ontario will continue to
import skilled workers from
overseas," Warner said.
"In the next five years, metro
Toronto will require an additional
600 carpenters. They will not find
them in Ontario because employers
are not training them. Instead they
will have to advertise overseas,"
Warner said.
"This is a crime in a province
where there are over one million
unemployed."
UBC
WATERP0LI
A GREAT WAY
TO GET
INTO SHAPE
Anybody who can
swim is invited.
Practice times:
WED: 10-11 p.m.
SAT: 5-6:30 p.m.
SUN: 5-6:30 p.m.
UBC Aquatic Centre
INFO: 222-1562
BachtO'School
SPECIALS FROM
SMEAFFER
20%OFFPENS
(over $10)
SHEAFFER
COMBINATION
BALLPOINT/.5 mm PENCIL
UBC BOOKSTORE
RETURN POLICY
Course Books
Sessional course books may be
returned (accompanied by original receipt) for full refund any time up to
the session deadline
Fall Session       Sept 30, 1986
After the respective deadline all course-
books will be NON-RETURXABLE.
Books must be unmarked and in
saleah!e-as-ne\v condition.
Non-Course Books,
Merchandise & Supplies
Returns will normally be accepted up
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when accompanied by SALES
RECEIPT.
BRUSHED STEEL
REG. $22.95
BACK-TO-SCHOOL
SPECIALS
$j7.95
BACK-TO-SCHOOL
SPECIALS
BLACK MATTE
REG. $24.95
$5.00 DRESS PREVIEWS $5.00
Who says theatre w unaffordable?
PARACELSUS
by George Ryga
""■""■fir,,
£
.•_• ••_
Sept. 25
punmousE
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nfn
nd Nor**".-
ncan pr<"niere*       illlXlXlZ::'.      be,
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'"""'VA
873-3311
Get your ticket* at the door on DRESS PREVIEW night. Tickets on «i/r al
The Vancouver Plavhoitse Theatre. Hamilton at Dunxmuir.
$1995
Sale ends September 30, 1986
NO RETURNS on sale items, special orders, electronic and computer
goods; all sales final.
REMEMBER to keep your receipt.
NO RECEIPT - NO REFUND
NO EXCEPTIONS
y> ,-,1-v't
"f»MWfal«mBIUMNHl»IKUHUlHllW»ll*lll
HMnnHwyniemEwm
SHARON POLLOCK
LEADING CANADIAN PLAYWRIGHT
Author of BLOOD RELATIONS
(FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE, SEPT. 17-27)
LECTURE: CANADIAN THEATRE:
DELUSIONS, ILLUSIONS & REALITY
DATE: Tuesday Sept. 23
TIME: 12:30 p.m.
PLACE: Frederic Wood Theatre
READING FROM HER WORKS:
DATE: Wednesday, Sept. 24
TIME: 12:30 p.m.
PLACE: Buchanan A104
Sponsored by: Departments of Theatre and English
We gratefully acknowledge
Leon and Thea Koerner Foundation
Canada Council
- ADMISSION FREE -
BACK-TO-SCHOOL SPECIALS
20% OFF CALCULATORS
CANON F-58
47 SCENTIFIC &
STATISTICAL FUNCTIONS
PACKED INTO EASYTO-USE
CALCULATOR
-A'
The new F-58 is Canon's latest 8-digit, single
memory scientific and statistical calculator.
Not only does it possess an unusually high
number of powerful functions, but it is also
priced to meet the budget ofthe most
economy-minded user.
Reg. $25.95
Back-to-School
SPECIAL
With your 20% discount
' it's yours for only
Atiiniin
$2Q76
Sale Ends September 30, 1986.
BOOKSTORE
g^W^i^--?
228-4741
■■) -Vs-.'V . Friday, September 19,1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page3
UBC athletics money missing
By SVETOZAR KONTIC
Seven hundred and fifty thousand dollars, allocated to UBC
athletics through the $32 student
athletic fee levy imposed in
September 1985 has disappeared,
said the AMS director of administration.
"Nobody seems to know where
the money went. I have been
through torturous meetings with the
University Athletics Council and
received no answers. It's really
frustrating," said Martin Cocking.
But Bob Hindmarch, UBC director of Athletics and Sport Services,
did not agree that money within the
athletic department is unaccountable." That is totally wrong. Every
dollar that comes from the fee is accounted for. Every dollar that is
spent   in   our   department   goes
through an internal audit. There is
no way we could spend money
without someone knowing," said
Hindmarch.
"Those kinds of statements are
ignorant," he said.
In March 1985, the Board of
Governors voted unilaterally in
favour of instituting the fee despite
a 1968 agreement with the student
society that  "the student athletic
K«"
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' ifru
fee will neither be increased nor
decreased without a referendum."
The fee was imposed as a result
of a 1984 Board of Governors decision to cut 10 per cent from the
athletic department's budget.
Instead of sueing the Board of
Governors, the AMS created a
University Athletic Council to control the athletic budget. The 14
member council currently has three
AMS members on it including
Cocking and is chaired by Neil
Risebrough, associate vice-
president of student services.
"Students have a right to know
where that $32 goes. The UAC
needs to create procedures to
tighten up the way things are
operated," said Cocking.
Risebrough was not available for
comment.
But Hindmarch said the athletics
program at UBC could not have
continued without the fee. "We
would have been out of business.
There would be no athletic program
of any sort," he said.
Hindmarch said the fee has
allowed gymnasiums to be kept
open and supervised.
"What people never seem to
realize is that we have to pay people
to maintain the gym and the fields
as well," he said.
But Cocking said the athletic
budget — which now totals $1.4
million — does not include
maintenance. "Because the fee is
separate it will all go to athletics. It
can't be shifted over to some other
area," he said.
Cocking said the athletics department does not have an accountant
or finance manager and they need a
proper controller. "One of the big
problems is that the athletic council
does not meet that often. It only
started meeting this summer and by
that time it was impossible to tell
where a lot of the money had gone.
I've just given up trying to track the
money down," he said.
Hindmarch however, said the
UAC has been effective.
"They have made sure of proper
accountability and that the money
is fairly distributed. It will take a
while to work out all the bugs. The
system still has some growing
pains," he said.
'*x.
McGill reneges on
divestment policy
'*'<$&
>*
Steve wou photo
MAN, LEGEND, LEGACY speaks to throngs of admirers, well wishers over the phone. I am God, your only God,
to worship any other is sacrilege. Godly one was heard later making moooool! sounds about campus trying to
teach apostles language of the lords.
MONTREAL (CUP) —
Although McGill University voted
to divest from South African companies almost a year ago, the
university recently acquired stock in
companies with South African interests.
Today McGill's apartheid-linked
investments have only decreased by
about 20 per cent. The university
has also bought new stock in companies such as IBM, Seagram's and
Noranda.
Guy Thompson, coordinator of
the McGill South Africa committee,
said   the   complications   arose
Liberal task force on education to visit B.C.
By JENNIFER LYALL
The federal Liberal party has
organized a task force which will
address the deteriorating quality of
post-secondary education in
Canada.
Testimonials solicited from college and university presidents,
faculty association heads and student union presidents will be used
to investigate the problems of
government funding to post-
secondary education: student fees,
financial aid, centres of excellence,
research financing and work pro
jects.
"The idea is to listen to what people have to say about education so it
can help us form national Liberal
policy," said B.C. Liberal leader
Art Lee.
The task force will travel to campuses across the nation and will be
held in B.C. in early October.
Lee said educational institutes in
B.C. are underfunded largely
because the provincial government
does not allocate federal funds earmarked for education.
"I have been told that last year,
the B.C. government made $20
million from the federal government in money not spent on education," said Lee. He added the
Liberal party has a strong commitment to post-secondary education:
"We would ensure whatever federal
funds were given to the province
would pass over to education."
John Dennison, UBC professor
of higher education, agreed with
Lee that government funding to
post-secondary education has contributed to the problems in educa-     dent Simon Seshadri.
tion.
"When the BNA Act was designed in 1867 (which made education a
provincial responsibility) they
didn't even conceive of universities.
We need a 1986 view of how education is funded," he said.
The AMS has been invited to address the task force.
"We're hoping to present a
students perspective on how
government funding hurt education
in B.C.," said student society presi-
Chiefs promise Manitoba new home for university
By SUSIE STRACHAN
WINNIPEG (CUP) — Manitoba
may become home for a new
university, to be located far north
of the southern three.
Chiefs of the 25 Indian bands in
the Manitoba Keewatinowi
Okimakinak (MKO) reaffirmed last
month a commitment to build a
university in northern Manitoba. A
committee of four has been struck
to assess prospects for such an institution.
"MKO has wanted a university
for a long time," said MKO chair
Rodney Spence, chief of Nelson
House. He said the university might
be built in Thomson, 800 kilometres
north of Winnipeg, where the
universities of Winnipeg and
Manitoba are situated. The third
university in the province is Bran-
Student council pres. resigns
VICTORIA (CUP) — The student council president of the
University of Victoria has been
forced to resign because she is not
eligible to register for classes.
Monica Maier, elected to the one-
year position last March, is "con-
stutionally obliged to resign," according to student council general
manager David Clode. he said
Maier will submit a letter of resignation effective the end of September.
Maier, whose academic probation was waived to allow her to run
for the position, learned in May she
would not be able to register. The
council decided to support Maier
until September should a development arise, although some councillors say she should have resigned
last spring.
A by-election has been scheduled
for later this month.
don, southwest of Winnipeg.
Chief Pascal Bihetty of the
Nathias Colomb band in
Pukatawagan said negotiations for
the northern university began in July. He said a proposed feasibility
study would determine how the
university would best benefit the
northern community.
"We're talking about (either) a
native-controlled university or a
university open to everyone in the
north," he said. "We will be working on the most popular proposal."
Bighetty said a university in the
north is very important to native
people. "Only some of our people
can make it in the southern universities because of the high cost of living, the difference in the way of living, and being separated, often for
the first time, from our families."
Most people in northern
Manitoba seem to be supportive of
the idea, but a few are urging caution.
Bernie Simand, director of Inter-
Universities North (IUN), said he is
"initially skeptical" ofthe plan. He
warns a northern university could
miss out on costs presently absorbed by IUN, which administers a collection of courses taught in the
three southern Manitoba universities.
"Right now, IUN is having small
things, like administration, registration and orientation costs, funded
by the southern universities," he
said. "A northern university probably won't be able to pick up on
those freebies."
Simand added it could be difficult to attract students to a northern university "A university has
to have a good reputation,
established by the quality of their
teachers and graduates before it will
attract people."
However, said Simand, "if this is
a motherhood issue for the people
of the north, accreditation will
come about."
because the university's investment
committee was not given a
definitive list of corporations from
which to divest until April.
Stocks which should be affected
by divestment motions passed by
the university's Board of Governors
last November were purchased during the period between then and
April, Thompson said.
"The university is working on the
premise that all companies are innocent until proven guilty, so that a
company will not be checked until
after the stock is purchased,"
Thompson said.
McGill has acquired 1200 new
shares in Seagram's, which runs a
separate South African sales and
distribution network, 4500 more
shares of IBM, which manufactures
computer and office products in
South Africa, and 30,000 shares in
Noranda, which has extensive mining, smelter and pulp operations in
South Africa.
Abbott Conway, vice-chair ofthe
Committee to Advise on Matters of
Social Responsibility, said divestment must be based on research.
"Divestment could not be an irresponsible thing," he said.
Instead of relying on outside
sources, Conway's committee wrote
to each company asking for a list of
their holdings, and approved or rejected them based on these findings.
Thompson said the university is
secretive of its business dealings.
The university uses a blacklist to
prevent investment managers from
buying banned stock. However,
Thompson said this does not stop
accumulation of stock by donation
or ignorance of a company's
background.
"They won't release the blacklist
to the public," said Thompson.
"They won't say if a stock is sold
because of divestment, and they
aren't publicising statistics on
divestment."
The social responsibility committee will advise the investment committee to sell stock in unacceptable
companies, although Board of
Governors policy allows investment
managers to not sell until it is
"financially prudent."
Thompson said this allows
McGill to retain unacceptable
stocks until they are no longer profitable.
"Because the greatest concern for
the Board of Governors is the
university's financial security,
they'll never act faster," he said. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, September 19, 1986
Drugs
Monkey see, Mulroney do.
It seems our beloved prime minister has been reading
too much Time magazine and has once again confused
our loud neighbors to the south with the good ole U.S.
of Eh. This time we have an "epidemic" of drugs.
Over the weekend Ronald and Nancy Regan made an
impassioned speech against the evils of illegal drugs.
They rallied about their "crusade" calling on all
Americans to fight in the "war" and expectedly labelled
drugs as "unAmerican". It seems as though one good
American has been stirred by the battle cry; and that
man is Brian Mulroney. The very next day Mulroney
was calling for drug testing in order to combat the
Canadian "epidemic".
The drug speeches may have been entirely coincidental but many see Mulroney's marionette strings shortened beyond reason. We, however, know better.
There are other explanations of the wonders of
Mulroney's speech. The most credible being that when
one plays any videotape of Ron and Nancy backwards
one hears commands to ingest powerful mind altering
chemicals.
America is suffering a drug crisis. Drugs are on the
front page of every magazine, Dan Rather puts on his
checkered red shirt and hidden microphone and takes a
walk down "Crack Street", families are ruined, and
young people die. This is a tragedy. But it is an
American tragedy.
Canada too suffers from illegal drugs and all the illegal
activities associated with them. But there is no
epidemic. And if there was one, the prime minister
would be mounting a phoney war. The holes in Canadian security are growing according to the head of the
Customs Excise Union.
The drug problem isn't as desperate here as in the
United States but already we know we suffer from a
reactionary leader. 	
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Red wine, Black blood
THE UBYSSEY
September 19, 1986
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Friday
throughout the academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and are not necessarily those
of the administration or the AMS. Member Canadian
University Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is SUB
241k. Editorial department, 228-2301/2305. Advertising
228-3977/3978.
In the beginning all was chaos. This wasn't very conducive to international relations, so Man created
God in his own image. He didn't do a very good job. God's first words were "Let there be blight." And
it was so. "No, no, no!" cried Svetozar Kontic, "that's all wrong! With that he immolated himself
before the shocked and speechless Morgan Burke. "Sorry," said God, trying again. "Let there be
spitel" "Who is this guy?" asked David Ferman to no one in particular, though Stephen Wisenthal was
listening and replied, "Give the guy a break. It's his first day on the job." "Yeah," said God. "Gimme a
chance ... Let there be night!" And it was so. "Make it long," called Jennifer Lyall from the next
room, where she was painting cats blue, with Evelyn Jacob, who held them still. "Yeah," piped in Darryl Jackson, "it's a press night." "Let there be fright!" screamed God, and Peter Berlin ran over the
horizon, howling something about shaving wild dogs, or making love to igneous rock formations.
"Keep trying," consoled Peter McDougall, "You'll get it." "I know," said God, puffing up his divine
chest. "Let there be light!" And so The Ubyssey was born. "Yay!" cheered Michael Groberman and
Malcolm Pearson from the Peanut Gallery. By then, of course, it didn't matter, because things were so
badly screwed up anyway. God, having outlived His usefulness, retired, and, like all mediocre leaders,
published a biography, entitled, arrogantly enough, "The Book." It was a best seller, although Craig
Brooks admits he'll wait for the movie, along with Michelle X. Are you still with me? This is the writer
speaking. I can't believe you really read this stuff. I mean why do you think we put it in tiny print like
this? Certainly not for your convenience. This is not meant to entertain you, so if it does, go take a cold
shower, tf you were meant to read this, it would have a catchy headline, like "Woman married to alien
gives birth to twin maggots." Actually this is a forum for the exchange of international espionage inf or-
mation, carnal knowledge, and other things they don't teach you in English 100. Just ask Norm Rav-
vrn. He'll be the first one to tell you how and why. That is, if Rick Hiebert or Pradeep Jethi don't get to
you first. Are you getting tired of this driweling banter? Want some hardcore news? Then read a different paper. Just the other day. Dean Nicholson was heard to say nothing, Nel Finberg was seen to be
invisible, and Shari bte Abdullah felt numb. Is this the end? wondered Chad James. Am I the last one?
Is it really the end?
While the prime minister was on
his three day excursion to the west
coast it came as a surprise that he
would take time out to criticize
those people and provinces opposed
to the sale of South African wines.
Judging by Mulroney's statements
to the U.N. about the abhorrent
policies of apartheid, one would
think he would be supportive of any
measure designed in the long term
to free South African blacks from
exploitation.
Certainly it would be difficult to
see the prime minister supporting
the policies of the provincial
government over the sale of South
African wines if the situation in
South Africa were reversed. Imagine if in South Africa, whites
were the majority slave labor being
tortured and killed by a minority of
ruling blacks. Somehow I think
Mulroney would be singing a different song for the pollsters and the
provincial government would not
value the freedom by buying South
African wines so valiantly.
While I do not condone breaking
bottles of South African wines,
perhaps a creative non-violent approach could be taken. An advertising campaign should be directed at
those who fail to understand the
consequence and symbolism of that
purchase. By buying South African
red wine you are drinking black
people's blood; unfortunately for
some, the truth may be too hard to
swallow.
John Pennant
arts 3
Do Expo for nothing down
Want to get into B.C.'s billion-
dollar party for free?
There are two ways that I can
immediately think of.
Become an Expo employee. At
least for one day. Employees get
passes admitting them to the site for
free. But you won't have to spend
your time working for $4 an hour.
Start on the first day of the month,
then quit on the second. Expo's
employee passes are God for an entire month and are not cancelled
when you quit. So you could have
30 days of freedom (less in
October), and still make it to school
or the beach some off-days. No
wonder so many student employees
quit just after Labour day.
Find someone who is going to
tonight's football game and has a
season pass to Expo (like me). B.C.
Lions tickets are good after 4 p.m.
on the day of the game. You walk in
on your friend's Lions tickets (slipping them $5 for being such a nice
person) and they walk in on their
seasons pass at 4 p.m. You hand the
Lions tickets back to your friend.
After spending a couple of hours at
Expo, you and your friend say
good-bye, and while they are off
watching B.C. cream Edmonton
you will have four Expo hours for
free!
After the game your friend can
re-enter the site on their season's
pass (before 10 p.m.) and then you
can watch the fireworks or hit the
pubs for another couple of hours.
And while we are on the subject
of Expo, ever wonder why attendance at Expo is so far above projections? Seasons pass holders. Just
for the hell of it, one day I was
walking from the Unicorn to the
Munich Festhaus, and walked past
West gate. Just for the fun of it, I
walked out and walked back in
again — in effect being counted
twice. Now if I can do that a few
more times . . .
Expo will probably find its
seasons pass holders are attending
more often than projected. This will
cause the attendance to be inflated,
depositing only a percentage of the
money spent on these trips to Expo
coffers. Many of my friends (I have
lots of them) who work downtown
and have passes regularly attend
Expo at lunch just to sit and listen
to the bands and catch a pavilion or
two. Not much money there.
As a frequent visitor to the Irish
pavilion I would like to put my vote
in to retain this fine establishment.
So in Vancouver, no one will ever
sing the phrase, "and so that's why
you have never seen a Unicorn to
this very day ..."
Have a good school year, and
remember to keep buying those
Lotto 6/49 tickets — not so much
for your 1 in 13.9 million odds of
winning — let's pay off the deficit
like good British Columbians.
C. Brooks
Alumnus
p.s. Vent your frustration —
write to The Ubyssey today. Friday, September 19,1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
N. S. cops
refuse gays
By LOIS CORBETT
Reprinted   from   the   Dalhousie
Gazette
Canadian University Press
Almost two months have passed
since the attorney-general of Nova
Scotia assured police chiefs that he
would resist any federal legislation
that would force him to hire gays as
police officers. But the uproar caused by his homophobic statements
shows no sign of diminishing, while
the Conservative government in the
province pretends it doesn't hear.
Ron Giffin, an eight-year veteran
of Nova Scotia's Tory government,
told a meeting of Atlantic Region
Chiefs of Police that gays create
"morale problems" in police forces
and that he is "upholding the fundamental moral values of our society" by insisting that they not be
hired as police in the province.
"I would be completely opposed
to any legislation or other enactment to compel the admission of
homosexuals to any municipal
police force in the province," Giffin told the July 9 meeting. Later at
home for a meeting in his riding of
Truro-Bible Hill, he speculated
aloud to his audience: "I honestly
wonder if we aren't being carried
away with individual rights."
Giffin threatened to use the opt-
out clause of the Charter of Rights
and Freedoms, if he had to, to ensure no gay cops would be hired in
Nova Scotia. "If the courts were to
rule under the Charter of Rights
that we are compelled to do this, I
would be prepared to go to the next
step, which would be to introduce
legislation to prevent that and, if
necessary, to exempt that legislation
from the operation of the Charter
of Rights," under Section 33 of the
Charter, he said.
Those statements, and others
Giffin made for weeks following
the initial speech to defend his
stance, caused a flurry of protests
and generated calls for the attorney-
general's resignation.
Giffin said the reaction to his
speech 'was predictable, something
that he expected. "I've been in
politics eight years now, and I'm
not surprised when people react the
way they do," he said.
"All I can tell you is that the
police have expressed concern in no
uncertain manner and, quite frankly, no one appears to have paid the
slightest attention to them. They are
talking with experience, about a
policy that's been in the police force
for generations. They're not opposing gays, but asking for an exemption, because they are a special
case," he said.
Giffin said he was just trying to
be realistic. "I have no problem in
the world with the situation they
have in San Francisco, where they
have gay policemen. But I'm telling
you that in Truro, Nova Scotia, it
just wouldn't sit," he said.
Meanwhile, the Gay Alliance for
Equality (GAE) drafted a resolution calling for Giffin to quit
because he was obviously unwilling
to uphold the rights of Nova Sco-
tians, particularly those of gay men
and lesbians.
Robin Metcalfe, a Halifax gay activist and member of GAE, says the
organization also wants "the
government to disassociate itself
from Giffin's statements" and
refrain from using the opt-out
clause. GAE also wants the government to include a clause in the province's human rights code which
disallows   discrimination   on   the
basis of sexual orientation, said
Metcalfe.
The government hasn't responded to any of GAE's demands yet.
Even a letter sent to Nova Scotia
premier John Buchanan in late July
from 25 representatives of a wide
variety of community groups was
left unanswered.
The premier's silence on Giffin's
stand against the hiring of gay cops,
his aides claim, does not mean that
he agrees with his attorney-general,
but that it is "a non issue."
Caught outside a cabinet meeting
a week after Giffin threatened to
use the opt-out clause, Buchanan
told reporters that he didn't think
the province would opt-out
"because it has not yet been determined by a court whether it applies
or not ... I don't support (Giffin)
nor do I disagree with him, because
I think it's a non-issue."
The premier and his cabinet are
trying to forget Giffin ever spoke
out against gays on police forces
and, when Buchanan and others say
it's a non-issue it is because, says
Metcalfe, "they'd like to believe
that, so they can evade answering to
the degree of public outrage
Giffin's comments started. They
wish Giffin hadn't brought it out."
A constitutional law expert at
Dalhousie  University agrees with
meeting, we emphasized the fact
that we could not agree to having
homosexuals on our police forces,"
said Cole, "but whether that resolution prompted Mr. Griffin to raise
the whole subject, raise the flag, so
to speak, I don't know."
Cole said the police chiefs of
Nova Scotia were concerned about
the issue when a parliamentary
committee in Ottawa was collecting
information about allowing gay
men and lesbians to work for the
RCMP and the military late last
year. "When we were viewing the
situation, we knew that if it came to
pass that homosexuals were allowed
into the RCMP, then we were
afraid that it would filter down to
the municipal level. Our organization felt then that it was not appropriate to have homosexuals in
the profession we're in," he said.
"That's not saying we're
discriminating against gays. But we
do have to say it, and take that
stand, until homosexuals are accepted by society", said Cole.
Cole said the police are "the
moral reflection of the morals of
the community" and he thinks people in the province would find it
"very difficult if the towns and
cities opted to have homosexuals on
the police forces." He disputes a recent Gallup poll which found more
"And people's attitudes are
changing now, they've been changing over the past 15 years. There
have been signals sent out that there
is almost a social consensus that
sexual orientation cannot be used as
a basis of discrimination," he said.
The media attention to the issue
has generated also shows that society has gone through a transition
about the issue, said Metcalfe.
When Giffin first made his
statements, the press dogged his
every move, contacted other Conservative party members in the province, interviewed gay activists as
far away as Toronto and even
published editorials calling for Giffin's resignation.
"This is the first time I've seen
the media consistently supportive of
gay rights," said Metcalfe. "With
all the coverage and their confrontation of Giffin, you would almost
have to believe that there was never
a time when they hadn't been supportive."
"Homosexuality is a sin. It's a terrible, terrible sin.
It's not just a disease, its not just a bad habit,
it's a sin. " — Christian Political Alliance Official.
Metcalfe, but says that although the
calls from reporters to his home and
office have slowed down considerably, he hopes the issue will
not just die due to lack of media attention. For Professor Wayne
MacKay, this latest incident is just
another example of the Buchanan
government's dissatisfaction with
the Charter of Rights.
"Clearly this is a calculated move
to single out an unpopular and
small minority in the province, one
against which he thinks he can
make political gain. It's almost unthinkable in 1986 to make the same
sort of statement against Jews,
Blacks or women. He's reading the
people of Nova Scotia and thinking
the majority of them disagree with
giving gays full rights and protection," said MacKay.
MacKay said he doesn't like to
see the attorney-general threatening
to use the opt-out clause in what he
described as an "indiscriminate,
off-handed fashion. There may be
cases where its use is appropriate,
but those are only extreme ones. It
shouldn't be used as an afterthought in a speech to the chiefs of
police," said MacKay.
But the president of the Chiefs of
Police Association in Nova Scotia
said Giffin's speech was well
thought out and well-received at the
Truro meeting. Keith Cole, deputy
chief of police in Dartmouth, as
well as president of the association,
said his organization supports the
statements of the attorney-general,
and does not see why Giffin or the
police chiefs should change their
minds.
In fact, Cole said the issue was
raised in October, 1985 when the
chiefs of police passed a resolution
urging that gays not be allowed onto municipal police forces. "At that
than 71 per cent of the province's
citizens are against discrimination
on the basis of sexual orientation by
saying, "you can state all kinds of
statistics, and use Gallup polls like
that one. And they are valid argument, we dn't dispute that.
"But those people who advocate
having homosexuals on police
forces haven't sat down and assessed the problem that is there," he
said. "People in the community
who responded to those polls would
say they have no problem with gays
on the police force until it was their
young son or daughter who was involved in an incident and arrested
or searched by a gay cop."
Cole also said he was looking at
the issue from "the gay's side,
we're trying to protect them and tell
them they have to be accepted by
society first. Police have enough
problems as it is, with trying to
patrol areas and control situations,
and understand new legislation, but
throwing that one into the middle
of all these problems would be too
much."
Metcalfe said Cole is using self-
serving arguments, as much as he
would like to believe he's looking
out for gays. "A gay person who
applies for the job as police officer
would be much more aware of the
problems than Keith Cole. But you
have to say, 'So what?' People have
to make a choice on the issue and
say 'tough shit' — people are going
to have to get used to the idea of
having gays on police forces."
Public attitudes change because
institutions change, says Metcalfe,
and the institutions, like the police
forces, have to be leaders in the battle to protect gay rights, not
followers who wait for sometime in
the future when homosexuality is
accepted.
And while the news coverage has
slowed down, letters about Giffin's
statements continue to pour into
the offices of Halifax newspapers.
Anne Derrick, a Halifax lawyer and
an author of one of the letters, said
she hopes the issue will not die, at
least not until the attorney-general,
and perhaps the entire conservative
government, are defeated in the
next provincial election. Derrick
wants Giffin to "recant or resign."
"I think he's a homophobe and
he hasn't recanted. I don't think the
attorney-general should occupy that
position if he has those beliefs and
if he says them publicly," Derrick
said.
Derrick wants the government to
say it is committed to the Charter.
"Giffin has shown us the danger in
the Charter, by threatening to use
the opt-out clause. But I think it
would be politically obtuse to rely
on that clause."
Giffin has given the justice
system in Nova Scotia a poor image, says Derrick. "He deserves the
application of justice in Nova
Scotia. Sure, gay people are
discriminated against across the
country, but there are some steps
beging taken by other provincial
governments like Quebec, and the
federal government to do
something aobut that. They are at
least taking some steps towards
liberalizing attitudes towards gays.
But what does Nova Scotia do? It
has an attorney-general who says
gays are weirdos and he caters to
the people who believe that. That's
a horrifying position to adopt in
1986," says Derrick.
Wayne MacKay said he is always
trying to fight opinions in central
Canada that generalize about Nova
Scotia and he doesn't want this
issue to be something that people
outside the province think can happen "only in Nova Scotia."
"What I've been saying a lot lately is that it's not necessarily Nova
Scotians speaking, it's the government. A significant number of
Nova Scotians are incensed by what
Giffin said. But here we have a
government who is opposed to protecting the rights of its people,
especially minority groups. The
government here is upfront about
its opposition to the Charter. They
don't want it to protect people."
There are a number of cases
where the government, particularly
the cabinet, have made it quite clear
they are not happy with the Charter
of Rights. A number of ministers
are on record as saying they don't
agree with the Charter, said
MacKay, and that they, not the
federal government, know best
about protecting people's rights.
"That's been Ron Giffin's line,
that's been (social services minister)
Edmund Morris' line. They didn't
want a charter of rights included in
the constitution and they are particularly unhappy with the broad
equality of rights the Charter
guarantees Canadians," said
MacKay.
Some other people are unhappy
with the Charter of Rights too, including a small right wing fundamentalist group which has written to Giffin and the daily
newspapers congratulating him on
his stance. Bob Ritchie, author of
the letter and vice president of the
Christian Political Alliance of Nova
Scotia, said "the Lord" told him
and a few others to start a political
party to re-establish Christian principles in the province.
"We wish to establish a just rule
in this province," said Ritchie,
"and if we govern this province,
God will bless Nova Scotia." Ritchie said the newspapers edited out
biblical quotes he used in his letter
"to show that homosexuality is a
sin. It's a sin, a terrible, terrible sin.
It's not just a disease, it's not just a
bad hibit, it's a sin," he said.
While CPA members are not
overly numerous in Halifax, Ritchie
says he has attended several
meetings since the party first formed in April. He says the response it
is receiving in the rural areas is better than he expected.
The CPA members are the people, and perhaps some not quite so
extreme, to whom Cole and Giffin
are catering to when they say are
answering to the "morals of our
society." They are the ones that
convince Giffin and Cole that the
stereotypical vision of gay men and
lesbians they hold are valid.
"There are a lot of ramifications
of hiring homosexuals as police officers," says Cole. "If a police officer does a search, and does it properly, then there shouldn't be much
of an outcry. But if he is gay, you'll
get some people who wouldn't like
it. A lot of people are turned off by
homosexuality. And that's when
having gay cops becomes a problem," he said. Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, Septi
fringe fringe fringe fringe fringe fringe fringe fringe fringe fringe fringe fringe fringe
Fringe Brecht shrill and slapstick
By NORM RAVVIN
Bertolt Brecht's theatre has the
curious ability to seem as appropriate in an anthology called
"Masterpieces of the Drama" as it
does on a hastily arranged stage at
the Anza Club, as part of Van
couver's Fringe Festival. Brecht is
compelling as a figure who has been
so quickly accepted a 'one of the
greats,' even though his politics
were unabashedly antagonistic
towards everything that conventional society (its art included) has
to offer.
'The Beggar or the Dead Dog'
and 'Lux in Tenebris,' performed
by Vancouver's TheatreSpace, are
as shrill and polemical as anything
Brecht wrote. But there is an element of slapstick in both plays that
lightens their mood and makes
Brecht's   spokesmen    for   the
underclass   likeable   —   they   are
schlemiels with a conscience.
In 'The Beggar or the Dead Dog'
a political event is turned into a
debate between a grinning
technocrat and a bum with a penny
whistle. They each tell their own
version of history that makes a liar
Persephone and Hodes haunt audience
By PRADEEP JETHI
Persephone and Hades excels as
an eerie and haunting piece of performance art. As an audience-
interactive play it seeks to redefine
and recreate the myth of
Persephone, at the same time questioning the nature of theatre and the
audience's perception of it.
Persephone and Hades
By S.D. Leydenberg and Marilyn
Arsem
Main Dance Place
2214 Main Street
ended last night
Throughout the play,
Persephone does not speak. Her actions are guided by a set of signs out
of which a member of the audience
chooses which to set before her.
The signs represent objects on the
stage, or simple verbs. As each sign
is placed, Persephone performs the
indicated action to the appropriate
object. Hades sits immobile with his
back to the audience, staring into a
mirror, randomly reciting a set of
14 speeches.
The play examines themes of
dominance and control: the audience's interactivity controls and
influences the direction that the
production takes. However, the actors' dramatization also controls
and influences the audience's in-
tepretation of the interplay between
Persephone's movements and
Hades' speeches. Hades realizes this
power over the audience when he
claims, both theatrically and meta-
theatrically, that he has "all the
people at my beck and call."
The performance sets up
reciprocal and fluid dynamics between audience and actors: both
have active roles and both have
passive roles; both are the
creators/interpreters, and both are
the created/interpreted. Yet the
black-mesh curtain separating the
audience from actors acts as a constant reminder that though we can
affect the world of art, we are
separate from it.
The tone and tension of
Persephone and Hades is built on
the relationship between the sound
of Hades and the motion of
Persephone: silence and stagnation
Africa play leaves depths untested
By MICHAEL GROBERMAN
Deeper into Africa is a rather
shallow attack on white supremists,
capitalists and sexist males.
Set in Africa after World War I,
K.C. Brown's new play puts a
group of six stereotypical
charachters on a journey deep into
Africa, where they will found a
new, perfect society. The characters
are: the mad leader, a conceited
aristocratic British woman, her
cousin/servant, an East Indian
ivory merchant, and the female anthropologist.
Deeper into Africa
by K.C. Brown
Directed by Pauline Landberg
Cambrian Hall
215 East 17th Avenue
September 19, 20: 4:15 p.m.;
September 21:.9 p.m.
One night the cousin/servant is
killed, and a whodunnit investigation ensues in which everyone accuses everyone else, always for a
very wrong, bigotted, narrow
reason.
The best things about this play, in
rank order, are Bruce Harwood and
Kairin Bright's set.
Bruce Harwood is the demented
white supremist, Dr. Bilbao, who
leads the group. He is deeply moved
when a group member suggests they
name their new state after him. He
is   disgusted   to   learn   that   Peter
Pilkington-Price is a member of the
Young Socialist Party. Harwood's
enchanting presence gives the production all of its character.
Long rags and pieces of rope
mesh hang from seven feet above
the stage, attached to a revolve-able
metal circle.  As the actors move
See page 9: ACTORS
Dylan comes to full life
By PRADEEP JETHI
"We are born for tragedy" says
Ray Jones, as Dylan Thomas, in
Dylan — Portrait of a Poet. The
play reveals the self-destruction of
one of the poetic geniuses of the
first half of the twentieth century.
Cyril Royston's script is a
dramatic monologue in which Ray
Jones acts the part of the poet.
Though biographical in nature,
Dylan is not just a series of dates
and events; it captures the spirit and
essence of Dylan Thomas — his
desires, his drives, his loves, his rejections — throughout his short
life.
In the form of short, often very
humorous, anecdotal scenes, we are
presented with short slices of
Thomas' life. We travel from his
hatred of school and his intense
Dylan — Portrait of a Poet
By Cyril Royston
Cambrian Hall
215 East 17th Avenue
Today and Saturday: 9 p.m.;
Sunday: 3 p.m.	
desire to be published, to his life of
drinking and prostitutes, his marriage to Caitlin, and his arrival, in
his final days, as a lecturer in the
See page 9: POWERFUL
form dialectic opposites with sound
and movement. Persephone's slow
movements are steeped in the
physical and sensual, as the audience can feel her fate of bondage;
Hades' tormented pleas for her continued presence reveal his love and
passion for her.
The audience was often presented
with the chance to experiment with
the signs in order to see what
responses different permutations
would elicit from the actors, and
from other audience members. One
man placed at the front the three
signs: "tastes", "fruit", and
"grow weak", imposing himself as
re-creator and artist of the myth.
While Persephone performed the
instructions, a female member of
the audience removed the "grows
weak" sign and Hades launched into a speech saying, "just raise your
hand, all the problems disappear."
By choosing to use sign and symbol as their media for communications, the Mobius Performing
Group from Boston consciously invites the questioning of sign-
systems as media. The audience is
able to explore how a reality is
created by verbal and non-verbal
signs, and more specifically, how a
reality is limited (eg. Persephone's
range of motion) by the parameters
of the sign-system used (eg. the
number of signs available).
The actors address the problem
of interpretation of signs and their
relationship to signifieds (the objects on the stage) by performing a
number of different interpretations
of the same sign sets.
In this way Persephone and
Hades acts as a meta-theatric performance, literally moving beyond
the stage into audience participation and creation, and forcing the
audience to consider problems of
perception and interpretation of
theatre. It truly pulls the audience
to the Fringe of experimental performance theatre.
ANIMATION FESTIVAL
By CHAD JAMES
This year's Festival of Animation
at the Ridge should help break the
conception of animation as those
things on Saturday morning T.V.
The organizers of the Festival,
Spike and Mike, have brought
together Canadian films from
Quebec to Vancouver, with international participation from the United
States, Hungary, the Netherlands,
and Czechoslovakia.
The Festival of Animation
The Ridge Theatre
3131 Arbutus
738-6311
September 19-23
- The  majority  of festival   films
have identifiable, pertinent themes.
Although the religious tone is
prevalent in Creation, the film deals
with its subject in a mythological
vein which prevents it from sinking
under biblical rhetoric. Creation is
particularly delightful for the continuous, sweeping movement: the
brooding colours and blurry shapes
never cease their slow metamorphoses into a host of other forms.
The film ends with the creation of
man and leaves the viewer savoring
the fact that all men are equal.
In the completely opposite direction lies the Dutch film Elbowing, a
witty treatise of modern humanity
as nothing more than machines. In
the film, the ritual of habit is upset
by an inane individualist who
refuses to follow the assembly-line
process. In the end he does choose
the same fate as the multitudes, but
by embracing the common destiny
in his own unique way, he has won
a small victory.
Some themes are more traditional
such as the Academy Award winner
from Quebec, Crac, which deals
with aging youth's loss of innocence
and the rampant industrialization
of the country-side. With Chagalllike imagery and colours, this film
tells of the construction of a rocking chair and the ensuing changes
the chair experiences.
From the film Criminal Tango
comes the universal theme of people
confronted with the truth about
themselves. The entire film is a
chase, a shadowy figure pursuing a
man while a couple in the
background tangos in and out of
the picture. The black and white
technique of scratching the image
onto the film creates a ghostly atmosphere that makes the film interesting and exciting.
Though most of the films are
very enjoyable, a small minority are
disappointing. The film Amazing
Bone.uses the ubiquitous cliche of a
sly fox capturing a little pig and taking her home to eat her. She has a
talking bone that, predictably,
rescues her by casting a magic spell
on the fox, and she lives happily
ever after.
The Academy Award winning
Hungarian film The Fly does not
develop fully. The ingenious film is
seen completely through the eyes of
a fly: a journey through a garden,
an exploration of a house, a chase
by the house's owner, and finally
death by flyswatter, yet the clever
idea suffers from a lack of extraneous meaning, and an abrupt
end after three minutes.
The strongest aspect of the
Festival is its variety of style. There
is the brilliant animated clay film
Dinosaur that has won many
awards, the extremely difficult and
painstaking technique of "scratch
on film" in Criminal Tango, a
selection of animated T.V. commercials, and a multitude of old
animation from pre-Disney days.
of the other, and the beggar, who
talks, he says, to forget the death of
his dog, innocently unravels the
politician's glitzy persona.
'Lux in Tenebris' makes better
theatre. It is funnier and less
preachy. In it, Brecht manages to
include a prostitute, a newshound,
and a shyster offering lectures on
syphilis (for 2 marks 50, with exhibits), in a plot too convoluted to
describe.
If anyone should think Brecht's
characters excessive or his depiction
of the immorality behind the facade
of public morality too shrill, a
recording is included between the
plays of Brecht being questioned
before Joseph McCarthy's inquisitorial 'Government Operations
Committee.' This works as a
reminder that the excesses of
Brecht's drama are not unknown in
public life.
The performances are less than
perfect but this does not smother
the play's vitality. In the Anza
Club, with the cash register ringing
and unmatched chairs scattered
around the stage Brecht seemed to
belong.
PERSEPHONE
mo'
CRIMINAL TANGO iber 19,1986
THE    UBYSSEY
By PETER BERLIN
Sweaty nights of frenzied rhythm
and booze in some small, seedy and
overcrowded club are now considered to be part of a mythical past
but Tuesday night the Blasters
brought rock and roll as it should
be to the Town Pump.
The Blasters gig was no attempt
to revive a dead musical fashion but
a celebration of the very heartbeat
of pop music.
The Blasters sizzled right from
the start. They opened up with
American Music, their manifesto,
which was brought to blazing life by
Hollywood Fats' first guitar solo.
Fats is not built along the lines of
an Eddie Van Halen; more like
Jackie Gleason in The Honey-
mooners. But then his playing style
suggests he's not interested in
becoming the next great guitar
hero. His solos are brief, violent
and to the point, propelling the
songs along without missing a beat.
Clearly his greatest influence is the
daredevil style of Scotty Moore,
Elvis P's early sidekick.
Bment behind a net.
Fats' flashing, slashing style was
well supported by the solid rhythm
playing of John Bazz on bass and
Bill Bateman on drums. Phil Alvin,
who writes most of the songs, supplied drawled vocals menacing
smile, from his full-set fridge sized
molars.
But for all their instrumental proficiency, after a while the Blasters
began to plod. Many of Alvin's
songs are merely average and the
band haven't gone beyond their
mastery of the music to build their
own personal style. It's that key
step, that spark of genius that carried the Beatles, The Who and,
most of all, the Rolling Stones out
of the sweaty clubs to stardom.
Even now Bruce Springsteen and, in
a watered down way, Huey Lewis
and the News and the Hooters are
turning this sort of music into hit
singles.
On my way to the concert the
driver of the Knight St. bus told me
the best move the Blasters ever
made was to add Lee Allen to the
band. He was right. Allen is a
61-year-old saxophonist who played
on many of the great New Orleans
hits of the '50s. Allen doesn't play
on every number and didn't come
on until half way through
Tuesday's show. At once his honking sax lent beef to the sound. The
jerky, muscular version of I'm
Shaking was one of the hot spots of
the main show.
Allen returned for the two encores which naturally enough provided the climax for the long evening.
For the second encore, the band
played songs by the two men Alvin
said should have been included in
the 10 recently inducted into the
new rock and roll hall of fame. And
with Walker's Too Tired and
Richard's You Keep a Knockin' the
PHIL   ALVIN   .   .   .
band showed how good they can be
with top-grade material with real
character. Perhaps if the Blasters
covered more classics and stopped
menacing   smile.
trying so hard to succeed with their
own, recent, material, Tuesday's
show would have been great rather
than good.
Tokyo meets Athens
By DEAN NICHOLSON
This Medea is a powerful fusion
of cultural expressions, both traditional and modern. It is the famous
play by the Greek dramatist
Euripides restated in a Japanese setting. Although the text is in
Japanese, headsets are provided for
simultaneous translation.
Medea
By Euripides
Directed by Yukio Ninagawa
Queen Elizabeth Playhouse
until September 20.
Medea has helped Jason gain the
Golden Fleece, betrayed father and
murdered her brother, and, now
escaped with Jason to Corinth. The
story opens ten years later with the
self-seeking Jason about to wed the
daughter of King Creon while
Medea and their two sons are to be
banished from the kingdom. Torn
by grief and bitterness Medea
wreaks a terrible revenge, killing
Creon and his daughter and then
her own children as a gory means of
heaping suffering upon Jason.
As in a traditional Japanese and
Greek theatre, the play is performed by an all male cast. Mikijoro, in
the lead role of Medea, the scorned
woman driven to murder her own
children to revenge her betrayal by
her husband, is a strong centrepiece
of this powerful drama.
The climactic scene in which
Medea, resolved to kill her children,
says a final farewell to them, in
gripping in its emotional intensity.
The staging of the play combines
elements of traditional Greek and
Japanese theatre, is charged with
the boldly modern directing of
Yukio Ninagawa. Ninagawa has a
style similar to film director
Kurosawa. A bare, lifeless stage is
the backdrop for vibrantly rich
costumes and expressive, overstated
acting. The use of bold, primal colours accents the driving emotional
quality of the work.
The stunning multi-layered silk
costume that Medea wears at the
beginning is gradually removed until at the height of her plotting she
stands in a stark, red body stocking,
consumed by her bloody quest for
revenge. Having forsaken innocence and maternal instinct
Medea completes her savage intentions and reappears in a shimmering
gown, towering above the the
stricken Jason with the bloody
clothes of her children in her hands.
This sensual, exciting marriage of
two classical theatre forms is a unique theatrical experience for Vancouver audiences.
MEDIA
offs kids to spite Jason.
Toy piano clangs, bangs and clicks
scratch  on film.
By SHARON KNAPP
Terry Sawatsky's Toy Piano
doesn't miss a beat. In fact, his
Rhythmn Machines throw in a few
clangs, bangs and clicks for good
measure. His kinetic sculptures
made from a toy piano, a home
computer, tin cans, bed springs and
other nonmunical materials produce hypnotic rhythms which have
the curious technopeasantry flocking to the doorway of the Pitt
Gallery.
The major part of the work is
contained in a square of tubular
scaffolding crisscrossed by a fine
spiderweb of wires which connects
the separate pieces of welded
sculpture.
The lighting system has been
dropped from the ceiling to mingle
with the frame and wires, leaving
the viewer to wonder where the installation leaves off and the gallery
begins.
The master controls lie in the tiny
toy piano which has five microswit-
ches attached to its keyboard that
allows Sawatsky to access his computer program of random note patterns. His modern day Goldberg
Variations is created by instructing
his Vic-20 Commodore computer to
alter the length of the notes and
their accents and intervals. He
embellishes the first track by playing other keys that play on the strings of an electric guitar neck that
has been inserted into the piano.
Finally, a series of undescribable
sounds are added when he levers a
ski pole that activates more guitar
strings mounted on the back wheel
of an upside down ten speed.
His performance has a kind of
giddy craziness about it that is infectious to viewers, who wander
around, trying to figure out where
the sounds are coming from.
Sawatsky is a class-three welder
who finished his art education at
Emily Carr. Sawatsky's first metal
sculptures were revelations of the
inner workings of machines. He
finds it ironic that the more we
become dependent on technology,
the less we are inclined to lift off the
top of our word processors to find
out what makes them tick.
He moved into performance art
when he saw another artist playing
a homemade electric guitar that had
a 2x4 for a neck, and realized he
wanted to perform on the rhythmn
machines.
Toy Piano strikes one faltering
note when it tries to stand on its
own as a series of sculptures instead
of being content to be a performance piece.
Where they do succeed, as in the
ski pole-bicycle construction, some
form of explanatory text would encourage visitors to consider the
works as pieces in their own right.
Sawatsky acknowledges he may
have been too ambitious in this installation. "My next step", he says,
"will be to concentrate on making
audio tapes for sale, or sculptures
that are meant for a silent gallery
format. I think this work was too
ambiguous for most people."
Toy Piano closes this Sunday at
the Pitt, but you can catch the best
part of Sawatsky's art when Terry
and his noise band, the Mars
Monkeys, stage a free audio art
performance in the Robson Square
Theatre Friday, September 19 at
7:30 p.m. Page 8
THE    UBYSSEV
Friday, September 19,1986
KGB misleads West
By RICK HIEBERT
A former Czech intelligence
operator has written a fascinating
book on the KGB's efforts to
mislead the West. Ladislav Bitt-
man's The KGB andv Soviet Disinformation is both authoritative
enough to be used by intelligence
officers and basic enough that the
average reader will be entertainingly
introduced to this interesting aspect
of Soviet espionage.
The KGB and Soviet Disinformation
By Ladislav Bittman
1985
Bittman, who escaped to the
West in 1968, was Deputy Director
of Czech intelligence's disinformation department, and supervised
hundreds of attempts to fool the
West.
Disinformation campaigns,
writes Bittman, are carefully planned by the KGB and then approved
by the Politburo, which keeps close
watch on all KGB activities.
A good example of disinformation in action, writes Bittman, is a
KGB campaign against Henry Kissinger when he was the American
Secretary of State in the early '70's.
Faced with Kissinger's successes
in foreign policy, the KGB decided
to try to neutralize his effectiveness.
They spread rumours that Kissinger
had been an agent of the KGB while
teaching university. Some radical
right newsletters, and the John
Birch Society magazine publicized
these accusations.
Next, Soviet propaganda organs
attacked Kissinger as the author of
a "treacherous, selfish American
foreign policy."
Then, the KGB took a basically
innocuous 1974 intelligence directive signed by Kissinger, which told
European   intelligence   gathering
units to find out what Western
leaders were thinking, and made
some change to the document.
The new document was released
in the summer of 1976. Now it looked like Kissinger wanted detailed information "relevant to their European leaders' disloyalty to policies
and objectives in the N.A.T.O.
alliance." The KGB forged document also had Kissinger inquiring if
any high European officials could
be bribed and if any European trade
initiatives with the Soviets could be
wrecked to the advantage of U.S.
trade deals.
Bittman also discusses Soviet efforts to infiltrate the news media
with KGB agents, plans to forge
Western government documents
that make the U.S. look agressive
or indifferent to Third World concerns, attempts to hinder the CIA,
Soviet emigres, and other anti-
Communists. He also adds an interesting perspective on KGB connections to international terrorism,
Bittman concludes by saying that
in order to combat KGB disinformation efforts, we must be fully
aware of its activities and goals.
Mayall plays driving blues
By NEL FINBERG
Twenty years ago The
Bluesbreakers with Eric Clapton
was released, a landmark album in
white blues revival. Wednesday
night John Mayall brought it all
back with some of the most intense,
driving blues this city has seen in a
long time.
John Mayall
The Town Pump
September 17
Albeit somewhat of a has-been in
light of who he once was, known
primarily for springing off blues-
rock greats such as Eric Clapton,
Peter Green, John McVie, Mick
Taylor, and many others, Mayall
holds his own as a veritable blues
legend, to whom the appearance of
all those old, hard-core blues fans
who showed up and grooved late into Wednesday night are a tribute.
And those fans did not leave disappointed.
Mayall's lineup includes lead,
bass, rhythm guitars and drummer,
as well as Mayall himself, alternating on rhythm, keyboards and
harmonica  —  the  lead  guitarist
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pumping out non-stop screaming,
wailing licks, virtually stealing the
show for himself. The Pump was on
its feet from the moment the band
hit the stage to the last wailing solo.
Despite the innovations that
Mayall has gone through in his
career, it seems that it's back to the
original stuff again. Wednesday
night we heard a lot of classics the
Bluesbreakers did (and redid) in the
mid '60's — Little Girl, All Your
Love, and Looking Back.
The Town Pumpo is currently
featuring a whole slew of digging-
up-bones-out-of-the-'60's concerts,
including the likes of Mayall,
Donovan, Buffalo Springfield
Revisited, Spencer Davis. So, if you
have a propensity towards the sentimental or the schlocky, check it
out.
Another great blues concert has
passed. But fret not: coming up on
October 3rd, the Pump again hosts
the fabulous Koko Taylor.
Nel Finberg
OFFICE FOR WOMEN STUDENTS
MATURE STUDENTS'
SUPPORT GROUP
TUESDAYS, 12:30-1:30 p.m.
L
SEPT. 23-OCT. 7
in Brock 106A
OCT. 14-DEC. 2
in Brock 223
16,278 to choose from—all subjects
Save Tim* and Improve Your Grades!
Order Catalog Today with Visa/MC or COD
^213-477-8226%'
Or. rush $2.00 to: Research Assistance
11322 Idaho Ave. #206-SN Los Angeles. CA 90025
. Custom research also available—all levels	
Rhodes Scholarships
for 1987
Applications are available from the Awards Office for the Rhodes
Scholarship, for 1987/88.
Candidates must:
— be Canadian citizens or persons domiciled in Canada;
— have been born between October 2, 1962 and October 1, 1968;
— be unmarried;
— have completed at least three years of University training by
October 1, 1987.
Successful candidates will have demonstrated literary and scholastic
attainments, fondness of and success in outdoor sports, qualities of
truth, courage, devotion to duty, sympathy for and protection of the
weak, kindliness, unselfishness and fellowship, moral force of
character and instincts to lead and take an interest in their contemporaries.
COMPLETED APPLICA TIONS MUST BE SUBMITTED
BY OCTOBER 24, 1986
HAVE ITALL.
HAVE IT NOW
SPECIAL STUDENT RATES ON TOP-QUALITY
COLOUR TV'S AND VCR'S NOW AT GRANADA.
SPECIAL STUDENT RATES:
14" colour-H795/month
20" colour-$1995/month
26" colour -$2495/month
VHS VCR - WVmonth
Converters - $5°°/month
TV/VCR STANDS ARE ALSO AVAILABLE FOR RENTAL
Granada has a full range of colour TV's and VCR's waiting for you - just
choose the one that suits you best. And you get no-extra-charge, worry-free
"Granadacover" service.
Contact your Granada Campus Representative. Check the on-campus
poster for details.
HAVE IT ALL, HAVE IT NOW.
HOME ENTERTAINMENT Friday, September 19, 1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 9
Powerful recital explodes
From page 6
United States.
Roy Jones vivaciously brings
Dylan Thomas to life. His is one of
the most complete character poor-
trayals at the Fringe Festival. Jones
is brilliant in capturing Thomas'
youthful impetuousness and desire,
and he manages to accentuate his
portrayal of the older Thomas with
those same characteristics. His
complex use of facial expression
reveals Thomas' passion and intensity for poetry through all the
depression and setbacks in his life.
Dylan Thomas' poetry sparkles
when Jones recites it. The beauty of
Cyril Royston's script is how
smoothly the transition is from
monologue to poetry recital.
The most powerful recital explodes from Jones Mips as a raging
Thomas, drunk and depressed,
composes Do Not Go Gently Into
That Good Night upon learning of
his father's illness. In a melancholy
mood on his thirtieth birthday,
Thomas launches in Poem in October, drawing as his subject the
familiar rural scene of Wales.
The scenes in the play that focus
on his childhood and the life of the
common people in the pub serve to
indicate the source of Dylan
Thomas' writing. His poetry exude
a sense of ritual as he explores con
tinual processes of life, and death
and change, through sets of image
and metaphor drawn from the
natural world.
Jones' portrayal subtley reveals
Thomas' character and the script
convincingly creates fictional
characters as Thomas speaks to implied others: his wife, his close
friend Vernon, his mother.
The occasional address to the audience   links   us   with   the   scene:
"prisoners in a live melodrama".
The creation of realistic illusions,
such as Thomas' mocking of the
Cockney women, or his horrifying
imaginings of being in a bath with
white mice, seems to be Royston's
self-reflexive comment on the
nature of theatre to create illusion
and spectacle. The sense of ritual in
theatre is heightened by the poetry,
especially since the poetry itself is
charged with nuances of ritual.
Actors form imountahs
From page 6
through the jungle, they push their
way through this moving, dense
mass of hanging material, giving an
interesting sense of the dense jungle
vegetation, and the densely
populated spaces of the troubled
mind.
Director Pauline Landberg has
made intriguing use of body configuration forests. One actor lies on
his back on the stage, side to the audience. He bends his legs up, from
the waist, until they are above his
head, where his feet meet the feet of
the other actor lying head to head
with him. There are two of these
two-actor-formed mountains, with
a human waterfall of descending,
wriggling fingers in front of one.
Two actors, using a pair of
fingers on each hand to represent
the two legs of a character, "climb"
one mountain, then the one with
the waterfall. The actors, in various
contortions, deliver the lines of
their two-finger alter-egoes walking
through the mountains. When the
female anthropologist's pair of
representative fingers tumble into
the waterfall, the actors re-assume
their human forms, and look down
into the abyss where poor Miss
Prett has fallen.
If only there had been more use
of configuration, it's use at this late
point would have made sense. Here
it is a rather bizarre, though
fascinating, afterthought.
African jazz drums erupt
By NEL FINBERG
Flowing drum rythms erupt into
bursts of brass: Obo Addy and
Kukrudu brought his brand of
African/jazz fusion to the Town
Pump Sunday night, a sound that
has been coming back to Vancouver
with increasing frequency and
popularity in the last few years. The
audience, as appreciative as it was
small, packed the dance floor,
gyrating to those African drums.
Ghanaian master drummer Obo
Addy, son of a Wonche medicine
man, has been living in the United
States since 1978, having brought
over his feeling for native African
music and combined it with western
jazz, another facet of his sense of
musical idiom.
Obo Addy and Kukrudu
The Town Pump
September 14
The ensemble consists of Obo
Addy himself (the master
drummer), a second drummer, a
saxophonist, trombonist,
trumpeters, lead guitarist, and
bassist.
The performance consists of
feverish polyrythmic drumming,
chanting, sudden trumpet and saxophone, slipping into staccato
handclapping, the audience swaying, a communion of handclapping.
Obo Addy explained the elemental nature of music in African society: specific music being played for
births, deaths, war, marriage,
spiritual events, etc. An interesting
point he made is that the master
drummer determines what he plays
by what the master dancer is performing, a highly interactive form of
expression.
Chartered
accountancy.
It's your chosen profession.
Now you are looking for the right firm to train with, an
exceptional firm to provide you with:
• well-honed and up-to-date technical knowledge.
• exposure to a variety of industries & experience.
• scope for your own initiative.
• career development opportunities.
• the best possible training
You should talk to &lbliche Ross
If you are ready to turn your degree into a profession and
gain experience in accounting, auditing, tax, business valuations, electronic data processing and insolvency, Touche Ross
is the firm for you. We will be on campus:
Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday, October 20, 21 and 22.
Submit your application, accompanied by recent transcripts, to the Employment Centre on Campus until October 3.
We will be in contact with you as soon as possible.
&Tbuche Ross
CHARTERED ACCOUNTANTS/MANAGEMENT CONSULTANTS
B Lot Parking
The seven "B" parking lots, situated immediately south
of the main campus are now controlled by coin operated
exit gates. All entrances and exits are gated and, on
entering, each vehicle is counted. When the lot is full to
capacity, a lot full sign is illuminated. The entry gate will
not operate again until space becomes available. The
exit gate will raise when 25c coinage is placed in the coin
slot.
The 25c exit fee entitles the vehicle to remain in the lot
for a maximum of one day. For this reason the B lots
must be cleared Tuesday to Friday, between the hours of
3:00 a.m. and 5:00 a.m. Commencing at 7:00 p.m. on
Fridays, to 7:00 a.m. on Mondays, parking will be free.
Resident students are entitled to purchase a resident
decal and exit key card for a yearly fee of $35. Key cards
and resident decals, which allow a vehicle to be parked
overnight in the B lots, are available at the Traffic
Office situated at 3030 Wesbrook Mall.
Department of Traffic and Security
VANCOUVER
669-3343
NEW WESTMINSTER
522-7931
LANGLEY
534-7477
VICTORIA
383-1174
PRINCE GEORGE
564-1111
(^ases&&
Tonight! Thurs. Sept. 18
Calling All Regulars
VIP & REGULARS
PARTY!
8:30-10:30 WINE & CHEESE
This Weekend
WILDCHILD
plus Sat. Sept. 20
Ray Roper and
The All Star Jammers
featuring members of
PRISONER with special guest
David Steele
NEXT WEEK Sept. 22-27
Vancouver's favourite party band
TRAMA
coming soon MATREX
VIRGIN RECORDING
ARTISTS
• SIMON KAOS
Tues: Mick's Celebrity Jam
Wed & Sat: Ladies Nite with the notorious
Wacki Racki
THURSDAYS ARE
PARTY NITES!
FRASER 4RMS
HOTEL»261-7277«1450 S.W.MARINE DRIVE Page 10
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, September 19, 1986
Bdubtfc
Majolica and Slip ware, a pottery exhibition bv
Sam Kwan and Jane Williams, at the Gallery of r .".
Ceramics on Granville Island (668-56461 until
September 28.
Icons of Post-Modern ism, a diversity of works
by ten Italian artists, at the Simon Fraser Gallery
until October 3.
Southern Cross, a series of wood engravings by
Canadian artist Laurence Hyde, at the Burnaby Art
Gallery until October 26.
The medium is Metal, the Theme is colour, a
display of jewellery at the Cartwright Gallery on
Granville Island, tel. 687-8266.
Paintings from Lawren Harris Estate at the
Vancouver Art Gallery until October 31.
The Romantic Landscape Now, an exhibition of
Canadian landscapes is showing at the Surrey Art
Gallery until September 28.
Shannon Gunn and Friends, an evening of jazz
at the King Edward Campus Auditorium (1155
East Broadway; 875-8220), 8 p.m. Tix General $4, $2
students.
Buffalo Springfield performs at the Town Pump
September 19 and 20. 66 Water Street, 683-6695.
Blood Relations, a play about the life of Lizzie
Borden at the Frederick Wood Theatre, UBC
(228-2678). $5 students, $7 regular.
Faulty Towers, performed by the North Vancouver Community Players at the Vancouver East
Cultural Centre (1895 Venables, 254-9578) 8 p.m.
Tickets are $8.
HcVl£6 %^C42&?
SUBfilms (228-3697) until Sept. 21: The Jewel of
the Nile, starting Sept. 25, Poltergeist II. Thursday
and Sunday at 7 p.m., Friday and Saturday at 7 p.m.
and 9:30 p.m.
The Ridge (16th at Arbutus, 738-6311) Festival of
Animation until Sept. 23. 7 p.m. and 9:30 p.m.
every night, Sunday matinee 4 p.m.
%££
Agent, Tony Papa, Hoi Polloi.at the York
Theatre (639 Commercial Drive, 254-5934) Sept. 19.
Tix $8 adv.. $10 at the door.
TODAY
ASTRONOMY AND AEROSPACE CLUB
First official meeting of New Year; newcomers
welcome, 5:30 p.m., Astr., and Geoph. Bid.,
Rm. 142.
UBC THUNDERBIRD CREW CLUB
Exercise in steering a rowing shell, 5:45 a.m.,
Burnabv lake.
FREE FLICK FRIDAY
"Maria," refreshment to follow, 7:30 p.m. Music
room, St. Mark's College.
UBYSSEY SEMINAR
Reporting B.C. Politics by Keith Baldrey, Vancouver Sun's chief Zalm watcher. Sub 241k 4
p.m.
SEMINAL POLITICS
Vancouver Sun political reporter Keith Baldrey
(left, in photo above) will speak on covering B.C.
politics at 4 p.m. today in the Ubyssey office, SUB
241k. Baldrey, who was a student journalist but
scant few years ago, was active in covering the
Socred leadership campaign and will give reporting tips for the upcoming election. Next week
Chris Wong speaks on entertainment writing.
UBC CURLING CLUB
2 Draws Available
WEDNESDAY, 5:00-7:00
THURSDAY, 9:30-11:30
Starting Date: Wed., Oct. 8
Thurs., Oct. 9
Box No. 27, AMS office or at our booth on
Clubs Days Sept. 18, 19 in SUB.
UBC LIBRARY
Tour of  Main and Sedgewick  Libraries,   10:30
a.m. and 12:30 p.m., everyone welcome. Meet
at Main Library, main entrance hail.
SORORITIES OF UBC
Rush kickoff, 12:00 noon to 2:30 p.m., SUB
plaza north.
SATURDAY
UBC WINDSURFING CLUB
Join the season's opening! Novice and experienced people welcome, 9 a.m.-4 p.m.,
Jericho Sailing Centre.
SUNDAY
UBC WINDSURFING CLUB
Join the season's opening! Novice and experienced welcome, 9 a.m.-4 p.m., Jericho Sailing Centre.
MONDAY
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Classes start this week. Free drop-in with
coupon. Jazz 2 8:30-10 a.m. Jazz 1 3:30-5 p.m.
Beg. Jazz noon-1:30 p.m. Ballet 2 and 3 5:30-7
p.m.. Party room (except Ballet 2 and 3, Plaza
south).
TUESDAY
STUDENT COUNCIL FOR
EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN
General meeting,   noon,  meet out  in front of
Scarf 100 or go to Hut 017.
INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
STUDENTS ASSOC.
General  meeting  and   elections,   noon,   Buch.
A204.
UNITED CHURCH CAMPUS MINISTRY
Informal  workshop,   noon,   Lutheran  Campus
Centre.
WOMEN STUDENTS' OFFICE
Mature Student's support group, noon, Brock
106A.
INTERESTED IN CA EMPLOYMENT?
ARTHUR ANDERSEN & CO. is seeking 1987 graduates
for Vancouver and all other offices of the Firm. Submit
your resumes to the Canada Employment Centre on Campus (forms are available from the Centre) by October 2,
1986.
All resumes will be acknowledged. You will be contacted
on or about October 10th regarding campus interviews
which take place during the week of October 20th. Additional information is available at the UBC Canada
Employment Centre and the Accounting Club.
IBM-XT COMPATIBLES'
NORA SYSTEMS*
Student Special!
IBM PC XT COMPATIBLE SYSTEM
640K MEMORY
8088 (4.77 MHZ) PROCESSOR
2-360K DISK DRIVES
DISK CONTROLLER CARD
MULTI I/O CARD (P/S/G/CLK)
HERCULES COMPATIBLE CARD
OR COLOR GRAPHICS CARD
KB-5150 XT TYPE KEYBOARD
$1,299
TURBO SYSTEM
SAME AS ABOVE WITH 8 MHZ
PROCESSOR RUNS 60% FASTER
$1,399
IBM. PC. XT ARE REGISTERED TRADEMARKS OF INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES
1 YEAR PARTS/LABOUR WARRANTY PLUS FREE TRAINING
2845 CAMBIE STREET, VANCOUVER,      TEL: 872-NORA
-NORA SYSTEMS® INC-
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: AMS Card Holders — 3 lines, 1 day $2.75; Additional lines, 60c. Commercial —
1 day $4.75; Additional lines, 70c. Additional days, $4.25 and 65c.
Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the day before publication
~   ~ Publications, Room266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
Charge Phone Orders Over $10.00 — Call 228-3977
COMING EVENTS
30 - JOBS
COLLECTOR'S DOLL-TOY
Sale. September 21, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Royal
Towers Hotel, 6th St. & Royal Ave., New
West.
AMNESTY
INTERNATIONAL
25th Anniversary
AGAINST
OBLIVION
POETRY READING
Sept. 23, 7:30 p.m.
U.B.C. SUB
Auditorium
$5.00, Students: $2.50
SCOOTERS!!!
ON DISPLAY TODAY
BETWEEN SUB &
AQUATIC CENTRE
Cheap Wheels
736-4299
3 YR. OLD CHILD requires an imaginative,
active UBC student to keep her company a
few eves./wk. & some wkends (approx. 30
hrs/mo.I Building a long-term relationship
would be desirable. Location ideal for student living on campus. Call Mark 222-1004
aft. 9 p.m.
EARL'S IS LOOKING for energentic, exp.
kitchen people. Apply in person on Tuesday, Sept. 23, 3-5 p.m. 4397 W. 10th Ave.
EARN EXTRA INCOME through a fast
growing business, flexible hours. For appointment, call 435-3768 or 278-0453.
WANTED: Friendly, energetic person for
part-time reception work in family doctor's
office. Good telephone manner & typing
skills essential. 731-8201.
RELIABLE HOUSESITTER for elderly
gentleman while hsekeeper has time off.
Mon. 5 p.m. overnight to Tues. 9 a.m. &
Tues. 5 p.m. overnight to Wed. 9 a.m.
Close to UBC bus. (Westside) Refs. Driver
lie. preferred. 228-9255.
35 - LOST
LOST Wed. Sept. 10. Denim jacket near
Geog bldg. or Yum Yums. Reward.
689-5703 anytime.
11 - FOR SALE - Private
STURDY MANUAL TYPEWRITER. Mature
Phillips 10-speed bike, solid book case. All
very affordable 738-3654.
HP-41CV excellent condition. $200.00
Call Fernando 224-4285 after 5:00 p.m.
HONDA ELITE 150 scooter. Like new.
$1,500.00. 224-2318.
H.P. 97 HEWLETT-PACKARD programmable printing calculator. Like new. $800.
437-7741 Bob.
40 - MESSAGES
NEVER RETYPE AGAIN!! Wordprocess
now at $100, not $2500. Free info. ROBINSON BOOKS, POB 76799U, VANCOUVER,
B.C. V5R 5S7.
A GOOD LOOKING GUY, late 20s, recent
grad would like to meet a sportif woman for
dinners, TLC, fun in the sun and snow. I'm
into all kinds of things, and best of all, no
longer have to study all the time. Reply Box
1000 c/o The Ubyssey.
S.A. it took courage to write please write
again! E.G.
20 - HOUSING
65 - SCANDALS
ATTRACTIVE FURNISHED SUITE west of   WINNER in MacLean's "Win This Luggage"
Dunbar. $385 all inclusive. Suits international grad. sudent. 228-1256 after 7 p.m.
ENGLISH BAY 1 BDR. to sublet. Nov. 1 part
furnished, spect. view $355/m mature student or couple. 687-2385.
STUDENT
HOUSING
The Fraternity of Phi Gamma
Delta offers on campus
room & board for any UBC
student.
— prepared meals
— laundry facilities
— colour T.V., microwave
— sauna & MORE
For info call Nindy
5785 Agronomy Rd.
222-4470
contest (during Student Bargain Days) is
fourth-year student Linda Braid of North
Vancouver. Congratulations from
MacLean's on campus!
70 - SERVICES
CRISIS PREGNANCY? Birthright offers
alternatives to abortion. Call 687-7223 (Free
pregnancy tests).
A-1 TAX BREAK SERVICES. Tax planning
RRSP, tax shelters 2065 W. 4th Ave.
738-3164.
30 - JOBS
LOOKING FOR MATURE person who enjoys sales, is hard working, responsible and
organized. Approx. 15 hrs./wk. Must be
able to work days, nights, wknds. Call
Diane at Work Warehouse 736-2678.
THE ANGLICAN STUDENT
MOVEMENT AT UBC
and
ST. ANSELM'S
ANGLICAN CHURCH
present
Choral Evensong
7:30 p.m. Alternate Sundays
Sept. 21 A Solo Cello Recital
by James MacLaren Hill
will follow the service.
Everyone is welcome
ST. ANSELM'S CHURCH
University Blvd.
70 - SERVICES
University Hill United
and Presbyterian
Congregations
invite you to join us in worship
Sunday mornings at 10:20 a.m.
in the Epiphany Chapel,
Vancouver School of Theology
Young Adult Groups Sunday
or Monday evenings
Phone 224-6377
6050 Chancellor Boulevard
WEST POINT GREY
UNITED CHURCH
8th & Tolmie
(Just outside UBC gates)
SUNDAY, 10.30 A.M.
Worship & Church School
224-4388 (mornings)
75 - WANTED
SOCCER Goaltender wanted for Pt. Grey
team 2nd div. Van. Metro League. Call
George 879-3417 or Brian 736-4546 Eves.
85 - TYPING
MINIMUM  NOTICE  REQUIRED-Essays,
term   papers,   resumes,   theses,   reports,
UBC location (Village) 224-2662.
ADINA WORD PROCESSING for resumes,
essays, theses. Discount for students. 10th
& Discovery. Phone 222-2122.
TYPING? YOU BET! Theses, term papers,
essays, whatever. Experienced, reasonable.
Kits area. June, 738-1378.
WORD PROCESSING letter quality. Near
UBC $1.25 per page. Call 228-8968.
WORDPERFECT is my speciality for all
your typing/word processing needs. Call
Colleen 987-2324.
STUDENT/FACULTY RATES
$1.50/pg. dble. spaced text.
Equations & tables: $14.00/hr.
Resumes: $5.00/page
50 personalized form letters only $35.00
Cerlox binding & photocopying.
Fast, professional service.
Jeeva's Word Processing
201 - 636 W. Broadway
876-5333 m/c&visa
JUDITH FILTNESS, quality typist. 3206 West
38th Ave. 263-0351.
TYPING. Quality work at reasonable rates.
Fraser-Kingsway area. Paula 873-2227
24 hrs.
PROFESSINAL TYPING SERVICES
FOR BUSINESS AND STUDENTS.
CALL BYTE SIZE CONSULTANTS
669-0026
GET ME NOWII
Good   quality,   fast,   efficient.   Reasonable
rates. Phone 734-1302. Friday, September 19,1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 11
Ooooops
Oooooops
Ooooops
On Sept. 16, the Ubyssey
reported the U.S. navy experienced
60 accidents with nuclear weapons
between 1965-85. (Peace groups
protest warships, p. 8). The correct
number is 620. The person responsible has been MIRVed.
THAT'LL STOP YOU
N      0
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COL
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P
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D D
B E
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R A
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A L
M  P O R A R Y
O  O B M G P G
U   M L O G I N
R O D R H
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S
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P D Y
T A A
R R L   R
U O I     F
W O L
A M O  L   E
I T Y   K   A
S
D
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E
F   V   I
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F
H
S
E
R
F
E
R
AURA
FREEDOM
QUALITY
REFRESHING
POPULAR
COLD
TASTE
LEADING EDGE
MUG
STREAM
FRIENDSHIP
GOOD TIMES
ROCK N ROLL
LOYAL
BEER
FUN
AGGRESSIVE
BOOGIE
CONTEMPORARY
It shouldn't take you more than two minutes to find all the words hidden in
this puzzle. Page 12
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, September 19,1986
Would you have the guts to say
a professional musical stinks?
JERRY'S COVE
NEIGHBORHOOD PLB
Minutes away from UBC Campus •^^-m
Remember -DAILY SPECIALS"
Hot & Cold Food from 11:30 a.m. until Midnight
3681 West 4th (4.h & Aima>     734-1205
Recreation UBC presents
SHOTOKAN KARATE
Monday and Wednesday
8:00 - 10:00 p.m.
Saturday, 10:00 — 11:30 a.m.
Gym E, Osborne Centre, UBC
Beginners classes start Sept. 15
For further information
Call Rec. UBC 228-3996
"T. Ohshima - Shihan"
Kiss your grades good-bye
Find SUB 241K
For the vilest rag wants you.
And you won't regret
Writing arts reviews.
Writing arts reviews
Kiss sensitivity goodbye:
Your fine arts friends will ask
you
Who the hell you think you
are.
Saying their work stinks
In the campus rag
In the campus rag
Kiss self-respect goodbye
Prostitute your writing
Interview    your    favourite
stars.
You can meet them all
Through The Ubyssey
Through The Ubyssey
Students run campaign
By JENNIFER FEINBERG
Canadian University Press
MONTREAL (CUP) — A coalition of five student groups is launching a megamedia campaign to
find alternative solutions to the problem of education underfunding in
Quebec.
The coalition is trading in tried-
and-true methods of strikes and
demonstrations for a slick media
campaign, complete with mauve
and canary-yellow billboards.
Representative Francois
Desrosiers said the group will spend
about $25,000 during the campaign
on subway billboards, posters, and
radio and television advertisements.
The slogan of the campaign is
"Dans un monde branche — des
universities branchees", which implies that universities will have to
become more in step with society,
or — taken literally — more "plugged in".
The group advocates better
management of funds, access to
quality education, and a practical
evaluation of professors.
The group, which includes the
student governments of McGill,
Concordia, Universite de Montreal
and Ecole Polytechnique, are proposing the following alternatives to
tuition fee hikes and incidental fees:
•adequate government subsidies;
•better    management    of   human
resources;
•easier   tax   breaks   for   potential
donors.
"In a changing world, we have to
have universities that are in step,"
said McGill council vice-president
lan Brodie. "We can't push
ourselves into the next generation
of technology without keeping up.
"If we are crippling our universities through inadequate funding,
we're crippling our future," he
said.
The coalition believes the public
is generally unaware that the
government has made substantial
funding cuts for the past five years
and that the loans and bursaries
system is totally inadequate.
"Contrary to popular belief, raising
tuition fees is not the solution to the
underfunding problem," said
Desrosiers. "There are many other
ways that have not been properly
studied."
"Tuition fee hikes are not the
solution and they won't solve the
problem," said U de M secretary
general   Luc   Trepanier.   "If   the
government maintains such a nar-
rowminded view, the problems will
be back and worse in years to
come."
Desrosiers said government subsidies should reflect university
needs. He points to the per capita
formula subsidy which has decreased from $6,300 in 1981 to about
$4,100 in 1986.
RED LEAF
Restaurant
Luncheon Smorgasbord
Authentic Chinese Cuisine
228-9114
10% DISCOUNT ON
PICK UP ORDERS
LICENSED PREMISES
Mon. Fn. 11:30-9:00 p.m
-     -        CLOSED SATURDAYS
Sundays and Holidays   '
4:00 p m   9 p.m.
2142 Wsstern Parkway
UBC Village
Opposite Chevron Station
CALL FOR
APPLICATIONS
Applications are now being accepted to fill
one (1) vacant student SENATE-AT-
LARGE seat. The term of office will
commence October 15th, 1986 to March
30th, 1987.
As per the Universities Act and the A.M.S.
code of procedures and by-laws, the
successful candidate will be an A.M.S.
member. Applications may be picked up
from SUB 238 and returned by 4 p.m.,
Monday, September 29, 1986.
For more information, please contact AMS
President Simon Seshadri SUB 256,
228-3972.
UBC rx-r (E-X-C-E • L-L-E-N-"D x r
The  eat e ri
JL
1 FREE LUNCH
DAILY
SPECIAL'
't
This is a terrific deal! Bring a friend or a sweetie, purchase 2 of
the daily specials and receive the least expensive one FREE.
This coupon applies to daily specials only, isn't valid for takeout or with any other coupon. HAVE A GREAT DAY!
3431 WEST BROADWAY
738-5298
Al
JUST ADD WATER.
Next time your mouth
waters for an envelope, think
of Kinko's.
kinkcs
GREAT COPIES GREAT PEOPLE
5706 University Blvd.
222-1688
M-TH 8-9 F 8-6 Sat 10-6 Sun 11-6
SIMPLE  SHELVES
OFf REGULAR PWCE5
£ASr UrtM&

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