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UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Feb 14, 1969

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Array Straight Benefit Dance
MONDAY  FEB.  17  NOON
SUB  BALLROOM
Mother  Tucker's  Yellow  Duck
The  Winters'  Green
MOTHER TUCKER'S YELLOW DUCK (above) will appear with
THE WINTERS' GREEN at the Straight benefit Monday noon.
The Georgia Straight has recently been
saddled with a $1500 fine for criminal libel,
the latest in a long series of attempts to kill
the newspaper.
This time, however, the attempt will succeed, unless enough money is raised to pay the
fine. For this reason The Ubyssey is sponsoring a benefit dance.
Whatever your opinion of the Straight, it
is in the situation it is because of its continual
desire to ridicule and expose the ills and injustices of society, and because of this is constantly under attack from those in positions of
power in our society.
The attempt of the Straight, whether justified or not, to criticize a Vancouver magistrate
and the legal system has been seized upon to
try to silence it.
In the words of editor Dan MacLeod: "At
issue is the right of every person and every
minority to freely dissent, to openly oppose
what they believe to be wrong. It is a fight
against discriminatory laws that can be used
to arrest people watching a fountain or an
antique piece of legislation that can be dragged
out of the books to smash a 'hippie rag'.
If you cannot make it to the dance, bring
your contributions to The Ubyssey office in
SUB or send to Georgia Straight Defence Fund,
217 Carrall St., Vancouver 4.
Admission: minimum 50 cents.
This issue has
no mention of
THS UBYSSEY
Robin Harger
Vol.  L,  No.  43
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 14,  1969
228-2305
Aftermath of Sir George
MONTREAL (CUP) — A total of 363 charges were laid in
Montreal's municipal court Wednesday as police paraded 90
people up before the bench in the aftermath of Tuesday's violent
upheaval at Sir George Williams University.
The occupation ended violently Tuesday and left in its
death throes over a million dollars worth of damage, a fire and
water-gutted ninth floor of the school's Hall building, 90 arrests
and numerous injuries to police, students and by-standers.
Meanwhile, back at the building, an army of student volunteers mopped the halls, dusted books and carried furniture. The
administration is aiming for a Monday reopening of the school.
Perry Anderson, target of the racial discrimination charges
that started the whole, fuss, was reinstated Wednesday by acting
principal Douglas Burns Clarke. His suspension Monday, ostensibly for his own protection, was one action that stiffened faculty
resistance to the students and led to their rejection of a compromise proposal just four hours before the violence erupted.
UGEQ BLAMES ADMINISTRATION
L'Union Generale des Etudiants du Quebec, Wednesday, declared its full support for the students and blamed the administration for precipitating the violence.
The union urged that the public not judge the act of the
students itself but rather its cause. It also denounced the "dishonesty" of certain news media for holding foreign elements
responsible for the action.
In the house of commons Wednesday, external affairs minister Mitchell Shai-p said the government may deport or deprive
of financial aid foreign students involved in the affair.
A breakdown of the people arrested Tuesday runs as follows: 30 women, 60 men, 48 non-Canadians of whom 24 are
from the Caribbean; of the 90, 28 were students of other universities and schools; 49 whites and 41 blacks; 7 juveniles.
McGILL ANTICIPATES ACTION
Just 10 blocks away, McGill University, perhaps anticipating
trouble because of the dismissal of political science lecturer,
Stan Gray, moved to protect its computer installation. One of
the machines was moved off campus, and indications are that
others will follow. The main entrance to the computing centre
was boarded up on noon Wednesday.
Monday night, the whole affair at Sir George seemed calm
and approaching satisfactory settlement. Tuesday morning, it
exploded wildly out of control.
The spark to explosion, ironically, was a weekend-long round
of negotiations between the occupying students and the adminis-'
tration. By Sunday afternoon, the negotiators had hammered out
a working proposal — and that's where the confusion began.
The students' lawyer said he had been told by the lawyer
for the administration that the terms of the agreement — acceptance by the administration of the five demands set by the
occupiers in return for an end to the occupations — would be
ratified by the administrators.
Students demanded that the hearing committee be reconstituted on a basis acceptable to both the professor and the black
students, no punitive action be taken against those involved in
the occupations, and criminal charges laid against three blacks
in a dispute over a misplaced letter be dropped.
The occupiers sensed victory and arranged a party Sunday
night.
Meanwhile, the administration lawyer took the agreement
to principal Douglas Burns Clarke for signature. Clarke hesitated and said he wanted to sleep »n it. The next morning, he
did not sign but rather called a faculty association meeting to
discuss the proposals.
Spirits were still high in the two occupation centres — the
computing centre and the faculty club — everyone waited for
final victory.
But the faculty, after a stormy seven-hour session, rejected
the proposal and replaced it with another one unacceptable to
the students. The faculty was incensed over Clarke's morning
suspension of professor Perry Anderson, ostensibly for his own
protection.
The faculty had also supported the old hearing committee
and was not willing to renege on that support.
Their refusal to accept the negotiated agreement had tragic
consequences.
When the faculty rejection was relayed to the students, they
greeted it with stunned resentment. Two weeeks of frustration
and wearying occuption sharpened into focus. Some occupiers
cried, others hardened and called for a close-down of the school.
At that point, the principle of non-destructiveness still held.
The occupiers decided to seize the entire building. As a
major portion rushed to lock all the entrances, a small group
headed out into independent action. They swarmed into the
cafeteria, seized chairs and tables and started barricading all
the exits and escalators from the fourth floor to the eleventh.
To get into the cafeteria, they took axes to the locks, a move
that brought the police In.
About 4 a.m., 50 uniformed police marched into the school.
As they tried to mount the barricades, they were washed away
by powerful streams from fire hoses trained on them by the
students.
But realizing the weakness of their position, the students
retreated from all areas of the building into the computer centre.
That was the breaking point. Once they had watered down
the police, they were there to win or lose, win or lose big.
The police followed them up. They broke through the barricaded glass doors of the computer centre and were again met by
jets of water from within.
Two policemen were cut — it is unclear whether they were
injured by window gjass or flying bottles, it is probable that both
were involved.
Realizing they hadn't the strength to get in, the police settled
down to a seige. Forty of them stood outside the centre in ankle-
deep waer singing "Michael Row the Boat Ashore".
The students then started to smash up the centre.
They tossed IBM cards, print-outs, papers, research documents — anything they could find — out the windows. These
were followed by typewriters, portable computers, adding machines. Nine floors down, the city streets, now cordonned off
by police for three blocks, were thick with paper. By-standers,
at least 1,000 strong in early morning, waded through reams of it.
The students then announced they would destroy the com-
To page 4
See: POLICE
SIR GEORGE ANALYSIS: pf4
Windsorites
also seize
a building
WINSOR (CUP) —Some 55
University of Windsor students
seized the school's theology department early Tuesday morning in a protest against nonrenewal of a professor's
contract.
The students are also demanding a voice in faculty hiring
processes.
Student discontent with the
hiring policies sharpened two
weeks ago when the theology
department refused to renew
the contract of D. W. D. Kelly.
A demand by students for the
reasons behind the move
elicited a statement from his
department head that university regulations prohibited revealing cause in such circumstances.
Kelly says he was rejected
for causing dissension in the
department and "not understanding department ideas".
His department head, Rev. E.
R. Maliey, CSB, has admitted
Kelly's offences were non-
academic.
When a second petition a
week ago to the school's administration failed to produce
any further clarification, the
students moved into the theology department.
They marched in with sleeping bags, food and cameras and
chained the doors behind them.
They said they would remain
there until the following demands are met:
• Equal student-faculty representation at the department
level.
• Open    meetings    at    all
To page 3
See: ADMINISTRATION Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday,   February  14,   1969
CAMPUS  BLURBS
On Vietnam
What do you knew about
Canadians in Viet Nam?
If your answer is "not
enough", hear Clara Culhane
Wednesday noon in Buchanan
104.
She was a nurse with Canadian Medical Aid to Viet Nam,
and is presently on a speaking
tour of the west coast.
In addition an anti-war veteran GI will speak Friday noon
in BU. 104.
A peace march will be held
in Seattle this Saturday starting 1:30 p.m. at City Hall park.
Heart disease
Pump, pump, pump. Thu-
dump, thuh-dump,  thu-dump.
That's music to the ears of
the heart foundation canvassers who will be on campus
next week soliciting funds for
heart disease research.
The foundation is hoping for
$216,000 in their province-
wide drive.
The money will be spent
largely here at UBC in the
department of anatomy and in
the public education section of
the heart foundation.
TRIUMF cash
The UBC board of governors
has awarded to Stevenson Construction Co. Ltd. the contract
for stage one of Tri University
Meson Facility (TRIUMF). It is
expected stage one, which consists of a combined office
building laboratory and workshop, will be completed by the
fall.
The contract for the gym
was  awarded to  Hans Habler
Ltd. The gym whih replaces
and will be similar to the gym
formerly located on East Mall,
is to be located next the
Thunderbird Winter Sports
Centre. Expected completion
date is fall 1969.
The second part of TRIUMF
is expected to start in 1970.
The total cost of the TRIUMF
project, which is federally
sponsored, is close to 19 million
dollars.
Arts action
Elections for arts undergraduate society positions will
be held Feb. 21. Nominations
for president, vice-president,
treasurer and secretary are
now open and will close Wednesday.
Nominations should be sent
to Box 57,  SUB.
Songfest
The 27th annual Song Fest
takes place this Friday 8:00
P.M. at the Queen Elizabeth
Theatre.
Fifteen fraternities and sororities will be competing for the
festival of songs award and the
program also features a new
folk singing group.
Tickets are for sale at the
A.M.S. office or the Q.E.T. box
office before the show.
Beer Pit is permanent
TUXEDO
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By ALEX VOLKOFF
The Pit finally has a place of its own.
At a special Sunday meeting, students' council gave the Pit Management Committee the
go-ahead to proceed with development plans
for the expansion area on the lower floor in
the south-west corner of of SUB.
Until now, the beer gardens have been
shifting from the party room to the ballroom
extension, and have not been able to operate
on set days.
Since its opening at the end of last term
the Pit increased days of operation from one
to three per week, but once a permanent place
is ready in the basement, it will be run daily.
And it will be available to more than just
membership card holders.
During the day-time from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30
p.m., the area will |be used as a coffee house,
and will be open to everyone on campus.
Then in the evening from 4:30 p.m. to 11:30
p.m. it becomes a beer garden, and only members are allowed.
Besides hoping to provide "the best coffee
o-i campus" the coffee house will serve pastries
and different kinds of buns.
"We don't want to duplicate what Food Services provides in the cafeteria," said Sean Mc
Hugh, chairman of the Pit Management Com-
mitee, "so we're going to find new things to
serve."
A specialty of the Pit will be pizza, made
here by special cooks, and, if proven feasible,
it will be delivered anywhere on campus.
"What's important is that we're running it
ourselves and moreover, it is the members who
pay for it," said McHugh.
Although the initial monies used to finance
the area will be borrowed by the Alma Mater
Society, it will be the responsibility of the
Students   Club  to   repay  these   monies.
Last year's class left $7,000 for the idea of
a pub on campus, even though the idea hadn't
yet been acted on at all.
This year the Pit Management Committee
would like the grad class to donate at least
$10,000 towards the Pit, basically for a good
sound system, and the rest for the furniture
fund.
The interior design for the expansion area
is to be determined by a student competition
amongst members of the School of Architecture. The final selection will be made in the
third week of March, and the Management
Committee hopes building will be completed
in time to open the Pit Sept. 1.
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Get your Swing-Air I. 0. Card from: Miss Diedre Meagher, 3112 W. 5th Avenue Friday, February 14, 1969
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
Hodge, Grahame, Gibson win
By JOHN GIBBS
Ubyssey Council Reporter
Personality appears to have prevailed Wednesday as Fraser Hodge became Alma Mater
Society president.
Despite the apparent lack of political difference between the two candidates, Hodge defeated Les Horswill with the biggest percentage
of votes in AMS history.
Hodge   garnered   4,933   votes   to   Horswill's
1,249, for about 79 per cent of the votes.
On the same slate, Dave Grahame -was
elected co-ordinator and Dave Gibson became
internal affairs officer.
Grahame defeated Hanson Lau with 3,166
to 2,692 votes.
Gibson won over Dave Mossop and Ken
Collier. Gibson had 3,814 votes to Mossop's 956
and Collier's 868.
Acting returning officer Chuck Campbell,
said the total turnout of about 6,350 was
roughly the same as the average of the last
three years.
Hodge said his first priority next year
would be to embark upon a program of education for the citizens of B.C.
"The public doesn't understand what goes
on   at  university,"  he  said.
Hodge said the emphasis would be on person to person discussion, rather than public
marches.
He credited Dave Zirnhelt, current AMS
president with doing an excellent job and
laying the necessary groundwork for what is
planned for the next year.
Hodge said he plans to enter graduate engineering next term.
Horswill attributed his defeat to personality
and Hodge's experience, saying they were
politically similar.
"Fraser had an image of taking a firmer
stand against illegitimate political action on
campus," he said.
Zirnhelt said he was very pleased with
Hodge's election and the intention to conduct
a public relations campaign.
"I'm going to recommend a budget of maybe $20,000," he said. "Its something I've been
thinking about for some time."
Hodge has a clear mandate to undertake
this type of venture, he said.
Trio on council
by acclamation
Democracy in action will give UBC voters
one choice for four offices.
Acclamation has filled three of the four
executive Alma Mater Society positions that
were to be voted on Wednesday.
External affairs is the only position to be
contested with Mike Doyle, Bob McKee and
Fred Buchwold aspiring.
Tony Hodge, eng. I, will join his older
brother Fraser as vice-president, and Chuck
Campbell, eng. II, is next year's treasurer.
Sean McHugh will foe ombudsman also by acclamation.
Candidates and seconders statements for
external affairs will appear in Tuesday's
Ubyssey.
Statements should be less than 100 words
and delivered to The Ubyssey by noon Monday.
Administration  manoeuvre fails
levels
ment.
From page 1
of   university   govern-
• Amnesty for the occupiers.
The administration responded Tuesday by charging "widespread mis-understanding and
misrepresentation with respect
to the facts."
The student council voted
14-2 Tuesday afternoon to support the occupation, but Wednesday, when 3,000 of the
school's 4,200 students met in
general session to discuss the
occupation. Sentiments ran approximately 2 to 1 against the
action though no vote was
taken.
Later Tuesday night, a group
of 60 residence students stormed down to the occupation site
to clear out the demonstrators
but were cooled down by residence heads—all students.
The Windsor police, when
contacted, said they would not
intervene unless asked to by
the administration.
On Thursday negotiations
over the three day occupation
stumbled strangely as administrative officials approached
the occupiers late Wednesday
night and then reneged Thursday morning.
According to the occupiers,
Joe Sasso, head resident at the
school (a hired official who
overseas all residences) came
to the occupation site with an
offer he said originated from
J. F. Leddy. administration
president at the school.
He said Leddy was prepared
to sign any letter drafted by
the students agreeing to their
demands in return for their
evacuation of the building.
The students refused and demanded   to   meet   personally
with Leddy. The next morning,
Leddy not only denied authorizing the proposal, but he re-
Skelton raps
Robin Skelton, British-born
poet and critic and head of
creative writing at the university of Victoria, will read at
UBC on Monday.
Skelton is the author or editor of some 31 books, including
12 volumes of his own poetry.
He is a noted critic and authority on numerous contemporary and early twentieth
century writers.
Skelton's latest work is entitled Selected Poems. Some
five more volumes are expected to be released this year.
The reading, sponsored by
the creative writing department, will be held at 8 p.m. in
Angus  104. Admission is free.
CUS loses 2
OTTAWA (CUP) — CUS
came out on the losing end of
a slate of three referendums
Thursday — it lost two and
two one.
Queen's University voted to
withdraw, the University of
Saskatchewan at Saskatoon
decided to stay out and Glendon College opted to stay in
the national union.
The Thursday results drop
the union's membership to 22
schools. Since the first of the
year, one school (Mount St.
Vincent) has joined, two
(King's College and Glendon)
voted to stay in, five (St.
Mary's Winnipeg, Waterloo,
Victoria, Queen's) have pulled
out and four (Southern Alberta
Institute of Technology, Edmonton, Saskatoon) stayed out.
fused to deal with the students,
calling them an "unofficial
group".
He said he was prepared to
talk to the representatives of
the student council but not
with the occupiers. He reiterated his stance when five representatives of the protestors
came to his office to negotiate.
The occupiers outlined reasons why he should negotiate
Their reasons included a senate statement of the day before
which urged such talks, a student council endorsement of
the occupation and his talks in
the past with unofficial groups.
The talks broke off without
any sucess. Over 150 students
spent Wednesday night in the
theology department and they
were joined by four faculty
members.
Late Thursday afternoon, the
occupiers were discussing the
matter with officials of the
school's faculty association.
The students are conducting
counter-courses and seminars
and say a substantial number
of faculty members are joining
in.
At a student council meeting
Thursday night, council appointed an official five - man
body to negotiate with Leddy.
The five are all occupiers.
Council also called a referendum which will ask students
to support the demands of the
occupiers and calling for a general student strike if Leddy
continues to refuse to negotiate.
The demands now are: Reinstatement of Kelly; parity with
faculty on all departmental
decision-making foodies; representation of the hiring and
firing committee; and access
to the records of all university decision-making bodies.
— lohn frixell photo
LANDSLIDE VICTOR, bashful new AMS president Fraser
Hodge barks orders to his troops: "Paint SUB red." With
brother Tony acclaimed as internal vice-president, and
Chuck Campbell as treasurer, engineers have their firmest
hold ever on student government.
A Mower in a Concrete Plant
Do you have any kind of a problem concerning UBC?
If you do, put it in writing and send it to Flower in a Concrete
Plant, Ubyssey offices, SUB, or leave it in the ombudsman's
office in ihe main foyer of SUB.
A.: In response to the many queries about AMS and library
cards, we have obtained the following information..
For all those who no longer have their pink AMS cards,
these will be reissued on Monday, from 12:30 to 4:30 beside the
information desk in SUB.
The charge will be two dollars.
These cards, as well as the library cards, are needed for
voting in next week's elections. They are also accepted as I.D.
for student rates at theatres, etc., which library cards are not.
Q.: I have a girlfriend on campus, and both of us have some
spare time during the day. Rather than sit around the cafeteria
drinking innumerable cups of coffee, we would like to go somewhere so that we can be alone and undisturbed. Do you have
any suggestions?
A.: We discovered that SUB has a number of beds for unspecified purposes, which can be reached by going through the
Johns down in the games area. The lighting is usually turned off,
which is useful. Also, there are shower facilities in case you feel
like cleaning up afterwards.
For the outdoors-minded, there are all kinds of wooded
areas on campus which provide reasonable cover. The oriental
Nitobe Gardens down towards International House provide a
pleasant background, although the miniature pines are a bit of
a hazard.
So Happy Valentines' Day.
Up Periscope!
This is the first in a series
of regular columns about
happenings and mishappen-
ings  in  and  around SUB.
—a larger, more comfortable
TV lounge, complete with a
25-inch color set, carpets,
and soft lighting, now exists
in SUB 207. This facility, replacing the noisy and overcrowded alcove in the conversation pit was made possible through the generosity
of Mrs. Phyllis Ross.
—second floor poster room is
always available for student
groups; paint and supplies at
small cost; drawing-boards,
tables, drying racks, and
lockable cupboards aplenty
(not to mention the view).
-the first weekly Crashdiver
Prize goes to the sodden
sailor who kicked his way
out of the trophy case during the marathon dance . . .
$80 damage and superficial
cuts.
SUB Management Committee Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday,   February   14,   1969
;mmmmmmMMMmmmmmwMmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm
TMMSSEY
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university year by the
Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are those
of the writer and not of the AMS or the university administration.
Member, Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey also subscribes to the
press services of Pacific Student Press, of which it is a founding member.
Ubyssey News Service supports one foreign correspondent in Pango-
Pango. Authorized second class mail by the Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash. The Ubyssey publishes
Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City editor, 228-2305;
editor, 228-2301; Page Friday, 228-2309; sports, 228-2308; advertising,
228-3977.
FEBRUARY 14,  1969
Police at barricades
From page 1
puters, one by one, until the police left. This was at 8 a.m. and
Clarke had had enough. He toldt he police he "wanted them out
of there, and I don't care how you do it."
WAITED FOR RIOT SQUAD
The police told him they had to wait for the riot squad,
Montreal's crack team designed for crowd control and riot-
busting. The squad arrived at 9:30.
But they didn't move in until 1 p.m.
Various administrators, thinking they could save the computers, wanted to  hold  off.
Meanwhile, a huge mob had gathered in the streets below.
The majority cheered the police. Others, about 400, supported
the students. Fist fights erupted continually, at least five people
were arrested throughout the day. And the police, as they moved
in to quell the fights, used billies to break up knots of people,
injuring several.
One police van was set aflame but the fire was quickly extinguished.
By 1 p.m., it was clear the computers were being destroyed.
The riot squad was given orders to move in and started breaking
down the barricades.
At that point, the occupiers smashed the remaining computers
and set fire to the barricades.
Flames shot out 15 feet and the police drew back. The blaze
was visible for three city blocks. Thick black smoke filled the
corridors and at least five policemen and firemen were overcome by smoke and rushed to hospital.
SMOKE AND HEAT UNBEARABLE
The students, ringed by fire, stayed in a back room near
an open window. Out in the corridors, newsmen and other students fled the area to get away from the smoke, unbearable even
two floors away. Dozens retched in nausea.
The fire began to move in on the students. The riot squad
managed to put out the fire and get the students out before
they were all either burned or overcome by smoke.
The police seized 96 and kept them lined up against a wall
for two hours as they put out fires and awaited instructions.
Only a few of the occupiers managed to evade arrest.
At 6 p.m., they were shoved into nine paddy wagons and
taken away to be processed. The university will press charges
against all of them — one official said: "We'll hit them with
every criminal charge possible."
The students have been charged with conspiracy, arson and
mischief. Mischief alone carries a maximum sentence of life,
arson a maximum of 14 years.
The damage: at least a million dollars worth of computers.
The centre itself won't be functional again until next October.
The whole ninth floor of the Hall building is gutted. Walls
are down, floorboards torn up. windows smashed.
Water damage has wrecked at least five other floors. Valuable research projects were destroyed. Animals in psychology
experiments on the eleventh floor all died. Some adademic
records and exam marks are forever lost.
Ninety-six students now face severe criminal charges and
lengthy sentences.
The university will be shut down at least until Monday
and may take months to get back to normal operation. And of
course, the Anderson case may never be properly handled.
It's a sad story of frustration, ridigity, weakness, absurdity
and betrayal. An administration roundly scorned by students for
mishandling the affair finally came to grips with the situation
and lost out to the faculty.
The students, who had taken such delicate care of the com**
puters for two weeks, finally destroyed them and lost any chance
they may have had of legitimacy.
The faculty, never militant throughout and at no time the
leaders in the affair, raised its hackles at the worst possible time.
And everybody loses — over a dispute about the composition
of a committee.
EDITORS: vying in the frequency and ferocity of
their vows of 'never again*. Main prob-
Co-ordlnitlns    -    Al   Birnie lem was with  all  the  heavies in Win-
...                                                    ,    .. nipeg,   everybody   else   decided  to  stay
Managing      Bruce  Curtis away, too. Thank Christ for the wires.
News      John   Twigg Of   those   few   who   rattled   around.
City               Alex Volkoff. Peter Ladner notable  were  Charles Hulton and Niel
'"■"'"■ Roadrunner,  who   exposed   dirty   scan-
Associate   Paul Knox dals   and Nader Mirhady, John Gibhs,
Wire       Irene  Wasllewski Maurice Bridge, and Nick Orchard, who
Page Friday  Andrew Horvat simply  exposed.
«„_».                                           ■ -_ U.HH-., Rik   Nyland   carried   the   ball   admir-
»P°™   *"m M,aa,n ably in sports, white Tong. Gordie. and
Photo      Fred   Cawsey Frizell, John, toed, ph.
Ass't News   John Olbbs Big Georgia Straight benefit Monday.
People    willing   to    hand   out    leaflets
It was a dark day at the  old home- Monday   a.m..   come   to   The   Ubyssey
stead.   Finlay  sittied  and Birnie   layed, office before  noon.
Plan is to build a drive....
By CHARLES HULTON
In a letter to The Ubyssey last week, Niels
F. von Meyenfeld, arts 3, urged students to
"write to the people concerned! Get on an
open line show! lyiake a sign! Go lie in front
of a bulldozer!" to prevent a road from being
built around the Point Grey peninsula.
Since then some students have called for a
meeting ad vigil to oppose a $5 million dollar
plan for a Point Grey road and marina.
The plan, calling for a waterfront road
around Point Grey, a two-thousand boat marina
and a two-thousand meter rowing course was
discussed last September at a Parks Board
meeting and vigil to oppose a $5 million dollar
students is to stimulate public discussion of the
project to point out its shortcomings.
The road would run from Spanish Banks
west around the wooded tip of the university
endowment lands and the boat harbour would
be protected by a new breakwater off the
long jetty running out from the North Arm
of the Fraser River.
Preliminary investigation on implementing
the plan was started by a Point Grey citizen's
committee in March 1967, including Dr. Bill
Gibson of the UBC department of medicine.
Since the Parks Board has jurisdiction of
the beach land between the high and low water
marks, the committee was joined by city planning director Bill Graham and commissioner
Lome E. Brown.
From the outset the committee was primarily concerned over erosion of the shore by
run-off water from the cliffs, seepage from
the ground and sea water.
An engineering firm drew up the plan
which became part of a report adopted by the
committee in June 1967. From then on negotiations rested with the Parks Board.
The intention of the Parks Board at that
time was to ask the federal government for
$1.27 million to be used for dredging and a
breakwater, and $1.7 million was to be sought
from the province. Private interests were to
donate $265,000 for the rowing course and the
rest was to be financed by the Parks Board
through the city.
However, no funds have been allocated by
the federal government on the city although
it appears that now construction is actually
going ahead — trucks have started dumping
fill on the beach — at the expense of private
interests.
Board commissioner George Puil confirmed
this Monday and added that he felt 50 per cent
of the student body would benefit from the
project.
Last year's captain of the rowing team Eric
McAvity termed the project "heaven-sent" as
there will be a breakwater and natural lagoon
for the thirty-odd rowers on campus.
Many students seem unaware of what the
basic issues are. Few people disagree about
the marina and rowing course proposals but
why should a lovely setting like University
Beach be defaced by a highway? While in
many cities like San Francisco one must travel
many miles out of the city to reach a wilderness area, Vancouver is fortunate in having
such areas, like Stanley Park and University
Beach nearby.
To keep it this way UBC student Fred
Boehm has called for a meeting at 8 p.m. Monday in the SUB club's lounge to discuss the
proposed roadway. It is hoped that all those
concerned about the sacrifice of Vancouver's
last remaining virgin beach will come to discuss the project with geographers, ecologists,
and hopefully, representatives of the Parks
Board.
Scott Lawrence, spokesman for an ad-hoc
committee that has been formed at UBC to
stimulate public and private awareness about
the problem, said that due to the urgency of
the situation, vigil and picket, lines be held at
the site of the construction Tuesday, February 18, starting at 10 a.m.
but could end up only dirt
By NIELS von MEYENFELDT
As you are reading this article, University
Beach is gradually being covered by a wall of
rocks and mud, the foundation for a two-lane
highway and parking stalls. The prospect of
automobile traffic on Vancouver's last remaining natural beach area is repugnant to many
people, including a substantial number of
UBC students.
A random poll conducted in SUB revealed
that out of 42 students, 4 (9.5 per cent) were
in favour of the highway, 15 (35.7 per cent)
were in the dark about the project and 23
((54.8 per cent) were opposed.
But just in case you don't object to the encroachment of the automobile on our most
precious land, there are other reasons for
questioning this project.
A. W. Breakwell, a spokesman for the Vancouver park board (where you should direct
your criticism), has declared that dumping of
fill will continue so long as private interests
continue to provide dirt free of charge, or
until the end of the road is reached. Incidentally, these private interests are also paying for
the bulldozing costs.
But strangely enough, no funds have been
allocated in the spending estimates of the park
board, nor in the budget of the federal works
department, nor by the provincial dept. of
highways for improvements to the project such
as paving and landscaping. The park board is
going ahead without, the finances to see the
project through to completion.
In fact, the $5 million plan announced in
September 1968 never moved beyond preliminary negotiations. The prospect of a gigantic
plaque of mud sitting indefinitely on University Beach looms very large indeed.
Some pro-highway individuals I have
spoken to claim that University Beach can be
made to look like Spanish Banks, with ample
room for both the highway and beaches. The
park board mutters vaguely about dredging
up sand for a new beach alongside the highway.
But does the project's $5 million price tag
include the total cost of dredging up sand to
make a new beach? And is it feasible to keep
sand beaches intact in that location?
Unlike   Spanish Banks,  University  Beach
slopes quite sharply ih some places due to the
scouring action of the tides and the strong currents parallel to the shore.
The sand that is leached away from the
beach winds up on the endless flats of University Beach.
Furthermore, during the winter months
the tide invariably remains close to the high-
water mark. Since the road is presntly being
constructed not far above the high-water mark,
whatever beach there may be will be inundated for most of the fall and winter.
Taken together, these considerations mean
"forget about the beach".
The advocates of the highway say something must be done to check erosion of the
cliffs that line the shore. Nobody denies this.
But why a highway? A walkway would
lend itself better to the beauty of the area.
Can you imagine a highway on the beaches
of Stanley Park? Nor is a barrier at the bottom
of the cliffs the complete answer to the erosion
problem. Surface run-off does as much damage
as the tides.
Because many people disagree with the
basic assumptions of the park board on what
constitutes sound recreational development, the
University Beach project should be discontinued immediately. And because vital technical and financial aspects of the plan are
highly suspect, the project should be discontinued immediately.
Before any further work is carried out, a
plebiscite should be held in Vancouver and
the university endownment lands (students
voting also) to determine whether people really
want a road along University Beach.
If, construction of the road cannot be stopped by the cumbersome conventional means
of public protest — letters, petitions, phone
calls and lobbies — then citizens and students
might resort to the tactics that the good people
of San Francisco used to halt the construction
work in the form of a sit-down demonstration, marches, and pickets. Such a course of
action is to be used only as a last resort in case
all other means fail.
But please make up your mind. Go down
to Spanish Banks and see what is happening
down there. And dammit, react! TFIERESCNE
GOOD THING
about* the
>OUN6ER
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Romance returns.
EAiMAMT
love
SumpA
PAGE
FRIDAY
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Morsels
AppCTEASERS
CHICKEN
LITTLE
HAD A FAT
WIPE   NAMED
CHICKEN
BIG/
THE
ABOMINABLE
SNOWMAN IS
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ONCE YOU   GET TO
KNOW
him/
delightful
experience The course
of true love
LOVE
LORE
WORE
WIRE
HIRE
HARE
HATE
HATS
BATS
BASS
LASS
LOSS
LOSE
LOVE
DOVE
WOVE
WOKE
POKE
PIKE
HIKE
HIVE
HAVE
HATE
LATE
LAVE
LOVE
MOVE
MORE
SORE
SIRE
SITE
BITE
BITS
HITS
HUTS
HUMS
HUGS
HAGS
BAGS
BARS
BARE
BALE
BALD
BOLD
HOLD
HOLE
HALE
HATE
GATE
GAME
SAME
SALE
SALT
SILT
LILT
LIST
LOST
COST
COSY
POSY
POSE
ROSE
ROVE
LOVE
LONE
BONE
BORE
CORE
CARE
CURE
CUTE
MUTE
MATE
HATE
RATE
RATS
FATS
FITS
KITS
KITE
KINE
FINE
FIVE
LIVE
LOVE
Musicai
Bitchiness
With LOVE from
Quiggles
by STEPHEN SCOBIE
by MICHAEL QUIGLEY
Last June, writing in High Fidelity,
Steven Lowe gave a rave review to an
album called The United States of America (Columbia CS 9614) by the group of
the same name, saying "Buy this record.
It is an outstanding achievement and establishes rock as a viable and kinetic art
form." Since the magazine also gave the
album a star which "denotes an exceptional recording", I figured that sooner or
later I'd have to get the album, which I
did earlier this week on one of my occasional pilgrimages to the downtown discount record stores.
Although the music on and by The United
State of America is more than competent
(leader Joseph Byrd was the founder of
the New Music Workshop at UCLA), I
was bothered by some of the song lyrics
which are in the best anti-bourgeois tradition, or, as Lowe said in his review, "The
lyrics deal with America's hang-ups —
institutionalized hypocrisy, the Sodom-like
psychoses of our cities, the problem of
finding meaning in the midst of social
cataclysm."
Here's a couple of examples. First, from
"The American Way of Love":
And a dollar ninety-five
Takes you to the movies
With  the secret sins  of nymphomaniacs
unveiled.
Later on an indiscreet
Encounter in the men's room
While   you   tell  yourself   that   a   natural
urge prevailed.
And every night you can find
(Sittin' and a-sippin' on a Burgie"),
Men who've found a piece of mind
For a minimum of payment,
There is topless entertainment
That men above the age of thirty-five can
understand.
and from "I Won't Leave my Wooden
Wife for you, Sugar":
Now listen, Baby,
And  try  to understand
That tying you is fine
And whipping you is grand.
Now I just can't tell you how much fun
it's been.
You make me feel twenty-five again . . .
If I should meet you on the street someday,
I hope you'll understand me if I look
away,
It isn't that I'm ashamed about you and
me
But I've got to consider my morality.
And I won't leave my wooden wife for
you, sugar,
I've got a split level house with a wonderful view, sugar,
Three sweet kids and a Yorkshire terrier,
too, sugar.
And I just couldn't stand it when you come
home late from school.
circular photo of the United States— see also pf 3hree
What bothers me about the lyrics is not
that I'm afraid of a horrible artistic-revolutionary change to my own humble and
cozy bourgeois existence, but the fact that
the whole anti-bourgeois kick seems to be
becoming a bit stale. For example,
last week I attended a generally depressing performance during the Contemporary
Arts Festival called "Operation Feedback", a sort of musical-theatrical performance. Aside from some nice lighting
effects, the piece consisted mainly of undulating dancers who looked like they
were rehearsing for the first time, accompanied by three musicians trying hard to
be "far out" but not managing to get beyond a limited musical vocabulary which
consisted mainly of traditional rock licks.
In the middle of the performance, someone came out on stage carrying a rack of
magazines and proceeded to intone various
phrases from them into the microphone.
The one phrase repeated most was "Better
homes and gardens for all people" which,
as could be expected, drew some cynical
guffaws from members of the audience
who realized the anti-bourgeois implications of the reading. Ho hum.
As well, it seems that the satirical-cynical-
rock which The USA and other groups are
trying to peddle has been done before
and done much better. There's the song
by The Mothers of Invention called "Mom
& Dad" with such memorable lyrics as
Ever take a minute just to show a real
emotion
In between the moisture cream and velvet
facial lotion?
Ever tell your kids you're glad that they
can think?
Ever say you  loved 'em?  Ever let  'em
watch you drink?
Ever wonder why your daughter looked
so sad?
It's such a drag to have to love a plastic
Mom & Dad.
and what I consider The Mothers' anti-
bourgeois    masterpiece,    "Brown    Shoes
pfage 2wo
THE     UBYSSEY
Don't Make it" on their album Absolutely
Free, with its closing line: "TV dinner
by the pool — I'm so glad I finished
school."
There is also the question as to whether
satire and cynicism in rock music, or in
any art form for that matter, can have
any effect. Will the countless teeny-boppers who buy and listen to the albums by
The Mothers have their lives changed at
at all? Or will the "young" audiences
that saw The Graduate really consider the
bitchy anti-bourgeois sentiments expressed in that film? Probably not. They'll
grow up to be "plastic people" and brainless adults just like the ones they snickered at in the film and in the song lyrics.
Frank Zappa, leader of The Mothers, perhaps has an explanation for this kind of
approach when he writes, in Rock and
Other Four-Letter Words, ". . . you have
to understand that most people like to
perceive satire in what I do. I mean that
they really aren't into the music; they
are too hooked on the pure theatre side
of the music. They're listening to a comedy
routine and they want to listen to it that
way because, unfortunately, a lot of people
aren't really equipped to evaluate any
other kind of artistic structure. You know
as well as I do that for an audience there's
nothing easier than comedy."
However, in spite of, and maybe because
of all the above, the album The United
States of America is still worthy of your
attention. You might like some of the
other lyrics such as "Love Song for the
Dead Che", which has a nice, relaxed
musical setting, "Stranded in Time",
which plainly shows the influence of
"Eleanor Rigby", or "The Garden of
Earthly Delights". Or if you're sitting in
your psychedelically painted room smoking dope and waiting for Daddy to send
you some more money to get you through
university and you're wondering what
groovy new record you can buy which
knocks the horrible conformist bourgeois
world outside, then The United States of
America is made for you, too.
Friday,   February  14,   1969 Breast assured
By TIM WILSON
. . . the inhabitants of this planet for eons past
seemed to be bent on their own destruction.
They are a decidedly circular race, having
round heads, and worshipping two rather pendulous glands attached to the chest of the female
of the species. The course of their history is
I think, worthy of  our  consideration.
There is a good deal to be said for the theory
that since these pendulous, round glands are
the first things that their young see at birth,
the after-image of their circularity remains with
them for the rest of their lives. This fact influences their thought processes in such a manner
that they can conceive of no idea which does
not eventually return to its beginning.
The circularity of this race is evident in many
of their philosophical concepts. One of their
more noted scientists, who went by the name
of Albert, proposed that if one were to look
out straight into space with a tremendously
powerful telescsope, one would see the back
of his head.
For many ages, the advocates of circular thinking, or the boob people, controlled life on the
planet. They never saw an end to war or
poverty or hate or any of the other evils that
plagued their lives, so they surmised that these
evils would continue indefinitely.
But miraculously, after a great war in which
many of the boob people were killed, an invention that was to change the course of their
history came into popular use, namely the
bottle feeder. No longer were their young
subjected  to  the  brain-washing effect  of  the
female mammary glands. The people of the
more technologically advanced countries quickly adopted this manner of feeding their children, since it provided them with more time
to putter away at their circular misconceptions.
Unconsciously, they were nurturing the straight
thinkers.
It took about twenty years after the initial
change from gland to bottle feeding, for the
children to mature. But at last, they began
to come into positions of prominence, they
entered the schools and universities of the
Earth, they tried to effect changes, but ran into
violent opposition from the boobs. They protested war and hate, they protested things that
the circular thinking boobs could not even conceive of. There was a long and hard battle at
hand, the straight thinkers were portrayed as
unclean individuals, especially by the circular
oriented mode of communication available at
that time, the boob tube.
During this battle, the straight thinkers ran
into many obstacles, one of the most deadly
of these was bureaucracy, also known as the
booby trap. The unsuspecting straight thinkers
often fell into this trap, thinking that their
hopes were just around the corner, and many
of them were forever lost, doomed to a circum-
locutionary life. But fortunately, there were
enough of the straight thinkers now, to effect
some really drastic changes on the Earth, they
had even won some teats in parliament. After
many years of heroic struggle, the straight
thinkers finally straightened out all the injustices done by the boobs, and put an end to
all those things that the boobs had thought were
endless.
keep abreast
Wanna see a sexy movie? Free?
Page Friday has acquired by clandestine
methods, courtesy of Odeon Theatres, a
whole bunch of free tickets to next Thursday's opening night of the film Joanna.
And we're giving them all away, to you,
free, in a Valentine's spirit of love.
Honest.
All you have to do is come to The Ubyssey
office in SUB, at 12:30 on Monday, carrying a book whose title contains the letter
J (for Joanna). We'll give out the tickets
on a first come first served basis until
our stock is exhausted.
Don't miss this fabulous, etc. See you
Monday.
Love,
Uncle Andy and Cousin Steve.
1
LOVE'S LABORERS
Orgasmic orgies shook the
Ubyssey office Thursday as
Page Friday's erotic band
procreated this week's issue.
Michael Quigley thrust his
unshaven cheeks gratingly
against the soft, pink, yielding, fleshy cheeks of The
Ubyssey's shiny new furniture. As he moaned, Bruce
Dolsen sprinkled him with
milk.
Kirsten Emmott dropped by
and informed us that she had
never indulged in heavy petting in the back of a car.
Ten minutes later, she retracted. But not before showing us this gem from the
Hippocrates medical col-
column:
Q: In a heavy petting session should a guy unzip himself and place his organ in
his date's hand, or wait for
her to do this for him?
A: Questions of social etiquette are handled by columnists such as Dear Abby
and Ann Landers.
Stephen Scobie writhed obscenely, then departed. Today he is reading erotic
poetry at noon in Buchanan
100. Since this paper hits
campus about 1 p.m., that
means you missed it, didn't
you?
And then came Valerie Hel-
lennell. Oh yes, then came
Valley. Vale! Ave! Salve!
Lave! Hellennellennellennell
ennellennellennell.   Yummy.
And over all, in magisterial
calm, brooded the pale, ascetic, profile of Andrew
Whore-vat, high-priest of
Japanese exoticism, lord and
master of us all. He at least
is far above the base desires
which plague our trembling
bodies; he at least has never
felt the tugging desires of
the impatient flesh. A being
of pure spirit, lofty, free, he
reigns in happy innocence
and awesome purity.
A lesson, students! Let him
be a lesson to you all. Upon
this obscene day of Valentine, let us rededicate our
pure young bodies to the
search for Truth, the search
for Beauty, the search for
Purity, the search for Chastity. Let us be worthy — of
Andrew.
And may the love of God,
which passeth all our understanding, be with thee, and
support thee, till we meet
again.
But in the meantime, screw.
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Will a Former U.B.C Professor
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Friday, February 14th, 1969
at George Cunningham Building
Coffee and doughnuts will be served following
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Backlash / Frontlash
or how the ashes of the
Sir George Williams fire
cast pall over Student Power
By CHARLIE BOYLAN
The explosion at Sir George has rocked all
of us. Responses are varied, but for the most
part they are more frightening than the original destruction. It appears the burned-out computer centre will be a rallying cry for a counter-
offensive against the student movement in
Canada.
On the CBC's World at Six last night, a Cal-
gary Tory M.P. called for a version of an Un-
American Activities Committee to "investigate"
what he calls an "international conspiracy".
Self-proclaimed "moderate'' Dean Maxwell Cohen of McGill's Law School joined the chorus
with his line about radical students scaring
away liberal men (presumably himself, Clark
Kerr and Sam Hayakawa) from making gradual
reforms in what is basically an okay system.
Student liberals too beat a hasty retreat warning about an "anti-education backlash".
Backlash, hell. The frontlash is already on
every university in the country. For example,
same "moderate" Cohen told 10,000 striking
CEGEP (Quebec junior college) students last
fall that they couldn't graduate directly into
MJcGill's law school. Reason being, according
to "moderate" Cohen, McGill had its eye on
the continental market, not on the paltry needs
of Quebec society.
The crisis is real. It met 200,000 kids last summer when they couldn't find jobs. How many
won't find work this year, you tell me. Our
junior college grads have no place to go. The
more Manpower clamors for higher education
in order to find a slot somewhere on the labor
market, the greater the relative poverty facing
Canadian students, in class, and out.
Resistance against adequate financing of higher
education (compounded by failure to recognize
it as a national priority, a priority facing both
nations in Canada) is joined by an increasing
resistance to meaningful student-faculty democracy within the university. Things are uptight. Inner and interdepartmental politics
degenerate into how to divide a shrinking pie.
Students are a threat. Arts I-type reform programs provide better education but they cost
more. Democratic decision making also means
the end of arbitrary firing of professors and
bureaucratic indifference to individual students.
"Moderate" Cohen should explain how even-
stinking concession from administration and
faculty hierarchies at McGill has been wrenched
out of them by student activism.
There is another area of grievance on our campuses, one well-hidden under liberal rhetoric.
It's racism. In addition to ordinary student
problems, black students (in the main from
Africa and the Caribbean) face discrimination
in housing and employment. In Montreal, where
anglo-saxon chauvinism pollutes the whole
social fabric of that Quebec city, racism against
blacks has a long history. "Moderate" Cohen
might consider its anti-Semitic roots of thirty
years ago.
I'm not going to justify the burning. From the
relative comfort of my white, fairly unhassled
environment, it looked like a stupid, senseless
act. But note the overt racist reaction. "It
wasn't us white Canadian students who did this
savage barbaric thing." And to cinch the international conspiracy angle, Cheddi Jagan Jr.
is dragged on to the stage. I met Cheddi last
year at Sir George and he's no more a conspirator than any other "foreign" student in Canada. And before we start feeling so lily-white
liberal about our "generosity" in providing a
place for "them", we might consider Canada's
relation to the Third World.
It's one of colonial exploiter. The CPR, Royal
Bank and Alcan make fortunes out of the
Caribbean people. How jolly it is for our snowbound middle-class to jet down to sunny Jamaica and be waited on by black men in starched
white jackets. How many Canadian universities
teach this ? How many students are made aware
of Canadian holdings in Brazil, or Canadian
arms shipments to Portugal to be used against
blacks in Angola and Mozambique?
I make these points so that we at UBC won't
be stampeded into a mindless attack on our
student brothers. We don't need to justify a
particular political act to identify with the
grievance. Nor do we have to apologize for our
demands for money and democratic reform.
Our universities were built by the collective
labor of our nation to provide its youth with a
meaningful future in our own land. We ask
nothing more. To get it we must start off by
telling "moderate" Cohens to go to hell, buckle
up for a long fight ahead and in the process
make sure apparently unjustifiable actions like
those at Sir George don't happen again.
tr=iT=ir=ir=ir=ir=ir=ii=iT=&r=ir=iT=^r.
Ji*=**Jl********Jl*****dl*****dF**drr-*][=lr
On the beach
By JAKOV KORSZKY
It was while walking along the beach, picking up pebbles and
throwing them at the mass of water that I saw her: a tiny figure
on a log, gazing at the sea as a fawn at the deer which gave it
birth. What attracted me was the air of serenity around her; it
directed my steps until I stood a few paces away. At that distance, her face was beautiful and at the same time unfathomable.
I must have remained motionless for less than a minute, but it
seemed much longer. At last, I broke out, "Who are you?"
In any other situation, such a question of a strange girl would
not have been asked; and if it had, would have elicited a sharp
reply. Yet, when she looked up at me she did not seem surprised.
"I'm Lois. And you?"
Our eyes met.
"Just a lonely man trying to leave his prison of aloneness."
As I spoke to her, I became aware of her white tunic, similar
to those worn in grecian times. Her hair was long, flowing down
to her waist. She wore sandals that showed very delicate feet.
She beckoned me to sit next to her on the log. When I did, her
arm slid into mine and she smiled happily.
"No one should be imprisoned.  Life is  too short and human
Foramorr
We for,
Andtyalkt
In Raw
J**^*-*-*^*--*^r--**^*--*-dt*^t----dt=*Jr^r*****d
pfage 4our
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday,  February 14,  1969 Veterans ? Not really
By NORBERT RUEBSAAT
The problems and general uneasiness of an
opening night performance are well known and
these become no less harrowing if the play
involved is also the premiere performance of
an untried and hitherto unknown play. Local
dignitaries, not to mention critics, raise more
critical eyebrows than usual and the audience
is probably as yet somewhat reluctant to form
a relationship with stage action.
These kinds of things vexed the opening of Vancouver playwright Rod Langley's The Veterans
(which I previewed last week) at the Arts Club
Theatre on Monday. It was too bad, because I
still think the play, given a little ironing out,
is basically good.
The whole idea of a hospital ward forming
the geographical matrix for vemonous triangle
of semi-immobile and strongly demented human specimens has large potential. The third
act and particularly the climax actually
brought this out quite well, and the play would
have been a success had the previous acts not
failed to provide a suitable build-up. But in
these, I did not find immediacy, the sense of
emergency inherent in the veterans' self-
indulgent love affair with their tomb. I did
not feel the obsession of Price with the spot
on the wall or his peaches, nor that of Giles
with his 'projects' until it was too late and I
had to fill in what "should" have happened.
The alliances and back-handed confrontations
took too long to develop and one could not
flick on to them in time to feel the impact of
the catastrophe.
A lot of these flaws were no doubt the fault of
the actors themselves who, besides muffling
lines and missing cues, also dropped whole
sections of the script — forcing them to ad-
lib their way back to where they started.
They were ill-prepared and, it seemed to me,
not completely in tune with each other.
Derick Ralston was effective as the hell-fire
spewing Avery but he was too alone: John
Gretton as Price showed his inexperience while
Ted Stidder (while being quite funny), tended
to ham it a bit and steal the show too much.
I am convinced, however, that director George
Plawski can improve a lot of these details with
his cast for following eveings.
A play like The Veterans has to make it on
language. If we are to realize the insanity, the
extreme self-centeredness of the characters, it
must come out in their words, in the subtlety
with which the actors handle intonation and
pause. Dialogue must always be multi-layered
—quick thrusts with sugar-coated daggers, all
against all. And especially in this play, where
geography and possibility of movement have
been so nearly shaven down, the failing of
language to come through densely enough is
crippling.
Which is unfortunate, because there is no doubt
that Langley is at home in this verbal idiom.
The play merely needs a clamping together of
ends, a tighter acceleration, and a more vibrant transferral from script to stage.
umd
vftime   Sandpipen'j
Our so
To the long t
Of surf airs
Hand in /uind,"
Heart in i
Looking tit.
In daylight,  j;-., "'■
Now is ww Mt&laieT ■
hlatir. ;
And IwdlHd
Whatfabpem,:
Happen.
•=ir=J[=lr=Ir
rookie veterans
existence passes like a dream. You don't have to live alone for
I am with you now."
The tears welling in my heart were more plentiful than the
Vancouver rains, and the void in me was engulfed by love for
Lois.
In my moment of ecstasy, I was not completely satisfied, and
she sensed this.
"You're not satisfied because you seek only love's peace and
pleasure. You are afraid of the pain of tenderness, of bleeding
willingly and joyfully. You worry about the future."
At that moment, I realized the prison that had caused me so
much anguish had been built by me, stone by stone. I had not
known that the really important thing in life was to be alive
and not to have much; that love is not only a relationship with
a person, but a feeling for the world as a whole. Motherly love,
brotherly love, sexual love: all these were different forms of
this same feeling.
I realized that love is an act of faith in life. I took Lois in my
arms and embraced her strongly. She placed her lips on my eyes,
while she pressed her body closer to mine.
We fell asleep in each other's arms, two souls united as one, yet
remaining two.
When I awoke, she was gone.
photo stolon  front:
' Naw York Times
Friday, February 14, 1969
■=d**-^p=j|----dr---d*=***J******d •=*•■; t***^
WHY WAIT...
RESPOND
FEBRUARY 11-18
An Attitude Survey — Students' Assembly
with our wrap-around diamond wedding rings for
maximum effectiveness. Designed to encompass a
plain engagement ring, they will not only set off the
solitaire beautifully - but lend a touch of elegance.
The rings illustrated are exclusive Grassie
designs and must be handcrafted
Special Discount Available to Students and Faculty
685-2271
Tel. 385-4431
566 Seymour
Victoria Store—1209 Douglas
"The Graduate'
'Bonnie and Clyde'
this year it may
be'Joanna'.
HAIL
JOANNA'."
Saturday Review
Photograph by
Michael Same.
Copyright 1968
Twentieth Century Fox
film Corporation
20th Century Fox presents
JUMIN INM starring GENEVIEVE WAITE / CHRISTIAN DOERMER / CALVIN LOCKHART
DONALD "SUTHERLAND / GLENNA FORSTERJONES / Produced by MICHAEL S. LAUGHLIN
Directed by MICHAEL SARNE / Screenplay by MICHAEL SARNE / Words and Music by ROD McKUEN
ORIGINAL SOUNOTRACK AVAILABLE ON 20th CENTURY FOX RECOROS PANAVISlON*    /    COLOR   by DELUXE
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OO I
GMNVIUE
THE
UBYSSEY
pfage 5ive Doing their thing on the recently
elevated stage of the BISTRO, the
Island's toughest group, AS
SHERIFF, as well as the MINT
VERSION, with that out of sight
first Lady of Rock, Miss Wanda
Walker. 2081 West 4th Ave., 8
p.m. - 1 a.m. through Sun. 736-
9920.
EAT IN -TAKEOUT* DELIVERY •
Education — P.E. Formal
SUB BALLROOM
Fri. Feb. 14- 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.
music by
The Stafford Allison  Quintet
Tickets: $4.50 couple in Ed. Bldg.
DUTHIE  BOOKS
Now 4 Locations to Serve You
OUR  U.B.C  BRANCH
4560 W.l Oth AVE.   -   224-7012
and   at
919 ROBSON   -   684-4496
1032 W. HASTINGS - 688-7434
670 SEYMOUR ST.   -   685-3627
DUTHIE BOOKS
In Concert
THEODORE BIKEL
| ■
i Folk Singer
j   QUEEN ELIZABETH THEATRE
|       Wednesday, February 19th. — 8:30 p.m.
•
Tickets on  Sale  Now at
VANCOUVER   TICKET   CENTRE
630 Hamilton  Street   —    683-3255
All  Eatons stores, Townhouse Electronics in  Kerrisdale
CARIBBEAN STUDENTS ASSN. PRESENTS
An East West Presentation
NON-STOP DANCING
THREE BANDS I!
<-.       )\   \k George Cuba's Latin Trio
\l W(\ vffl* Ccr'bbean  Natives  Calypso
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Calypso Carnival '69
Time - FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 21,1969
8:30 p.m. - 1:30 a.m.
Place—
STUDENTS' UNION BUILDING BALLROOM
UBC CAMPUS
Admission $2.00 each—Tickets from I. H. 224-3545
REFRESHMENTS  -   50c   EACH
BEST COSTUME PRIZES !! SEE YOU THERE !
pfage 6ix
Boylan
over
By CHARLIE BOYLAN
Ships are launched with champagne. Your sub was launched
with vomit. As students heaved their guts at the all-night
drunken orgy-dance marathon,
sub came alive. The official
opening took place the morning
after. Naturally, no students
came to hear Governors, Deans
and other dignitaries tell students how responsible and
jolly they were for footing the
bill for sub.
As another front for this
bacchanalian festival, student
hacks organized hack intellectuals to pose and ponder worldly problems. But the panel pro.
gram flopped. Students weren't
fooled for a minute. They know
what sub is all about Only
six showed for the panel I was
duped into — three were sub
committee members, one was
the AMS secretary and two
stumbled in on their quest for
the pub.
Our topic for the evening
"How Sub Relates", provoked
me to write the following,
which I publish for all those
who forgot to come:
Let me relate first to another
sub opening; one which I
attended at Dalhousie in Halifax when I was still editor of
Scan Magazine in November. It
was a circus of self-promotion
and self-congratulation performed by 200 bureaucrats,
millionaires, "bright young
men on their way up", lackeys
and prigs. They crowded together in what was, I guess, the
"speakers pit" — covered with
a two inch piled green rug
there to drink fine scotch and
wine magnaminously donated
by the student body so that
this very special group of people could celebrate on their
behalf — I guess. The sophistication and intellectual depth of
conversation evoked poor Pruf-
rock's blanched and effeminate
squeak of despair:
In the room the women come
and go
Talking of Michelangelo
This illustrious gathering in
Canada's city with the largest
Afro-Canadian population
boasted two black men. Both
wore white and served the
booze.
Later at dinner the comedy
degenerated to farce. Scripts
were provided eagerly by President Hicks, father president of
Dal, a dottering Board member
and two student bureaucrats
who kept tripping over themselves whilst they pinned medallions and other trophies of
honour on their illustrious col.
leagues. Hicks took the opportunity   of  speaking  briefly  —
after all, "This is student's
night" he beamed with that
"ah, if only every father should
have such obedient children"
smile which must be the envy
of every campus president in
Canada.
But Hicks thought it necessary
to take time to defend the
Board of Governors. "They've
taken quite an attack these
days," he said, "by those who
would destroy and not build
like you here who created this
lovely tribute to our university." Applause all round —
especially vigorous from one
student councillor about whom
it was whispered that he planned to run for student pres this
year.
"Well it's simply not true to
say our board is appointed because they are 'big capitalists'."
He grins and a nervous giggle
breaks the silence. Everyone
knows the Board members portfolios amount to corporate incest. "No sir, that's just not
true. Almost all our Board
members are graduates of Dalhousie and we're proud the
way they voluntarily serve our
little community." Which says
more about the origin of Dal
graduates than it does to refute the truth of big business
domination of Canadian universities. But anyhow the applause is thunderous. After all
they are proud of the Board.
lovely building, a tribute to the
students of Dal.''
"Bravo, bravo" — solid clapping — clap, clap, clap. Clearly
audible and no doubt re-assuring to President Hicks even if
the Third Estate hadn't been invited  to  dinner.
Next t d speak was Gov. McNeil,
namesake of Dai's new sub —
building with vision. McNeil
stumbled to the mike; he can't
see too well. Slightly slimmer
than our own inimitable and"
sprightly Chancellor Buchanan,
McNeil has — how shall I say
— history. You see, in the
Maritimes blood line counts
more than here in the open
rugged coast. Here you just pay
cash; there it helps if your ancestors were United Empire
Loyalists before Columbus discovered America from the native inhabitants.
Anyhow, the younger more
aggressive set there knew
Gov. McNeil was irrelevant,
but they nodded smugly as he
pratted on about family virtues and his great aunt Elsie or
Bertha or who ever who was
the first woman graduate from
Dal. And so they pinned a
medal on him, and on the
architect, and on the contractor and on all the past student
sub chairmen who had all
grown up to be successful lawyers and real estate men and
one    was    even   an   engineer
*jJ)-jL
Just look at those rows of beaming, button-down smiling idiots.
Just like their parents — white,
middle-class, with enough concern and initiative to be on
sub committees. Yes, student
initiative, such a good word
"initiative". More digestible
than power.
"Of course you students have
had your problems with the
Board" continues Hicks, flush
with frankness. "Goodness
knows, negotiations for this
building have been trying".
(Smiles and nods abound). "But
that's democracy; give and
take.   And   the  result   is   this
which shows how important
sub's are to interdisciplinary
unity.
The only ones who didn't even
get so much as honourable mention were the workers who
built the goddamned place or
the 30 or so black men and
white women who served them
dinner at 90c an hour (only
slightly below the poverty
line).
At evenings end Hick's proud
and cherub-face beamed to a*
Dean: "I didn't want to say
too much. Let the students take
the spotlight. It's their building,
you know."
POOL CAPADES
RAIN, SNOW, ICE OR SUNSHINE-THE SHOW MUST GO ON,
AND ON,  AND ON  .   .  .
EVERYONE  WELCOME  TO   WATCH   THE   BUBBLES
(AND PEOPLE) FLOW
FRI., FEB. 14, EMPIRE POOL
12:30
Legend Reading Centre
NEW SPEED READING
CLASSES
Mon. Feb. 17, 7 p.m. Bu. 3218
Tues. Feb. 18, 7 p.m. Bu. 3218
MEET INSTRUCTORS
WEEK OF FEB. 10
Mon., Wed.,  Fri.,  12:30-1:30
Bu. 3210
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday,   February  14,   1969 A tale of
Blish
By SEYMOUR MAYNE
Once upon a time there was a blish who wanted a blush. But this blish always got flustered
when she saw a blush. Once a blush, who got
real friendly, came over to her and asked her
if she would like — but no, she cut the conversation short. A fit of selfloss possessed her
and she blustered out: Mush t t t aroun mush
room." The blush, needless to say, made for
the nearest direction.
Blish didn't want to be like some of the other
lonely blishes she had seen. They were so
blished and old and they spent their time
bamboozling each other about their ages and
talking of the good old days when they could
get a blush all flustered and hot. "No, I want
to be a bliss!" blish cried, "O, to be a bliss!"
And who overheard her, a blush, no doubt. A
pale blush who for evermore had despaired of
ever getting flustered. He tried to get the
blish's attention but he was so pale, he was
taken for thin air or a gust of dust. Blush knew
that this was it — he had to show some colour.
So he decided to say something outrageous in
a loud tone of voice in order to catch the attention of blish and in order to embarrass
himself into blushing conspicuousness. "O luscious blish, may I rush unto you!" he cried.
Blish was taken by surprise.
a   blish
Ruebsaat's
left-over
candy
rape tape
By NORBERT RUEBSAAT
The following monologue is a printed reproduction of a tape recording. It was found
in a drawer of a bedroom chest in my apartment shortly after I moved in and is no
doubt somehow connected with the previous
inhabitant.
I reprint it here without any presumptions
as to its relevance, insight, or even its
logical coherence, but only with a kind of
awed dismay, and the hope that someone
other than myself may comprehend this
outpouring of a man's mind. Of the speaker
I know litte except that he lived alone,
moved out suddenly and has not been heard
from since. He left nothing else behind.
It is clear to me that the man was somewhat
introverted, strongly demented and probably
intensely alienated from his world. And yet,
in a perverted kind of way, he seems to
have clearly seen the chaos and insecurity
which so threaten our dear world today.
I leave you to draw your own conclusions.
* • •
'So you thought Candy was a dumb blond
plastic Playboy men's room pin-up dredged by
Hollywood from the nether spheres of Terry
Southern's limp day dreams? The female
of our species (a human person after all)
feels justifiably insulted and at once one
removed from her momentary escort. With
such things, as "how can you get turned
on by that . . . ? We are not objects!" she
fails him, while he fumbles for consciousness and performs a quick resume of his
self image.
'Agreed! The film is entirely unsubtle in
its concept of the daughters of Eve — besides being generally (the critics agree) a
rather mediocre cinematic achievement.
Have we, after all, not buried our Marilyn
Monroes, absorbed the sexual revolution,
and achieved deep meaningful communication with the second sex on quite another
plane? Who cares what Hefner says!
'Last year some cat wrote an article in this
paper on how women were made into playthings by a male oriented North American
world. How true! ... he had instant female
friends and wlas a talked-about-man-on-
campus. So Candy goes around knocking
down male myths, she has power, she tears
manhood from its various pinnacles — by
being a bouncing ball, a Barby doll, object.
'But objects are also revered, promote ritual
and inspire worship. Periodically they symbolize man's ultimate transcehdance of his
world. They even inspire poets!
'Again, however, womandom rebels, and it's
damned right. Meaningful human communication is not established through religious
gestures.
'So let's look at this new thing, communication — on equal terms please. It's obviously
got to be somewhere beyond pure lust,
which we have just dismissed as plastic
and unacceptable. On the other hand, neither
can it be allowed to peel off like a project-
tile into the higher bliss of religious fervor.
We need a fusion, a synthesis.
'Now Candy is the collective dream, the
cosmic desire of aspiring men. She is both
naively pure and lustfully attainable. She
combines, in fact she is, the epitome of
momism and sexual need. Her lovers, therefore, Americans all, are both conquerors
and little boys — spiritual asceticism and
carnal delight are attainable in her.
'But have we not already chastised the
Romantics severely for confusing our two
extremes by dreaming up a unification of
spirituality and sexuality and calling it the
love-death? (a bad trip)
'Possibly the Romantic geist is still with us?
Candy is of course, of the "now" generation,
the beautiful people of New York and environs. Freedom is the world here, and . . .
of course . . . LOVE? That is our synthesis,
our new meaningful communication! Candy
is both dream and object, she is spiritually
free to give her body.'
* • •
We see -why our above friend and fellow
male had to struggle with his self-image.
His date, however, continues to rant: "This
romantic neurosis is in our day grotesque,
and, under the pseudonym of free love, a
plastic dream!"
FLOWERS
Origin a'i*.      n    Flowers
For    AC     0**[!*.icns
10°0   OFF  CORSAGES
Phone 736-7344
Friday, February 14, 1969
TUITION   FEE
INCOME TAX RECEIPT
are now available
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MAIN FLOOR, ADMIN. BLDG.
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Monday thru Friday
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Fri., Sat.
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Even. por information phone
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.....*.***••......<
mm
A CIBVER AND WEIL-DRAW^
ADVtRTisfcMftMT tr OoJoJeS*
Wu
New
ecV.
security is -finding a
associates.
MO}
lack cf security is
■finiina out Ustiuok
are <v? wanted...
jAPNETTC'S
BUNNY
CLUft
.. $Hb positive action.
IS MucA fetter tfan
feeling selfsorry.
•4- wkiskers
thumpers
a fret suite io tHe
iaeHtijficatioM of real
fonzsi Buroiies.
lajanetfce skidded
to a, stop, there
■ was a si-sn inviting
'bunny ijpes fo join
a club—or at least so
slit thought*.
now, our iuttny tfirl
knows when ift&^is,
wanted.
IV is a little harder,
Sometimes,to k*iew
wnenyou aren't".
this Club didn't want
lief at all. ""bvA 1 have
e^uipmentl^he sotfo&X.
hxl the Bttle man only
laughed. °
comes tKe campttsbank
\o -the fescue! our
mana<fer explained that
these clubs aren't for
TaiJbite at all— just-for
frustrated fkavtet-s. he
Suggested that -perhaps
she* could start her own
frunny club * and even
arranfed a loan to pay
fbr pesters and stuih.
last we heard, the
line-up was over a
Moc-lc long.
•but we suspect that-
those fellows may te
a ink disappointed
with t3ie se-fctzp.
you see, tfase tunnies
are. for real.
campusbeuk.brenFcK
in the admiraabtttian. bujjduuf
<J.f .peiT-aan, manager
Op^ete.Stloadaylo'ThJU&aa.y-Qfo-bniday
THE     U BYSSEY
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FILMSOC PRESENTS
WARRENDALE
Friday 6l Saturday, Feb. 14-15
FRI. 12:30,3:30, 6:30,9:00    SAT. 7:00 9:00       §[Jg    THEATRE   "   50C
HenigjY
SUNDAY
MATINEE ONLY
2 p.m.
Varsity
224-3730 V
4375 W. 10>h
pfage 8ight
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday,   February  14,   1969 Friday, February 14, 1969
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 13
Summer employment scene
will be worse this year
By DAVID BLACK
CUS  Secretariat
Students who found it difficult to obtain summer employment last year will find it even
harder this summer.
The prospects for student
employment are dimmer since
last year's low. A number of
economic realities reveal our
position:
• approximately 30-40% of
Canadian students were effectively unemployed last summer
e the overall unemployment
rate has shown an unusual increase during the winter
• there are no precise figures on student employment
and no plans to handle the
summer's rush on jobs this
year.
The Dominion Bureau of
Statistics says 74,000 persons
between ages 14-19 were unemployed last summer. This includes only part of all students
seeking jobs.
JUST NOT ENOUGH JOBS
In 1967-68 there were 237,-
000 undergraduates in Canada
(DBS): add to this all graduate
students and member of com-
munity colleges, technical
schools, etc., and the increase
in this year's enrolment —
there just aren't enough jobs.
Manpower has no statistics
on students entering the work
force, when, for how long, etc.
The government agency claims
to have found 17,000 jobs last
year once it had set up special
services to handle the unexpected demand. (This figure includes such jobs as two or
three houns a week cutting
grass.)
Although last year's situation was described as unusual
— it was reported that some
2,700 women with BA's were
unemployed  in  Toronto  alone
— there don't appear to be any
more opportunities opening up
in 1969.
Coupled with increasing unemployment figures,, summer
student employment could
effectively disappear.
The job shortage will force
students to rely increasingly on
loans and awards' to finance
their education. The loans plan
was designed to supplement
student   summer   earnings.   If
TO ALL
THE GIRLS
AT UBC
HAPPY VALENTINE'S DAY
From The Brothers Of
ZETA BETA TAU
NEW YORK
COSTUME SALON
RENTALS
WHITE DINNER JACKETS
TUEXDOS,  DARK  SUITS, TAILS
COLORED JACKETS
SPECIAL  STUDENT   RATES
2244)034 __ 4397 W. 10th
the amount of part-time and
summer work has been permanently reduced, a new approach will have to be developed.
MUST   DEFER   EDUCATION
After combining the accent
on student contributions, the
generally low amount available
in awards and the rising cost
of living, a significant number
of students may have to defer
their education. In any case,
the goal of the federal-provincial loans plan — "to ensure
that all who are capable can
continue their education"—will
not be fulfilled. Unless a basically different stance is taken,
a number of solutions appear
possible:
(1) The loans - awards program be greatly expanded.
This entails more money from
already hard pressed government revenues. The money
would have to come from increased taxes; though not necessarily from that tax base already overtaxed1—i..e. it is possible to increase taxes on a
more equitable basis with the
implementation of the Carter
Report and a tax increase to
larger corporations (soecially
mining and oil companies).
(2) Implementation of mammoth summer work projects
for students. This could involve a CYC-style program
allowing students to work during the summer on various
community projects and have
this credited toward increased
financial aid at university.
Again, money is coming from
government funds, though with
an input of real work on the
part of the student and a contribution from community or
private enterprise.
(3) Operation of universities
on a tri-mester basis. This has
c e r t a i n obvious attractions
(more students in less time;
better use of basic facilities)
but would require greater ex
penditure than an increase
loans and awards. It would involve greater university operating costs and a simultaneous
cut-back on student summer
earnings (if they are in fact
available).
(4) Governmental policies
aimed at full employment —
the simplest and most obvious
solution. Full employment is
possible.
Canadians still lack many of
the necessities of life (housing,
food, medical assistance and
they can be supplied. The unemployed could be engaged in
filling these needs of the government initiated the proper
programs. And full employment policies, would automatically raise tax revenues..
Sponsored by Lutheran Students . . . .
CREATIVE HYSTERIA
A Valentine Party that invites you to "do
your thing." Creative dancing, painting,
poetry,   etc.   Food   too.
FRIDAY, 8 p.m. at the
LUTHERAN CAMPUS CENTRE
5885   UNIVERSITY   BLVD.   UBC
VOLKSWAGEN
SPECIALISTS
Large Stock of Parts on Hand
CERTIFIED MECHANICS
UNIVERSITY SHELL SERVICE
4314 W. 10th 224-0828
LOST
YOUR AMS CARD?
To Vote Next Week You Will Need -
T. Your Pink AMS Card
and 2. Your.White Library Card
You Must Have Both Cards To Vote!
REPLACEMENT CARDS
(Complete with New Photograph)
Will Be Issued MONDAY, FEB. 17
Apply  at the  Information  Desk  in  SUB between
12:30  and  4:30.   A charge  of  $2.00 will  apply.
This is your last chance this term to get a replacement. Page  14
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday,  February  14,   1969
Going Skiing
Over the Mid-
Term Break?
GET YOUR CAR TUNED-UP NOW . . .
by the  specialists  .   .  .  Volkswagen,
Mercedes, Volvo . . .
AUTO-HENNEKEN
8914 OAK STREET (at Marine) Phone 263-8121
"QUALITY   WORKMANSHIP   GUARANTEED"
P.S.-HAPPY VALENTINE'S DAY  .  .   .  HANS
OFFICIAL  NOTICES
Alma  Mater  Society
Elections
SLATE II — Nominations have closed. Election will be
Wednesday, Feb. 19.
All Candidates Meeting
Monday, Feb. 17, 12:30 in SUB Auditorium.
Come   and   hear   the   candidates   for   Vice-President,
Treasurer,  External   Affairs   Officer,   and   Ombudsman
speak.
Elections are your business!
Conference on Canadian Affairs
Applications are now being received for delegates to
attend this conference on Canadian affairs at the university of Winnipeg from Feb. 27 - March 1. Cost per
delegate will be $20.00. Guest speakers will include:
Gilles Gregoire, Joe Green, Rene Levesque, Jean-Guy
Cardinal.
Application forms to be submitted to A.M.S. secretary,
Room 248 SUB before  12 noon February 19.
Please state qualifications and reasons for interest in
conference.
uE? *4950
Any Color-ALL FITTINGS - ONE PRICE ONLY I
Bring Your Optical Prescription
to Us... AND REALLY SAVE !
IjONDON Ed DRUGS
I OPTICAL DEPT.
SINGLE VISION GLASSES
Complete from $9.95    Includes Lenses, Frame & Case
At These Locations Only
VANCOUVER
677 Granville        -        Opp. The Bay        -        681-6174
NEW WESTMINSTER
675 Columbia      —      Opp. Army & Navy      —      521-0751
NORTH VANCOUVER
1825 Lonsdale 987-2264
SP0R TS
WOMEN'S VOLLEYBALL TEAM back row from left: Nancy Wells, Marg Pearce, Marilyn Turner
(manager) Linda Schaumleffel, Barb Lee; 2nd row from left: Diane Symonds, Sandi Matheson, Miss Marilyn Russel (Coach) Lorraine Fortier; front row from left Janice Ramsay, Marilyn Moase, Eija Peitso.
Largest womens  volleyball meet
This weekend, UBC will be the site of the
largest women's collegiate sports weekend in
in Western Canada.
Nine curling and volleyball teams from
B.C., Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba
will compete for top honors Thursday, Friday
and Saturday.
Volleyball runs all day from 10:30 a.m. till
well into the evening, at the Memorial Gym,
while the curlers start at 9 a.m. at the Thunderbird Arena.
Defending volleyball champions. University
of Manitoba are expected to receive strong
opposition from University of Calgary and the
hosting Thunderettes.
University of Saskatchewan would appear
to be the team to beat in Curling as they have
won the championships for the past five years.
Saskatchewan has   a   very  impressive  record
at home this year but will receive strong competition from University of Alberta and UBC
rinks.
Admission to both series of events is free
and students are urged to take advantage of
the opportunity to see this top calibre play as
well as one of the largest congregation of
good looking female athletes in one place.
Maigon to lead UBC
The UBC judo club will do battle against
other judoka at the Vancouver Judo Tournament to be held at the Garden Auditorium on
Saturday.
The accomplished Charles Maignon, one of
the best judokans in Canada will compete along
with Bruce Harwood and Art Adams.
RESPOND
RESPOND
RESPOND
RESPOND
RESPOND
ATTITUDE
SURVEY
Feb. 14-21
AMS - STUDENTS' ASSEMBLY
THANK YOU Friday, February 14, 1969
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 15
Weekend Action Box
DATE
SPORT
OPPONENT
PLACE
TIME
Feb.   14-15
Ice Hockey
U. of Alberta
UBC
8 p.m. &
2:30 p.m.
Feb.  15
Rugby
U. of Washington
Wolfson
2  p.m.
Feb.  15
Judo
Invitational
Garden
Aud.
12 noon
7:30 p.m.
Feb.  14-15
Wrestling
Championships
Women's
Gym
7:00 p.m.
11   a.m.
Feb.  16
Soccer
Emtracht
Callister
2  p.m.
Feb.  14-15
Volleyball
Championships
Gymnasium
10 a.m.
Feb.  14-15
Curling
Championships
Rink
10 a.m.
Top collegiate hockey team here
Today the best Collegiate
hockey team in Canada comes
to UBC to don the skates
against the Thunderbirds in a
pair of weekend games at the
Thunderbirds Winter Sport
Centre.
Coach Clare Drake brings
his team, The University of
Alberta "Golden Bears" to
town in good health and defin-
ately much stronger than the
team he lead to the collegiate
championship last year.
Edmonton has already
cinched first place in the Western Division but will provide
excellent Competition as the
Birds strive to improve their
won-lost record in an attempt
to pull even with Calgary in
second spot.
UBC has regained the services of Jim Fowler and Stu
Gibbs, both of whom had been
injured in the Calgary games,
but will be back in the regular
line-up.
Meanwhile the UBC Braves
continue on their merry winning ways as they defeated
Ladner 8-1 on Wednesday.
The Braves clinched first
place in the league for the
second straight year with their
17th consecutive league win.
In  the  Ladner  game  Steve
Fera scored in the first period,
Bill Cartwright in the second
to make it 2-1 going into the
final period when UBC erupted
for 6 goals.
Coach Andy Backogeorge is
extremely pleased with his
team and felt that the losses
to Calgary may have helped
the team. The Braves strength
at present is centered on goalie
Fred Masuch and the whole
defence.
On Monday night the Braves
play White Rock Gulls at the
Winter Sport Centre at 7:30.
Thunderbird
skiers excel
This year's International collegiate ski meet, at Banff, Alberta, attracted 16 teams making it the biggest ski competition of its kind in collegiate
skiing.
The Thunderbirds put in a
very respectable showing
against some of the strongest
schools in the U.S. Notably,
Denver, U S A F Academy,
Washington, Montana nad Idaho.
UBC's Alan Vittery had a
terrific run in the giant slalom,
placing him in third place, just
one second off Paul Rochetto
of Denver, who won the giant
slalom and the individual alpine combined.
Rolf Pettersen placed fourth
in the 9-mile cross country
run time a time of lhour-30
seconds. Other team members
placed 8th, 9th, and 10th giving UBC a second team place
in this event.
Weekend   Bird to watch
HAAR
PIMA Meld'A
A versatile all-round athlete will likely be
all around the field this weekend for birdwatchers to watch.
John Haar, captain of this year's Thunderbird
soccer squad will lead his team into battle Sunday
at 2 p.m. in Callister park.
Haar, a half-back on the team, is a well known
B.C. athlete winning the Bobby Gaul Memorial
trophy as UBC's outstanding athlete of 1968.
John is an excellent soccer player as he has the
ability to go both ways, being able to play offensive
and getting those shots on goal as well as being
able to play defensive and slowing down the opposition.
This first year law student may never challenge superman's supremacy in the fight against
evil, but he will be a Bird well worth watching
on a Sunday afternoon. This Sunday afternoon
for instance.
VARSITY
AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE LTD.
(Sso)
A Complete
Automotive Service
All   Model*  -   All   Mokot
"32 Years at Ihii Location"
10 Ave W& Bianca 224-7424
STAFF PHARMACIST
Modern 750 bed hospital requires
the services of a pharmacist. Re-
sponsibilities include clinical
pharmacy, drug information services, in-patient and out-patient
dispensing, sterile and non.sterile
manufacturing and participation in
educational    programs.
Excellent working conditions in
modern pharmacy and generous
fringe   benefits.
Apply to:
DIRECTOR   of
PHARMACEUTICAL     SERVICES
St.   Joseph's   Hospital,
50 Charlton Ave.  E.,
Hamilton 20, Ontario.
THE SKY IS FALLING
THE SKY IS FALLING
... or Countdown
to 2000 A.D.;
Today is the last day to
apply for the
ROCHDALE
SYMPOSIUM
See
WUS, SUB 220
Across the street from Fraser .
Full Facilities
Dine In  - Take Out -  Delivery
1381 SW. Marine    263-44401
SIMPATIC0
PIZZA
2385 BURRARD
731-9721
FREE DELIVERY
The in  people  are  discovering  Simpatica
If they can  — Why  don't you?
Pizza who's taste just has to be tried
And enjoyed for a flavour that's new.
New,  like the colour of our decor
And  the  atmosphere it all provokes.
Come stay awhite and enjoy us
And please let us be your hosts. Won't you?
Once a customer has tried our Pizzas once — they are always back
again.  Proves something?
Romantic   &   Relaxing   Atmosphere
SIMPATIC0 PIZZA-2385 Burrard
SMILE!
Have your teeth cleaned, polished and fluoridated by dental
hygiene students at the Faculty of Dentistry on campus at
a modest cost. At the same time you will be instructed in
the proper care of your teeth.
Because of limited facilities it may be necessary to
restrict the number of patients accepted for this treatment. If you are interested, please telephone for a
screening appointment at:
228-3623
or see Miss J. Faulafer in Room 122, John Barfoot McDonald
Building, Faculty of Dentistry.
HELD OVER BY POPULAR DEMAND
FILMSOC will bring back "THE GOOD, THE BAD, AND THE
UGLY" on TUES. MAR. 71/69, at 3:00, 6:00, 9:00
SUB THEATRE —50c
For Three Men
We CMI Har Hasn't Hell.
It Has Practice!
GLINT EASTWO'
£tf3
LEEVANCLEEF
THE GOOD.
THEBADS
THEUGIY"
ELIWALLACH
in the role of Tue
Screenplay Dj
WESCAOTLLI,
lUCUM VWCEWOB
and SERGIO IE0NE
UiJsic bv ENNIO HOftmCOHE
Produced tiy ALBERTO GAMU.DI /
lor P E A-ProdwioniEuropee   \
TECHMSCOK' TECHMCOLOr «sr5
GET TICKETS EARLY
TO AVOID DISAPPOINTMENT
TUES., MAR. 11, 1969 - 3:00, 6:00, 9:00
SUB THEATRE - 50c
FILM SOCIETY REGRETS ANY DISAPPOINTMENT AS A RESULT OF THE LARGE
CROWDS ON TUESDAY'S SHOWS AND HOPES THAT NO
ONE WAS TOO INCONVENIENCED
tfc Page  16
THE        UBYSSEY
Friday,   February   14,   1969
BENEFIT DANCE
Benefit dance for Georgia
Straight Monday noon, SUB
ballroom. Featuring Mother
Tucker's Yellow Duck and Winter's Green. Minimum donation
50 cents.
FRIDAY AND WEEKEND
KARATE ICLUB
Meet   Saturday   9   a.m.,   SUB    party
room.
NEW DEMOCRATS
John Harney, Ontario NDP provincial
secretary will speak in SUB 230 noon
today.
CHINESE VARSITY
Dance   to   Carl  Graves  and   Soul Unlimited    8:30-12:30   tonight,   SUB   caf.
members   $1.50.
NEWMAN CENTRE
Newman-VCF hootenany at St. Mark's
7:30 p.m. Sunday.
ALLIANCE  FRANCAIS
Meet  today noon,  IH upper lounge.
Rentals and Soles
TUXEDOS  -  DINNER   JACKETS
MORNING COATS - TAILS
ACCESSORIES
Complete Size Range
Latest Styles
10%  UBC Discount
JIM ABERNETHY, MANAGER
2046 W. 41st 263-3610
We've taken over
the
GROUSE NEST
TONIGHT/
(Valentine's Night)
• 3 floors of dancing
9  p.m.   - 2 a.m.l
• 3  top bands
• A fun night in a prestige setting
for  single   people  21   to  401
• SPECIAL PRICES — $4.50 FOR
GUESTS- $3.50 FOR MEMBERS . . .
INCLUDING  SKYRIOE
• FREE CHARTERED BUS LEAVING
FROM HOTEL VANCOUVER'S
GEORGIA ST. ENTRANCE 8 P.M.,
RETURNING TO SAME LOCATION
2 A.M.I
• BUS TRIP BY RESERVATION ONLY.
PHONE FOR BUS RESERVATION
NOWI
• GRAND PRIZE: De Luxe ski week*;
end for two at Whistler's Christina
Lake Lodgel
• Night Skiersl Join us at the Grouse
Nest  after  skiingl
THE SINGLE
KEY CLUB
206—717 West Pender
682-2774
VCF
Fritz Hall  speaks on  Involvement today noon, SUB party room.
PRE-MEDICAL  CLUB
This  Sunday's  seminar cancelled  due
to  unforseeable   conflicts.
THE  PIT
Pit   open   tonight  4:30   p.m.-midnight.
All members please  attend.
HELLENIC CULTURAL SOCIETY
Dr. Dorothy Somerset will present a
slide show on Greek theatre Monday
7:30 p.m. at IH. Greek dancing to
follow.
POETRY
Robin Skelton, internationally famous
poet reads at 8 p.m. Monday in
Angus 104.
MISCELLANEOUS
LEGAL AID COMMITTEE
Free legal advice, AMS veep's office
in SUB, Monday, Wednesday and Friday noons.
SIMS
Daily   meditations   7*30-9:30   a.m.,   4-
5:30   p.m.,   SUB   213.   Weekly   group
meditation   Thursday   7:30 p.m.,   SUB
105-A.
ARTS US
Arts   election:   send   nominations   to
Box 57, SUB by Feb. 19.
'tween classes
VIETNAM MOBILISATION
Stephanie Coontz, Seattle anti-war
worker, speaks on anti-war GI demonstrations   today   noon,   Bu.    104.
MONDAY
EXPERIMENTAL   COLLEGE
Prof. R. Goldman: Revolution in education   in   China,   Monday   noon,   Bu.
100.
COMMERCE  US
Presidential candidates meet in Ang.
407 Monday.
TUKTOYAKTUK FESTIVAL
The Tuktoyaktuk Founders* Day Festival committee meeting scheduled
for Monday is cancelled. Next meeting to be announced on Tuesday.
NEWMAN CENTRE
Lunch with Crunch — informal lunch-
in with Rev. P. Crunican, Newman
National Chaplain, at St. Mark's Monday noon.
ALPHA OMEGA SOC
General meet Monday noon, SUB 213.
INTERNATIONAL JEWRY MUST BE CONDEMNED FOR
IMPERIALIST WAR-MONGERING AGAINST THE DEMOCRATIC FREEDOM-LOVING PEOPLE OF ARAB NATIONS
DEBATE?
SUB Theater, TUESDAY 18th, Noon
CLASSIFIED
RATES:  Students, Faculty & Clubs—3 lines, 1 day 750, 3 days $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00, 3 days $2.50.
Rates for larger ads on request
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and
are payable in advance.
Closing Deadline is 11:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publication Office: 241 STUDENT UNION BUILDING,
UNIVERSITY OF B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
ATTENTION ED.-P.E. STUDENTS:
Tickets for formal Feb. 14 on sale
in  Ed.   Building.   $4.50 couple.
CREATE YOUR OWN: PAINT,
Montage, Sculpture, Light Show.
Lutheran Campus Centre, Univ.
Blvd. and Wesbrook. 8 p.m., Fri.
14th,   cost  50c.
DANCE THIS FRIDAY TO "MAIN-
land Blue" at Totem Park. 9-1.
Guys  $1.25,  Girls  .75,   Couples $1.50.
TONIGHT — CARL GRAVES AND
the Soul Unlimited in the SUB caf
8:30 - 12:30.
C.V.C.-N.V.C.   Members   $1.50
 Non-members  $2.00	
MOCK DUCK AND SPRING IN
Dance and Concert at Pender Auditorium, 339 W. Pender, Fri. Feb. 21.
9-2.  $1.50.
x^^iX^x-M* M o#"|
Valentine Greetings
12-A
SHENA PUNUM HAVE A HAPPY
Valentine's Day and behave your-
self in  L.A.  Love  Ding-Ding.
TO     CAROLYN     ENG.     FROM     JIM
with  lots  of love  and XXX.
TO:    PAT    H     "WITH   ALL    MY
Love."  From  RDR.
HAPPY   VALENTIES   NANCY   AND
Doreen   from a  mutual  friend.
MY DARLING NIKKI: MAY THIS
and all your days be happy. All my
love   now  and   forever.   Ron.
CANDY AND BOBBI: SEX DOESN'T
rot your teeth. Expect your Valen-
tine  tonight.  Jack,   John,   Rick.
BEAR: IRLY
ALWAYS
PRITT.
I.L.U.A.L.!     HAPPY    FEB.    14    K.B.
Love   from   Forestry   III.
NEXT TO ME . . . VW I LIKE YOU
best Robbie. Happy Valentine's
Day.  Bill  Smith.
TO K.G.N. DON'T YA' BE MY VAL-
entine and pierce me with your
arrow.  G.C.Y.
TO FOUR WENCHES: PHYILLIS,
Judy, Sherri and Anne-Marie from
two stalwart supporters of free love.
Bob and  Dave.
KISSES   AND   DAISIES   TO   JOYCE.
Love R.
TO MY "PETER LORRE" HAPPY
Valentines, Gary! Love & 82 kisses,
Susan.
THE OLD (ODD??) COUPLE
strikes again: Dearest bubbles, so
help me god this is no line I crave
your bod be mine, sweet Valentine
aim i lux  cuddles.
JOYCE:     HAPPY     R=A     (I-SINW)
,   Day.  Love  Loren.	
PEN   ALIAS   BOOBY:   AFTER   FOR
saking   the   Virgin   Isles   how's   life
with   the   Erect  One?  D.D.G.   Alias
Oh  Booby!!	
OBJECT: IMMORALITY IN PRINT
procedures: A Merry Valentine to
you  Julianne  B.
MICHAEL I LOVE YOU.  BARBARA.
Lost   &   Found
13 AUTOS  FOR  SALE (Contd.) 21  Tutoring
LOST THREE KEYS ON A LARGE
paper clip. East Mall and University   Boulevard.   681-2713.
LOST: BLUE RAINCOAT IN LAW
Building. Keys and brown gloves.
Call   685-8074   or  Law  School   Sec.
LEFT BLACK UMBRELLA IN BLUE
car while hitchhiking on Tuesday
morning.   Please   phone  731-1503.
LOST ONE WEDDING RING AND
one Graduation Ring in Memorial
Gym. Sentimental value. Reward.
Contact  Brian,  228-9149.
LOST BRIEFCASE BY TREES BE-
tween SUB and Home Econ. Wed.
afternoon. Important notes. Please
return   to  SUB   Information   office.
Rides  & Car Pools
14
RIDE NEEDED FOR 8:30's. ALSO
ride needed from UBC approx. 9:30,
3 or 4 nights per week. Larry,
263-0042,  First  and  Commercial.
RIDE/WANTED TO VERNON FOR
one, two or three at mid-term.
Phone 732-8283.
DRIVER FOR WEST VAN. CAR-
pool wanted. Around 22nd Ave. WA
2-4406.
DESPERATELY NEEDED: RIDE TO
UBC for 9:30's (or 8:30's) from
Sapperton area. Phone Ina at
526-5712.
RIDE WANTED FOR 8:30's FROM
Renfrew and Wellington, Van. 16.
Call  433-3151  after  6:30.
Special Notices
15
NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARY
at the UBC Barber Shop & Beauty
Salon. "It pays to look your best."
5736   University   Blvd.   228-8942.	
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance premium? If you are age 20
or over you may qualify. Phone
Ted  Elliott.   299-9422.
LEGEND READING CENTRE —
Speed reading experts — new
classes. Feb. 17 & 18 — Phone Mike
Kvenich,   254-4557   (eves.)
MALE MODELS FOR HAIRSTYLING
course. Phone Mr. Skeates at 874-
7473 after  6:30 p.m.	
CHINESE VARSITY CELEBRATES
"Year of the Rooster": February
14th, SUB. Carl Graves — Soul Unlimited. 16th—Year End "Progressive Dinner". 17th—New Year Day
Coke Party.	
MANUSCRIPT EDITING — FORMER
Toronto Globe & Mail education
writer available for stylistic and organizational advice on articles,
theses, book-length manuscripts, etc.
Contact  Box  34,   AMS,   SUB.
PUBLIC PERFS. OF CAN-CAN
continue. Reserve tickets 228-3176
Old Aud.  tonight and Saturday.
THE   STEPHENSON   PAINT   SHOW
ing will be postponed until Fri. 21st
of Feb. 	
•*•   WHIFFER   ***   HAPPY   THING
to whiff and poo and puff.	
TO ALL THE DOLLS ON SECOND
floor MacKenzie House, especially
Shirley. With all our love, Mike
and Fred.
HEY LADY, STOP, IN BED OR OUT
of bed, stop, I will tell you a story,
stop,  me too.	
LOUIE, I.L.Y.S. GOOD SQWUZ.
Happy Valentine's Day. Love
Christy.
Lost & Found (Contd.)
13
LOST: TURQUOISE ENAMEL PEN-
dant between Educ. and Village.
Sentimental value. Also pearl ring
in Educ. parking lot. Please call
228-2141,   local   154,   daytime.
LOST NOTES IN YELLOW FOLDER
in plastic bag maybe left in hitchhikers car — Call Margo 224-7279
or  leave   in   Agriculture   Bldg.	
STOLEN: DANISH BADMINTON
racquet, blue frame, Wed. Women's
Gym, 5:30 p.m. Contact Hans Svendsen,   FUS   Office.   Reward.
EMERGENCY SAVE THE BEACH
Committee meeting Monday 8:00
p.m.. Clubs Lounge SUB. All concerned welcome. Is roadway on
beach from Jericho to Wreck Beach
necessary?	
'51 CHEV. SEIZED UP. PARTS OR
offers. Tires windows etc. Phone
228-8614.   Any   time.	
57   DELUXE   V.W.   GOO   RUNNING
condition.  733-7109 after 6:00 p.m.
MUST SELL 1960 FORD FAIRLANE
in running order. Heater, snow tires.
$60.   Phone Pete,   224-9017.
1968 VOLVO 142, GREEN WITH TAN
interior. Exc. condition. 738-6615
evenings.	
1968     RENAULT     10,     EXCELLENT
condition. Fair offer will be accepted.
224-6968.
MUST SELL '57 BUICK SPECIAL
V-8 auto. Exc. condition. Call 733-
3144.
'62 ACADIAN. EXTRA GOOD CON-
dition. 6-Standard. $650 or best
offer. Ph. 224-9691, Rm. 2.
'52 AUSTIN. EXC. CONDITION.
Runs on fumes. $150. Phone Dave,
224-6431.
Autos Wanted
22
Automobile—Parts
23
Miscellaneous
33
Rentals—Miscellaneous
36
Scandals
37
CREATE - CREATE - CREATE
Do  Your  Thing
Friday,   Feb.    14,   8   p.m.
Lutheran  Campus  Centre
WILL THE GIRL I EMBRACED
briefly in the Toronto train station
August 29th, '68, please call Patrick
at  298-0926.  Hurry!
Sewing & Alterations
38
Typing
40
EXPERT   IBM   SELECTRIC   TYPIST
Experienced essay and thesis typist.
Reasonable  Rates —  TR  4-9253
ESSAYS AND SEMINAR PAPERS
expertly typed, $25c per page, 5c
copy. Fast efficient service. Phone
325-0545.
EXPERIENCED TYPING, WORK
guaranteed. Please keep my phone
no.  for your convenience.  684-5783.
Help  Wanted—Female
51
NUDE    MODELS    WANTED.    WILL
pay.   Call  George  224-7438.
Help Wanted—Male
52
MEN, INVEST IN YOUR OWN BUSI
ness. $10,000.00 yearly. Possible
part-time. Able to organize and
motivate self and others. Call for
personal interview. Mr. Wright
"TC".   536-7831.
64
EXCHANGE TUTORING — FREE
Japanese lesson in exchange for
free English lesson. 291-1825 (eves.).
URGENTLY NEEDED—TUTOR FOR
mathematics — certified general
accountant's course. Please call Mr.
Dunlop,  683-0744.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR  SALE
71
BOOKS OF INTEREST FOR RADI-
cal thinking people include works of
Marx Engels, Lenin, Trotsky, Malcolm "X", Che Guevera, etc. and
many other stimulating books —
periodicals "New Left Review",
"M o n t h 1 y Review", "Guardian"
(U.S.), "Gramma", "Workers' Vanguard", etc. Vanguard Books 1208
Granville.
MUST SELL! BUNK BEDS, BEDRM.
suite, kitch. suite. Phone Dave,
876-2019.
S A U S U I 1000A PROFESSIONAL
tuner amplifier. 100W R.M.S. turntable, speakers. $750.00 value. Must
sell. One month old. Best offer to
$500.  732-5642.	
MUST SELL — SACRIFICE! SACRI-
fice! Vox professional guitar, cost
$315 new, $140 takes. Has triple
toggle tone control, triple pick-up
and St. George amplifier, cost $135
new, $85 takes or both for $200. A
steal! Man's 10-speed English racing bike $92, new, let go for $50 —
4 month old only. Electrolux $25.
Ladies' golf clubs & bag $20. Plus
others.  Call 596-1123.     	
MAN'S BLUE LEATHER WIND-
breaker. Size 40. Zipper front and
pockets. Good condition. Phone
684-3458. 	
FUNKY P.A. AMP 30 WATTS PLUS
two 15-inch speakers. Excellent for
guitar.  Call Dave 263-3010.	
'53 METEOR. STAFF PARKING
sticker. 738-8510. Good transportation.  Offers.	
FUN FURS. GENUINE CANADIAN
fur. Silver-Blu Fox Cape, new $55.00.
Red Fox Coat, new $55.00. Others
$15.00*—$45.00.   224-4597.	
FOR SALE: BLACK FUR COAT.
Midi length, good condition. Call
261-0080 before  10:00 p.m.  evenings.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
Vicinity 6th & Cambie. Own room.
Furnished transport, most mornings.
Phone  Kris 872-2315.
LANDED AMERICAN EXILES CO-
op Dinner, (50c) with John Conway,
NDP Leadership Candidate, Sun.,
Feb. 16,  7 p.m.,  1065 West 8th.
Travel Opportunities
16
ARE YOU READY TO PICK-UP
and go mid-term? Get your youth
fare card now and fly half fare, $3.
Good on most airlines in North America. Valid until 22nd birthday. Call
Deirdre for yours. 738-1678 evenings.
GLOBE     TROTTING     BY     MOTOR-
vehicle.   Interested   males.   731-9542.
Wanted Misc.
18
STAMP      COLLECTION      WANTED.
Phone  263-6485  after  7  p.m.
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale
21
AUSTIN WESTMINSTER O.D. MUST
sell.   Best   offer   to   $900.00.   732-5642.
POWER!     470     H.P.     FORD.     MUST
sell.  Best offer to $1,200.00. 732-5642.
Help Wanted—
Male or Female
53
LIFEGUARDS, CITY OF KAMLOOPS
Dept. of Parks and Recreation, 112
Lome Street. Applications due by
March  1,   1969.
FANTASTIC FOLK NIGHT PDAN-
ned in The Pit. April 4th. Any group
or person interested in performing,
contact Ross 278-0853. Come on out
and do  your thing!
Work Wanted 54
INSTRUCTION
Music
62
GIBSON ACOUSTIC GUITAR, J-50.
Adjustable bridge, non-electric.
With hard case, strap. $200. Dave,
224-6431.
HUGE  GUITAR   SALE!
10%  to 30%   off most  stock.
Classics,   Steelies,  Electrics.
BILL   LEWIS   MUSIC
3645   West   Broadway . 738-0033
Special Classes
63
CLASSES IN WEAVING, WOOL
Spinning and dying. If interested
call   732-5423.
REASONABLE ACCOMMODATION
available for two students. Close
UBC.  Call 224-4294.
SEELING ROOM FOR RENT FOR
$40. Male. Some meals possible.
Call 733-3018.
Room & Board
82
ROOM AND BOARD ON CAMPUS:
$85.00. a month at Delta Upsilon
Fraternity House; Good Foods, short
walk to classes, quiet hours, Phone
228-9389 or  224-984L	
ROOM AND BOARD OR ROOM AND
breakfast in private home in Kitsilano   District.   Call   738-3988.	
LIVE ON CAMPUS AT THE DEKE
House. Good meals, good study conditions.   Call  Jamie  224-9691.
Furn.  Houses   &   Apts.
83
FEMALE TO SHARE WITH WOMAN
2  bdrm.   apt.   in   Oakridge.   Private
bthrm., kitchen facilities, Pool.  Call   *•
AM 1-3900. 	
WANTED MALE GRAD OR OLDER
student to share West End apt.
Convenient, soundproof. $63.50 mth.
March  1.  685-3187. 	
WANTED GIRL TO SHARE 2-
bedroom apt. $45 per month. Phone
736-5397  after  6.	
TWO GUYS TO SHARE HOUSE.
Own room, 3rd & Burrard, furnished. Phone 738-0784 or 736-7128, Paul.
WANTED 2-BEDRM HOUSE, CLOSE
to UBC. Mature teaching couple,
no  childern,  no pet.   327-0201.

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