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The Ubyssey Sep 21, 1978

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 Expect no mercy on tuition
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. ILXI, No. 5      VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 1978
,48    228-2301
-peter menyasz photo
REMAINS OF: STUDENT still waiting for tuition fee deferment now lives in museum of anthropology. Skull finally gave up on life of student to become museum piece and recently had teeth parted to emulate idol Leon Sphinx,
one of the seven blunders of the world. "Sphinx and I are birds of a feather, dead to the world, but living in hearts
and minds of those who remember we once existed," said skull.
TA salaries $500 short of promise
By VERNE McDONALD
Graduate studies student senator
Dave Smith charged the university
administration Wednesday of
"going back on its word" on policy
affecting teaching assistants
salaries.
Smith said increases in TA
salaries were to be equivalent to
increases in junior faculty salaries
according to a UBC policy
statement issued in 1973.
But TA salaries are an average
$500 less than what they should be
if the policy had been followed.
Smith claimed the policy had
been re-affirmed as recently as this
spring.
"At a meeting of the senate,
(administration president Doug)
Kenny was asked whether the policy
was still active. He replied clearly
that it was," he said.
Erich Vogt, faculty and affairs
vice-president, said Smith's charges
are inaccurate. He said a committee
of deans decided this spring to
revise the policy, but confirmed it
"for the interim."
He said the policy was currently
being rewritten by graduate studies
dean Peter Larkin, but did not yet
know if the policy on TA salaries
has been completed.
Vogt said the 1973 statement of
TA salaries is difficult to interpret
and that it was more speculation
than firm policy.
The statement reads: "In
general, stipens will be eligible for
increases at about the level awarded
to junior faculty."
Smith said the 1973 agreement
was that both junior faculty and
TAs were underpaid and each
would be given increases at the
same rate. But junior faculty
received salary increases of more
than 60 per cent since then, while
TAs received about 40 per cent, he
said.
See page 2: TEACHING
By HEATHER CONN
Penniless students at UBC hoping to meet Friday's tuition fee
deadline with a late student loan can expect no mercy from the administration.
"I think it's highly unreasonable for a student who breezes in
Sept. 1 without much financial planning to come to us and ask for
money," says student awards office director Byron Hender.
"Some students in the past held
the attitude that the university was
going to be a soft touch. They left it
up to someone else to look after
them. But the initial onus is on the
student (to plan finances to pay
fees)."
But the student is a second-rate
citizen when it comes to loans, according to one student waiting for
his loan outside the awards' office
Wednesday.
"They just threw me out. I got an
exit out the door. Their attitude is
'screw you.' I'm broke. They told
me: 'We have no money to give
you," said Harry Pettit, education
4.
Pettit, who applied late for a loan
because he was a non-student working in a remote area, said the
university is inconsistent in its
policy regarding student loans.
"On the one hand they're asking
you to be a responsible, mature
adult. On the other, they're saying:
'Right now, you're shit." They
think mommy and daddy will help
us pay tuition fees. Right now I
have $6.47 in my bank account
This is no bullshit."
Hender said he thought the
university was more lenient than
other institutions toward late fees
and added the awards' office will
"bend over backwards" to help
students who planned their
finances.
He said he will readily help
students who applied for a student
loan before the July 1 deadline and
who have not yet received their loan
because of processing delays in Victoria.
This year there is a two and a half
month delay between applying for a
loan and receiving the documents in
the mail.
The process normally takes six
weeks.
"We've heard the documents
should arrive by Sept. 29, but it's
really up in the air. We rely on mail,
going through Victoria, there are so
many steps. We depend on a lot of
different sources," said an awards'
office clerk who asked not to be
identified.
"We're terribly swamped. We're
understaffed."
She said there are only three staff
people currently working on student loans. In the summer, eight
people were hired to assess 4,500
student loan applications, she said.
Students who wish to appeal the
amount received in their loan must
wait a month for an appointment at
the awards' office.
"I'm not happy about that," said
Hender. "Hopefully, if they have a
real financial twister they'll be
squeezed in. But we decided last
year to let the student talk to someone, get better information and
get the money they're supposed
to."
"The awards' office has always
See page 7: THEY
Sandhu wins
presidency
By CHRIS BOCKING
In an unexpected decision,
student board of governors
representative Paul Sandhu was
elected Alma Mater Society
president Wednesday.
Sandhu handily defeated
commerce senator Bob Goodwin by
a vote of 20 to 12. SRA science
representative Jim Bodner withdrew his nomination after Sandhu
announced his intention to run.
Sandhu was clearly the choice of
veteran representatives. His
nomination was a surprise to most
observers and came as the result of
two days of backroom
negotiations.
AMS external affairs officer Kate
Andrew threatened to leave her
position if Sandhu was not elected.
"I'll quit if he (Sandhu) doesn't
win," she said before the vote.
Sandhu said he "felt there was a
real need  for someone  with  the
knowledge      and      experience
necessary to fill the position."
The election was held at Wednesday's SRA meeting to find a
replacement for Bruce Armstrong,
who resigned the presidency after
receiving an administration
ultimatum to drop all extracurricular activitties or be
ineligible for enrolment.
The AMS president chairs all
SRA meetings, acts as students'
representative to the administration
and faculty, and is recognized as
the chief spokesman for UBC
students.
In other SRA business a motion
that the Varsity Outdoor Club be
provided with a fund of $25,000 to
finance capital projects or improvements for the benefit of the
club was ruled out of order.
The VOC financed and built the
See page 12: OUTDOORS
'' "   .       >^^ '41- ;•",- -if' \isk -i
RCMP launch intensive attack on campus crime
By FRAN MACLEAN
UBC's high crime rate has prompted the
RCMP university detachment to launch a
campus wide anti-theft publicity campaign.
"Thefts at UBC totalled $22,000 last year,"
Cpl. Rod Derouin said Wednesday.
The RCMP estimates more than $100,000
was actually lost in UBC thefts, because only
one in five thefts are reported, he said.
"We recognize that statistics on theft are
astronomical and it is for this reason we applied for a grant from the B.C. Police
Commission," Derouin said.
The RCMP received a $2,000 grant from the
commission in July to start the anti-theft
campaign. Derouin said an additional $500
was received from UBC for the campaign.
The RCMP published an information
bulletin telling students how to prevent thefts,
which was included in all pre-registration
forms.
The RCMP will also distribute anti-theft
posters around campus next week.
Orientation lectures, pamphlets, posters,
and personal contact with students will be
included in the campaign, Derouin said.
"We want to make students aware of the
problem and what they can do about it," he
said.
The person who-wraps his watch around his
wallet to time his studies and then leaves for
five minutes is equally as guilty as the person
who steals the watch and wallet, he added.
"The person sitting across from him will
only do that (steal) because he saw that person
get up and leave."
Derouin said the major part of the anti-theft
program is aimed at making students aware of
what can be done to prevent theft.
"Students don't identify their property,
they leave valuables on their car seats and they
leave their lockers open. The library has to be
one of the worst areas for theft because people
leave for a few minutes to go to the washroom
or copy machine and don't take their purses or
wallets.
See page 3: UBC Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, September 21, 1978
Despite UBC promises
'Teaching assistant salaries too uneven'
From page 1
TA salaries have increased at the
same rate as faculty salaries. The
discrepancy between the stated
policy and the implemented policy
ranges from $258 a session for an
applied science TA, to $839 for an
Efiglish 1 TA. Their current
stipends are $1,307 and $3,856
respectively, as opposed to $1,565
and $4,695 they would receive if the
policy had been followed.
The TAs made a presentation to
the board of governors Dec. 20,
calling for policy implementation,
the bringing of stipends to the
stated levels and the diminishing of
discrepancies among TA salaries in
different faculties.
Smith said no written reply was
received, but he spoke to Vogt in
July and was assured the requests
were to be met.
In August Smith said he was told
at a meeting with faculty deans that
the TAs would have to accept an
across-the-board six per cent in-
WOMEN STUDENT'S
OFFICE
CAREER
ORIENTATION
"GO HIRE YOURSELF
AN EMPLOYER"
Career Counselling Workshops
I—For WOMEN (3rd & 4th year); 3 THURSDAYS,
Session 1, OCT. 12; Session 2, OCT. 19;
Session 3, OCT. 26; 12:30 - 2:20 p.m.
II—For WOMEN (Returning/Mature); 3 THURSDAYS,
Session 1, OCT. 26; Session 2, NOV. 2;
Session 3, NOV. 9; 12:30-2:20 p.m.
Ill—For WOMEN/MEN (3rd & 4th year); 3 THURSDAYS,
Session 1, NOV. 16; Session 2, NOV. 23;
Session 3, NOV. 30; 12:30-2:20 p.m.
Workshops will include evaluation of skills, career
and  lifegoals,  resume writing and  interviewing
techniques.
Facilitators — Maryke Gilmore, Workshop II, Tel.:
228-3449.
Diane Waterman, Workshops I & III,
Tel.: 228-6271.
PRE-REGISTRATION REQUIRED
PLEASE SIGN UP ON
WOMEN STUDENTS' OFFICE DOOR
Buchanan Building, Room 456
or call: 228-2415
Water proof Rain
Gear that Breathes
Featuring the revolutionary
new fabric
GORE-TEX f
$
Quality Gore-tex
rain parka
A MOVING SPECIAL from the
expanding Pack & Boots Shop
Drop by our new larger location
NOVEMBER 1, 1978 at
3425 W. Broadway
PACK&
BOOTS SHOP
1406 West Broadway Tel. 738-3128
710 YATES MALL VICTORIA 383-2144
crease, with no change in the
discrepancies among different
faculties.
"Their attitude is open-market
labor," Smith said. "If they can
pay 32 cents rather than 33, they'll
pay 32.
"If they can get a fine arts TA
for $3,000 and have to go to $4,000
for a chemistry TA, then that's
what they'll pay."
He said the TAs still cannot get a
written acknowledgement from the
administration that their request be
considered when the new policy is
formulated.
But Vogt said the TAs have been
consulted continuously in forming
the new policy. "They have met
with the committee and will continue to meet with them" he said.
CampusBank
■The Little Bank That's A/ways Open'"
At U.B.C.
We are pleased to announce the placement of
an "INSTABANK" cash dispenser at our
Student Union Building Branch. You may
now withdraw cash from your chequing
account on a 24-hour-a-day basis. There will
be no additional charge for use of the
dispenser and the CampusBank card is free!
How
to use
With CampusBank
you can . . .
• withdraw     cash     from     your
personal chequing account
• avoid line ups
• make deposits
have 24 hour a day — 7 day a
week service
•   obtain up to $25 cash a day
Remember Your CampusBank Card is free...free ...free.
J^L   The First Canadian Bank
Bank of Montreal Thursday, "September 21, 1978
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
UBC board callous charges c'tee
By JEFF RANKIN
The UBC board of governors has
repeatedly taken a weak and callous
stance on human rights issues, a
member of the committee for the
defense of human rights in Chile
charged Wednesday.
Rod Haynes said that in two
separate instances the board
refused to use its power to aid the
movement for restoration of civil
rights in Chile.
"There are very few places in
society that you can turn to for a
legitimate concern for moral
issues," he said.
Haynes was critical of two recent
incidents involving the board. In
the.first case, he said, a petition
signed by thousands of people was
presented to the board, asking them
to send a representive to Noranda's
upcoming   shareholders   meeting.
Since UBC holds 1260,000 worth
of shares in Noranda, they could
have voted against planned investment in Chile, he said.
But all the board did was send a
letter mildly condemning countries
which abuse human rights and
expressing its concern, said Haynes.
"The second case was when we
asked the board, through a motion
presented by student member Paul
Sandhu, to send telegrams to the
Chilean and Canadian governments
concerning the fates of 2,300
Chilean political prisoners," he
said.
"The motion was overruled.
"We (the committee) feel that the
callous way they have ruled out of
order such a request when they were
DYNAMIC DUO OF would-be candidate Marcus Gee, at unusual loss
for words while standing at podium, and Chris Gainor, Gee's public relations officer, ponder future after Gee was declared too sane to contest
Alma Mater Society presidential election. Gainor, a former Ubyssey
-geof wheelwright photo
editor and would-be Tory bagman, said candidate was upset at
ruling and contemplating partial frontal lobotomy to get back in running.
Gee, a former Ubyssey news editor and cover boy, had no comments for
the press.
Tentative agreement could end CUPE strike
Cariboo College administration
and non-teaching staff have
reached a tentative agreement
which could end a month-long
dispute.
Local 900 of the Canadian Union
of Public Employees and the
college council met separately
Wednesday  night  to  vote  on  a
proposed agreement.   .
Details of the proposal have not
been released.
Faculty members refused to cross
union picket lines Monday. The
college council reacted by cancelling all classes and closing the
college.
CUPE demands include a wage
Roth man's sales stopped
EDMONTON (CUP) — The
University of Alberta students
union has stopped the sale of all
rothman's tobacco products from
its retail outlets to protest the
company's ties with South Africa.
The decision, made by the
student council over the summer, is
part of a campaign to oppose the
South African regime's apartheid
policy and to investigate student
union linds to South Africa, with
the aim of severing them, external
vice-president Steve Kushner said.
The council is also looking into
the possibility of banning Carling-
O'Keefe products from all student
union liquor function. According to
Gordon Turtle, a student who
brought the matter before the
council, 50.1 per cent of Carling-
O'Keefe stock is owned by Rothman's of Canada, which in turn is
owned by the Rothman group of
South Africa.
A few dificulties are expected
because of the boycott, said student
union officials. Alberta liquor laws
currently require licensed lounges to
carry all brands of alcoholic
beverages. The student union will
be lobbying the provincial
government to change that
regulation.
The boycott of Carling-O'Keefe
products will also have to be
ratified by the university's board of
governors, who are co-holders of
the liquor license.
The council also voted to form a
committee to conduct an
educational campaign on South
Africa's apartheid policies.
increase, an elimination of outside
contracting and job security
guarantees.
The college council originally
rejected an offer by the union to
submit the dispute to binding arbitration.
The students' association, in
anticipation of a lengthy strike, sent
a plea to the Alma Mater Society
Wednesday calling for student
support of the union demands.
AMS external affairs officer Kate
Andrew said she personally supported the students' request that the
council resolve the dispute immediately.
"The students up there are really
disillusioned and don't see much
support for them, so anything we
can do will be appreciated," said
Andrew.
Neither the college association
student president nor the local
union office could determine who
was responsible for the surprise
return to the bargaining table.
"I wish I could help you out, but
I'm as much in the dark about who
got them back to negotiations as
you axe," student president Kelvin
Stretch said in an interview from his
Kamloops office.
The result of the balloting will
not be known until at least noon
today.
the only governing body of the
university is the issue here,"
Haynes said.
George Morfitt, who was
chairman of the board of governors
at the time, said Wednesday that his
reasons for rejecting the motion
were that it did not deal with the
business of the university.
"The board felt that we had
discussed it previously and decided
what to do on the Noranda matter,
and when it came up a second time,
we felt it was a matter outside of the
business of the board," he said.
Haynes said the committee asked
the telegram be sent "in the hope
that the more people we could get
to express their concern to the
Chilean and Canadian governments, the more likelihood of
getting something positive happening."
The committee does not want or
expect UBC to sell their Noranda
stock, he said. "Rather we want
them to use their leverage to
represent the feelings of the
students and people more strongly.
"Selling snares would just be
washing their hands of it."
UBC crooks
hit students
on campus
From page 1
Derouin added that if students
would mark their property it would
make it difficult for the thief
the stolen item.
"We've had about 12 reports of
stolen bicycles this year, but people
just won't mark serial numbers on
them."
The opening of UBC's new
Aquatic Centre this month has
begun to increase the number of
thefts on campus.
Derouin said that although only
one pool theft has been reported at
UBC's new Aquatic Centre, there
have probably been considerably
more. '
Derouin said a major part of the
anti-theft campaign would be
directed at making students aware
of the consequences of stealing.
"We believe that the thieves are
fellow students, and if a person is
caught it would mean probable
dismissal and a definite criminal
record."
Derouin said that a number of
UBC students were charged with
theft in 1977m "Few outside people
come to the campus and any
visitors wouldn't hang around the
library, which is one of the worst
areas for theft," he said.
Derouin said thefts of university
equipment are also a problem.
He said the university will have to
pay for stolen lab equipment and
computer time, and it will probably
come from students' pockets.
r
Hacks dash for open senate seat
Hats are furiously flying into
the ring for the UBC student
senator byelection, but a
bureaucratic returning officer
refuses to reveal the identities of
the candidates.
Marlea Haugen, student
representative assembly returning
officer, said Wednesday four
candidates had filed nominations
for the position.
But only Arnold Hedstrom,
former senator and Alma Mater
Society secretary/treasurer, has
publically announced his intention to run for the post.
Haugen   said   she   would   not
reveal the names  of the other
candidates because "they might
decide   to   withdraw   from   the
^election."
Hedstrom said Wednesday he
chose to run for election because
he missed sitting on senate.
Hedstrom said he would like to
concentrate on teacher
evaluations and library improvement if elected.
"Senate should be very
receptive to student proposals and
should encourage students to
introduce new programs," he
said.
Former Ubyssey news editor
Marcus Gee Wednesday
squelched all rumours that he
would run for either a senate
position or the AMS presidency.
"I am not, I repeat not, a
candidate at this time," he said at
a poorly attended press conference in SUB Wednesday.
The student senator seat was
left vacant after Lome Rogers
resigned to travel to Mexico.
Nominations for student
senator close at 4 p.m. today.
HEDSTROM. . .riding Tory wave? Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, September 21, 1978
Dam rights!
The best news we heard this week is
that B.C. Hydro chairman Robert Bonner would like this province to export
more electricity to the United States.
After all, who needs water which
flows uselessly out to sea. The
Americans want the energy and now we
have a chance to make a bundle selling
the power to them.
We should start damming our best1
rivers now to exploit the full benefit of
the coming energy shortage.
And the first place to start is with the
Fraser River. We should reactivate immediately the original plans for the construction of the Moran Dam.
One of the tragedies of this province's
economic history is that we let that
weak-kneed NDP government kill this
imaginative and innovative project,
started by the foresighted Socred
government under W. A. C. Bennett,
the best premier this province ever had.
Bleeding heart liberal environmentalists will moan and weep about the
destruction of irreplaceable natural
ecosystems. It is to laugh. How can one
even compare the lucrative benefits of
massive hydro-electric projects with the
preservation of some runty sub-species
of fish, fowl or animal, which will probably become extinct anyway.
The fishing industry, concerned only
with its own selfish motives, will scream
that these projects will destroy entire
salmon runs.
If the province's fishermen can't find
fish after the construction of a few
dams, then maybe they should become
loggers.
And the narrow self-interested farming lobby will object to these proposals,
arguing that rich river bottom land is
best for agricultural uses.
Expropriate them and send them
packing. Who needs a bunch of hicks
anyway, when we can have clean electric power in their stead.
Bonner also rejects suggestions of
development of the "exotic (energy)
alternatives so dear to the hearts of protestors."
Right on! The federal government
blew it when they set aside millions for
the development of solar power, the
cure-all alternative proposed by longhaired eco-freaks.
Fortunately there is no danger of the
provincial government pulling that kind
of stunt.
The time for massive redevelopment
of our dormant energy resources is now.
Let's get the bulldozers moving. With a
little bit of luck we can be selling our
province down the river to the
Americans in no time.
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Letters
Conference chairman slams hacks' boycott
You know that ripped-off feeling
you get when the pop machine eats
your 35 cents? That's the feeling I
got after reading why the AMS
hacks are boycotting the leadership
conference this year.
Let's get a few facts straight:
1. the conference is organized
by a committee of eight students,
who sent the invitations and plan
the agenda. We have the help of a
few "nostalgic alumni" who
planned the conference last year,
but whose role this year is limited to
offering advice, handling the
correspondence and funding one
third of the cost.
It remains the Alumni
Association's intent to completely
divest itself from the conference, as
well it should. It would have been
possible this year if the AMS had
decided to support it.
In any case, the fact that the
students are running this year's
event has been made clear to Kate
Andrew and the other hacks on
many occasions. Either they don't
listen or don't believe us.
2. The committee took immense
care in sending invitations to as
wide a spectrum of student
organizations as was possible. All
undergrad societies, about 10 clubs,
(including all the political clubs and
the Young Socialists, many athletic
and other activity clubs) and the
entire SRA and SAC.
The delay in the AMS invitations
was only to ensure that with the
limited space at Camp Elphinstone,
there would be enough room for all
of them, after the others had
responded. This has also been made
clear many times, and suggestions
that I was coerced into inviting any
AMS member are blatant lies.
If any bias exists in the
delegation, which we have consciously avoided, it is only because
the invitees have not responded, or
declined to attend.
3. The conference agenda deals
mostly with problems facing
student organizers (which may be
the reason that many faculty
members are unable to attend).
There are information sessions on
how the administration functions,
similarly for the AMS, fund-raising
ideas, the new student services setup, and many other topics
suggested by the delegates themselves.
If the AMS hacks don't like
students discussing their operation,
it is unfortunate.
But there is no reason that
students who pay $24 in AMS fees,
and 25 times that in tuition,
shouldn't discuss how it's spent.
4. Friday's Ubyssey article dealt
at length with the lingering
suspicion that the conference is an
administration brainwash. Son't be
ridiculous. The agenda is planned
by students on student issues; the
sessions allow presentation from as
many diverse viewpoints as
possible, and the moderators are all
students. With the delegation in the
approximate ratio of 110 students:
30 faculty/staff/administration: 10
alumni, it is likely that the floor
discussions will bias the students.
Any deficiencies arise solely
because of the reluctance of
students to participate (are you
listening, Kate?).
No, the conference doesn't have
any "concrete results" in terms of a
tuition or bus fare roll-back, but
then what does? It does give student
organizers a chance to meet the
people they have to deal with,
perhaps learn something of use,
and to tell Doug Kenny what they
think of another tuition hike.
Any takers?
David W. Rowat
chairman student leadership conference
Life at library not so fine
THE UBYSSEY
SEPTEMBER 21, 1978
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and not of the
AMS or the university administration. Member, Canadian
University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial office is in
room 241K of the Student Union Building. Editorial departments, 228-2301; Advertising, 228-3977.
Editor: Mike Bocking
The corn crop had failed and the future of the country folk looked dismal. "Someday, all this will be
yours," croaked a crusty old Bill Stillborn as he puffed on his corncob pipe and patted his two little
bushleaguers Tom Hawthorn and Heather Com on their respective noggins. The young fry Chris
Bockcorn and Jeff Rankcorn wallowed woefully in the homestead swamp and fretted over their bleak
future. Suddenly a bearded hillbilly Verne McDoncorn emerged from the bush and surveying the sickly
cornpatch bellowed: "I ain't seen no grass in daaaaaaays." He passed his corn-infested feet over the
crop of Len Mackcorn and Kevin McGeecorn and almost trampled Geof Wheelcorn and Patti Birdscorn
who lay snuggled behind the shed. "OOOOOooooh, wait til I tell momma on you," cried the stoolie
Julie Wheelcorn." Y'all catch one helluva lickin' ". She cuddled up to the scruffy scarecrow Mikej
McBockcorn and tickled him silly with a handful of hay. "Well, I declare. I ain't seen no corn husks like
this in all my life," bleated the barnyard belle Fran Macorn as the menfolk looked on with shamed
faces. Chris Fulkcorn and Peter Manyaszcorn frolicked in the hayloft and had loads and loads of fun flinging cow patties high in the sky with cold pitchforks. "That's real corn," said the moo-cows.
I would like to correct some of
the information presented in your
Sept. 14 story on library fines.
Your reporter has created the
impression that the library would
like to receive funds collected
through library fines. This is not
true and was certainly not implied
in any comments made to her. Nor
was the effect on the library of the
"devaluation of the Canadian
dollar" even mentioned in our brief
conversation.
As I indicated to her, any funds
collected through library fines are
paid into general university
revenues because the library should
not place itself in the position of
profiting from fines assessed solely
for the purpose of getting books
back when they are needed by other
borrowers.
The present policy on library
fines was adopted after wide
consultation with library users. It
was continued only after a second
survey, one year later, showed that
most library users felt it was both
fair and necessary.
Fines are assessed when overdue
books are requested by another
borrower. Those students who
amass large fines have either inconvenienced other potential
borrowers on several occasions or
have failed entirely to return the
books they have borrowed.
Although the rate at which fines
are calculated was increased two
years ago to $1 a day (to a
maximum of $25), fewer fines are
required under the present system.
This is in keeping with the general
view that penalties should be stiff
enough to ensure the return of
books that are in demand and that
more consistent enforcement is
necessary if fines are to be effective.
At the same time, a formal appeal
procedure was established to take
care of those cases in which
borrowers feel they are being
penalized unfairly.
I would like to emphasize that
library fines are not assessed for the
purpose of generating revenue for
any part of the University. Their
sole purpose is to ensure that
library materials can be made
available to those who need them.
We would be happy to stop fining
library users if a better method of
accomplishing this could be found.
Incidentally, though your
reporter did not ask, I think that
this library has received excellent
support from the university for the
purchase of new library materials.
Other university libraries in Canada
and the United States have been far
less fortunate in obtaining the
funds required to keep up with on.
Douglas N. Mclnnes
assistant librarian
public services
BoG maligned
I would like to correct some
major errors in your Sept. 14 report
and editorial concerning the
election of Ian Greenwood as new
chairman of the UBC Board of
Governors.
The chairman is normally elected
to serve a one-year term. George
Morfitt attended his last regular
meeting as chairman on July 4th.
As he indicated to you, the post is
rotated so other members can have
an opportunity to serve.
Announcement of the election of
a new chairman was circulated to
board members the week before the
meeting was held, as an item in the
regular agenda.
The election is held at the last
meeting of the summer to give the
chairman-elect time to familiarize
himself with his new duties which
commence with the first regular
board  meeting in  early  October.
The board is composed of 15
members who meet regularly
throughout the year. One would
not expect such a small group to
require a lengthy period to
deliberate on the selection of a new
chairman.
Contrary to your editorial,
Greenwood is still general manager
of the Kelowna-based B.C. Tree
Fruits Limited. In electing him the
board acknowledged the importance which the university
attaches to the B.C. interior as one
of the regions it serves in the
province in its capacity as the
University of British Columbia.
William White
Secretary to the Board Thursday/September 21, 1978
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
God: Get it while it's hot
What does it mean to be a human being?
What are the problems, needs, confusions
that we struggle with and the joys that we
celebrate?
When we get it together to say - this is who
I am, this is what it's all about - what are we
saying?
Those of us who say that the Christian
story is the one we live by, the one we ask
others to live by, need to be careful about
what we say to those questions, especially
because we ask people to trust us, share their
vulnerabilities, make committments. When
we say to people "this is the way it is, come
on board with us", we run awesome risks of
being wrong, of misleading people, of being
arrogant.
c
By BARBARA
BLAKELY
J
So when I as a Christian see the Campus
Crusade film "How's Your Love Life" I am
angry and sad and disturbed. From the
Christian perspective in which I have put my
trust, their perspective is inadequate and
incomplete, and perhaps even actively
damaging.
I'm eiware as I say this that many people do
in fact find that approach satisfying, meeting
their needs, "true" for them. I want to say -
there's more to it than that, it's more
complex, more rich, more mysterious - and
I'm aware of taking some of those awesome
risks. I will try to be clear about my reasons
for saying these things and to be opento
further dialogue and conversation.
The film has been widely criticized for its
Madison Avenue media hype approach,
peddling Jesus like beer. This is an obvious
If looks af problems of
sexuality at the most
trivial and shallow
level.
criticism to make - it's a slick expensive
production, and it knows all the available
gimmicks. The real problem that I have with
this is that it can work - the slides, the music,
the visual onslaught, the emotionally loaded
images - they touch us, grab us, almost
without our awareness.
Exactly because the movie does speak to
real needs, of love and loneliness, of
belonging, intimacy, sexuality - exactly
because the movie does hit us in places of
vulnerability, tearfulness, yearning - this
media hype is a rip-off.
It's blatantly manipulative and exploitive
of real, needs and often terrible fears. The
anguish and despair that lead to suicide are
not to be lightly splashed across the screen,
punctuated by an ear-splitting shotgun blast.
The way to call us to faith is not to play
melodramatically on real needs and fears,
threaten us with a breaking point, and then
sweep down like Superman to rescue us like
damsels in distress. It's a cheap trick. We are
called to faith as adults.
This brings; me to a second point, which I
"How's Your Love Life" is a slick, hardsell Christian presentation which is being
presented at UBC this week by the Campus
Crusade for Christ.
The heavily-promoted presentation
features a film which has outraged campus
chaplains for its crass selling techniques.
Campus Crusade was started by
millionaire Bill Bright and much of the
money for the movement comes from
wealthy American businessmen.
The film depicts a suicide and the so-called
sexual and emotional problems faced by
university-aged people.
In this perspectives article, campus
chaplain Barbara Blakely criticizes their
approach to evangelicism. Blakely is also one
of the first women to become an Anglican
priest in Canada.
feel keenly as a woman and a feminist. The
view of love, of intimacy, of male-female
relationships in this movie, is completely
inadequate. The problems of love and sex
are presented entirely from a male point of
view.
Women are presented in a very romanticised fashion, such as the long series of
slides where women's faces fade in and out
with images of flowers. They are seen as
objects to be got hold of, places where needs
can be met. And the guy in the movie already
fears at the start that "It's the same old story
... You're in love with a lady and you know
she's gonna break your heart."
The anguish and despair
that lead fo suitide are
not fo be lightly
splashed across fhe
screen.
So when his problems come to a head
because he can't find a woman to meet his
needs, it's the same old stereotypical male-
female story. My point is that, yes, the movie
does present real problems, but it does not
present any analysis of the source of those
problems - it presents no cultural and
political critique of our society, of sex roles,
of the institutional structure of relationships
we're conditioned to.
It looks at problems of sexuality at the
most trivial and shallow level, assuming that
they are given, inevitable, always with us.
However, the problems of sexuality have a
lot to do with the particular structures of this
The film is blatantly
manipulative and
exploitive of real needs
and often ferrible fears*
male-dominated society, and need to be
critiqued and changed - and this is a completely Christian quest for liberation and
justice.
Further, sexuality in itself will always be a
"problem" - simply because its an experience
of intensity and vulnerability, calling us out
of our separate selves and into union and
To stay with the sexual metaphor a bit
longer, it's fascinating to me that the woman
describing her conversion experience at the
end of the film says rapturously "and then I
met Jesus" ... he becomes a knight in shining ■
armour who rescues her as a damsel in
distress.
This is the image we are all to fit into, men
as well as women; we are asked to become
passive and dependent, swept off our feet
into ecstatcies  of passion.  As a  woman
■win
conditioned to see love and relationships and
sexuality this way, I know how destructive
these roles are. True adulthood and selfhood
do not lie in this direction for anyone, and
certainly not for Christians.
We are called to faith as adults. As adults
sharing. That is, it's inherently a "religious"
experience, simply because of its capacity to
shatter and transform us. As such, sex and
intimacy are places where we can meet God,
not experiences from which we flee to some
spiritual never-never land.
we do have needs and vulnerabilities, and
these are indeed places where we can meet
God. But we also have strengths, resources,
power - we are not to use these as sources of
control and power over others, but as gifts to
be shared.
We are called to a faith of radical
discipleship - to respond to the challenges of
Jesus to love and do justice - not to a way of
self-indulgence and individualism such as the
film portrayed. The delight we feel in Jesus is
not an end in itself to be enjoyed privately,
but a gift to be shared with the world, and as
a source of evergy and vision for the transformation of that world.
Socreds strike out
The past few weeks the news media in
this province has focused it's attention on the
B.C. Hydro bus fare increases. To date, this
action has prompted three front page, anti-
Socred, anti-fare increase articles in the
Ubyssey along with numerous editorials
expressing a like point of view. Individuals
have been encouraged to use 15-cent
promissory notes when riding the bus as a
way of protesting the increase.
The people who propose such action
obviously base their views on faulty logic.
Firstly, it is most unlikely that anything short
of a general strike combined with
firebombings would change the government's mind on this issue. Secondly, even in
it did succeed, the Socreds would resort to
their old slight of hand tricks and recover the
loss elsewhere. Other social services would be
cut, maybe even funding of universities.
Somehow, someone else would suffer.
c
By BOB STALKY
J
It is most imperative to understand that
when dealing with Socreds we are dealing
with people who feel the poor should suffer
at the expense of the rich. A look at their past
"accomplishments" shows more than
adequately what this government stands for.
Upon assuming office, this government
sought to punish British Columbians for
voting NDP. One of the first and most
controversial actions taken by the government were the Insurance Corporation of
B.C. insurance premium increases. First, the
government sought to convince us that
I.C.B.C. was unstable, so it transferred $181
million to the corporation from general
revenue, all this being done so as to create as
much publicity as possible. Less than a week
later, the funds were discreetly transferred
back. The Socreds succeeded in discrediting
the NDP and "justifying" the insurance
premium increases which ranged from 100 to
200 per cent. The insurance increases caused
a massive backlash against the government,
which was hard pressed to find statistical
evidence to justify them. To make matters
worse, education minister Pat McGeer even
encouraged us to sell our cars if we couldn't
afford to pay the excessive rates.
As a government dedicated to a "user-
pay" concept, individuals are forced to pay
what amounts to a massive regressive tax at
the same time as the government abolishes
succession duties, a move which mainly
benefits the rich. Certainly, the fact that the
Socreds are the government does not mean
that they know how to govern.
Another example of this mentality is found
in the form of ferry rate increases, another
application of the user-pay concept. These
massive increases choked off tourism to
Vancouver Island. This caused hotel owners
and members of the chamber of commerce,
whose members for the most part voted
Socred in 1975, to come flocking to the NDP.
Later, when it became evident that tourism
was declining, Grace McCarthy thought up a
self-glorification scheme which also served as
a tourism campaign. Instead of lower ferry
rates and increasing tourism under an NDP
government, we are treated to higher ferry
rates, smile buttons, and Captain Cook
under a Socred government. While amazing
Grace brags about the fact that tourism is
increasing under the Socred government, she
fails to mention the effect our 86-cent dollar
has on the increase. She also fails to
mention that tourism in B.C. increased under
the NDP government, when Canada was
blessed with a full-value dollar. Smile buttons may be a great scheme, but lower ferry
rates would have been far more effective.
These previous examples bring us full
circle to the present problem of bus fare
increases. Now we battle through more
morning traffic and park even deeper in the
now full B lots. The bus fares are double
what they were under the NDP, and service is
poorer. Adding insult to injury, the Socreds
have just announced further reductions in
services which wil no doubt be justified by
declining ridership caused by the recent fare
increases. Cost-benefit analysis comes to the
rescue once again.
It is because of the Socred mentality that I
find the student representative assembly's
recent action concerning the fare hikes most
inadequate. If the SRA feels allocation one-
thousand dollars to hire an organizer will be
effective it is most mistaken. Unless the
SRA focuses it's attention on the cause and
not the symptoms, it will fail once again.
When someone keeps beating you over the
head, you don't cut your head off because it
is sore, you eliminate the person who beats
you. By the same token, when the government beats you financially, while it puts
party hacks like Robert Bonner on the public
payroll, and while it subsidizes the rich, you
don't attack your emptly wallet, you attack
that government. It only makes sense.
I am not simply an apologist for the NDP.
perspectives
Instead, I am asking you to compare the two
governments and their accomplishments. But
remember, the so-called financial stability of
'the Socreds is but another fallicy. They stay
out of debt by selling, at a profit, the crown
corporations which the NDP bought out of
general revenue. Soon, when all the assets of
B.C. taxpayers are sold off, you will find out
just how good the Socreds are at money
management.
With the possibility of a fall provincial
election looming, let us not forget what both
the NDP and Socreds did for us and to us
(respectively). Remember, the words of
governments mean very little when compared
to their actions.
This little flack piece was written by Bob
Staley, who not surprisingly, is a member of
the UBC-NDP club.
Perspectives is a column open to everyone
in the university community.
Submissions do not reflect the viewpoint
of The Ubyssey. Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, September 21, 1978
'Tween classes
TODAY
UBC YOUNG LIBERALS
Organizational meeting, noon, SUB 125.
LIBERTARIAN SOCIETY
General meeting, noon, SUB 211.
GAY PEOPLE
Introductory meeting, noon, SUB 211.
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Women's drop-in, noon, SUB IX
DEBATING SOCIETY
Demonstration debate has been cancelled.
voc
Basic   mountaineering   skills   workshop,   7:30
p.m., SUB 221.
ROWING CLUB
Introductory   meeting,   noon,   War   Memorial
Gymnasium room 211.
CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR CHRIST
How's your love life?, 11:30 a.m., noon, and 1:30
p.m., SUB auditorium.
SFfen
General meeting, noon, SUB 216.
COOPERATIVE CHRISTIAN
CAMPUS MINISTRY
Guest speaker Raymond Whitehead on Christians and Maoists, noon, SUB 207.
PROGRESSIVE CONSERVATIVE CLUB
Organizational  meeting with  elections,  noon,
SUB 213.
FILMSOC
Production meeting, noon, SUB 247.
HILLEL HOUSE
Speaker Bezalei Porten on the Proclomation of
Cyrus: The first Zionist movement, noon, Hillel
House.
PSYCH CLUB
Bzzr night, 5-12:30 midnight, SUB 215.
AMNESTY UBC
General meeting, noon, SUB 212A.
INTER-VARSITY
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Robert McLeod glorifies God, noon, Angus 104.
SIMS
Weekly meeting, noon, Angus 210.
UBC NDP CLUB
Organizational meeting, noon, SUB 212.
FRIDAY
DEBATING SOCIETY
General meeting, noon, SUB 215.
GSA
Folk night with free admission, 8:30 p.m., Grad
Centre den room.
PANHELLENIC
Luncheon, noon. International House.
MY JONG LAW HORN KUNG FU
Demonstration by Alexander Kwok, noon, SUB
ballroom.
UBC HANG-GLIDING CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 215.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Disco '78, 8 p.m., International House.
COOPERATIVE CHRISTIAN
CAMPUS MINISTRY
Salmon barbecue, 5:30 p.m., Lutheran Campus
Centre.
DEBATING SOCIETY
Demonstration debate, noon, SUB 215.
MEDIEVAL SOCIETY
Get acquainted night, 7:30 to 10 p.m., SUB 215.
SATURDAY
VOC
Long hike and dance, Brittania Beach Social
Club.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Latin America night with band, food and culture
for $2:50, 6 p.m., International House.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
AND COOPERATIVE CHRISTIAN
CAMPUS MINISTRY
Living the faith morning conference with Rev.
Jim Martin, 10 a.m. to noon, Lutheran Campus
Centre.
SUNDAY
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Gym nite, 7:30 p.m., Thunderbird Gym.
MEDIEVAL SOCIETY
Medieval dance instruction, 1 p.m., SUB 207.
MONDAY
UBC ATHLETICS
Tryouts for junior varsity men's basketball, 4:30
p.m.. War Memorial Gym.
TUESDAY
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
General meeting, noon, SUB 130.
CREATIVE/CONTEMPORARY
DANCE WORKSHOP
Workshops open to everyone, 5 p.m. to 6:30
p.m., every Tuesday, Armory 208.
SAC DIRECTOR OF FINANCE
Meeting of all club treasurers, business
managers, social coordinators and signing officers, noon Tuesday and Wednesday, SUB 206.
WEDNESDAY
VOC
Meeting and slide show, noon, Chem 250.
Gauguin for if
af arf gallery
Now, for a limited time only, you
can get your very own great works
by the greatest painters, including
Cezanne, Van Gogh, Rembrandt
and Gauguin.
The only catch is that the works
are only prints of the originals, but
for $1.75 and up you too can own
some of the world's finest works.
These artists and many others
will be available today until Sept. 29
in the SUB art gallery. This offer is
available only during this period and
may not be offered later this year,
so act now.
Over  1,200 prints will be for sale
Hot flashes
in the gallery, which will open daily
from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Australian art and works by M. C.
Escher are featured attractions.
And no, they are not being sold
by K-Tel, but the sale is being sponsored by the AMS art gallery.
SF fans?
Folk fun
There's nothing folksier than an
honest-to-goodness down home
earthy folk night.
The folks down at the Graduate
Students' Association are holding
one humdinger of a folk night. If
Joan Baez sends chills down your
spine, then make sure you git to the
Grad Centre Garden Room by 8:30
p.m. Friday.
Do you think the Millenium
Falcon was a movie starring
Humphrey Bogart?
If so you probably won't be
interested in the UBC science
fiction and fantasy club.
The club will be holding a general
meeting today at noon in SUB 216
and new recruits are welcome.
STEREO
SERVICE CENTRE
A worn needle can ruin your records
"Free" Inspection
Most popular style in stock
.lS88W.4th.Ave. 731-9813
IMKGJNUS
EXHIBITION
/IND SALE
OF FINE ART PRINTS
SPONSORED BY
AMS
Art Gallery
featuring the works of Chagall, Dali, Matisse,
Breughel, Cezanne, Van Gogh,
Homer, Klee, Monet, Magritte, Picasso, Miro,
Bosch, Renoir, Toulouse-Lautrec, Wyeth ,
Gauguin, Rembrandt.   Group of Sewn,  Blish
and others.
PRICES
LARGE   PRINTS
$3.50EA3FOR$8.50
SMALL   PRINTS
$1.75 ea 3F0R$4.5O
DkTE Sept. 18-29 (excl. wk.-end)
TIME 9 q-m- -5 P-m- SPECIAL FEATURE:
PLACE Art Gallery — Australian Art and
Union Bldg. M.C. Escher
Over 1200 different prints
INTRAMURALS IS FOR YOU
For Schedule Refer
Page 86-88 INSIGHT 78
Dial Inter-Action
228-2401
Rm. 210, War Memorial Gym
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES:   Campus - 3 lines, 1 day $1.50; additional lines 35a
Commercial ^,3. lines, 1 day $2.50; additional lines
50a Additional days $2.25 and 45c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance, Deadline is 11:30 a.m., the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room 241, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. VST tWS
5 — Coming Events
10 — For Sale — Commercial
COMMUNITY SPORTS. Excellent prices
for ice skates, hockey, soccer, jogging
and racquet sports equipment. 733-
1612, 3613 West Broadway, Vancouver,
B.C.
1945 RAMBLER WAGON. Faculty owned and well maintained since new.
Radio, mounted snows, roof rack, 6
cyl., 3 spd., 88.000 miles. Just passed
city test. New muffler and tail pipe.
Good condition, 15-20 m.p.g. $500 obo.
266-4051. Arrange for viewing on
campus.
11 — For Sale — Private
MICROSCOPE WILD M12 for sale. Bin-
ocular outfit, attachable Kohler lamp.
Phone Chris: 228-1088 or 228-4537.
$1,000. .
1M9 CHEVY NOVA Good condition,
itecent city test. $500 o.b.o. 2S1-M46.
'«» VOLVO 142 S. New radials, original
owner. Super well looked after. Four
cylinder, great on gas. Beady to go.
$1,350. 733-4872.
25 — Instruction
FR^E complimentary music lessons on
guitar in an innovative method. "Having studied guitar for one year at
McGill University, prior to Mr. Mer-
enda's classes, I can truly say that
his approach to the guitar is far
superior and that I spent a good
portion of the time undoing the bad
habits I had picked up from previous
instruction." — McGill Bachelor Music
Student. Accomplish in three months
expertise and skills which may take
one year or more in conventional
study. First time in Vancouver. Limited enrollment. 732-7314. Teachers
Workshop for music majors. 73B-7314.
65 — Scandals
CITR   UBC    RADIO   FM   CABLE   95.9.
The sound of the campus open for
membership. Boom 233 SUB. Come
up for a look around.
FLESH—FLESH—FLESH    CORDON    is
now playing at SUB Theatre. Softcore porn. Only $1.00.
70 — Services
CINEMA WEST presents REEFER MADNESS and MARIJUANA (tell your
children), in the old aud., Fri. and
Sat. 2 complete shows each night.
Only C1.00!
85 — Typing
ON CAMPUS TYPIST. Fast, accurate.
Reasonable rates. Phone 732-3680 after
6:00 pjn.
TYPING — 75c per page. Fast and accurate by experienced typist. Gordon,
685-4803.
EXPERIENCED SECRETARY will type
essays, term papers, etc. Can transcribe from a tape recorder. 60r- per
page.  Phone 732-1597.
90 - Wanted
30 — Jobs
THE   LAW   BOARD   REVIEW   CENTRE
is seeking a Regional Director to
assist in the operation of its LSAT
review course in the Vancouver area.
Applicants should have a background
in business, law or related area, and
be available on a part-time basis
October through January. To arrange
for a personal interview during the
first week of October, please write
the: LAW BOARD REVIEW CENTRE,
Suite 330—1152 Mainland Street, Vancouver, B.C. VGB 2T9.
35 - Lost
REWARD for return of Tissot woman's
wrist watch, silver band. Lost Friday,
English Dept.  872-4103.
NEEDED — Volunteer reader for visually handicapped student. Help read
essays, notes and texts. Phone Carol,
738-4191.
WANTED — live-in cook (female pref.)
with cooking knowledge. Kerrisdale
area, comf. quarters. To prepare
dinners and (some) breakfasts for
couple. Weekends off. Wage neg.
High character references essential.
261-5024.
WANTED — One used manual typewriter, one used TV, B. & W. or
color. Phone 22W719. 	
^—^^ —^—^
$4.00 PER POUND of used Canadian
Stamps. Includes stamped portions of
envelopes, wrapping paper and cardboard cartons. No torn or peeled off
stamps. No limit. R. S. Livingstone,
No. 2—1100 2nd Ave. West, Prince
Rupert,  B.C., 624-4480.
99 — Miscellaneous
CREATIVE/CONTEMPORARY DANCE
WORKSHOP starts Sept. 26, Tuesdays,
54:30 p.m., TTBC Armoury, Rm. 208.
Open to anyone with some dance
experience who is interested In exploration of movement, composition,
and performance. For information,
call Marcia Snider, 224-0226.
UBYSSEY CLASSIFIED GET RESULTS Thursday, September 21, 1978
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
Gay magazine faces Ottawa obscenity trial
OTTAWA (CUP) — The Body
Politic, a national gay rights
magazine, will face trial January 2
on charges of obscenity in a case
that has raised questions of
freedom of the press.
The charges arose from an article
in the paper's December/January
issue entitled "Men Loving Boys
Loving Men" which examined
pedophilia.
The trial will come a year after
police raided the newspaper's
offices,   seizing   almost   all    its
financial and editorial records,
including its subscription lists.
According to paper spokesman
Edward Jackson, the raid was "an
obvious attempt to terrorize the
readers of this newspaper" and to
"shut this paper down".
Jackson said freedom of the press
was at stake in the case.
"The real intent of the police raid
was to shut this newspaper down.
They were intent upon taking as
much as they could.
The raid, he said, had the effect
of "intimidating subscribers of a
publication of which the government does not approve."
According to Rick Bebout, a
member of the Body Politic
collective, the paper has been able
to continue publishing since the
raid, although it was "difficult at
first".
None of the documents has yet
been returned to the paper, he said.
However, the staff are allowed
access to them and can copy them at
a cost of ten cents a page.
In June, the Supreme Court of
Canada refused to hear a challenge
by the paper to two Ontario court
rulings upholding the legality of the
search warrant used in the
December raid. No reasons were
given for the refusal.
The lawyer for the paper's
publishers, Pink Triangle Press,
argued that the search warrant was
too vague and would allow the
police to conduct a "fishing expedition".
Those charged in the case are
Pink Triangle Press and its three
— Jackson, Kenneth
and Gerald Hannon.
wrote   the  controversial
'They said there were no fee deferrals'
From page 1
been very supportive," said Ingrid
Gillespie, education 5. "It's my
fault for applying late for a loan).
I'll have to pay a $35 late fee for tuition. But the university should
make some allowances."
The university usually gives
students waiting for their loan a
deferral slip which acknowledges
that they have applied for a student
loan and ensures that they will not
have to pay a late fee.
But until 4 p.m. Wednesday this
policy was not in effect.
Since the first week of classes, the
finance department displayed signs
which read in bold letters: NO
DEFERMENT OF TUITION
FEES other than payroll
deduction."
Students who went to the finance
department for a deferral slip were
flatly refused.
"They told me there were no
deferral slips. Even if I had the required recommendation slip, they
said no way," said Gillespie.
"They told me there were no
deferments and they didn't even ask
me for a recommendation slip,"
said Julie Wheelwright, arts 1.
Students who now wish to obtain
a deferral slip may do so at the
finance department, assistant
treasurer Del Brooks said Wednesday.
"We're giving them a week of
grace. We'll let them off the hook if
they applied early and have a
recommendation slip. To us,
they're excused."
A recommendation slip is an official slip from the awards' office
which gives students "notice of
recommended award" and shows
they have successfully obtained a
recommendation for a student loan.
"There should be no deferrals,"
chief finance accountant John
Lomax said Monday. "Generally,
the policy is no deferrals but they're
waiving it this year and making exceptions."
He refused to comment further.
Chief supervisory accountant P.
D. Bullen said he did not know how
many requests for deferrals had
been made this year, but added the
total was usually a considerably
small portion of students.
BLACK & LEE
TUX SHOP
NOW AT
1110 Seymour St.
688-2481
directors
Popert,
Hannon
article.
They face a charge of
possession of obscene material for
purposes of distribution and
another of using the mails for
transmission of obscene, indecent,
immoral,   or  scurrilous   material.
Bebout said the paper had
already collected $23,000 in
donations to help pay its estimated
$30,000 court costs.
While he did not expect any
problems in collecting the
remaining $7,000, he said the paper
would have to push people into
realizing its situation was still
urgent.
Foreign students safe from health cuts
UBC
Graduation
Portraits
since 1969
Auuiyraitb   ^lufiuui ICtfo.
3343 West Broadway
732-7446
Phone now for your Free sitting
Foreign students in B.C. will not
be affected by health minister Bob
McClelland's decision to cut
foreign visitors from the provincial
hospital insurance program, a UBC
health services spokesman said
Wednesday.
University regulations require
foreign students to purchase
hospital and medical coverage from
Seaboard Life Insurance, he
said.Foreign students receive the
same benefits under the Seaboard
insurance policy as those covered
by the B.C. hospital insurance
program, said Pauline Coll of
Seaboard.
STARTS TONITE
SUBFILMS proudly presents
Students are covered by the
Seaboard insurance policy for one
year at a cost of $155. Students who
remain in B.C. for 12 consecutive
months become eligible for
coverage under the B.C. program,
Coll said.
McClelland's decision will only
affect holders of temporary visas.
Foreign students at UBC hold
special student visas.
ICINEMAWEST
dopily presents
K0RRES
+ ** MOVING AND Ts:
DO TRANSFER LTO.I-
■STORAGE
Big or
Small Jobs
Reasonable
Rates
2060 W. 10th:
Vancouver
732-9898
ALSO GARAGES,
BASEMENTS & YARDS
CLEAN-UPS
Varsity Outdoor Club
LONGHIKE — 78
What? - Hikes both days, supper & dance Sat.
Where? - Brittania Beach
When? - This weekend Sept. 23-24
Info, tickets for Supper and Dance at lunch hour
on Thursday and Friday in the
Clubroom — 18F Sub basement
REEFER MADNESS
plus MARIJUANA (tell
your   children).   Two
complete shows each
night.
Friday & Saturday:
7:00 6 9:30       $1.00
Note: Showings in the
OLD AUDITORIUM.
Thurs., Sun.: 7:00
Fri., Sat.: 7:00 & 9:30
SUB Theatre        $1.00
Curlers   ^£)
Have you signed up to curl
this year?
IF NOT
Phone Rick 224-2070
UBC Curling Club
 Entry Deadline Sept. 28, 1978	
Science Undergraduate Society
Double Disco
In: Sub Ballroom - ID required
Rm 207-209 - free punch
Date: Friday Sept. 22, 1978 - 8:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m.
Tickets available in Rm. 216, Auditorium Annex
until 7:30 the day of the dance.
Discount for Science Students
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA ■
1978 FALL LECTURES
BY VISITING PROFESSORS
F. Denys Richardson
Dr. Denys Richardson founded the Nuffield Research Group in Extraction Metallurgy
at the Royal School of Mines, Imperial College of Science and Technology in 1950 and
is now professor emeritus and senior research fellow at that institute. He is among the
foremost metallurgists in the world, centering his research on the thermodynamics and
kinetics of metallurgical processes. His ability to relate metallurgy to other branches
of science and society makes him an excellent speaker.
METALS IN SOCIETY - NEEDS, PRESSURES, PROBLEMS
Thursday, September 21      In Room 250, Chemistry Building, at 12:30 p.m
ALL LECTURES ARE FREE
PLEASE POST AND ANNOUNCED
sponsored by
H The Cecil H. and Ida Green Visiting Professorship Fund
YOU   ARC INVITED   TO       --
PARTICIPATE   IN ~
HIGH  HOMDAY
SERVIGES #   d
AT M^wSl
CHABAO HOUSE
497 W. 39" AVE.
VANCOUVER,B.C
where the prayers
are meaningful
.. the people
are friendy
and everyone feels
at home.
ttCSH   HASHANA
'tHMIKG StttlCtS-OCT.I.2.3
son. m$0. roes. • ?:it p.*.
• moKKiHt snricts- OCT. 2.3
MOK. THIS.-10:00 A*.
YOM   KIPPUR
• TOtS.tft.-OCT.IO-KOl  »tt*l-4:30r.M.
» wt».M0*mne- ocT.n-if.O0 *■*■
HOLIDAY DINNERS AT END
OF   ALL   SERVICES
324-2400/06
NO  CHARGE Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, September 21, 1978
lif
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should be without.
Canon
CANOLAL1011
CALCULATOR
$42°°
A compact, portable "Mini-Desktop"
calculator with 3-way power systems, ft can
be operated from AC outlet with the AC
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Canon
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VANCOUVER
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HOUU: M0 AM to I WO P.M.
IURNAIY
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HOUU M0 AJ*. to 1040 P.M
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743 C0UJMMA ST.
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10348 UNO GEORGE HCWY.
(Mart to Th. K-Mort)
HOUU: M0 A.M to 1040 P.M
GUUTORD SHOTTING CENTRE
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PERSONAL SHOPPING ONLY—SORRY NO PHONE. COD. OR MAIL ORDERS Thursday, September 21, 1978
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 9
Ontario aid does not compute
OTTAWA (CUP) — As many as
7,000 Ontario student aid applicants have been shortchanged
because of a computer error.
The incorrect assessments were
caused by an error in programming
the computer used for processing
student aid applications, according
to Toby Fletcher, assistant awards
officer at  Ryerson  Polytechnical
"Once you've programmed one
of these little fellows, you know
it will always share your basic
assumptions. Thafs more than
you can say for the
students—not that we aren't
working on that too."
350 register
at Manpower
A new centre devoted to student
employment and career opportunities is meeting much success
on campus since its June opening,
according to centre staff.
Three hundred and fifty students
have registered with the Canada
Employment Centre in Brock Hall
for a wide variety of jobs ranging
from farm labor to part-time
waitressing.
About one third of these students
found jobs from those offered by
79 employers who complied with
the cintre's minimum wage and
equal opportunity policies.
Students should have the first
opportunity at campus jobs, the
centre's acting manager Maureen
Gilchrist   said   Wednesday.
Currently students must apply
for campus employment through
the same employment relations
office as the general public.
The centre was established to
replace UBC student service's
placement centre, which closed last
May.
Both the government and the
university have realized the severity
of student unemployment, said
Gilchrist. She added that the centre
has contacted many companies,
who will be, sending representatives
to the UBC campus in search of
prospective employees.
DOGWOOD
BASKETBALL TRYOUTS
Junior & Senior Men
Sept. 21 & 28
6 p.m. - 9 p.m.
WINSTON CHURCHILL GYM
Institute. Their re-programming
was necessitated by recent changes
in the Ontario student aid plan.
Fletcher also blamed cutbacks in
the student aid operation for the
delays in sending out cheques to
students.
"With cutbacks, they are short-
staffed. Believe me, I have a lot of
sympathy for the people in the
ministry. It was a major change so a
whole new computer system had to
be set up."
Fletcher said the students who
are hurt most by the error are those
who received no money whatsoever, even though they qualified
for aid.
The computer was shut down in
the middle of August in an effort to
correct the problem and resumed
operation Sept. 11, according to
Bill Clarkson, a director of student
affairs for the ministry.
"The computer was tested,
tested, and tested again, but you
just can't think of all the problems
that come up," he said.
However, Fletcher said OSAP
had run the applications through
the computer without pre-testing
the system.
Other causes of the delays included late hiring of editors to
check out applications and a delay
in sending out chapters for the loan
awards officers' manual, Fletcher
said.
He said some chapters are still
forthcoming.
Youth advisory group decides not to advise
OTTAWA (CUP) — A government advisory group set up to deal
with youth unemployment has
decided to make no recommendations on the recent government changes in job creation
programs and unemployment
insurance.
The national youth advisory
group, which advises employment
and immigration minister Bud
Cullen on prospects for youth
employment, did discuss the two
topics at its meeting here September
14.
However, according to student
member Paul McFaden, it made no
recommendations because "it ran
out of time".
"Apparently, the group didn't
want to deal with it (the changes),
so it let the time run out."
During the discussion of the
government's job creation strategy,
McFaden said members expressed
skepticism of government estimates
of the number of jobs that would
actually be created, particularly in
the Jobs Experience Training
program.
The government has estimated an
additional 94,000 jobs will be
created for youth, with 63,000
coming from JET.
The emphasis of the committee
was   away   from   temporary   job
creation and towards making
permanent positions in the work
force, a "big change" from its
former emphasis on short-term
work, McFaden said.
The committee did not want to
neglect temporary job creation
completely, he said, but wanted
more emphasis placed on permanent work.
Other topics discussed at the
meeting included federal and
provincial efforts to coordinate
education, female labor force
participation and youth attitudes to
the world of work.
The group made no recommendations on these topics either,
McFaden said.
A large portion of the meeting
was taken up with presentations
228-6121
PUBLIC
FRI. & SAT.
7:30 p.m. - 9:45   p.m.
SUNDAY
1:00 — 3:00 p.m.
STUDENTS
& CHILDREN    ,75
ADULTS $125
THUNDERBIRD
WINTER
SPORTS CENTRE
LATE PAYMENT OF FEES
A late payment fee of $35.00 additional to all other fees will be
assessed if payment of the first instalment is not made on or before
September 22. Refund of this fee will be considered only on the basis
of a medical certificate covering illness or on evidence of domestic
affliction. If fees are not paid in full by October 6,1978, registration
will be cancelled and the student concerned excluded from classes.
If a student whose registration has been cancelled for non-payment
of fees applies for reinstatement and the application is approved by
the Registrar, the student will be required to pay a reinstatement fee
of $35.00, the late fee of $35.00, and all other outstanding fees before
being permitted to resume classes.
DANCE TO A LIVE BAND
with the
U.B.C.
SAILING CLUB
At: The Grad Student Centre ""
Date: Sat. Sept. 23, 1978 — 8:00 p.m. -1:00 a.m.
Tickets available from Club Executive, AMS office or at the door
R3DFTOP PARKING «
AIR CONDITIONED «
224-4912  HAIRWORLD
2620 SASAMAT (WlOth AVE.& SASAMAT
VANCOUVER
and audio-visual shows, which the
group has to decide to discontinue at its next meeting.
When asked his opinion of the
usefulness of the group, McFaden
refused to comment. He did say,
however, that the group had a lot of
potential although, "it hasn't come
down to grips with the youth
unemployment problem."
The group will  meet again  in
November.
Co-operative Christian
Campus Ministry
(Anglican-United & SCM)
SALMON BARBECUE
Friday, Sept. 22
at 5:30
Come and meet us!
At the Lutheran Campus Centre
(Wesbrook & University Ave.)
Henneken Auto
MERCEDES-VOLKSWAGEN RABBIT-VOLVO
Service—Repairs—Used Cars
8914 Oak St. (Oak & Marine) 263-8121
Notice of Election
An election will be held on the 29th September 1978 to fill the following position within the Alma Mater Society
Senator at Large
Nominations for a person to fill this position will be acceptedwcom-
mencing Thursday the 14th September, 1978. The nomination period
will close at 4:00 p.m. on Thursday the 21st September, 1978.
Nomination forms are available at the Registrar's Office and election
procedures and other information is available at the A.M.S. Office,
Room 246.
Pam Rosengren
Secretary/Treasurer
Room 252, 228-2050
hair studio inc.
UNISEX HAIRSTYLES
FOR APPOINTMENT
224-1922
224-9116
5784 University jttaacttaB»nk of Commerce)
master charge Pago 10
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, September 21, 1978
Computer error costs unemployed $700 each
HALIFAX (CUP) — The
Unemployment Insurance Commission is in the midst of a battle
with people in Nova Scotia who,
because of an error on the part of a
UIC computer programmer, are
being asked to pay back up to $700
each.
Dalhousie Legal Aid and the
Halifax Coalition for Full Employment are representing nineteen
of the 5,058 people affected.
A UIC technician aparently fed
the wrong statistics for four months
of 1977 into the UIC computer and
people unknowingly received over
an average of four weeks benefits
more than the Commission intended.
This summer UIC sent out letters
of "disintitlement" to the people it
claimed were overpaid, and encouraged them to start paying back
through deductions from current
UIC accounts or by paying off the
debt.
Dal Legal Aid and the Coalition
however appealed the decision and
convinced the commission they had
a right to have a group hearing of
nineteen people. They hope the
material they have gathered will
help other claimants making
appeals and that they can set a
precedent by winning a form of
class action suit.
The main argument against the
Commission is the UIC's own
distortion of its act. They found the
commission to be stretching its own
terms to try and collect the money.
A brief presented to UIC
maintains the term "disintitlement" can only be used in cases
of deliberate bad faith on the part
of UIC claimants, such as fraud.
"There is no way it can be used to
collect money lost through the
UIC's own negligence, and there is
no clear legislature to deal with
computer error," the coalition brief
states.
They also discovered that the
UIC has written off its own
mistakes in the past.  The Com-
Creative
Styling
/ 1JX
Style It Right
See what the proper
styling can do for
your   hair.
APPOINTMENT
SERVICE
731-4191
mission once forgot to ask people
who received UIC benefits if they
also received Canada Pension Plan
benefits, an error which allowed
some.people to receive more than
expected.
The Coalition feels equal
compassion should be given to
Maritimers who are in an area
where there are 33 unemployed
people for every job vacancy.
After last week's first hearing the
claimants still felt they had a good
case. The three person judical
board had listened to the entire
brief   and   presented   no   real
argument against it. The meeting
was finished hours before the
appealers had expected. But, as
Ginni Green of the Coalition said,
"The board may listen, but
bureaucracies are known not to be
consistent."
"Besides, the UIC commission
has vowed to fight the appeal to the
highest court in the land, so the
battle is far from over."
Ironically, it will probably cost
the UIC as much as the 1.5 million
dollars it would lose by admitting
its mistake, to collect the overpayment.
HELP YOURSELF
TO HIGHER GRADES
LARGEST SELECTION IN B.C. OF
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* MONARCH NOTES
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*SCHAUMS OUTLINES
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Membership open to 4th year
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-OPEN-
THURSDAYS 8 P.M. - 12 P.M.
FRIDAY HAPPY HOUR 4 P.M. - 6 P.M.
FRIDAY EVENING 8 P.M. - 1 A.M.
BAND EVERY FRIDAY EVENING
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Qb7      grin
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THE Poster & Print
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'Decorate With Posters
PAYMENT OF FEES
THE DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE, GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION BLDG., WISHES TO
REMIND STUDENTS THAT THE
First Instalment is Due On or Before
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 1978
Auditions for the Theatre Department's
Production of
THE BACCHAE
by Euripides
to be presented
November 7 - 22
Directed by DONALD SOULE
will be held on
TUESDAY, Sept. 19 (3:30 ■ 5:30)
THURSDAY, Sept. 21 (12:30 ■ 2:30)
FRIDAY, Sept. 22 (12:30 - 2:30) and (3:30 - 4:30)
in Room 112 of the Frederic Wood Theatre Building
AUDITIONS OPEN TO ALL UBC STUDENTS, FACULTY AND STAFF
BICYCLE
STUDENT SALE
it's the best way back to school
. . . and you save $$$ on this sale!
Raleigh Rampar 10-Speed^
Reg. 139.95 - SALE 122.95
Raleigh Record 10-Speed
Reg. 164.95 - SALE 154.95
Raleigh Grand Prix 10-Speed
Reg. 194.95 - SALE 179.95
Also Chimo, Apollo and many more!
Specials On Touring Bags and Racks!
"Check Our Prices,
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3771 W. 10th Avenue (at Alma)    224-3536
< Thursday, September 21, 1978
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 11
® THC UBYSSEY
$10
PER
MONTH
No. 37
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, JANUARY 9, 1962
Hereof The Southam Trophy
Campus bus
runs hiked
BCE   to   increase   UBC
service 25% next month
B.C. Electric will begin express bus service from two city
points next month in an effort to help solve campus traffic
problems.
Bus service  will also be  improved  between  Blanca  loop
and the university during rush hours.
The plan was announced Monday by BCE planning superintendent D. W. Mills.
"This is not a temporary
change," stressed Mills. 'We will
try it for the rest of the term
and will then make any modifications necessary."
UBC buildings and grounds
superintendent Tom Hughes
said he sees the changes as a
"25 percent increase in service."
"Although it is not the complete answer to tii.? problem it
is definitely a step in the right
direction and shows that the
BCE is working on the problem
— I'hoto  by   Don   Hum
HERE'S A VIEW of student president Al Cornwall as he will be seen by one councillor at the first
meeting in the new Brock board room Monday night. The new horseshoe table is twice as
big as the old one, to accommodate the seven new councillors added last year. The 23
councillors will be spread around the 30-seat table and the furthest will be 30 feet from
the chairman.
Illegal   beer   brings   fine;
man   with   blond   acquitted
Witnesses   at  a   student   trial   student council offices but while   any
Friday told of events .which saw
Student building
consultant called
Student Council decided Saturday to hire planning consultant Porter Butts to aid in the
planning of the proposed student
union building al UBC.
Butts is presently director of
the student union building at
the University of 'Wisconsin. He
has been planning' consultant
for more than eighty student
union buildings en this continent and in  Europe
In a letter to the Council he   of  transportation   for  UBC  stu-
outlined    the    elaborate    four-  dents to and from the campus,"
stage   plan   he   follows in his  Hughes said,
work- Under the new plan:
The   stages    include   prepara-      Twq express buses wU, leaye
t.on   and  subm.ss.on   of   a   pre-  Broadway   and   Main  and   two
l.minary  report and a building   wU1  leave  Qak  and  Broadwa
program   based   on  analysis   of  and trave,  „ Broadway  in
data    developed    from   student  time  to   reach  the us fof
surveys and other methods.
8:30 lectures each morning. The
points.
In  the  afternoon.
buses  will
si student drink half a bottle of
beer in the student council
offices and another student
found with an unidentified blond
girl in the darkened Mildred
Brock room.
Maurice^ Anderson,    a    first
year   education1   student,    was
Butts also prepares a detailed buses wi„ st      on,    at transfer
review  of  the  architects   preliminary floor plans and of the
working drawings for the build- ,                             , „„  „ ,
ing. He would visit UBC for a leave, "ST* at 2:30' 3:3°- 4:30'
few days to evaluate local needs, f and 5^» ***■ »nd ™" tta**
carnage    that    had    been     Council president Al Cornwall to Granville and Broadway, wit*
he was talking to him Beaumont  caused.                                              said  Butts  will  work with the stopS at transfer *>»*».
and the girl fled en foot out of      The quartet then went to the student planning committee. Fare   f«   the express bases
Brock Hall. Kelsey said he and   student    council   offices  where, will be twenty cent*.
Yee    gave   chase   on  foot   and  during  the conversation a half AAaaKvCCPV ic here Between Blanca loop and the
found the girl near the front of   bottle  of  beer  dropped  on the ,*,vvw'' aa^ ' •»"^1 ^ campus,   buses  will   run every
Brock.                                                   floor.                                                        The Ubyssey -was asked Mon- twelve minutes, instead of every
Ai they brought her in Ander-       Kelsey said Anderson picked day to remind students that the fifteen minutes, before 1 pjn.
son came down the stairs near  up the bottle and after offering Aggies abortive attempt at litera- After 1 p.m.. the shuttle serv-
the   council   offices   and  seeing       He   said   when   found   in  the ture, the Moobyssey. will be-at ice  will  operate  every  10  min-
Yee  and  Kelsey with  the  girl.   Mildred Brock room. Beaumont Ubyssey distribution points Wed
immediately offered to pay for   gave the name Vic Patterson,     nesday.
ufes, to make connections with
downtown buses.
Communists   starving   600   million   Chinese
fined $10 for  illegal possession
of liquor  in Brock   Hall.   And .      _ ,        ,
Nen Beaumont, a first year Formosa   Consul   General   charges
pharmacy student,   was   acquit- ———■——™——■——■————i^————»
ted on a charge of conduct unbecoming a student. Both  were
charged  after   events  in   Brock
Hall the night of Nov. 22.
Court Chief Jurtice Lance
Finch referring to Anderson
said: "Because the convicted
deliberately drank half a bottle
of beer in the presence of Proctor Leo Kelsey the court sets
the fine at $10 rather than the
usual $5."
The chain of events outlined
by Kelsey was:
He said he found Beaumont
and the girl when he noticed
one door of the Mildred Brock
room open. He said he ordered
them from the room but then
found the lock broken.
Kelsey then said he told Beaumont he could either be charged
by student court or the RCMP.
Beaumont elected to be
charged by the student court
and the trio set out to find a
student councillor to charge
Beaumont with breaking the
door.
Kelsey said he found education president Stan Yee in the
By MIKE GHENBY
In the last 12 years, the Chinese Communist regime has
brought the 600 million people
of China to the verge of starvation.
The Consul General of the
Republic of China in Vancouver, Mr. Yin-shou Che, made
this claim Monday in a panel
discussion, opening Far East
Week here.
"The Communist regime is,
at this moment, the weakest
and most hated by the Chinese
people since its establishment
12 years ago," he said.
The Chinese Communists in
Peiping are entirely Soviet in
ideology, organization, and
background, the Consul General said.
"In the first five years of
their rule, in order to consolidate their power, the Communists    liquidated    20    million
Remember when?
people whom   thty   considered
counter   -    revoh
said.
"With the inst
so-called people
the Chinese peoi
uced  to  the   sta
than   that   of   -j    Remember the good old days of
zoo'." 1962,   before   that   crown   cor-
Mr. Yin-shlu C poration monster B.C. Hydro
extensive econon existed? Old B.C. Electric really
development in cared about service to their student
mosav customers, as shown in a 16-year
With our experience on Tai-    •refrain    from
giving aid or
Chinese Com-
hen their iron
on against the
se Consul in
luneo Tanabe,
runs are cut back while the fare iry a^iration
goes up and up. ace and free
Yes,   those    were   the days,
friends and you can relive them   the U.N.  be
today   thanks   to   the   current ward   theae
Ubyssey's love for the past. And
Todav   on   tj old Ubyssey story. Nowadays bus   remember, where were you in '62? his apprecla-
mmmmmmmmgm^^^^^^^^^^^^m r  East Week
"We free Chinese, while en-     project  as vital in  promoting
farmers, workin
land, are producing twice that
they   did  ten   years   ago."   he
said.
"Today, of the exports of my
country, almost fifty per cent
are manufactured articles. The
per capita income on Taiwan is
double what it is on the mainland."
The Consul General also
mentioned the improvements in
education and public health.
joying our freedom, naturally
wish to help our people en the
mainland to regain their freedom." he said.
"We cannot write their, off.
We will continue to struggle
for the freedom of the entire
Chinese people."
Mr. Yin-shou Che urged the
Free World to help the Nationalist Chinese or at least to
Canadian-Asiatic relations.
Dr. Policronio de Venecia,
consul for the Philippines,
spoke on the general improvements of his country's national
economy.
He said that the economic
growth depended on the question of giving more rights and
privileges to individual capitalists. Page 12
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, September 21, 1978
JOB-SEEKING STUDENT Lynell Wittal, comm 3, at right, is assisted by UBC manpower
centre staff member Marian Williams. Centre, located in Brock Hall, opened during summer
and replaces student placement service previously run by UBC student services department.
-peter menyesz photo
Staff welcome students to peruse job listings for part-time and full-time work rather than join
Canada's record-size unemployment army. For more information see story on page 9 inside.
Moonlighting fight
UCBC, McGeer indifferent to faculty's battle
The UBC faculty association's
attempts to change outside
professional activities policy for
professors has been greeted with
indifference by university officials.
Eric Vogt, administration vice-
president for faculty and student
affairs, says the current
arrangement is adequate. He added
that the policy, implemented by the
board of governors, serves as a
useful guide for professors.
But former association president
Richard Roydhouse disagrees.
"The existing policy doesn't
make clear exactly how to apply the
rules to a variety of activities.
"For example, if a person in the
physical education department
coaches a hockey team on a
Saturday afternoon it is considered
an outside activity," he said.
"But if someone in the English
department does the same thing it
isn't considered an outside activity.
"The faculty association would
like to think someone is judged on
their academic achievement. If they
fly kites or pull teeth in their spare
time its up to them," said
Roydhouse, a dentistry professor.
And in a telephone interview
education minister Pat McGeer said
Wednesday the refutation of
moonlighting activities by
professors is a matter for their
employers, the university's board
of governors.
Existing restrictions were imposed last year in the wake of
scandals involving applied science
dean Liam Finn and animal
resources ecology professor Julius
Kane.
Finn resigned as dean after being
criticized for making large sums of
money from off-campus work
while receiving $50,000 a year for
his full-time job at UBC.
And Kane is alleged to have used
UBC computer time for his real
estate business and for storing a
novel he was writing.
"At present there is a lot of
concern about policing professors,
but if professors must be policed
there's    not    much    hope    for
universities in this work,"
Roydhouse said.
The Universities Council of B.C.
has also written a report on
"outside professional activities,"
but few council members seem to
remember it.
The council is appointed by the
provincial government and serves
as a liason between the government
and the universities.
Council member P.R. Sandwell
said   he   knew   little   about   the
statement. "I don't know anything
more about the UCBC statement
than the average reader," he said.
Roydhouse said he was most
concerned about the inflexibility in
the university's moonlighting
regulations.
"The demands for a
neurosurgeon and his conditions
for working are likely to be quite
different from that of an English
professor writing a poem," he said.
Outdoor clubs7 $25,000 request ruled out of order
From page 1
Whistler Mountain cabin, which is
now being used by the ski club.
The VOC financed the cabin by
selling bonds and by taking out
AMS loans which have since been
repaid. The cabin was built by VOC
architecture and engineering
graduate students.
nothing to show for their efforts.
"We want compensation. We've
been trying for four years to get this
motion through the SRA. We'll be
back."
The VOC  originally asked  for
$30,000, he said.
"The AMS is making interest on
that  money  right  now,"   former
UBC administration president
Doug Kenny has given a letter of
endorsement to the AMS supporting bus passes for students, and
Pauline Jewett at Simon Fraser
University has done the same, the
SRA was told.
Armstrong    said    B.C.    Hydro
chairman Robert Bonner is more
committee reported.
"In future students will have to
produce identification at the
registrar's office before they can
vote," committee chairman Dave
Coulson said.
The move follows election
irregularities caused by proxy
ballots in a January board election.
AFTER HIGH SCHOOL I
WORKED IN THE BUSINESS
WORLD ANO SAW ENOUGH OF
BACKSTABWN6 TD 00 ME
■ r"^°R LIFE.
SO TD ESCAPE
nr I WENT
iWk TO
COLLECE.
^r>
OUT I WDN*T ESCAPE
IT I JUST ENTERED A
WORLD WHERE ALL T)C
BACKSTABBERS ARE
—tT " V-\ YOUNGER' I
J
SO IN THE ENO, I
MAY FAIL KY COURSES,
BUT I'rt BECOMING AN
EXPERT ON POLITICS/
<H+
McGEER
what, me worry?
VOC president Julian Cunsteo
was shocked at the SRA's decision
to rule the motion out of order.
"We've put all the wealth and
work into the cabin to the benefit of
all VOC members, past and
future," he said
Dunsteo   said   they   now   have
AMS president Dave van Blarcom
said.
A motion calling for AMS
support for local 900 of the
Canadian Union of Public Employees which has been locked out
at Cariboo College, was passed
unanimously.
than receptive to the idea of student
passes.
"We're at the critical stage
now," said Armstrong, a member
of the AMS bus committee.
Students can no longer vote by
proxy in senate and board elections,
the election implementation ad-hoc
A motion was also passed to put
the full support of the AMS behind
tfee fight to get student representatives on the tenure committee.
"The tenure committee has a
direct impact on students, choosing
which professors will get tenure or
not,"    said    Van    Blarcom.

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