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The Ubyssey Mar 2, 1972

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 **$?V*.
WE UBYSSEY
Vol. UH, No. 56 VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, MARCH 2, 1972
48
228-2301
"COGITATION marks face of sociology prof Martin Meissner at Union of Radical Social
Scientists open forum on Social Science and the Working Class Tuesday noon, as laborer
—garry gruenke photo
Jack Scott makes a point. Discussion of who is served by present-day industrial sociology
spilled over into Angus lounge from lecture hall after 1:30. Summary is on page 8.
Briefs on tenure disagree
By SANDI SHREVE
The legislature committee investigating the tenure
question finally heard from students on Tuesday, and the
two briefs presented gave opposing views of the tenure
process in B.C. universities.
Former Alma Mater Society vice-president Rob
McDiarmid, a Human Government executive member,
told the committee on education and social welfare that
the decision-making methods used by the arts faculty are
not sound.
And Doug Aldridge, incoming AMS president,
presented the committee with a brief which supports the
administration's views of the system.
The committee is investigating tenure conditions at
universities in B.C. and has heard briefs from the faculty
association, administration and students of UBC and from
representatives of the University of Victoria.
McDiarmid told The Ubyssey Wednesday he believes
the general critieria for deciding tenure are sound because
"tenure seems to work quite well in the professional
faculties, such as medicine — of which I know very little.
"But these theoretical premises are often not applied
in the arts faculty — especially in the English
department," he said.
He charges the present system of deciding tenure
encourages applicants to be "uncreative and subservient",
to ensure they do not differ from the accepted norms of
the select few who will decide their future career.
On the basis of these statements, the fourth-year
political science student's brief accused the administration
and faculty association briefs of having presented "lies
and misrepresentations" in saying there were no serious
tenure problems at UBC.
The specific lies McDiarmid referred to were
statements presented to the committee by grad studies
dean Ian Cowan, on behalf of the UBC adminstration Feb.
17.
"I don't believe Cowan is right in saying the primary
consideration in tenure decision-making is teaching.
"His statement that denial of tenure is not dismissal is
untrue because the unsuccessful applicant can no longer
teach at UBC and has a black mark on her record in future
job applications," said McDiarmid.
But he stressed his belief that such shortcomings
relate only to the arts faculty and alleged they are not the
fault of the actual tenure system.
The AMS executive brief, representing members of
the present and incoming executive, also supports the
tenure system.
But it maintains the only problem with it concerns
the lack of student contribution to decisions.
The administration stand on the issue is the same as
that of the AMS, said Aldridge.
The AMS brief states various alternatives for ensuring
student participation in decision making should be
decided by students and faculty in each department.
Alternatives presented included student-organized
questionnaires, briefs to tenure committees and student
membership on tenure committees.
The means for reform, according to faculty
association president Robert Kubicek "is to encourage
more questionnaires and reports from students regarding
their opinions of the individual in question."
But he said he would never support the inclusion of
students on tenure-deciding committees because "they
don't have to live with the decisions they would make.
They are only here for a few years."
McDiarmid hinted that he disapproved of government
intervention in the matter while both Aldridge and,
earlier, Cowan and Kubicek avoided the point despite
reports that they also disapprove of this interference.
One more hearing is scheduled before the committee
presents its recommendations to the legislature. That
meeting will be to hear from Simon Fraser University
representatives.
"'4^?r; *<i<3.*h
Grad money hassle looms
Vested interests are playing a part in the distribution
of the grad class budget, a graduating student charged
Wednesday.
Most of the $9,000 section of the budget to be
divided among groups seems directed by the executive to
projects with which they are involved, said the student,
who wishes to remain anonymous since his is one of the
other groups applying for money.
"The executive is dominated by engineers and the
urban vehicle project is sponsored by the engineers. This
group has been told to apply for a $6,000 grant from the
class.
"This leaves only $3,000 to be divided between two
other groups, since only three groups will receive money,"
he said.
The student also said "gifts" to UBC approved by the
executive mainly deal in 'hardware' projects rather than
those concerning people.
Among the projects approved by the executive for
presentation is one to put telephones and vending
machines in Sedgewick Library and another to create a
computerized, mosaic, sun-diaL
Among the groups not eligable for application were
the Burrard food co-op, a women's rights booklet,
Women's Place and Frontier College. All were denied
because the executive said they did not serve the
university community.
However at least one group— the Burrard food
co-op — contend that its rejection on the grounds cited is
not valid.
"The co-op is situated in an area with a large student
population and would be ideal for the house needs of
these people," said B-rian DeBeck, a spokesman for the
group.
Other groups allowed to apply for grants are the
Mental Patients Association, University Day Care, ECO,
Speak-Easy, Women's Studies and the Crane Library.
Voting is today at noon in the SUB ballroom. Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday, March 2, 1972
People's loophole outlined
You don't have to be a
business tycoon to take advantage
of the loopholes in the new
federal income tax legislation, a
Vancouver insurance salesman
told The Ubyssey Wednesday.
The government has provided a
people's loophole.
David Jaques told The Ubyssey
that under the new legislation a
person can put up to 20 per cent
of his taxable income in a
registered pension retirement fund
and deduct this from his income.
The last day for registering this
money would be the final day in
February of each year.
However, on the first of March,
the beginning of a new fiscal year,
the money could be withdrawn
from the fund, and the fund
closed up.
For example, if a person was to
have a taxable income of $2,000,
he could register 20 per cent of
that, or $400 in the fund. The
taxable income would drop to
$1,600.
Unfortunately for all budding J.
V. Clynes, there are a couple of
catches in the otherwise crafty
set-up.   The   money   withdrawn
Equipment
meeting set
A meeting is being held at 8
p.m. tonight for people interested
in daycare, kids, toys and
playgrounds.
Trudy Moul, 224-0937, says
some people are putting together
an Opportunities for Youth
application to get money to make
equipment for the day care
centres on campus. They need
carpenters, painters, people who
can sew and like that.
The meeting will be at 5760
Toronto Road.
from the fund has to be .declared
in your next year's tax return and
to open the pension fund you
have to have that 20 per cent of
your income available in cash on
the last day of February.
Jaques recommends that if a
person is going to use this scheme
next year, he use a trust
company's registered fund other
than a mutual benefit fund. He
said that the trust company would
charge the $55 fee most mutual
funds do. That is $55 to open the
fund and another $55 to close it
out.
Reaction in the UBC school of
law indicated that there was no
real feasibility in the scheme. One
member of the faculty, who asked
not to be identified, said it would
only serve the purpose of
deferring the taxes for a year.
"I would certainly check it out
Cross-campus seats
for student court
Candidates for student court will be chosen this year from as
many disciplines as possible instead of only the law faculty as in other
years, a law students association officer said Wednesday.
LSA external affairs officer Ross Ellison said that since the AMS
code only requires three court members to be law students, the
association plans to recruite the other seven prospective jurors from
other faculties.
The association has been directed by Alma Mater Society
president Grant Burnyeat to recommend 10 candidates to student
council from which seven will be elected.
Traditionally the court of five judges and two alternates has
been composed totally of law students, although this year's court has
one non-law member.
Burnyeat said Wednesday he was not opposed to the idea
although he saw possible problems with constitutional questions for
members with no legal training.
"I think any student on campus should be able to follow
arguments in the disciplinary area. I would prefer law students
however," he said.
The candidates will be picked by March 7 and will be voted on
March 15 at a joint meeting of the outgoing and incoming councils.
very carefully before
recommending it. It just doesn't
sound right and is a bolt from the
blue to me," he said.
If the pension plan isn't what
you had in mind iaques had
another suggestion.
The new legislation provided
for a personal exemption of
$1,500 for a single person, and
only $800 for a spouse. Jaques'
suggestion was that divorce and
common-law marriage save money.
PANGO PANGO (UNS) -
Ecological disaster hit here when a
labor organizer cried: "Blorgs of
the world unite!" Some did,
creating a huge, messy coagulation
that took weeks to clean up.
TUXEDO
RENTAL & SALES
+ D.B. & S.B. Tuxedos
+ D.B. & S.B. White Coats
+ D.B. & S.B. Suits
+ COLORED SHIRTS
Parkins at Rear
BLACK & LEE
Formal Wear Rentals
631 Howe
688-2481
The Best in
Greek Cuisine
ZORBA'S SHISH
KEBAB
2902 W. BROADWAY
733-7522
Hours 9:00 a.m. to 12 p.m.
10% DISCOUNT TO ALL
■.STUDENTS & FACULTY.
You are invited to
attend today's special
Finance Committee
Meeting
on
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HILLTOP GULF
SERVICE
-  JOE     MIZSAK -
Tune-Up Specialists For All Makes
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JAPANESE & EUROPEAN CARS
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1
for 1972-73
A special open meeting will be held to discuss:
• SPORTS   • CLUBS
• SPECIAL EVENTS and
• PUBLICATIONS
Council Chambers, SUB
12:30-2:30
SPAGHETTI HOUSE LTD
4450 W. 10th Ave.
Hot Delicious Tasty Pizzas
famous charbroiled steaks — spare ribs
FREE DELIVERY • Right to Your Door
Phone 224-1720 - 224-6336
OPEN FOR LUNCH - SPECIAL MENU
HOURS - MON. To THURS. 11 a.m. to 3 a.m.
i FRI. & SAT. 11 a.m. to 4 am. - SUNDAY 4 p.m to 2 a-m..
mMNDENTAL MEDITATION
Lecture
Bu: Rm 204
Fri: 12:30  — March 3rd
Speaker: David Cox
FOR PREFERRED RISKS ONLY
It Pays to Shop for Car Insurance
YOU CAN SAVE MONEY ON CAR INSURANCE AT WESTCO
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HEAD OFFICE: 1927 WEST BROADWAY, VANCOUVER 9. BRITISH COLUMBIA
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FOR WRITTEN QUOTATION, NO OBLIGATION. NO SALESMAN WILL CALL.
MAIL THIS COUPON FOR OUR LOW RATES ON YOUR AUTOMOBILE
Name	
Residence
Address	
(Please Print)
City        Prov..
Phone: Home Office    	
Occupation .... ... .... 	
Age..       Married Q Divorced □     Male □
Separated D  Never Married □ Female D
Date first licensed to drive	
Have you or any member of your household been involved
in any accident in the past five years?
Yes D No Q (If "yes" provide details on a separate sheet).
In the last five years has your
license been suspended? 	
Are you now insured?	
Date current policy expires	
This  coupon  is  designed  solely to enable  non-policy
holders to obtain an application and rates for their cars.
Car No. 1
Car No. 2
Year of automobile	
No. of cylinders
Model (Impala, Dart, etc.)	
Days per week driven to
work, train or bus depot,
  Da)
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One way driving distance
Is car used in business
(except to and from wor
Mile
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k)?
Yes n No D
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Give number and dates
of traffic convictions
in last 5 years.
LIST INFORMATION ON ALL ADDITIONAL DRIVERS
Age
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Relation
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FPR UBC 44 Thursday, March 2, 1972
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
Too few faculty women, says brief
By MIKE SASGES
A campus women's group called Wednesday for an investigation
of the positions women hold as teachers to remedy "injustices and
anomalies in respect to rank and tenure."
The brief, by the Woman's Action Group, shows that only 90
women in the arts faculty are regular members out of 503 regular
members.
The brief will be presented to the provincial government's
standing committee on education and social welfare by Arts One
instructor Shelagh Day and associate sociology professor Dorothy
Smith.
Although less than 18 per cent of the faculty are women, a
recent study shows that 26 per cent of the arts doctorates in Canada
went to women.
"Commencing in 1972, new appointments to academic
positions in the University of British Columbia should reflect the
proportion of women receiving PhDs in that year," the brief
recommends.
The brief quotes statistics from a report done for the Royal
Commission on the Status of Women in Canada that shows definite
signs that women do not receive the same positions as men.
The brief states that women do not have as good a chance as
men to be appointed to positions of dean or department head, full,
associate and assistant professors.
This fact cannot be justified by the statement that men are
better qualified, since women had proven through their training and
experience that they are just as competent, the brief states.
Only women who are 70 or over have a chance of becoming a
dean, the brief reports.
The brief states that 540 of the 2,682 administrative and
academic positions on campus are filled by womea
"Thirty seven per cent of those women teach part time," said
the brief. "Many of these women might be promoted to full-time
positions if promotions procedures were not discriminatory."
Part time teaching conditions are bad, said the brief, because
they yield the lowest pay.
"Part-time teachers also have no choice in university or
departmental decision-making decisions. Nor do they have any
protection. They are entirely dependent on the good will of the head
of the department, and can be exploited in a purely arbitrary way."
The brief recommends that tenure be granted to both full-time
and part-time instructors and lecturers if they show excellence in
teaching undergraduate courses.
It also recommends that all rights and privileges of regular
faculty members be given to part-time members.
The group sard it agrees with the faculty association and
administration's recommendations that academic tenure be kept but
"the issue of tenure here is simply part of the general inequity in
promotion and tenure proceedings with respect to women in the
University of British Columbia".
Climbing stuff cheap
The Mountain Equipment
Co-operative has been formed to
provide mountaineering
enthusiasts with the necessary
equipment at lower prices.
The co-operative charges
between 25 and 30 per cent above
wholesale costs, which compares
favorably with the 50 to 100 per
cent markup at retail outlets,
according to a spokesman.
"Memberships     in     the
co-operative cost $5, and anyone
can become a member. However,
the club is mainly made up of
Varsity Outdoor Club types," the
spokesman told The Ubyssey
Monday.
The co-op has no permanent
location, but can be reached by
phoning Jim Byers at 682-2459,
or by going to the VOC clubroom
in SUB 14C, any Thursday
between 7:30 and 9:30 p.m.
SPIDER WEB IN WILDERNESS watches the day pass by Tsusiat Lake on the west coast of Vancouver
Island. Lake is one of several being considered .for inclusion in West Coast Trail portion of Pacific Rim
National Park. Sierra Club is presenting slide show on park Friday noon in SUB auditorium.
Place wanted
The Women's Place Association is looking for people who are
willing to share their home with women who need a temporary retreat
during a change in their life.
Ideally the group would like to have a five or six-bedroom house
in which to develop a setting where women can meet to do things
together, to talk about their lives and common problems.
"Although we don't have a house yet, we believe there is no
reason why we can't help women in transition through private
homes," group member W«ndy Jo Doran said Wednesday.
"Women in transition (the name of the project) will fill the
space between the home and institutions," said Doraa
A lot of women don't think their problems are serious enough
for social institutions or are frightened of them, she said.
"We will be holding a meeting Monday at 8 p.m. at 4465
Quebec Street for women who are interested in organizing the service
or offering a room in their home.
"We have a few homes now but need many more.
"We all know women who at some point in their life have
needed this service. When we tell women about the women's place,
they all say, "I hope it will be around when I need it'," said Doraa
For more information call 872-0284 between noon and 6 p.m. Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, March 2, 1972
Grad class patronage
One of the few redeeming features of that phenomenon known as a
grad class is the potential it has to do some good things with the few
thousand dollars earmarked for donation to projects considered worthwhile.
For that reason, it is disturbing to note the charge on the front page of
today's paper that the engineer-dominated grad class executive is attempting
to channel this money into projects it likes.
This is especially repugnant in light of the fact that two of these
projects are about as low as you can get on the priority list of anyone with
an IQ of more than 11.
We refer, of course, to the plan to put a bank of vending machines in
Sedgewick library and the proposed development of a computerized sun-dial.
A real sun-dial would be bad enough — but apparently the one under
consideration here won't even need sunshine.
And although there may be people moronic enough not to know what
season it is, or stupid enough to need a sun-dial to tell them what their
astrological sign is, or muddled enough to think such things matter much —
although there may be people like this, we doubt very much whether the
vast majority of UBC students fall into this dazed category.
These are the sorts of services that this so-called sun-dial will perform.
It almost makes the bell-tower look good.
And that ain't all.
The grad class executive has taken it upon itself to screen out a
number of valid applications for grad class funds before those of us who are
members of the grad class even have a chance to vote on them.
At the same time, it has approved for presentation to today's grad class
meeting a request for $6,000 for the engineers' urban car.
We strongly urge members of the 1972 grad class to attend the meeting
at noon today in the SUB ballroom when voting will take place.
We must make it clear that we are absolutely opposed to the sort of
high-handed patronage that the grad class executive has indulged in, and that
we intend to see to it that a grad class budget reflecting our collective
priorities is ratified.
Letters
Lunch
It would appear, from your
front-page article of Feb. 24, that
The Ubyssey is continuing its
policy of deliberate distortion of
both facts and quotations. Once
again, therefore, I will explain the
situation regarding the
"luncheon" memo — an
explanation which was given to
council and which your reporter
did not bother to cover.
The memo was not written to
the "Students' Coalition
executive" but to the old and new
AMS executive which includes
an independent, Tom
MacKinnon, and a Young
Socialist, Joan Campana. It was
not, therefore, an undercover,
backroom operation as you imply,
but a proposal for consideration
by the elected representatives of
the students.
Furthermore, the memo is not
AMS policy but a suggestion and I
would draw your attention to the
last line where I said that I
"would appreciate comments."
In respect to your comments
regarding "wealthy Vancouver
businessmen" I would point out
that nowhere does the memo
exclude other than businessmen
being invited. Indeed, the phrase
that I used was "community and
business leaders" specifically to
include at least a few people who
are not millionaires and who
(heaven forbid) may actually even
belong to a union or be
unemployed.
As far as the "No comment"
quotes are concerned, these are
totally untrue. At no time was I
ever asked the questions
contained in the article.
I was asked, in a general way,
what I had to say about the
memo. My reply was to the effect
that it was a suggestion for the
consideration of the executive and
that it had not as yet been
discussed. Until it was discussed, I
did not feel that I should
comment further.
I will not bother to comment
on your editorial since the idea
that students should not help with
the development of this university
is plainly idiocy.
As I said in the memo, I would
be happy to receive comments.
However, I am interested only in
those that are based on some
intelligent thought or legitimate
sense of enquiry and not those
engendered by hysterical partisan
opportunism.
David S. Dick,
Treasurer,
Alma Mater Society
Our reporter states that she
did, in fact, ask you the series of
questions you deny knowledge of
at the beginning of her interview
with you, and that your reply
was: "AU I can say is no
comment."
Furthermore, given the
fund-raising priorities mentioned
in your memorandum, we are
interested to know how union
members or unemployed people
are going to be able to contribute
to AMS coffers - the prime
reason for holding these luncheon
gatherings.
Finally, it strikes us as rather
odd that you maintain the lunch
plan is not AMS policy and is only
a suggestion for discussion, since
we happen to know that you have
made at least one phone call to a
member of the university
community to discuss the
organization of a luncheon and to
set a date.
If this isn't putting policy into
action we don't know what is.
Apparently the only "comments"
you're interested in are those
which coincide with the plans you
are already carrying out.
Honor
THE UBYSSEY
MARCH 2, 1972
Published Tuesdays, 1 hursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the writer and not" of the AMS or the university administration.
Member, Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a
weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located
in room 241K of the Student Union Building.
Editorial    departments,    228-2301,    228-2307;    Page    Friday,   Sports,
228-2305; advertising, 228-3977.
' Editor: Leslie Plommer
A horn sounds. Sweeping into the arena comes Sheikh Gord
Gibsonbabba's prized whites driven onward by the dignified Berton Ben
Woodeard. Maidens Sandra Shresar and Lesley Kruegonius scatter petals at
his approach but run before the fierce blacks of Messala Sasges now coming
into the ring. Then Tribunes Michael Gidora and Garius Gruenke sound the
call and Ben Woodward and Sasges whip their teams through the starting
gate and along the course. A cry is heard in the stands. Leslie Plommonius
faints Into the arms of Julius Twigg. Another cry, Richardus Betts points
to the arena. Messala Sasges has fallen from his chariot, and is trampled
into the dust. A hush spreads through the stands. A faint sound is heard. Is
it the holy man, Paulus Knoxius murmuring prayers? No, it is Sarah Kass
intoning "Practicum morti. Practicum morti..."
I am surprised at the exchange
of letters in The Ubyssey
regarding the supposed
non-admittance of women into
Sigma Tau Chi, the honorary
society formerly for men only.
According to the Sigma Tau
Chi constitution there is nothing
to bar female members. Also, at
the second-to-last meeting (March,
1971) the membership specifically
voted to include women in this
year's new-members list if any
women's names were
forthcoming.
Thus I am surprised that this
year's membership nomination
form which was sent out to
various organizations and
individuals, stipulates that only
men can be nominated.
No doubt this is merely a
printing    error    which    was
overlooked by current Sigma Tau
Chi president Gary Gumley.
I would encourage those
women who have made
contributions to the betterment
of the university to forward their
names to Gary Gumley, c/o the
education . undergrad society,
education building, UBC.
Art Smolensky,
Past vice-president,
Sigma Tau Chi.
Garbage
For some time, I have felt
extremely disturbed about what I
feel is the real GUT ISSUE at
UBC — this is the problem of food
services.
Now, I just can't understand
why UBC food services dishes out
such incredibly lousy meals. I've
eaten at some of the greasiest and
grimiest restaurants (crawling with
rats; fly-infested; etc.) in some of
the greasiest and grimiest cities of
this world, but never in my life
have I run into such blatantly
inedible garbage as at UBC food
services.
In particular I am referring to
the gack which is ladled out at the
SUB cafeteria: sub-food is really
an accurate name for these
products. Even a single spoonful
leaves you with a queasy doubt as
to who is digesting who. It's bad
enough we have to put up with
the brain damage this place
causes, without also having our
bodies destroyed in the process.
This is really adding injury to
insult.
Of course, I am not the first
one to notice this problem, and
there have already been some
attempts to deal with it. The
Human Government, for example,
went to the trouble of setting up
an alternate food service. The
only trouble is that this
"alternate" really hasn't altered
anything, as far as food quality is
concerned, though I am as good a
friend of Lyle Osmundson's as
anybody else, and I certainly
don't    begrudge    him   and   his
associates the few pennies that
they make at this operation.
The rise of the health food
store is a clear indication that
there is a growing wave of public
reaction against the death
merchants who push garbage in
the name of food. Admittedly,
there are a few racketeers in this
business, which is merely one of
the phases that every progressive
movement must pass through.
One of the most blatant examples
of this type of shuck is the SUB
cafeteria's "Health Food Bar".
What do they serve there? White
bread, some of it lightly colored;
various kinds of chemical "meat";
limp, tasteless lettuce and unripe
tomatoes; and a couple of kinds
of cheese, probably also strongly
suspect. This is as gross an
example of misrepresentation as
any I have seen.
However, there is one bright
spot in the generally dismal UBC
food picture — this is, strangely,
enough, the work of the
"right-wing" reaction to the
Human Government: the
Students' Coalition. What I am
referring to is their International
Food Festival (SUB 207-209),
which features God's Kitchen
natural food restaurant every
Friday from 12:30 to 1:30.
This group serves very tasty
food, including real salad (a
species totally unrelated to the
limp and vinegar-embalmed crap
that SUB-"food?" "services?"
menaces people with).
Admittedly, God's Kitchen's
prices are a little steep — about a
dollar for soup, salad, and a
sandwich (e.g., alfalfa • sprouts,
cream cheese, and solid green
lettuce on sunflower and
buckwheat bread). However, the
quantity they serve is far too
much for one meal. If they served
half the quantity at half the price,
I am sure that their business
would increase considerably. In
this way they could overcome
their present financial difficulties,
which at present are threatening
to drive them out of business. Thursday, March 2, 1972
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
Letters
One of the major problems is
the fact that they have to pay 16
per cent of their intake as rental
for the rooms they occupy.
The question then arises: Why
don't the God's Kitchen people
get together with Lyle
Osmundson, seeing as how they
are both basically concerned with
accomplishing changes?
Actually, I suggested this
possibility to both of them, and
they both gave me exactly the
same answer: "The other guy is a
crook," each one told me, "just
out to make a fast buck."
Frankly speaking, I just don't
have the time to coax a bunch of
silly children into taking a more
reasonable attitude. What I
wonder is: What need do we have
of "reactionaries" when the
"revolutionaries" are so busy
cutting each other's throats?
Peter Hlookoff,
MA student,
Slavonic studies;.
Breed
Re Renee Martin's letter in the
Feb. 24 Ubyssey:
I fully agree with her
observation that obnoxious,
loudly-talkative people in movie
theatres are bastards. They seem
to crawl out of the woodwork at
many Film Society presentations,
especially at the 9:00 p.m.
showing.
The main purpose of this
letter, however, is to challenge
Martin's statement that The Wild
Bunch was a "hideous" movie — I
assume Martin was referring to the
"violence and brutality".
The depiction of how people
were shot - i.e., shotgun wounds,
spurting blood, etc., might have
been a bit excessive, but its total
effect on and relevance to the
theme of the movie is
indisputable. And, from a cruder,
and more elementary viewpoint,
the spilling of blood was necessary
since bleeding is an integral part
of being shot.
Looking past the Hollywood
realism, I thought that the acting
often bordered on superb, the
cinematic techniques surpassed
excellence and the abundance of
visual images offered enough
impact to shatter the mind.
Jim Lim,
Science 4.
Drunk
Regarding    your    article    -
'Drunk'     organizer     disrupts
meeting    —    in    the    Feb.    24
Ubyssey:
I would like to clarify that I
did not actually use the work
"drunk" in reference to Steve
Anderson, and that I do not
believe he was under the influence
of alcohol.
It is true, however, that his
mind was not functioning
effectively.
The behavior of students who
tried to prevent Anderson from
speaking was crass, rude and
superfluous since his
psychological condition made it
obvious that he would not speak
for long.
Heather Wagg,
French dept. TA.
HILLEL HOUSE PRESENTS
MARLON BRANDO,
COLOR
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A Film by
GILLO PONTECORVO
United Artists
HILLEL HOUSE: BEHIND BROCK
SAT. MARCH 4,8:30P.M.
ADMISSION 75*        REFRESHMENTS
Another thrilling
column
Outdone by daughter Karen, who got her picture on the front
page of Tuesday's Ubyssey, English grad student David (Rock)
Schendlinger submitted this attempt to get back in the limelight.
At Peon U, the poor people's school, the English Department
has had a long history of internal squabbles. The most recent of these
involved the location of professors' offices.
Some malcontents accused the chairman of favoritism in
assigning his friends to offices conveniently near the drinking
fountains, while exiling popular junior faculty members to locations
next to the washrooms, where loud toilet flushes and dripping sink
faucets played havoc with concentration.
Never one to sidestep major issues, the student newspaper, The
Urinal, dove headlong into the controversy, labelling chairman Art
Gold's actions "cronyism." Then, with a characteristic instinct for the
real issues behind the issues, The Urinal drove on to the heart of the
matter, personality baiting and character assassination.
The most obvious example of cronyism reported by The Urinal
involved Hugh Silver who, like Gold, grew up in Cedar Rapids, Iowa.
Both men, in fact, were in Miss Wrench's grade 5 class, Gold in 1936
and Silver in 1932. It can hardly be a coincidence, then, that Silver,
whose game is pinochle, was hired last year instead of Cy Zinc, a
much-needed sheepshead expert.
Of course, Silver was given an office near the drinking fountain
(although it is reported that he rarely uses it) and far from the
washroom (despite his near-deafness which would nullify the adverse
effects of the noise from there). Many faculty members are upset
almost to the point of somnolence over this development.
And in the area of promotion to better offices, The Urinal
exposed one blatant case of favoritism. Howie Copper, a friend of
Gold, got the advance over Phil Iron, Walt Mercury and Elmer
Magnesium, despite the fact that the latter three all drink bourbon
and water and use the drinking fountain oftea Copper, like Gold, is a
whiskey sour man.
Furthermore, reliable inside poop from secretarial
kaffeeklatsches has it that Copper frequently appears in baggy pants
and narrow lapels. And he shares with Gold a penchant for correcting
the secretaries' grammar and spelling. Iron, Mercury and Magnesium,
snappy dressers all, let the secretaries do their own thing.
Next week — an important series on seniority practices in the
Peon U. plumbers' union. Do not miss.
Meanwhile, professional essay-writing has arrived at Peon U.
Early reports show some unforeseen problems developing,
however.
Ralph Nieblitz, first customer of Essay Writing Everywhere,
took his paper back to the firm, demanding a refund. "I got a D on
this thing and I want my money back!" he screamed. "My prof said
she was disappointed, it lacked my usual good humor and personal
approach or some crap like that."
Harvey Smarm, head of EWE, replied that EWE took "no
responsibility for grades. We just write papers. Now get out. I have
paying customers to serve."
In a related matter, applied agriculture professor Elmo Tweed
reported receiving 16 identical papers titled Manure Spreading With a
Forked Stick in response to an essay assignment on the history of
manure spreading. "It sure makes it easier to correct papers," he said,
"but there's something fishy going on."
Sober
You will please retract,
formally, your slanderous
qualification of me as 'drunk' at
the French department strike
meeting.
I had had but one mouthful of
beer before speaking. I was stone
sober.
Stephen Anderson
VANCOUVER'S FIRST
Vietnam Restaurant
Myton CORDON BLEU
738-9512
2764 W. Broadway      Closed Mon.
CHARTER FLIGHTS
STUDENT SPECIAL: DEPT. MAY-RET. SEPT.
VAN. LONDON   $239.00
Return Flights    $225.   UP
ONE-WAY
$145 Vancouver to London
$120 London to Vancouver
We have numerous return and one-way flights each month
to and from London. Ring our office for information and
free list of flights.
GEORGIA TRAVEL
AGENTS LTD.
1312-925 W.Georgia, Van. 1
687-2868 (3 lines)
TUNE-UP?
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Why pay more elsewhere?
QUALITY WORK
REASONABLE PRICES
AT
GRADUATE
STUDENTS
The Graduate Representative
Assembly is meeting on
Thurs., March 9,
7:30 p.m.
in the
Student Council Chambers, SUB.
All grad departments are entitled to at least one. vote,
departments with more than 50 grad students are entitled to two
votes.
Make sure your department is
represented:
The G.S.A. Executive
Extends this invitation to YOU! Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, March 2, 1972
Hot flashes
Wilderness
slides set
The Sierra Club will show
slides on the West Coast Trail and
Nitinat Triangle Thursday noon in
MacMillan 166 and Friday noon
in SUB auditorium.
The showing scheduled for
Wednesday noon was cancelled.
The Nitinat Triangle is a hunk
of wilderness on the southwest
coast of Vancouver Island. The
federal and provincial
governments are haggling over the
land as they set the boundaries for
the West Coast Trail portion of
the Pacific Rim National Park.
Meanwhile, logging companies
are surging into the wilderness
area with plans to begin logging
next fall.
Women's week
Next week is women's week,
sponsored by the women's studies
program.
Events will include open
seminars, art gallery displays and
guest speakers, dealing with topics
such as women and social change,
women and work and women in
the arts.
All the events, except a 35-cent
lunch on March 9, are free.
Free babysitting will be
provided from 10:30 a.m. to 2:30
p.m. for children of any age.
Parents should provide their own
food and diapers.
Organizers of the week are still
looking for persons taking the
anti-trade union position, to
appear on a panel Wednesday at
5:15 p.m. in the SUB ballroom. It
was erroneously reported Tuesday
that enough anti-union staff had
been located.
these points are invited to
participate in the work of the
committee, which includes raising
money for the aid of political
prisoners in Ireland and bringing
Irish speakers to Vancouver.
For further information call
Denis Bradfield at 688-6357 or
Maurice Flood at 681-4768.
Support
The Vancouver Irish Solidarity
Committee intends to seek
endorsation from organizations
and prominent citizens of the
city.
Sponsorship will be sought
around support of the following
four points: self-determination for
the new Irish nation, immediate
release of all those interned under
the Special Powers Act, abolition
of the Special Powers Act and
immediate withdrawal of all
British troops from Ireland.
All   those   in   solidarity   with
'Tween classes
TODAY
CAMPUS CAVALIERS
Meeting 12:30-2:3OSUB 125.
HILLEL
Talmudic   laws  of  marriage,   Rabbi
Marvin Hier, Hillel House 12:30.
BICYCLE CLUB
Logistics    for    protest,    SUB    224,
noon.
ALPHA OMEGA UKRAINIAN CLUB
John     Kasky     speaks    on    recent
experiences in Soviet Ukraine SUB
105B noon.
SKYDIVERS
General meeting SUB 205 noon.
CCF.
Practical   Christian   problems   SUB
211 noon.
STUDENT LIBERALS
Convention  report'SUB 213  noon.
NEWMAN CLUB
General   elections St.   Marks  music
room noon.
FRIDAY
SIERRA CLUB
West coast trail slide show, noon,
SUB auditorium.
T.BIRD MOTORCYCLE CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 130.
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
Karl Burau speaks on: Dismissed for
Incompetence— discussing Grade 7
social studies essays, noon, SUB
111.
SIMS
Lecture on transcendental
meditation, noon, Bu. 204.
MONDAY
ELCIRCULO
Election   of   next
noon, IH 402.
TUESDAY
PRE-LAW SOC
Guest speaker, noon, Ang. 415.
A panel discussion on
alternatives to collective
bargaining, featuring management
and labor representatives, will be
presented Thursday noon in
Angus 110 by the Commerce
Seminar Committee.
Management speakers will be
Chuck Connaghan, president of
the Construction Labor Relations
Association, Don Lanskail,
president of Pulp and Paper
Industrial Relations and Ray
Wilson of the labor relations
division of MacMillan Bloedel Ltd.
Presenting labor's view will be
B.C. Federation of Labor
secretary-treasurer Ray Haynes
and International Brotherhood of
Pulp, Sulphite and Paper Mill
Workers vice-president Pat
O'Neale.
Moderator will be commerce
prof Noel Hall who recently
arbitrated a settlement in the air
traffic controllers-government
dispute.
Energy
year's executive,
A film about all forms of
energy and their use and abuse
will be shown Friday night in the
Totem ballroom.
Energy Crisis, a CBC
documentary is sponsored by the
Totem Park special events
committee free of charge at 7:30
p.m.
PRESCRIPTION SERVICE
YOU CANT BEAT
ALMA
PHARMACY
224-4341
10TH & ALMA
RECORDING ARTISTS
MARTY GILLAN
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Their new Stereo L.P.
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Need Help??
Papers Written,
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2605 Alma
228-0022
TANSAR CRAFTS
SCHOOL
2006 West 4th Avenue
732-7721
Register now for classes in
leather, weaving and
pottery. Session begins
April 3rd
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Campus -3  Unas,  1   day  $1.00; 9 day* $2.50
Commercial - 3  fine*,   1   doy $1.25;  oddrfional
Hues 30c; 4 doy« price of 3.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephotm mti mm paymbh
la advance. Ztmmffim is SUM mm* the day before pttMkatkm.
Publications Office, Room 241 S.UJB.f VBC, Vm. 8, BX»
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
OLD FORT CAMPERS HOME-
coming Dance and Party, March
4th. For information phone 224-
7383.
Greetings
12
Lost & Found
13
Rides & Car Pools
14
Special Notices
15
 SKI WHISTLER!	
Rent  furnished   condominium   opposite  Gondola,  224-0657 eves.
OLD FORT CAMPERS HOME-
coming dance and party March
4th. For information phone 224-
7383.	
JAPANESE GIRL WANTS TO
exchange letters with Canadian
male student (over 21). For further details  phone  Gene  255-6868.
Travel Opportunities
16
FLY TO EUROPE FROM $170.00
round trip, student vacations and
tours, employment services etc.
Air mail for full details. Campus
Agents also required A.A.S.A
Limited, 15 High St., Ventnor
I.W.,  England.	
CAMPING   TRIPS RUSSIA
Europe, India. Information meeting Friday  12:30.  Bu.  3223.  Rosa-
lyn   Peering   922-0644.	
LEARN HOW TO TRAVEL OVERSEAS ON A LIMITED BUDGET
A meeting will be held at 7:45
p.m. on Monday, March 20th in
the auditorium of Eric Hamber
School, 5025 Willow. Vancouver
33rd & Oak) to help all those
travelling abroad on a limited
budget. Bring along your questions and learn how to travel on
a   shoestring.
A panel of experts, including a
qualified agent, who have travelled to all parts of the world
will be on hand to talk to you and
answer all your questions on
foreign travel. Free checklist will
be   handed   out.
No admission charge — so bring
your friends who are interested
in travel and learn how to save
hundreds of dollars!
Canadian Touth Hostels Association, 1406 West Broadway, Vancouver 9, B.C.. Telephone: 738-
3128.
Wanted—Information
17
Wanted—Miscellaneous 18
AUTOMOTIVE
Autos For Sale
21
'64 TR. SPITFIRE NEW BRAKES
transmission, differential. Best
offer.   Phone  229-4470.   Samir.
1960 VALIANT STATION WAGON,
good     running     condition    $275.00.
Phone  Alan,  266-8906.	
'65   SUNBEAM   1235
Running   good,    makes    about   30
miles/gallon.   Owner   can't   afford
insurance.      Must     sell     684-5763
evenings.	
1964 VOLVO P1800 SPORTS
coupe. Immac. cond.. overdrive,
radials. New clutch, brakes, city
tested  521-7643.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Duplicating & Copying
34
Scandals
37
WITH A LITTLE HELP FROM A
friend, you .too can succeed. See
the. experts at Corky's Men's
Hairstyling, 4th and Alma, 731-
4717.
Sewing & Alterations
38
Typewriters & Repairs
39
Typing
40
EXPERIENCED TYPIST- Manu -
scripts, essays, etc. at 250 per
page. Please supply own paper.
BEV HARCUS   266-9837.	
EXPERIENCED TYPIST WILL
type essays and theses quickly
and accurately. Donna Peaker
266-4264   Kerrisdale.	
YR. ROUND ACC. TYPING FROM
legible drafts. Phone 738-6829 from
10:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Quick service on  short essays.
Typing—Cont.
40
EXPERT IBM SELECTRIC TYP-
ist. Beautiful work, Mrs. Ellis
321-3838.     	
TEDIOUS TASKS — PROFES-
sional Typing IBM Selectric —
Days, Evenings, Weekends. Phone
Shari at 738-8745 — Reasonable
rates.	
EFFICIENT, ELECTRIC TYPING
my home. Essays, thesis, etc.
Neat, accurate work. Reasonable
rates.   Phone   263-5317.	
WILL DO TYPING MY HOME.
Reasonable rates. 985-8891. North
Vancouver.	
TYPING, THESES. ESSAYS, ETC.
Mrs.   C.  Hill.   929-1994.	
ESSAYS, PAPERS TYPED 25c
page.  Barb,  732-9985  after 6.
ESSAYS, PAPERS. THESIS,
assignments, fast, efficient. Near
41st   Marine   Dr.   266-5053.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
ai
STUDENTS TO ORGANIZE
Youth Opp. Project. Study B.C.
interior. Air transp. provided. 274.
1814. ___
SUMMER HELP CTN INTERIOR
Ranch. Moving irrigation pipe
half day. Pleasure riding, swimming, hiking. Bachelor housing
supplied. Low wages, mosquitoes
free. Four bodies required. Bonaparte Ranch, Box 217, Cache
Creek.
52
Work Wanted
INSTRUCTION & SCHOOLS
Music Instruction
SI
Special Classes
62
POT AT POTTER'S CENTRE! 12
week Spring session starts April
3 register early. Limited enrollment.   G.   Alfred   261-4764.
Tutoring Service
63
WORRIED ABOUT EXAMS? THE
UBC Tutoring Center has tutors
in nearly every course. Register
in   SUB   228   12:00-2:00   weekdays.
Tutors—Wanted
64
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
FULLSIZE ELECTROHOME AM/
FM stereo — attractive Deilcraft
cabinet — excellent condition —
$200.   Phone  266-0129.
RENTALS fe REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
ROOM FOR MALE STUDENT.
Kitchen and laundry facilities.
Handy to UBC $40 Der month,
224-1678.
Room & Board
82
IT'S NEW — STAY AT THE
D.K.E. House. Large spacious
rooms, semi-private -washrooms,
full laundry facilities, color TV,
excellent food. 5765 Agronomy
Road.   224-9691.
Furnished Apts.
83
APT. (5 RMS.) W LARGE SUN-
deck, near Locarno Beach, $145
p.m. to sublet May-August
friendly cat incl. Ph.: 224-6440 or
228-5181
Unf. Apts.
84
Halls For Rent
85
Houses—Furn. & Unfurn.      86
Use Your
Ubyssey
Classified Thursday, March 2, 1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 7
'Birds host national      s,
basketball playoffs
By MIKE GIDORA
Champions have this
disconcerting habit of showing up
when they're not really wanted.
It's: not that the basketball
teams from McGill, Windsor and
UBC hold anything personal
against the Axemen from Acadia;
it's just that Acadia is the current
CIAU basketball champions, and
the other three are challenging for
that title this weekend at War
Memorial Gym.
The four teams, each
representing one of the four
Canadian university conferences,
start play in a single elimination
tournament tonight to choose the
new Canadian champions.
Tonight's first game puts the
McGill Redmen against Acadia.
McGill is an interesting team; to
say the least.
They are led by a relative giant,
or so it seems. John Naponick
stands 6'9", weighs 360 pounds,
averages    30    points    and    20
rebounds per game and plays
football.
Naponick is joined under the
boards by 6'5" forward Howie
Roseman. Roseman came to
Redmen after Christmas and since
then the McGill team has
improved at an amazing rate.
Acadia is a direct contrast to
McGill. They take their basketball
extremely seriously. That is they
carry it to an extreme. They're a
cool and business-like team, and
their business is winning
basketball games.
The Axemen are returning two
starters from last year's team,
co-captains Steve Pound and Gary
Falker. Pound has a stack of
awards so high that he can hide
his 5'9" frame behind it with ease.
He is averaging a little over 25
points per game and is a literal
tiger on defence.
If there is a team that can be
called the Cinderella team in this
tournament, it has to be the
University   of  Windsor  Lancers.
s
They have had trouble throughout
the season getting untracked, and
only finished fourth in their
league but took the title in
post-season play.
UBC, of course, is the
remaining team in the
tournament. They play Windsor in
tonight's feature game at 9 p.m.
A great deal has been said
about the 'Birds on this page
throughout the year. A lot of it
complimentary; some of it not so
nice. But the fact remains that in
the last three weeks, UBC has
played its finest basketball of the
season and has to be considered as
one of the favourites this
weekend.
The other favourite: Acadia,
because they are defending
champions.
Tonight's losers play tomorrow
at eight while the winners go
Saturday at 11 a.m. in a
nationally televised final.
Soccer squad eyes first place
The visiting North Shore soccer
club suffered a 1-0 defeat to the
Thunderbirds Saturday at
Thunderbird Stadium.
The visiting North Shore soccer
club suffered a 1-0 defeat to the
Thunderbirds Saturday at
Thunderbird Stadium.
The win puts the 'Birds in a
good position to take first place in
the Pacific Coast Soccer League or
at least the runner-up spot.
The lone goal was scored in the
39th minute of the game when
Gerry Larson took a pass from
outside left, Jim Sator and netted
the  ball.  League  leading North
Shore made strong attempts to
even the score, but the 'Bird
defence was equal to the task.
The 'Biids received outstanding
efforts from goalie Greg Webber,
fullback Gary Born, link Phil
Sanford, and forwards Gerry
Larson and Tony Mayor.
The team travels to Victoria
March 11 for an important game
against Victoria West.
The next home game for the
soccer team is on March 23
against the University of
California. Half time attraction
for that game will be the annual
nurses-home ec battle.
Highlights
Fencing
The UBC fencing club hosts
the B.C. fencing championships
this weekend in Gym A.
Sixty competitors from across
B.C. are expected to take part in
the two day meet with men's and
women's competition in the foil,
sabre and epee events.
Events start at 9:30 a.m
Saturday with the men's foil and
continue all day. Sunday's events
start at 9:45 a.m.
The UBC club took the team
championship in the B.C. junior
championships held at Crofton
House School.
Peter  Ferris  finished  first in
Intramurals
ORIENTEERING trek goes
today at noon. Meet in they gym
lobby. Don't wear your 'Sunday
best' as the terrain isn't that good.
And the weather might not be
either.
TRACK AND FIELD entry
deadline is today. Competitors
are limited to three events,
including one relay. For further
information drop into the office,
room 308 of the Gym or phone
228-4648. The competition will
be held all day March 11, a
Saturday.
ARTS 20 RACE; This event
which began in 1920 is a seven
mile relay race from Vancouver
General Hospital to the War
Memorial Gym. A maximum of
eight men make up a team. The
entry deadline is Friday with the
racegoing on March 9 at noon.
foil, and third in epee and sabre.
Robert Best was first in sabre,
second in epee, and third in foil
Kevin Stewart finished fourth in
epee and sixth in foil, with Phil
Swift getting fourth in foil and
sixth in epee.
Basketball
Norm Vickery's Thunderettes
accomplished the expected on the
weekend as they .outclassed all
opposition in winning the WCIAA
women's basketball title.
In the first round of the
tournament the UBC team
defeated the University of
Manitoba 57-27 behind the 14
point performance of Terri
McGovern, while the other first
round game saw the University of
Saskatchewan defeat the
University of Victoria 51-37.
The final game, with UBC vs.
University of Saskatchewan, had
UBC leading 20-11 at the half and
53-27 at the end of the game.
Debbie Phelan led UBC with 12
points, while Terri McGovern had
11 and Janice Gee 10. Heather
Witzel scored eight for
S askatchewan.
By virtue of their first place
finish in Western Canada the UBC
team now advances to the
Canadian intercollegiate finals in
Saskatoon this weekend.
CLARK GLANVILLE (right) and
North Shore player go high with
their eyes closed to head the ball.
Or maybe it's a new dance step.
UBC won this soccer game 1-0.
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THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, March 2, 1972
THE USES OF SOCIAL SCIENCE
In an effort to "make the point that we have some
responsibility   to   the   people   who  run  society,   ther
working class",  the Union of Radical Social Scientists
sponsored a forum Tuesday noon on the subject.
It was the first of a series of URSS forums on the role
of the social sciences in the university and society.
The URSS is composed of students, grad students and
teaching staff in the social sciences who are seeking to
raise questions about who the social sciences serve and
how changes in this state of affairs can be brought about.
The main speakers at Tuesday's forum were one-time
worker-tumed-academic Martin Meissner, a UBC industrial
sociologist; and long-time worker and on-the-job union
organizer Jack Scott, a man who has been close to the
heart of the Canadian labor struggle for nearly five
decades
Scott began by stressing that he is not a sociologist in
the academic sense, and that his criticisms of the social
sciences were to be considered as such, rather than as
direct criticisms of Meissner's work. Meissner began by
denouncing what he called attempts by The Ubyssey to
make him "a capitalist patsy" and the "bad guy" in the
debate.
- The following articles contain the gist of each
speaker's position on the role of the social sciences
regarding industry and the working class.
Social research: not on behalf of anyone
Social scientists should not be doing work for either
the working class or the ruling class, sociologist Martin
Meissner told more than 150 people Tuesday in Angus
110.
"I'm not trying to do work for anybody in my social
research," he said.
Research, Meissner said, should consist of gathering
facts, assembling them and analyzing them. It should not
take place in the context of serving any particular
interested party.
"The demand that social research ought to be useful
to the working class 1 regard as a piece of arrogance, a
piece of elitism," he said.
Meissner said that once his work is done, it is not his
fault if management, for example, chooses to manipulate
the results for use against workers. He added that he
knows of very few examples of such manipulation
anyway.
"A lot of the 'worker-productivity' research is simply
bad research," he said. "Employers can't make much out
of this research.
"Suppose they find out that a large proportion of
their workers are dissatisfied with their jobs — so what?
What can they do about that?"
A number of questioners asked Meissner if he was
claiming to work in a vacuum, whether he considered his
role as a social scientist to be only that of a fact finder
and whether he claimed to be working without any moral
basis for research.
"The best I can do right now is give you the usual
motherhood statement — that I'm interested in knowledge
for knowledge's sake," Meissner responded, as the formal
portion of the forum ended and people began to leave the
lecture room.
Later, in an extended question period in Angus
lounge, he elaborated by saying that he does have strong
opinions but does not have time to both do research and
take action.
"You have to understand something before you can
do something about it," he said.
"I don't have the time to do everything."
A series of questioners made the point that the
findings of Meissner and other academics are not written
in a way that non-academics can understand, that they are
published mainly in academic journals and that it is the
ruling class which funds the research because it is useful to
this class.
"I don't want to do my research on behalf of
anyone," Meissner said. He said he has never had trouble
getting research funds, and does not think he would
encounter any difficulties getting money from the
university if he submitted a proposal to do research on
ways of overthrowing the capitalist system.
As to the way in which social scientists' findings are
written and disseminated, he stated: "If I wanted to be
effective (in generating social change) I wouldn't be a
social scientist."
Work and learn to stop the manipulation
The social sciences are manipulated almost entirely
by the ruling class under the present social system, worker
and unionist Jack Scott told the URSS forum.
"Using Dr. Meissner's statement that it's not his fault
if his research is manipulated, my answer would be that a
science which lends itself to manipulation needs to be
examined," he said.
"The purity of research in the academic world is a lot
of bullshit."
Given the present system social science is not going to
change, Scott said.
However, the radical social scientist has the
responsibility to do work that will in some measure alter
the ruling-class orientation of social change.
"The radical social scientist should be prepared to
take sides — consciously, openly — in order to try to
restore some of the balance," he said.
"The radical social scientist should be working for a
new society.
"Right now sociologists don't tackle the problems of
class society and oppression."
Scott discounted social science research done in the
form of attitude surveys of workers.
He said workers don't talk to academics because they
by and large don't trust them and consider them to be
working on the side of the bosses.
"There is never-ceasing guerrilla warfare in factories all
across the country between worker and boss — the boss
who wants more production cheaper and the workers who
want to defeat this purpose.
"This is guerrilla warfare that no social scientist can
find out about because workers won't tell him."
Scott said that instead of spending two or three years
writing an MA, social scientists might better spend their
time working.
"That's not a very attractive proposition — and the
fact that it's not a very attractive proposition says
something about the social sciences," he said.
"Working and learning might give sociologists a better
idea of what the hell's going on."
CARIBBEAN STUDENTS
ASSOCIATION
Important Meeting
March 3, 1972—4 p.m.
at   International House
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1123-1125 ROBSON STREET
20% DISCOUNT TO U.B.C. STUDENTS
ON PRESENTATION OF THIS AD
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1972
GRADUATING STUDENTS
*••*•••*******
GENERAL MEETING
TODAY AT NOON
SUB BALLROOM
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— vote on allocation of about $20,000
IF NO QUORUM PRESENT, NEXT
YEAR'S GRAD CLASS WILL GET THE
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