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UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Oct 25, 1991

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Array THEUBM
N
Winnipeg...
SNOW.
Founded in,
Vancouver, B.C., Thursday, October 25 ,1991
Vol 74, No 15
r
continued on page 4 Classifieds 822-3977
RATES: AMS Card Holders - 3 lines, $3.00, additional lines, 60 cents, commercial - 3 lines, $5.00, additional lines 75 cents. (10% discount im 25 issues or
more) Classified ads payable in advance. Deadline 4M0 p.m., two days before publication. Room 266, SUB, UBC, Van, AC. V6T2A7, 822-3977.
05 - COMING EVENTS
THE VANCOUVER INSTITUTE
Free Public Lecture
Saturday, Oct 26
Dean Michael A. Goldberg
Faculty of Commerce
UBC
VANCOUVER: NORTH AMERICAS
FIRST PACIFIC RIM CITY
Lecture Hall 2, Woodward IRC
at 8:15 pm.
11 - FOR SALE - Private
WRONG PHONE # CORRECTION! 1980
OLDS CUTLASS SUPREME BROUGHAM,
PW, AIR, NEEDS A TUNE UP & MUFFLER - SOME RUST - OTHERWISE
GREAT CAR! $1000 OBO. CALL 734-7271
OR 822-3977.
i	
PANASONIC WORD PROCESSOR for gale.
Almost new includes disks and printer ribbons. $460 obo. Call 251-4923.
ONE WAY TICKET TO MONTREAL - female. Vancouver-Montreal, Dec. 16. $200.
Contact Claire at 224-4705,224-4912.
20 - HOUSING
FIFTH ROOMMATE for luxurious Kite
home with 4 professionals. 30+ male pref.
N/S, N/P, 6 appl. $405/mo. & Hydro. Avail,
immed. or ASAP 738-4774.
25 - INSTRUCTION ~
SWIMMING LESSONS offered by experienced instructor. Flexible hours. Phone
Marshall 266-2746.
PORTUGUESE LESSONS. University
graduate Portuguese teacher. Private or
group lessons. Downtown Vancouver. 683-
0198.
$1600 + /MO. PART-TIME. No telemarketing, etc. etc. Go for it! it never hurts
to give a call. Mike, 290-9230, message.
WANTED: NANNY, live in/out, non-smoking, vegetarian family, 3 girls: 4,6,11. Must
drive. Jan.-June. Phone 734-3569/734-9359.
PEOPLE STILLNEEDED for part/lull time
work. Serious only. Great $$. For interview
call Michael, 290-9230.
ED'S LINENS.
Western Canada's leading retailer of bed &
bath fashion products is expanding into
Vancouver's West Side. We invite those
outgoing & enthusiastic individuals with
some retail sales background to join our
dynamic company. F/T or P/T positions
avail. Please contact Jeff at 731-2700 between 9 am - 5 pm.
80 - TUTORING
TUTOR WANTED for Grade 11 student 3
times per week. West Vancouver, 926-1878.
85 - TYPING
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST. 30 years exp.,
WD Process/typing, APA/MLA, Thesis. Student rates. Dorothy, 228-8346.
35 - LOST
30 - JOBS
MAKE $$$ WORKING part-time. Flexible
Hours. Call Franco ® 290-9368.
LOST: BLACK LEATHER BINDER at
phones by Blue Chip Cookies, Tues. Oct 16/
91. Need papers & notes please! Denise531-
9944. Reward for return.
40 ■ MESSAGES
MESSAGE OF ISLAM 2: Faith is to believe
in God. His angles, His books, His messengers and the Day of Judgement and in destiny, good or bad.
70 ■ SERVICES
SINGLESCONNECTION-An Intro Service
for Singles. Call 737-8980. 1401 West
Broadway. Vancouver (at Hemlock).
EXP WRITER WILL RESEARCH, edit and
type term paper, thesis, etc. Competitive
rates, call Michelle 732-0563.
HAIR WEAVING DONE BY experienced
African lady artist Good prices too. Get a
good deal, call 222-2693 today.
75 - WANTED      ~"
WANTED! 88 PEOPLE TO LOSE WEIGHT
& earn money. It's easy! Call Kay now at
939-6307 for details.
TUTOR WANTED to help my UBC homework & English conversation. Mustbefemale
UBC student Phone Sandy 739-8168.
AMS WORD PROCESS-ZING
ITS TIME TO START BOOKING
THOSE PAPERS!
Professional service for your essays
and theses.   Writing the GREAT
CANADIAN NOVEL? Come on in.
Competitive rates, a variety of
typestyles and 24 lb. bond paper. $3-
off essay coupons being given away
with each paid order- until the endof
October. Don't miss out... Room 60,
Student Union Building, or phone:
822-5640.
WORD PROCESSING ON laser, essays,
proposals, theses, resumes, etc. & editing.
$2/pg&up. Donna @ 874-6668.
PRECISE WORD PROCESSING
Experienced Legal Secretary - Student
Rates.
Phone/Fax 987-2677
WORD PROCESSING, professional and fast
service, competitive rates. West end location, call Sue 683-1194.
PROFESSIONAL WORD PROCESSING...
224-2678. Accurate, affordable, efficient
Student Rates; laser printing.
EXPERT WORD PROCESSING, Desk top
publishing, laser print. Exp. typing papers,
theses, resumes, etc. Call Bev 590-9390.
WORD PROCESSING, laser print, fast, accurate & reliable. Kits, Laura 733-0268.
PAPERS ETCETERA- quickly typed, proofread & laser printed. Saved on disk if you
wish. PICK UP & DELIVER mostlocations.
688-4734.
WORD PROCESSING
$1.50 per page
Call 224-9197
WORD PROCESSING & TYPIST for university professors and students. Good in
typing manuscripts. Reasonablerates. Call
Selinda at 244-8113.
WORD PROCESSING $2.50/dbl. sp. page.
Computersmiths - 3726 W. Broadway 9
Alma. 224-5242.
99 - PERSONAL
HELP! MET YOU SAT. Oct 12 on ferry to
Nanaimo. Didn't get your name. Pis use
phone number or call business - desperate to
see you. Brent heart stressed.
MEDICAL PRACTITIONER, 36, in White
Rock since 1965, bachelor, N/S, N/D, 5'6",
130#, interested in meeting YOU: 25-45ish
woman. I enjoy swimming - writing (sociology & self-care) - singing - tickling - dog-
training - giving & receiving massage - food
(Dim Sum & E Indian). I'm well-organized
& goal-oriented with balanced, easy-going
temperament
Prefer similar child-free quietly-sensual
moderately-attractive, reasonably-fit medical (or similar self-responsible) professional,
or soon-to-graduate. Describe yourself &
your wants (enclose full-length photo if you
feel comfortable): Max-Well,#451130PRPO,
White Rock, BC V4A9L1.
ATTN: PUNJABI MALES
An attractive, outgoing, Punjabi female grad.
student (22 years) is interested in meeting
outgoing attractive male. Great sense of
humour a must Send letter describing
yourself, include name, phone #, and photo
if poss. P.O. Box 100SS, c/o this paper.
HELP DAMSEL IN DISTRESS. Sperm
donor wanted. This lady needs a favour. Are
you a dependable, attractive, non-smoker?
Financial benefits. Leave messageanytime:
324-1954.
SC? VOU CM CA/-L LL/1       §
-A AT**AM AAfp *M/C|   <•>
Between
Deadline for submissions: for
Tuesday's paper is Friday at
330pm, for Friday's paper,
Wednesday at 3:30pm.
NO LATE SUBMISSIONS
WILL BE ACCEPTED.
Note: "Noon"« 12:30 pm.
Friday, October 25	
School of Music. Band Fest. UBC
Stage Band; F. Stride, dir. Noon,
Recital Hall, Music.
School of Music. Band Fest. 15th
Field Artillery Band; Capt. R. Van
Slyke, dir. 7pm. Old Aud.
Students of Objectivism. Does
Freedom Require Selfishness.
Noon, SUB 215.
Muslim Students' Assn. Wkly
prayers.l:40, Intl. House, lower
lounge.
Intl. Relations. Grad mtg all 4 yr
I.R. students. Noon, Buch A 202.
Saturday, October 26	
School of Music Band Fest. Pacific
Symphonic Wind Ensemble; M.
Berinbaum, cond. 1:30, Old Aud.
Meditation workshop! 327-4117.
Sunday, October 27th	
School of Music Band Fest. High
School Honour Band; M.
Berinbaum, cond. 1:30, Old Aud.
Stamp Club. Gen mtg, all welcome,
lpm, SUB 211.
Monday, October 28	
Student Counselling & Resources
Ctr. Workshop: Improving Concentration. Noon, Brock 200.
School of Music. Woodwind Chamber Ensembles. Noon, Recital Hall,
Music.
Hillel/Jewish Students Assn. Student Board Mtg, Noon. Jewish
Women's Study Grp, 5pm. Hillel.
Intl. Relations Students' Assn.
UBC Hist Prof. John Conway. The
removal of communism from E.
European education system. Noon,
Buch A202.
Tuesday, October 29	
Student Health Outreach Prgm.
Wrkshp: Student Wellness Team.
Nutrition & its relationship to
heart disease w/ Barb Branda,
RDN. Noon. Brock 204.
Student Counselling & Resources
Ctre. Workshop: Goal Setting.
Noon, Brock 200.
Pre-med Soc. Ophthalmology w/
Dr. Rootman. Noon, FNS 60.
Hillel/JewishStudents Assn. Who
am I? Being Jewish: Whatitmeans
to me w/ Alena Strauss (Psychologist & Counsellor). 5pm. Hillel.
Hillel/Jewish Students Assn. Famous Hot Lunch. Noon, Hillel.
Ctr for Research in Women's
Studies & Gender Relations.
Feminist Politics & the Dangers of
Difference: Some notes from a geographer, w/ Dr. Geraldine Pratt,
Assoc. Prof, Dept. of Geog., UBC
Scholar. Noon, FNS..
Reform Party Students' Assn.
Preston Manning, Leader of Reform Party of Canada. Question
period. 3:30 SUB Aud.
Volunteer work on campus related to global issues linked to an
int'l development organization?
Consider Plenty Canada, c/o
Heather Phaneuf, RR3, Lanark,
Ont., K0G1K0 (613) 278-2215 or
fax (613) 278-2416.	
YWCA series on the
myth of the global
village & its impact
on African women
October 29 The Effects of
Militarism on Women's
Lives in Africa (Gulzar
Samji/Vancouver Gender &
Development Group)	
November      6      The
Women's Movement In
Eritrea (Mulu Beine/
Eritrean Relief Association) 	
November 12 Technology, Gender and
Power (Anar Visram/
SFU)
FREE      INFORMATIONAL     SEMINARS
LSAT* GMAT* GRE
Monday,
Oct 28    7:00pm
UBC campus
Monday,
Nov 4   7:00pm
UBC campus
Monday,
Nov 11   7:00pm
UBC campus
STANLEY H. KAPLAN EDUCATIONAL CENTER LTD + 944-7717
RED LEAF RESTAURANT
LUNCHEON SMOkoAMiOfil)
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on <.is/i pick-up order*.
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University Village
228-9114   r-
MS it
The Dental
Clinic at UBC
is accepting
applications for
patients needing
EXTRACTIONS
including wisdom teeth
and minor oral surgery
Please contact
822-4216
for an appointment
CitA At
?AM
PRIZE! PRIZEIPRIZE! PRIZE!^
w 2
S3 The Ubyssey Annual   «
P. Halloween    3
| Story Contest «
?• WRITE A STORY!      3
3 WIN A PRIZE!          S3
_ .di
i, soo page 7 for more      ^
w information             2
Cu PRIZE! PRIZE!PRIZE! PRIXK
rans
^j
rans
i^j
The AMS is currently
accepting applications
for the
Disabled Students
Association Coordinator.
I^ck up an application in Room 238 or see
Shawn in Room 248 for more information.
Deadline is November 1, 1991.
2/THE UBYSSEY
Ocober 25,1991 **'&'*.  '- di   '-?
...mj...... — Xs....y...<.<x~*.-.s.A ?.	
NEWS
....UJ*.!*..
-    'vt              - f.**i
 .1 X-.M.	
GVRD plans
park future
by Rick Hiebert
A new management plan by
the Greater Vancouver Regional
District will shape the future of
Pacific Spirit Park.
The plan for the park, which
comprises most ofthe undeveloped
sections ofthe University Endowment Lands, commits the GVRD
to seek "as much public input as
possible* into its future plans for
the park, area parks superintendent Mitch Sokalski said.
"It has been very gratifying to
see the input of the public,"
Sokalski said. It took over 20
months of workshops andhearings
involving the work of over 700
people and 20 user lobby groups to
come up with the proposals in the
plan, expected to be approved later
this month by the GVRD board.
"The challenge now is to
implement the plan. The plan is
only as good as the efforts made to
implement it, but we have made a
good start," he said.
UBC has several committees
that interact with the GVRD.
Sokalski and his staff meet weekly
with the Campus Development
office. The UBC Real Estate Corporation (UBCREC) and the new
UBC incinerator project also are
part of committees interacting with
the GVRD.
Probably the most involved
UBC committee involved with the
UEL is the UBC Technical Committee on the Pacific Spirit Regional Park. Committee chair and
geography instructor Margaret
North feels that UBC is probably
safe from being hurt by the plan,
particularly the areas of the park
that are used for UBC research.
"They've always been sympathetic to input from user groups
and the university," she said.
"Everyone has to take the respon
sibility to make this into a useable
plan."
The plan also has the support
of interested parties like the Wreck
Beach Preservation Society.
"Ifs an exciting management
plan. The staff of the GVRD have
made a commitment to listen to all
park users. I hope they are using
this process as a model for other
GVRD parks and facilities," Judy
Williams, WBPS president said.
"Our next battle is with UBC.
We have no problems with this
plan."
The plan, which was approved
by a GVRD committee October 17
and is to be voted on by the GVRD
board of directors October 30,
commits the GVRD to:
—protecting the 221 acre
ecological reserve inside the park.
—requiring permits for entry
to the heron nesting areas on the
south part ofthe UEL shoreline.
—consulting with the public
and UBC regarding the erosions
and protection of the cliffs overseeing the beaches ofthe UEL.
—protecting local fishing areas and the Fraser River Marsh,
launching awareness and education programmes.
—work with the Wreck Beach
Preservation Society to ensure full
public input into projects affecting
the beach's natural setting.
—re vamping the trail system,
with an eye to protecting the resources of the park while keeping
it accessible to park users.
—monitoring mountain bike
use on the trails ofthe park for the
next two years, restricting bike
travel to multi-purpose trails.
—work with UBC Campus
planning to ensure that problems
between the university and the
park management are lessened, so
both can use the park effectively.
F1UE PHOTO
Emerson Grant Norman Dobroskay, bom March 13,1967 went missing
after leaving the Pit at lam, October 28,1988. if you know where he
Is, call the UEL RCMP detachment at 224-1322. $10,000 reward is
offered by family for his safe return and they offer $5,000 for concrete
information leading to his whereabouts.
Park plan to preserve UEL.
HLE PHOTO
Wreck Beach given
semi-official status
by Rick Hiebert
Denizens of the Lower
Mainland's most infamous "clothing optional" beach can rest easy—
they have Greater Vancouver Regional District approval for baring
bums.
Wreck Beach, the nude beach
on the shoreline below the cliffs
beside the university, has been
recognized by the new GVRD Pacific Spirit Park management plan
as a section of the beach where
nudity is acceptable.
The plan recognizes the
shoreli ne from Acadia beach to the
base of Booming Ground Trail (200
metres from the border of the
Musqueam Indian Reserve) as
"clothing optional." Furthermore,
the GVRD has committed to
working with a beach liaison
committee made up ofWreck Beach
lovers, the public and park officials
to ensure that the beach will be
"maintained in as natural a state
as possible."
Judy Williams, president of
the Wreck Beach Preservation
Society (WBPS) is happy. Wreck
Beach is the first nude beach to be
granted semi-official status by any
government in Canada.
That's a major victory," she
said. "What is really nice about it
is that naturist (nudist) groups
from all over the Western world
lent their support. It's the first
time that all of us have stood together."
At the meeting to approve the
plan October 16, the GVRD heard
submissions from nudists from
Canada, the USAand Europe, who
argued for the status for the beach.
John Laydes of the Federation of
Canadian Naturists came from
Ontario to speak to the committee.
The plan is to be finally approved at a GVRD board meeting
October 30, although that is probably a formality.
Williams said the ruling,
which commits the GVRD to
working with the WBPS to protect
the beach was a heartening win for
the group, which has lobbied intensely for the interests of beach
users.
"This is the culmination of
years of planning and trying to
keep the beach natural and we've
done it. The people who love and
adore the beach are ecstatic," Williams said.
"It'savery enlightened, avery
positive step and we love them for
it. It shows a live and let live atti
tude that perhaps you only get on
the West Coast. Hopefully other
beaches can benefit from what we
have done."
She said a survey the WBPS
conducted last summer was also
influential. It said 48 per cent of
the beach's users wore clothes (as
compared to the 52 per cent
who...didn't), showing that the
beach is still open to users of all
sorts.
"That proves to all critical
people that the only things that
keeps people away from the beach
are their own hang-ups," she said.
Area parks supervisor Mitch
Sokalski said the decision sprung
naturally out ofthe two-year consultation process for the plan and
reinforces the 1983 recognition of
the boundaries of Wreck Beach.
The adoption ofthe plan, however,
gives Wreck Beach semi-permanent status based on the status
quo.
"When an elected board has
endorsed a clothing optional beach,
subject to the Criminal Code sections on nudity as interpreted by
the attorney-general of BC, it is
certainly unique," Sokalski said.
Have you seen him?
By Dianne Rudolf
As October nears its end, midterm pressures can be forgotten
with the imminent festivities of
Halloween. For the Dobroskay
family, however, this time of year
marks a tragic event that has severely disrupted their lives.
Three years ago, on October
28, UBC Science student Emerson
Grant Dobroskay disappeared
without a trace. He was last seen
leaving the SUB after an evening
at the Pit, presumably on his way
home to Totem Park residence.
Though it remains an ongoing
investigation both by the UBC
detachment ofthe RCMP and his
immediate family, the search for
Dobroskay has not; resulted in any
new developments. "The file is still
open but there is nothing hew to
this point," said Constable Hough,
RCMP officer assigned to the case.
The family strongly feels information is being withheld, and
Dobroskay's aunt, Teesh Backlund,
makes an appeal to students and
faculty to disclose anythingrelated
to Dobroskay's disappearance.
His safe return or information
leading to his whereabouts will be
monetarily rewarded.
Unsolved Mysteries is considering the Dobroskay mystery
for a feature story. Definite plans
include mention on the television
programme's "roll call" of missing
persons to be aired this fall or
winter.
In the meantime, Backlund
writes, "We need your continuing
support and are encouraged by
your readers' prayers, kind words
and letters."
A Caucasian male with blue
eyes and curly light brown hair,
Dobroskay is 5'6" tall and weighs
130 pounds. He was last seen'
wearing a brown sweater, blue
shirt, dark pants and dark shoes.
He would be twenty-five years of
age.
Anyone with information on
his whereabouts or circumstances
leading up to Dobroskay's disappearance should contact the university detachment of the RCMP
at 224-1322.
October 25,1991
THE U8YSSEY/3 ,i/^ ■
Amnesty marks 30 years
Amnesty International: still growing strong after 30 years.
Drop into International House's
GATE 4
LOUNGE
on campus
Gate 4 is a friendly and relaxing lounge where
you can come to meet Canadian and
International students, watch T.V., play darts -
AND we offer some of the best prices on
campus. (Remember, International House is
available for bookings for your event. Specific
rules apply. Inquire at 822-5021.)
Open every week:
	
Tues.
4:30-
10:00 p.m.
Thurs.
4:30
10:00 p.m.
Fri.
4:30
■ 11:00 p.m.
fcimjj.mniiami^.unJihi.L|Siff*TW^iHiM|
by Karlyn Koh
Amnesty International (Al)
marked their 30th anniversary in
early October. A SUB concourse
display by Amnesty UBC, during
Prisoner of Conscience Week
brought home the reality ofhuman
rights abuse throughout the world.
Sheezia Islam, Amnesty
UBC's POC coordinator, stresses
that AI's mandate is not a sweeping one, but is very focussed.
"It is important to let people
know that we are not a political
organization. Our views are unbiased, and the main purpose is the
maintenance of certain articles of
the Declaration ofHuman Rights,"
said Islam.
Through the course of thirty
years, AI's public recognition has
grown (it won the Nobel Peace Pri ze
in 1977), acting as the light of hope
for the many for whom hope is
almost lost.
"I get frustrated thinking of
this one person in a cell praying
and hoping for release and justice,"
Islam said.
Nidal Ho, the adopted POC of
Amnesty UBC, has been jailed in
Syria since April 1987. He is being
held without charge or sentence
indefinitely.
This is one of many human
rights cases with which Amnesty
International (Al) is concerned.
Ilo's alleged crime is membership in the Communist Party Political Bureau (CPPB), which does
not belong to the government-
dominated coalition of political
parties, the National Political
Front.
Ilo and hundreds of other
CPPB members were imprisoned
between 1980 and 1989 for dissenting, although the CPPB does
not advocate violence. POCs like
Ilo are detained for their beliefs,
colour, sex, ethnic origin, or religion.
AFs mandate focuses on the
release of prisoners of conscience
(POCs), advocates fair and prompt
trials, and opposes the use of torture and the death penalty.
AI's stance against the death
penalty was highlighted in connection with the extradition of alleged serial murderer, Charles Ng,
to the United States, where he
may face capital punishment if
convicted.
Darren Goetze, chairperson
of Amnesty UBC, says AI's main
concern was not accurately portrayed in the media.
"People lost focus of AI's
mandate in the Charles Ng case,"
he said.
The general public feeling was
that Ng was already guilty, though
AWARDS
Important Notice
for Students interested
in Work Study
The LAST Work Study Drop-In Session will be held on
October 30.
Work Study Drop-In Sessions are held every Tuesday
afternoon at 1:30 and Wednesday morning at 9:30
starting September 17th through to the end of October.
Work Study is open to students from all provinces,
provided they have applied for student loans through
their home province.
In order to attend a drop-in session you must have:
•applied for a student loan
•and received your Notice of Recommended Award
he had to be tried in the States,
Goetze said. However, the main
issue Al was concerned about was
the extradition of Ng to California
to face the possible death sentence.
Goetze said there are many
reasons why Al opposes the death
penalty—that it is arbitrary, unjust and irrevocable. The eventual
extradition of Ng was a disappointment. As many see it, the
opposition of the death penalty
cannot be separated from the
movement for human rights,
Goetze said.
"No one, not even Ng should
face the death penalty," he said.
My charges against the police
continued from page 1
(1) The whole episode smirks of racism. Two black men were
suspected to have committed a crime, and the Vancouver police had
to brutalize the next two, unfortunate black men they could get. We
were never treated like suspects but, as one officer put it, we were
surely the criminals. It was as if they saw us coming out of the
robbery with smoking handguns.
We were treated like some lower animals because we are two
black men. From the police reaction to Kuda's questions, it is clearly
evident that the police did not have any specific description ofthe
robbers or their vehicle (assuming they escaped in one) with which
to confront us. The questions ofthe number of people in my car, what
colour of pants Kuda was wearing and our heights, certainly
confirms the fact that the only reason for our ordeal was the mere
fact that we are two black men.
(2) The police used more than reasonable force to make the arrest.
I was fully searched with my hands above my head and my legs
spread—that subsequent commands, from kneeling down, the kicks,
the handcuffs and other brutalizations were not necessary. After all,
nothing was found on me, there were at least four officers covering
me with drawn guns, the officer with the dog was at the alert—I
never showed any resistance or violence of any sort. I even volunteered identification but to no avail.
(3) The police neither informed me of any arrest nor did they tell me
why I was being arrested, although I asked for such information at
least four times. Of course, lower animals like us have no rights at
all. I used to see police tell people they are being arrested and read
them their rights as well.
(4) There was no apology for the indecent treatment and wrongful
arrest. It is only my persistent mention of calling my lawyer that
made the officer apologize to a machine for record purposes. We
really never got apologies. In fact, the officer's remark that we
finally turned out to be stars ofthe show suggests that we should
rather celebrate our humiliation in complete understanding that we
are now stars of a very successful Burrard St. movie (the movie title
will probably be The two black robbers"). I beg to disagree.
Based on this dehumanizing debacle, I hereby demand the
following from the police:
• that the officers responsible be fully investigated, and disciplined
appropriately.
•a written apology from the police.
• a guarantee that my freedom in Vancouver is not limited by the
colour of my skin.
Cornelius Muojekwu
UBC student
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4/THE UBYSSEY
Ocober25, 1991 TT^ H*mw«™*,
■V"  1^-iJ
•a-*- •-     "^---u v>-l
.^
«?•.!   S^
Where art and science collide
by Yossarian King
s
CIENCE fiction authors   ,_
1 are the architects of bridges
between engineers and poets, tl ie
spinners of tales linking the      	
often separated endeavours of
creativity and science.
WRITERS FESTIVAL
Tomorrow & Tomorrow &
Tomorrow
Arts Club
October 23
"Science means knowing,
fiction means dreaming," says
Spider Robinson, one of several
BC authors who shared their
dreams with the public as part of
the International Writers
Festival.
Prize-winning novelist
Leona Gom read from Y Chromosome, her newly published first
work of "speculative fiction."
Gom claims her long years as a
fan of pulp science fiction led her
to think, "Hey, I can do better
than this junk!"
Gom's story is set in the
middle ofthe 21st century, and
in the aftermath of nuclear war
and environmental holocaust the
males ofthe world are dying off.
While this may seem Utopian to
some, the current threat of
overpopulation is alarmingly
reversed, and Gom cautions "be
careful what you wish for, you
just m ight get it."
Hi jather Spears, better
knowri for her works of poetry,
has also just written her first
science fiction novel. Exploring
the idea of two people inhabiting
the same body, Moonfall is about
a future race of mental "twins."
Despite the disastrous potential
for sibling rivalry, these twins
feel pity for those fe w, poor
people born into tht mental
equivalent of solitaiy confinement.
Jeanne and Spider
Robinson, old hands at the	
science fiction game, read from
Starseed, the long-awaited
sequel to the twelve-year-old
Nebula and Hugo-winning
Stardance.
Stardance tells ofthe first
artists sent into space, signifying
to alien watchers that human
culture had matured enough to
join stellar society. As a parting
gift, the aliens leave a mysterious symbiote which can enter a
person's body and lungs and
enable one to live "naked in
space" as part of a telepathic
community.
The sequel is about Top
Step, the artificial asteroid built
as a training ground for symbiotic, zero-gravity dancers, and
the endeavours of a frustrated,
middle-aged dancer with bad
knees to get into this "womb of
heaven, where they turn people
into angels." Her story one of
leaving behind the many weights
we all carry around—not just the
physical weight of our bodies, but
the historical weight of two
million years as an Earth-bound
"Species and the emotional weight
of interpersonal dealings,
relationships, and love.
Following the readings, the
ai ithors took questions from the
ai idience and discussed the trials
-of breaking into the science
fiction genre, the inspirational
and financial pressures to write,
and personal literary heroes.
In describing Stardance and
Starseed, Spider Robinson sppki
of a
scie
leap
do1
all
scie rice
down
inson spoKe
i dream applicable to much of
s fiction. This dream, "ijo
so high you never come
l," encourages ambitions
sorts.
The Vancouver International
Writers Festival continues
thrqugh Sunday with many
different events. Ursula LeGuin
headlines a forum on "Sci Fi
through Women's Eyes" Friday
at 1pm Call 681-8400 for
information.
The five days ofthe Fourth Annual Vancouver International Writers Festival are well underway. This year, Festival organizers have focused on Latin American writers and literature,
including such authors as Carmen Berenguer, Alfonso Quijada Lirias and Nancy
^s**- Morejon, (journalist ofdaceta de Cuba). As well there are events celebrating Native
to^ and women's writings. Speakers include BC's Jeanette Armstrong, Susan
W& Musgrave and Leona Gom. The festival ends on Sunday, October 27.
Exploring the complexities
by Lucho van Isschot
HOPEFUL immigrants
arrive in the promised
land—only to realise how easily
promises can be broken. The
land never allows them to feel at
home.
"This is all very stylish,
uncle," declares Nik.
"Of course," replies his
uncle, "this is Canada!"
FILM
Sam and Me
- opens Friday
With her camera focussed
upon the immigrant experience,
Canadian director Deepa Mehta,
in her first feature-length film,
Sam and Me, explodes stereotypes about sexuality, immigrants, South Asians, Jewish
people, the young and the old.
The film was part of the
Vancouver International Film
Festival.
Based on Mehta's ideas,
Ranjit Chowdry (the actor who
portrays Nik) wrote the screenplay.
The protagonists, a young
Indian immigrant (Nik) and an
elderly Jewish man (Sam)
develop beyond their respective
stereotypes. Indeed, they are also
much more than just "victims" of
racial stereotypes.
Mehta insists each and
every individual is a complex
personality, shaped by unique
circumstances. Sam and Me is a
fresh and innovative film—one
which definitely merits viewing.
The main themes of Sam
and Me challenge the notion
of Canadian prosperity and
multiculturalism.
One on one, Nik and
Sam become comrades, but
forces beyond their control
conspire against them.
In the final analysis,
Mehta does not paint an
idyllic picture of
multicultural unity—she does
not let us off the hook.
Mehta, however, does not
always rise above the trappings
of stereotyping and some of her
characters do fall somewhat flat.
But when the camera
focuses on Nik and Sam, or on
the small community of immigrant men who share a house
with Nik and his uncle, rich
characterizations emerge.
The film's powerful and
satisfying conclusion leaves
many questions about the nature
of Canadian society, without
spoon-feeding the
answers.
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November 6-23 8pm
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Matinees - Thursday Nov.14 & 20 12:30pm
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October 25,1991
THE UBYSSEY/5 Painful power
plays
If you missed the hearings, you can see
it on talk shows. Miss the talk shows and
you can read about it in the glossy magazine
of your choice.
Thanks to the publicity surrounding
American professor Anita Hill's testimony
that justice Clarence Thomas sexually harassed her during the time they worked
together, sexual harassment has become a
hot topic.
It is not a new phenomenon. Whenever
there is an unequal power relationship, the
possibility of sexual harassment exists.
Sexual harassment can also be used to create an imbalance of power between two
equals.
Anti-feminists say if women want
equality in the work place, they should be
able to handle anything male co-workers
throw at them. Some say women just take
things too seriously—that sexual comments
are meant as jokes. But jokes that belittle,
objectify or threaten are not funny.
The effect, not the intent, is the problem. It is not up to a man in power to
determine whether or not a woman is being
tormented.
Women should be able to work in the
area of their choice, free from harassment
of any kind. Intimidation on the job lets a
woman know that she is not welcome in a
domain which some people consider to
belong solely to men. Women can be forced
out of jobs and a decent income.
Thomas, allegedly a harasser, is now in
a position to influence legislation which
directly affects women. His case is only one
example. That Anita Hill's testimony was
not treated with the concern it deserved is
only one example of how women's experiences are dismissed.
For all the talk of equality, changing the
conditions that women must daily contend
with is becoming more difficult.
theUbyssey
October 25,1991
The Ubyssey is published Tuesdays and Fridays by the
Alma Mater Society ofthe University of British Columbia.
Editorial opinions are those of the staff and not necessarily those of the university administration, or of the
sponsor. The Ubyssey is published with the proud
support ofthe Alumni Association. The editorial office is
Room 241K of the Student Union Building. Editorial
Department, phone 822-2301; advertising, 822-3977;
FAX 822-6093
The Ubyssey is a founding member of
Canadtan University Press
Mystic Stan brought to readers by astrologer Carla Maftechuk. Lucho
van Iaachof • image is seven clowns and one bellhop stock in an elevator.
Capricorn M.MaenKng this week yon should fed unconscious grumblings
of Aries airhead Sharon Lindores who is likely to feel an on-again-off-
again quality to most practical relationships and financial agendas.
Twisted twins Raul Peschiera you maybe feeling somewhat sentimental,
emotional and vulnerable this week, not to worry, Gem, this is mostly a
mildly jarring and passing astrological mood. The public accepts someone
who is right for you when you begin to feel sexy again, Paul Dayson. The
idea floats around in your mind for siz weeks, Johanna Wickie, but your
image is a postcard from a distant port. Mike Courey the grass is greener
where you are. Groups of groundhogs, charitable organizations, government agencies and the law will also be lucky for you, Paula Welling)..
Karlyn Koh, expect your first wave of mental energy Tuesday through
Saturday. Rick Hiebert, it'd be good time to scrutinize your relationship
with yourself, it might sound cryptic, but it isnt meant to be. Ellen Pond
should expect a gothic romance this week. Yggy "Joe* King, over the next
six months you have the rare astrological opportunity to change your
inner dialogues, Dianne Rudolf turf out a few bad tapes and program
yourself differently. Mark Nielsen, you'll be looking at the world with a
clever glint in your eye and silly grin on your face. It's time to run amuck
and have fun, Scorp Paul Gordon, and don't try to deny you've been
thinking about it! Cheryl Niamath, give yourself the green light to go
ahead and take up tarot cards. Ela3ine GriSth, you will meet someone who
works in a bar, lucky you. Sam Green, you have more whirling and twirling
to do for your career. Make sure you're working in a healthy office
environment, Helen Willoughby-Price. Express yourself Steve Chan, and
the planets will beam on your weekend plans with Cornelius Muojekwu.
Effie Pow, mid-week unique communications from Mars will let you know
the latestmovesandbeable to energizearoom of 300 people. Readers, stop
fighting against fate—life—and go with the positive tide of events.
Editors
Paul Dayson • Sharon Undores * Carla Maftechuk
Raul Peschiera « Effla Pow
Photo Editor • Paul Gordon
Letters
Green menace
Over the pastfew weeks,
the students of UBC have
been traumatized by hoar des
of little green, wriggling
worms descending from the
treetops. The horrible creatures (a.k.a. "the Green
Menace"), camouflaged
against the greenery that
surround UBC sidewalks
and roads, quietly descend
on invisible threads and wait
for unwitting passers-by to
walk into them. After these
tiny terrors have successfully infiltrated a student's
hair, they will remain there
for hours, wriggling and
crawling around, with the
sole intent of embarrasing
their host and spreading
complete disgustthroughout
campus. They have also been
known to hang in thick curtains across busy sidewalks
and other critical locations
to increase their effectiveness. One report tells of
swarms of green miniature
monsters covering the bust
of Norman Mackenzie outside the Fredric Wood Theatre, showing their complete
lack of respect for human
culture.
Why haven't UBC
officials done anything about
the Green Menace? Are they
going to leave the students
to defend themselves against
the wriggling fiends? The
students of UBC need positive action, now.
Stephen Cavers
Arts 3
Robin Hood
thievery
I feel that some people
are taking this summer's
infatuation with Robin Hood
a little too far. The glorification of thievery is fine for
the Hollywood grist mill but
stealing for profit or excitement is not cool, nor will it
ever be in our society. It's
easy to see why. Just place
yourself into the shoes of a
person or organization that
is missing some object of extreme value: a wallet, a car
stereo, maybe your computer, or as in the case of
Filmsoc, our VCR's and answering machine. That's
right, sometime between 9
pm and 1 am on Tuesday
night, Oct. 6th, a thief decided thatthe two VCR's and
the answering machine re-
The Ubyssey welcomes letters on any Issue. Letters must be typed and are not to exceed 300 words In length. Content
which Isjudged to be libelous, homophobic, sexist, racist or factually Incorrect will not be published. Please be concise.
Letters may be edited for brevity, but It Is standard Ubyssey policy not to edit letters for spelling or grammatical mistakes.
Please bring them, with Identification, to SUB 241k. Letters must Include name, faculty, and signature.
siding in SUB 247 were fair
game.
I think the person responsible for our missing
equipment is the human
equivalent to moral sewage
dumped into a pristine marine habitat. This selfish
and insensitive immorality
can do nothing but further
the vicious cycle of greed and
thoughtlessness prevalent in
North American culture. It's
obvious that stealing is expected and the norm. There
are locks and heavy duty
security systems on every
building to frustrate honest
folks and yet never enough
protection to prevent theft.
The problem lies in the complete breakdown of the psychological deterrentthat will
prevent people from committing such crimes. Then
of course there is the problem
of drug addicts and thieves
who are stealing for necessity rather than greed. It's
really difficult to prevent
your property from people
who are willing to do almost
anything to get it.
This stealing crime wave
has had dramatic effects on
the AMS. Now basic building insurance that is supposed to cover such things as
VCR's or stolen cash has a
deductible of $1000. Well,
how many clubs can afford
that? Even Filmsoc with its
steady source of income will
not be able to find the funds
to replace what we have lost
until next year's budget.
I feel such rage and frustration that this bloodsucking leech will probably never
be caught, nor will our
equipment ever be returned.
Filmsoc strives to provide
privileges to its membership
at a level almost unheard of
at Canadian universities.
We're proud to be able to
offer a lot for little in return.
However, this system of
Utopia breaks down when a
greedy party decides tohoard
rather than share.
A university community
is supposed to be above the
petty larceny that seems to
be a daily ritual in off-campus life. What ever happened to the integrity ofthe
so called top 10% of society?
Tuum Est does not include
the right to steal.
My final parting shot at
Filmsoc's very own amateur
grab and run cutpurse. I
hope you choke on the fact
that you left behind the re
mote control for the main
clubroom VCR. You can
come by any lunch hour and
ask Michael for it, if you've
got the guts.
Michael Gazetas
Filmsoc Chairperson
FilmS
Christophobia?
Ah, yes, I could have expected, and indeed did expect, the responses which I
received to my letter of Oct.
8 (Remember? the Bible
thumping one .)The response
was, "grab a sense of
humour", "Get a Grip",
"lighten up", "start enjoying
life". Perhaps my next letter
should be a witty attack on
feminism, or a humorous
slamming of homosexuals,
perhaps an horrendously
funny look at native Indians
(alaUBC engineers), or what
about a satirical jab at the
child with leukaemia—
what's that? You're not
laughing at these? What's
wrong with my sarcasm directed towards politically
correct groups? Oh, it offends? Well, lighten up, get
a grip, pull the pole from
your butt, laugh a little. Gee
you're boring. Man, Fm only
kidding! Oh, I see, I understand now—this is how it
works: Christians are narrow minded, overly serious
boobs. Why shouldn't they
take a bit of sarcasm directed
at the Bible? Why shouldn't
they just laugh it off when
The Ubyssey entitles its letter "Get out and make some
friends", or "Verily - I was
right, sayeth Ed" or whatever they titled this letter?
What's wrong with a little
Christophobia on campus
and particularly in The
Ubyssey? Fll tell you why—
for the same reason females
(andmales)rightlyprotested
the distribution of threatening letters to females in
Vanier, which were called a
joke! For the same reason
The Ubyssey wouldn't have
printed aletter sarcastically
reviewing a homosexual
piece of literature! For the
same reason anyone would
protest anything—it assaults what they believe.
Don't get me wrong, I'm
not trying to pull a "Satanic
Verses" on you, I haven't put
a price on your head, but
equally I'm not going to let
you laugh unchallenged at
God. Sure there is lots of
humour in the Bible, but Bill
Denham's intention was not -*-
to show it off. His intention
was to slam the very concept
ofthe Bible.
I was offended by Mr.
Denham's letter, and seemingly you (Eric Hudson and
Steve Cavers) were offended «■•.
by mine. If you want to talk
about the Bible or Jesus, call
me, but you're wanting to
laugh at its expense, keep it
private and don't expect a
quiet chuckle if you make it "-
public. -,-,
Colin Mills
Geography
In broad
daylight
On Monday, October
21st at 4:30 pm, as I was
walking towards the SUB
along the path between
Main library and the
Henning building, I unexpectedly felt an arm press
against the length of my
back. I found a strange
man (white male, approximately 35 years of age,
5'11", 160 lbs., blue, deep-
set eyes, acne-scarred
complexion, short, light
brown hair, gray Taiga-like
jacket, light jeans, and
brown leather shoes) to be
walking uncomfortably
close beside me. When I
stopped to ask him about
his behavior, he stood,
looking straightahead, and
strangely ordered, "Move
on...move on". Approximately ten minutes later, I
encountered him again in
the same area, however, I
was with a male companion this time and we confronted the man. His
behaviour immediately
became erratic. He spoke
of rape andbegan shouting
threats regarding a gun to
"come back and blow your
brains out". He then proceeded to run off. I have
notified campus security
and the RCMP and would
like people to be aware of
the potential danger of this
man.
Name Withheld
f     This Is a warning to those ^\
people who have submitted
|    letters (not perspectives) over    I
I  the 300-word limit: starting Oct.   |
30th this policy will be strictly
V       enforced. No exceptions!     J
6/THE UBYSSEY
Ocober 25,1991 Council briefs
bv Johanna Wtekie
Colin's smile
The AMS Student's Council
made a major commitment in both
time and resources to aid the case
of Colin Beechinor, a four-year- old
boy who has recently been diagnosed with Monosomy 7, a rare
form of leukemia.
Three separate motions were
passed to create an ad-hoc committee to raise funding for the
equipment, an automated HLA
trayreading system, andmorethan
$240,000 in support services to
operate a UBC site Canadian Bone
Marrow Donor Registry.
Currently, children and adults
like Colin die two times out of three
before they receive the valuable
bone marrow transfusion that will
save their lives.
Kathleen Moffat, a representative from Colin's Smile which is
organizing the fund-raising campaign, indicated the money for the
HLA system will be soon provided
for by a 'major charitable group,'
but funding is still needed to process thebacklogof available donors.
Council set aside $1,000 for
the venture, and all interested students wishing to volunteer time or
make a donation to the cause
should contact Jason Brett, AMS
president, at 822-3971.
Those who wish to become
donors should contact the Canadian Red Cross Society and be
prepared to attend an information session, view a video presentation, sign a consent form
and give a blood sample to type
the bone marrow.
AMS pizza
outlet named
A new pizza outlet, due to open
in January, was named by the
Council with alternatives provided by students at large.
Six names were included on
the short list with "Slice me
Nice","Ke-R-Squared (jir2)", and
"Piece 'a' Pizza" coming at the
top ofthe list.
"Pie-R-Squared" ended up
being the room favourite, with
strong objections voiced by those
who wished to name it "Dukes."
Dukes was the cookie outlet with
the lease that was not renewed
in order that Blue Chip could be
opened.
Charles Redden, AMS General Manager, dissuaded the
Council to choose the name
"Dukes" in consideration of the
legal implications.
"Each of our jokes costs us a
few hundred dollars," said Redden.
Canada West Scoreboard
Football
H
Manitoba 4
Calgary 4
British Columbia 3
Saskatchewan 3
Alberta 2
F A pts.
194 114 8
177 156  8
157 in e
136 181  6
99 201  4
This week In UBC varsity sports
Home
'• Baakatball Monday, Oct 21
6pm vs. Douglas College at War
Memorial Gym
Women's Held Hockey
(final standings)
British Columbia 8
Victoria 6
x Calgary 3
x Manitoba 3
Alberta        1
F A
12 4
13 4
8 9
6 8
6 20
Pts.
18
16
10
10
x Calgary awarded third place. It
tied season series vs. Manitoba,
including goals for and against {1-0-
1, 2-2), but finished with a better
goals against quotient (.888 to
.7S0).
Men's Soccer
w
Alberta 5
British Columbia 4
Victoria 3
Calgary 2
Saskatchewan 1
Lethbridge       0
T F A
1 18 3
2 24 3
1 14 7
1 8 9
2 4 20
1 1 27
Pts.
11
10
7
5
'« Vollayball Saturday, Oct 26
7:30pm vs. Portland State at War
Memorial Gym
Away
Varsity Cross Country Saturday, Oct
26 noon CWUAA Championships in
Victoria, BC.
football Saturday, Oct 26 1pm vs. U.
of Manitoba in Winnipeg, Manitoba
Xo* Book*y Friday/Saturday Oct 25 and
26 7 pro vs. U. of Regina in Regina,
Saskatchewan
Man's Basicatball Tuesday, Oct 22 8pm
vs. Trinity Western University in
Langley, BC; Saturday, Oct 26 6:30pm
vs. Brock University in St.
Catherines, Ontario and Sunday, Oct
27 3 pm vs. Guelph University in
Guelph, Ontario
Women's Soccer
w
Calgary 3
Alberta 3
Lethbridge 1
Saskatchewan 0
British Columbia 0
Hockey
Calgary
Alberta
Manitoba
Lethbridge
Brandon
L T
0 2
1 1
1 4
3 3
2 2
8 3
11 4
10 10
4 11
6 11
F  A
15  6
11  7
8  6
7 11
6 15
'a BaakatballWednesday, Oct 23
6pm vs. Langara College at Vancouver
Community College-Langara
Varaity Rowing sat. /sun. Oct 26 s 27
9am Head of the Gorge/Head of Elk
Lake Regattas in Victoria, BC.
Rngby Saturday, Oct 26 2:30pm vs.
Bayside in Tsawwassen, BC.
Man's Soooax Friday, Oct 25 2 pm vs.
U. of Calgary in Calgary, Alberta
and Saturday, Oct 26 3 pm vs. U. of
Lethbridge in Lethbridge, Alberta
Vfoaun' a Soccar Friday, Oct 25 2 pm
vs. U. of Calgary inCalgary, Alberta
and Saturday, Oct 26 1pm vs. U. of
Lethbridge in Lethbridge
nmsi
ATTENTION
puns
vVl( •
vVl( /
^p
CLUBS
t^J
At the Oct.28 Student Administrative Commission
meeting, the following Notice of Motion will be
considered; That SAC deconstitute the following AMS clubs:
Accounting Club
Marketing Club
Action Pursuit Club
Microbiology Club
Advanced Scientific Calculator Club
Mountain Bike Club
Amateur Radio Society
Musicians Network
Archaelogy Club
Muslim Students Association
Architecture Studies Abroad Club
My Jong Kung Fu Club
Artificial Intelligence Group
Newman Club
Atmospheric Science Club
Oceans Club
Automobile Club
P.D.T. Social Club
B2 Social Club
Pottery Club
Bio-Resource Engineering Club
Progressive Conservative Club
Business Encounters Society of Tomorrow
Red Sports
C.S. Social Club
Reform Party Students' Society
Campus Crusade for Christ
Robson Dart Club
Celtic Heritage Association
Rugby Social Club
Chess Club
Scandinavian Club
Chinese Collegiate Society
Science Fiction Society
Circle K Club
Scottish Country Dance Club
Commonwealth Society
Shotokan Karate Club
Delta Society
Skydiving Club
Finance Society
Slipstick
Fine Arts Society
Social Anarchists
Friends of the Trotskyist League
Society of Metals and Materials Engineering
Friends of Youth Parliament
Society of Naval Architects and Marine Eng
Great Wall culture Club
SoroitiesofUBC
Green Club
Southern African Work Group
Health Science Student Association
Spanish Speakers Society
Hong Kong Exchange Club
Squash Club
Ice Hockey Club
Stewardship Club
II Caffe
Student Christian Movement
Image UBC
Students for a Free South Africa
Industrial Relations Management Club
Students for Choice
International Relations Students' Association
Students Pugwash
Iranian Students Club
Students' Non-Partisan Club
Ismaili Students' Association
Tae Kwon Do
Jewish Students' Association
Taiwanese Students' Association
Kappa Sigma Social Club
Thunderbird Cheerleaders
Kendo Club
Thunderbird Cr?w
Korean Students Association
Tools for Peace
Landscape Architecture Student Association
Transcendental Meditation
Latter-Day Saints Association
Transportation Club
Le Club Francais
UBC Windsurfing club
Liberal Club
United Church Campus Ministry
Libertarian Club
University Christian Ministries
Life Drawing Club
Vegetarian and Animal Rights
Linguistics Club
Women's Engineering Club
This will become an actual motion at the Nov. 4, 1991 SAC meeting.
For more information, please see the SAC Secretary (RM 252, ph 2-6455) by Nov.l.
the Ubyssey
r l     O,
VVT'
HALLOWEEN£jjfl^
NOW   ACCEPTING
APPLICATIONS
iKhiMl
The Alma Mater Society is now accepting applications for the position of Student at Large on the
Publications Committee for The
Ubyssey.
Application deadline is Friday,
November 1,1991.
Applications are available in SUB Room
238. For More information, contact
Gerry Olynyk in Room 100R.
Ghost story takes place within UBC
and the Endowment Lands. The
first line is:"Staggering out of Main
Library I saw it rising from the
depths ofthe fountain."
Story must include:
• spelunking in the tunnels under LHC
• pickled herring
• the shattered remnants of Rita -Johnston's cabinet
• Main Library stacks
• the incinerator
• lumpy green paint
• the ghost of quorums past
• The Ubyssey
Deliver 2,000 typed words or less to
SUB 241K by noon on Monday, Oct. 28th.
The last line is: "Well, I could always shower ih"tKe"morning."
Mind-blowing prize T.B.A.
October 25,1991
THE UBYSSEY/7 39S Referendum Qms
^k)     Polling      \^k
Stations
Day Polls
Sedgewick Library
SUB (North)
SUB (South)
Angus
Buchanan
CEME
Aquatic Centre
War Memorial
Grad Student Centre
Night Polls
Place Vanier
Gage
Sedgewick Library
Plus the "Votemobile"
Computer Science
Hebb Theatre
Law
Macmillian
Scarfe
Woodward/IRC
Chemistry
Music
Totem Park
SUB (South)
Day Poll Hours:      M-F 10:00am - 4:00pm
Night Poll Hours:   M-Th 6:00pm - 9:00pm
All poll locations and hours subject to poll cleric availability
35S Referendum ECS
^J November 4-8 [^
Poll Clerks Needed to Staff Polling
Stations During Referendum. Make
Extra Money For Yourself or Your Club.
$7.00/hour,
Flexible Hours.
Sign up in SUB 246.
AMS Elections Commissioner
Student Administrative Commission
llud Kanke. CA: President. Kanke Seafood Restaurant Ltd.
The restaurant business for many is an expensive
lesson in risk management. Not so for Bud Kanke.
In W71. with a $900 savings balance. Bud and several
partners gave Vancouver diners the city's first upmarket
seafood experience. The Cannery.
Mulvaney's followed in 1975. Seafood with a dash
of Southern spice. Viva in 1979. A classic supper club. In
1984, The Ninth Ave. Fishmarket. Then Joe Fortes, in
1985. Seafood downtown style.
The menu grows. And now Kanke Seafood Restaurant Ltd., with some 1500 employees, reels in annual
sales of nearly $10 million.
Along the way, Bud Kanke has earned
the deserved reputation of a man with the skilis
to transform the most modest opportunities into
prize catches.
He credits his CA for providing him the base to
develop his entrepreneurial strengths. "It gives me discipline ... going by instinct is one thing, but there's merit
in managing with good, sound numbers'.'
Bud Kanke. CA with a string of seafood restaurant
successes.
If you think a future in chartered accountancy
would serve your career ambitions, write the Institute of
Chartered Accountants of B.C.
Our standards are higher
Institute of Chartered Accountants of British Columbia
1133 Melville Street, Vancouver, B.C. V6E 4E5
Telephone: (<i(>4) 081 -3261 Toll-free 1-800-663-2677
BudKankdsCA
helped him acquire
his taste in seafood
Plus5
p
U5
SELF SERVE
'LaserPri/iting
IBM COMPATIBLE
MACINTOSH
WORK AREA
QUALITY COPIES
UNIVERSITY VILLAGE
2N° FLOOR
2174 WESTERN PARKWAY
VANCOUVER, B.C:
224-6225
FAX 224-4492
OPEN EVERY DAY M-TH 8-9
FRI 8-6   SAT-SUN 11-6
r>xc
CgyST&L
GIFT SHOP
"Experience a beautiful healing Quality"
• Psychic Reading
• Psychic Tarot
• Chain Kits & Oik
•Astrology
• Aura Energy Reading
PLUS
Jewelry, Crystals, Cards, Posters, Incence,
Books & Tarot, Unique Collectable! and more
Custom Stone-setting and Jewelry design
lii'i Disviiunl «ilh WlSStudi'i
228-9460
2615 Alma Street, Vancouver
OCTOBERFEST
Friday, Oct 25, 8:30 p.m.
LUTHERAN CAMPUS
CENTRE
Join us for an evening of homebrewed Lutheran bzzr and United
fellowship at the Centre. Smokies
and sauerkraut will be served. UM-
PA-PA music will be avoided if at
all possible. Call 224-3722.
HP V 1
out and support Muscular
GAI* *
Oct ai*t,1&3&* 1*38
See you there 1
Bring your pennies.
ON THE BOULEVARD
Hair Care Services
Esthetician
$2.00 off cut
with presentation of this ad
Offer Expires Nov. 5
Suntanning Special
10 sessions for SS^00
5784 University Blvd.
UBC Village
224-1922*224-9116
8/THE UBYSSEY
Ocober 25,1991

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