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The Ubyssey Mar 24, 1987

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UBC Archives Serial
"YOOOOO JOE!" BELLOWS hyperactive cyclist as he rounds the turn in the penultimate le
g of the UBC Storm the Wall competition. He is closely followed by what he believes is Cobra
— malcolm pearson photo
Viper cycle, but is actually a plutonium-powered minijet, flying dangerously low.
Faculty call pay hike inadequate
By ROSS McLAREN
UBC's faculty gained their first
major salary increase in four years
last week but they are not happy
with the agreement, faculty president Barrie Morrison said Monday.
The faculty's 1986-87 salary
budget will increase by about seven
per cent, which includes a 3.5 per
cent salary general increase and a
three per cent merit increase.
But Morrison says the increase is
not enough.
"With that increase we will never
catch up with inflation. It (Inflation) has eroded our salaries by at
least 12 per cent in the past four
years."
Morrison is also upset that the
general salary increase was only
retroactive to January 1, 1987.
Because of the timing of the
retroactive clauses, Morrison says
the agreement is to the university's
advantage.
"We have been without a contract since June 30, 1986. When the
retroactive clause kicks in January
1, faculty's average income will increase by only five per cent", he
said.
"We estimate the university's annual salary budget will increase 3.2
per cent because their fiscal year
ends March 31," Morrison said.
UBC   associate   vice-president
Council urges BoG to divest
By EVELYN JACOB
Student council voted Wednesday to send a letter urging UBC's
Board of Governors to divest the
university's holdings in companies
that do business with South Africa.
"We want a clear statement from
student representatives that UBC
students are opposed to apartheid
and want the university to do
something about it in a concrete
manner," said Mary McAlister, a
member of Students for a Free
Southern Africa SFSA, UBC's anti-
apartheid group.
AMS president Rebecca Nevraumont said Monday she hopes student council's letter will be discussed at the next board meeting set for
April 2.
"No one can dictate to the board
what to do about this (divestment),
but I hope they will consider it (the
letter). Nevraumont called apartheid an "apalling concept," and
pointed out that divestment is a
"viable way of making the South
African government address its
style of government."
SFSA has been lobbying the
board all year to fully divest their
holdings in the companies. In
January, three members of the
group met with UBC president
David Strangway to voice their
anger with the university's investment    policy.    McAlister   said
Strangway at that time indicated he
was in favor of divestment but that
he disagreed with the group on the
criteria and speed for divesting.
She said she is happy with student
countil's decision to press the board
to reconsider its divestment policy.
The Board of Governors voted
last October to sell the university's
shares in two South Africa-linked
companies, Dominion Textiles Inc.,
and another company whose name
would not be disclosed after it
found they were in violation of the
Canadian Code of Conduct. But
the board left the door open for
future investments in South Africa-
linked companies that comply with
the code's conditions.
The board uses the code, which
calls on companies to improve
wages, benefits, and working conditions of black employees, as the
determining factor in its divestment
decisions.
Last year, the board reported it
had $1 million from its $90 million
endowment fund and $717,000
from its $90 millipn staff pension
fund invested in at least eight South
Africa tied companies.
UBC presently has investments in
the following seven companies with
ties to South Africa: Seagrams and
Sons, Falconbridge Ltd., Cominco
Ltd., Ford Motors of Canada, AM-
CA International, Moore Corp,
and Bata Ltd. Bata Ltd. and
Falconbridge Ltd ended operations
in South Africa last year.
Bertie McClean, who represented
the university administration in
bargaining, was tight-lipped about
the agreement.
"The agreement is before the
Compensation Stabilization Board
so it is in limbo," McClean said.
"The agreement is required to go
there as a matter of law. There is
not very much to say until the commission looks at the proposal," he
said.
The CSB, headed by Ed Peck,
was established as part of the province's restraint program and
reviews all public sector salary increases.
Morrison, however, said he is
upset that the CSB is reviewing the
salary increase.
"It's like having two courts and
two   judges.    We   negotiated
something binding on both parties.
Now we have to go before Ed
Peck" and the university can either
argue in favor of the agreement or
in opposition to it," he said.
Morrison was also critical of the
university's bargaining.
"The bargaining did not go
smoothly. "We began in April,
1986 and we have no results 12
months later. That's not satisfactory. Our members have forgone
money in their pockets because
there has been no agreement," he
said.
Morrison said last week's agreement was the first general increase
since 1982. Last year, 84 per cent of
faculty received merit increases
from 1983 to 1985 faculty salaries
were frozen.
Hagen defends funding increase
By EVELYN JACOB
Education critics and student
leaders may be unhappy with the increase in post-secondary funding
announced in last Thursday's provincial budget, but the minister who
gave out the money is not.
"My friends in cabinet, and college and university heads are amazed at what we came away with,"
said Stan Hagen, Minister of Advanced Education and Job Training
referring to the 5.8 per cent increase
to the operating budgets of B.C.'s
post-secondary institutions.
Critics have voiced disapproval
with the budget, saying that the increase in funding to B.C.'s three
universities and 19 colleges is not
enough to help them maintain competitiveness with other Canadian
education institutions.
They have also complained that
the 51 per cent increase in student
assistance is nowhere near the
amount needed to help financially
burdened students meet the high
cost of tuition fees and living expenses.
The Canadian Federation of
Students, although claiming a victory on student aid, said last week
that a significantly larger amount of
money would have to go into the
program to make B.C.'s student
assistance comparable to national
levels.
"B.C. would have to spend $60
million more on student aid," said
Marg Fartaczek, chair of the
Federation's Pacific Region.
But Hagen stands by his budget,
which he ways is "absolutely"
geared to help repair the damage
universities and colleges have experienced over the last four years
when restraint measures were imposed and funding to post-
secondary education was cut back.
"It's (education) a priority to us.
We're sending a message out there
to the universities and college communities that the government thinks
education is not only important but
vital," Hagen said in an interview
yesterday.
He said the 5.8 per cent increase
is enough to enable the universities
and colleges to provide adequate
teaching and services, despite
criticism that after inflation is accounted for, little would be left to
improve services.
"The whole objective here was to
try and answer some of the needs
that were generated (from the colleges and universities) over the last
year. We've attempted to address
that" he said, noting that improving faculty salaries has been a high
priority.
After last Thursday's budget was
announced, NDP unversities critic
Darlene Marzari said that only $2
million of the $8 million allocated
for student aid will go towards
loans and grants. Hagen said Marzari's estimates are "completely
wrong," as the ministry has not yet
decided how the money will be
divided.
"She (Marzari) would have no
way of knowing that."
Hagen will announce details of
the student aid program later this
week at the Vancouver Media Centre. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 24, 1987
New magazine fills void
OTTAWA (CUP) — A new national magazine for the Canadian
gay and lesbian community is set to
roll off the presses and into the
publishing void left by the recent
demise of The Body Politic.
Epicene, whose title is derived
from a Greek word incorporating
both sexes, is the response to the
needs of the country's gay population, said business co-ordinator
Charles Philips.
"The reason why we committed
ourselves to such a large undertaking was that we felt it was essential
to have a forum for the community
throughout Canada," said Philips.
Among the articles in the first
issue, which was set to be on the
stands by the end of March, is a
feature on The Body Politic, which
folded to the surprise of the gay and
lesbian community because of
financial and administrative problems.
The first issue will be 64 pages,
though regular size is expected to
increase to 80 pages. Editorial coordinator Christine Bearchell, one
of the collective members of The
Body Politic, said there are plans
for   international   distribution,
though the main focus of promotion is the North American market.
Other first edition articles include
PANGO PANGO (UNS)—
Thousands of hairy puce blorgs
celebrated the exile of deposed dictator Evil Lint Jerkoff to the island
of Presidents Past today. Jerkoff,
along with the Sweaty Czar Frantic
and the infamous Fickle Grub-
byhands, were vanquished by a
team   of   adventurers   calling
themselves the gang of four:
Jellybar Vile, Corny Bilge, Jiffy
Warts and Vicious "Choosy" Warmonger. (The latter should not be
confused with the Golden Age
Vicious Warmonger, an artist who
vanished into the anti-matter
university while battling Queen
Beck of Nevermind during the crisis
on infinite Ubysmals.
an interview with U.S. science fiction writer Samuel Delaney, a work
of experimental fiction for men,
and an article on censorship.
INSTRUCTIONS: Sck. Iron! page. Read page 3 next. Than read the editorial and
tough at the cartoon, tint, turn to tho AIDS article snd fallow the directions in
lt»Hj-». (tf you an female, dlaregard tha fast stap.t The reading at tha letter a and tbe
■porta pages an etrietty a matter of personal testa.
The Dental
Clinic at U.B.C.
is accepting applications
for patients needing
EXTRACTIONS
including wisdom teeth
and minor oral surgery
Please contact
228-4157
or
228-4216
for an appointment
JOBS JOBS JOBS JOBS JOBS JOBS JOBS JOBS
BoathousE
■*■    -*^   A KEG SPECIALTY SEAFOOD RESTAURANT   -**-**-------*r
SI1MER EMPLOYMENT
Perfect job for student who wants to combine work
with good times. Our summer dining patios are opening
shortly and we need to hire 30 energetic, dynamic people
soon. We're located at the north end of Richmond only
a 10 minute drive from campus. Apply now, we want to
talk to you before the summer rush. Interviews will be
held:
On Campus At
Brock Hall, Room 204A
Wednesday, March 25
from 12:00-2:00 p.m.
At The Boathouse
8331 River Road, Richmond
Saturday, March 28
from 9:00-10:00 a.m.
JOBS JOBS JOBS JOBS JOBS JOBS JOBS JOBS
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©©COA1979 Tuesday, March 24,1987
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
NIGHTMARE ON ELM STREET, PART FOUR: as this page was prepared at about a quarter to four in the morning, an appropriate caption for the above was not immediately forthcoming
to the sleep-starved brain. It was therefore decided that the photo could jolly well speak for itself. So use your imagination, and enjoy.
Military research drains funding
By JAMES YOUNG
Canada spends about $230
million — 5 per cent of it's $4
billion research budget — for
military purposes, a UBC
microbiology professor said Mar.
20.
' 'That number has been going up
constantly. It went up 12 per cent in
1985-86," said George Spiegelman,
during a noon hour lecture in SUB
205.
Although the Canadian amount
may seem tiny when compared to
military giants such as the U.S.
spend — roughly $38.5 billion, or
70.1 per cent of its 1986 research
budget — the net effect is to drain
funding from other more valuable
research, Spiegelman said.
"Research and development
spending for the military in Canada
has been going up on the order of
10 per cent per year since 1982," he
said. But research funding for other
areas such as the environment,
agriculture, health, and welfare has
either been constant or going
down."
While many Canadians are
unaware of the location of military
research, the Department of National Defense operates eight
regional centres and employs about
2,000 people, said Spiegelman.
In Esquimalt, near Victoria, the
defense department tests antisubmarine warfare systems, including work on underwater
acoustics and surveillance for
nuclear-capable submarines.
Spiegelman also referred to a
DND lab near Medicine Hat, Alberta which operates under an agreement with the U.S., Great Britain,
and Australia. He said this facility
is "particularly nasty," as it conducts chemical, bio medical, and
microbiological research.
Although the lab is only supposed to be testing defenses against
biological and other weapons, this
is undermined by the nature of
biological warfare, he said.
"The key thing about chemical
and biological weapons is they are
useless in a military sense unless the
attacker has defenses against them
— in testing defenses, they are
therefore developing the ability to
use the same weapons offensively,"
he said.
Spiegelman emphasized that funding sources, rather than the actual
content of the research itself, are
crucial in determining whether experiments should be classified as
"military."
Although projects funded by the
Defense Department may seem
perfectly    benign,    Spiegelman
reminded his audience that the purpose of the military was ultmately
to kill people more efficiently.
He recognized that techniques
developed in his research into
bacterial growth rate could be adapted to inhumane purposes.
"Anything that you do which increases the technological base of
society, which makes people able to
do anything more efficiently, the
military can use," said Spiegelman.
He cited the example of a researcher who studied patterns of bird
migration in the South Pacific dur
ing the Vietnam War.
Several years after completing his
research, the scientist learned the
project had military funding, since
the army was worried the birds
might transport biological weapons
used in Vietnam back to North
America.
Given the potential abuses of
research, Spiegelman concluded by
urging science students to join
political parties and assert more
control and direction over Canadian science policy.
Welfare rates inadequate, re port says
By SVETOZAR KONTIC
Seriously inadequate income
assistance rates in B.C. are creating
a trap, making it increasingly difficult for welfare recipients to
escape from, says a recently released report by the Social Planning
and Research Council of British
Columbia.
The report indicates that large
percentage shortfalls exist in
welfare rates, (Guaranteed
Available Income for Need) for individual and family groups when
compared to average monthly subsistence expenditures. The hardest
hit group are employable persons
under the age of 25 whose welfare
rates are 71.6 per cent short of a
calculated subsistence level, according to the report.
Welfare rate increases announced
in last Thursday's provincial budget
do not include single recipients or
couples without children.
Michael Clague, Executive Director of SPARC, said the government
cannot overlook the plight of single
people and childless couples living
on welfare. He said the ten per cent
increase in welfare rates announced
in the budget may be seen as more
than it really is.
"Across Canada it is always the
singles who have the toughest time
because it is perceived that they
have to look for work," he said.
The maximum G.A.I.N. assistance for the under 25 age bracket is
$384 a month, while the report
estimates that basic living expenditures    are   in   the   neighbour
hood of $659 a month. And the National Council of Welfare sets $889
a month as the current poverty line
for a single person living in Canada.
Clague said that single welfare
recipients are encouraged to shift to
the Job Trac program (a government employment initiative) but he
does not know much about the program or its success rate. He said he
has yet to find out how many jobs
the program created last year,
although about 5,000 are expected
to be created this year.
Clague said that at the present
time about 200,000 people in B.C.
depend on some form of assistance
and of those who do, roughly half
are unemployed employable people.
"Five thousand jobs won't cover
all of them (the unemployed). The
Teacher launches lawsuit against college
MONTREAL (CUP) — A Dawson College teacher who claims he
was maligned by the college with ac-
cusatons of sexual harassment is
launching a $200,000 lawsuit for
defamation of character.
Psychology teacher Mark Cummins said he is suing director of personnel Eric Bernier, as well as New
School co-directors Greta Nemiroff
and Pat Powers. Cummins alleges
they defamed his character when
they asked him to leave the New
School and undergo a psychiatrci
evaluation last semester.
The complaints stemmed from
Cummins allegedly touching female
students on the knees or shoulder,
and comments he made to a female
student at a party.
Cummins said the female student
told him she was looking for
volunteers to fulfill a fantasy and
that he responded if he was not
married with two children, he
would volunteer.
Under the college's sexual harassment policy, all formal complaints
must be directed to the ombudsman
or the college nurse. When a case
involves a teacher, it is sent to the
director of personnel.
"I have no idea what he is thinking about," said Greta Nemiroff,
denying that they maligned Cummins, "I did exactly what the college said and they directed the student (who filed the firs case) to Eric
Bernier."
Both Powers and Nemiroff
claimed that all procedures had
been followed, and that the case
had been followed, and that the
case had been properly handled.
Cummins, who was given a
medical leave of absence from the
New School in late October, said he
was asked to leave have a
psychiatric examination and was
subsequently told not to return to
the New School, regardless of the
outcome of the exam.
He also stated that the sexual
harassment charge was not filed until two days after he was asked to
leave.
Cummins said the complaints
were compiled together and taken
out of context. He denied that any
of the attention he gave students or
staff had been sexual.
"My complaint is not with the
sexual harassment policy per se, but
when the things I did fall under that
(policy), I wonder what doesn't,"
he said.
One of the main complaints was
from a student who, according to
Cummins, asked him privately
whether he ever "checked her out."
The student who was in Cummins' Human Sexuality course titled 'Secrets' said she had mentioned
in a discussion of body image that
she felt she was attractive but that
her "bum ws too fat."
Cummins said that when she approached him privately, he told her
that he did notice her and said
"sometimes when I look at you I
notice that you have a nice bum."
He maintained that the remarks
were not sexual.
"If somebody says there nose is
ugly, if I care about them, (1 would
say) your nose is fine." When asked
whether he still felt this had been an
appropriate response, Cummins
replied, "Perfectly, given the context."
A source close to the case said up
to five complaints may have been
filed against Cummins.
Cummins said both Bernier and
Nemiroff refused to tell him the
crucial number of complaints but
that he understood it was more than
one.
Attempts to contact students involved in the case were unsuccessful
and Nemiroff said she would
recommend against them coming
forward to talk to the press.
"(Students would be) putting
themselves in serious point of
liability," she said.
Cummins, who said he "doesn't
give a damn" about the money involved in the case, but only wants to
pay his lawyer's fees, expects to file
his civil action suit soon.
government has no strategy," said
Clague.
"There is a real catch-22 situation here. The more down you are
economically the harder it is to get
off welfare."
The report states in its summary
that the first condition of a social
security scheme, which is sustaining
recipients, is to provide for physical
well-being and survival through the
provision of adequate food,
clothing and shelter. And the second condition of the scheme,
which is to create positive incentives
and options concerning employment and education. Neither one of
these conditions is being met under
the present welfare system, it states.
The report makes eight key
recommendations:
• Eliminate age discrimination in
rates. Those aged 25 and under
should receive the same benefits as
those 26 and over.
• Eliminate reduced support during first eight months.
• Increase the earnings exemption. Earnings exemption should be
increased to $100 a month from the
current $50 a month.
• Increase shelter allowance. The
maximum levels of the shelter component of G.A.I.N. should be set at
the average market value for rents,
determined on a regional basis.
• Increase the support component of G.A.I.N. The support component of G.A.I.N. should be increased to adequately cover basic
food, clothing, personal care and
public transit costs.
• Index G.A.I.N. increases.
G.A.I.N. should be indexed to increases in the low income cost of
living.
• Provide public access to information. Criteria by which the
Ministry of Human Resources sets
support rate levels and shelter maximum levels should be made public.
• Establish a Provincial Commission on Social Security. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 24,1987
Plutonic
affair
Plutonium. Its chemical name isn't Pu for nothing. On the all-
time list of dangerous things, it must surely rank number one.
A few kilograms of the right isotope distributed equally in the
world's water supply would be more than enough to kill us all. And
one millionth of a gram inhaled is guaranteed to cause lung cancer.
So it comes as a surprise that the United States and Japan plan
to make regular air cargo flights carrying up to 226 kilograms of
plutonium through Canadian air space. It is not surprising that
Canada was not consulted by either the Americans or the Japanese
(the U.S. tells Canada its role in NATO and NORAD, it does not
ask). Canadian officials aren't protesting the route. Canadian law
presently does not restrict the transport of radioactive materials
over Canada.
According to The Globe and Mail, "Chief among Canada's concerns is a safe method of carrying the plutonium." This seems to
be a valid concern seeing as the containers designed have
reportedly failed crash tests. But if plutonium, which has a radioactive half life of 24,000 years and remains poisonous for 500,000
years, is flown over Canadian territory, will any guarantees of safety from other nations be good enough?
If the U.S.-Japan deal goes through, the only way of insuring
that Canadian soil, water and air are kept free of contamination is
amending the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Act to prohibit the passage of fissile material over Canadian territory.
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Maranathas backward mask
Boycott violent toys
In response to Martin Dawes' letter, "Violent video games . . ."
(March 20), I couldn't agree more.
Our society would obviously benefit
from the disposal of violent games,
as well as television programs, certain magazines, and plastic toy
machine guns. People should
realize that these are all the products of greedy merchants who seek
profit by encouraging destruc-
tiveness in children. Parents should
spend more time considering the
harmful effects of war toys,
however subtle, on their
youngsters. Young children need
protection until they are strong
enough to withstand corrosive influences.
It would be wonderful to get rid
of needless violent entertainment,
but external methods will not work.
If all the guns disappeared, we
would still have rocks. Banning
Rambo, Soldier of Fortune, and
any other form of violent exploitation would be a great injustice —
for censorship of any kind is a great
injustice.
What is needed is a strengthening
of internal values in order to abstain from supporting these diseases.
Simply stop sending your money on
offensive companies, and if enough
people feel the same way, the companies will go out of business. A
collective boycott by individuals is
different than an imposed boycott
by law (i.e. that ugly monster, censorship). In a society with diverse
moral standards, a consensus will
not be reached overnight, but increased awareness can only lead to
solutions.
By the way, Dawes comment on
Nietzsche got my goat. It seems
people often throw around the
quote "God is dead" too loosely
and out of context. I suggest they
read Thus Spake Zarathustra to
discover what Nietzsche really
means.
Greg Davis
arts 1
I would like to take this opportunity to make a few comments
towards the Maranatha Christian
Club, and the showing in SUB on
Friday, March 20 of Rock and Roll
-— a search for God.
The Maranathas charge, via the
use of their audio-visual extravaganza (which, by the way, has
been shown for the zillionth time
this year), that rock and roll is
destroying moral fibre of today's
society. The charge doesn't just extend to subject matter of songs, but
record covers, band names, and, of
course, horrors, backwards masking.
At this time, I want to openly
charge the Maranathas with
backward masking their video.
While watching their presentation, I
was attacked by subliminal
messages extoling Christian values
towards my subconscious.
Specifically, the video said the three
words "watch this closely." These
three words spelled backwards spell
"Ylesolc, siht, hctaw." A blatant
example of maniacle messages
within   the   Maranathan   mission.
Intellectual Santa will be missed
On Sunday, March 15, 1987, Dr.
Michael Ovenden, Professor
Emeritus of Astronomy, died of
heart failure in his sleep at age 60.
When I first met Michael, I was a
bored undergraduate entering my
second year of sciences. Having
been a childhood star-gazer, I
selected Astronomy 200 as an elective to escape the tedium of requisite courses.
On an early September morning
in 1983, 1 waited anxiously to hear
what this tall striking-looking man
had to say about the universe. I was
not to be disappointed. Soon after
he began lecturing, I realized that 1
was not going to spend the upcoming year just learning about planets,
stars, and black holes. That would
have been too simple and probably
boring. I was indeed going to learn
about "our" universe.
Michael paced back and forth,
hands folded behind his back and
eyes fixed to the floor. "I don't
believe in grading students," he
declared. "I don't believe in
memorizing facts. That is what texts
THE UBYSSEY
March 24, 1987
Thfe Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Friday
throughout the academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British Columbia. Editorial
opinions are those of the staff and are not necessarily
those of the administration or the AMS. Member Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is
SUB 241k. Editorial, 228-2301/2305. Advertising, 228-3977.
The Case of the Missing Writers. What happened to grumpy bear was the question on everyone's
mind. Did Svet Kontic mistake the change in season and hibernate eariy? Was g.b. hypnotized by a
Bruins game on T.S.N, it's late and no one knows. Mystery. Michael Groberman and Caroi Pedlar
went to look for g.b. bur Michael returned alone. Is Carol waiting for Wednesday's student council
meeting? No one knows. Mystery. What about James Young, intrepid cub reporter. Is James a
culinary mercenary, preying upon unsuspecting restauranteurs. Mystery. Who is left to look for him.
Perhaps Malcom Pearson; but he can't spell, and so must remain anonymous, like Dan Andrews.
Who's left? Jeffrey Swartz and Victor Wong tried to pass as writers but were ruled ineligible because
of their artistic abilities. That left Ross McLaren, Chew Wong, David Ferman and Evelyn Jacob. Like
we said, the case of the missing writers.
are for." He had secured our complete attention. Once he launched
into his lecture there was no doubt
he was of a different professorial
breed. "Science is a crude metaphor
of reality. Mathematics is only a
language," he would state emphatically, unconsciously striking
the overhead projector screen with
his metal pointer until one was certain the screen would puncture.
Michael's lectures often strayed
from "science" to metaphysics or
epistemology. He only desired that
students think for themselves and
he encouraged criticism of our most
fundamental beliefs.
As a naive second year student,
Michael's talk initially sounded
blasphemous to what I had been
spoon-fed for years. But I was an
easy convert. I enjoyed criticising
the status-quo. In the three and
one-half years that followed our
first meeting, I had numerous
discussions with Michael which
both greatly enriched my intellectual development and yet often left
me dumbfounded. He always kept
me coming back for more.
In 1966, Michael was appointed
as UBC's first astronomer. He'
taught both science and arts
courses at UBC and the Emily Carr
College of Art and Design and
established himself as one of UBC's
most outstanding researchers. He
also worked bringing education into
the local community and lectured
publicly on topics ranging from the
Anthropic Principle to Lewis Carroll's Alice in Wonderland. A gifted
intellectual, Michael was able to
speak with ease on most any topic.
At his memorial service, a close
friend appropriately referred to
Michael as an "intellectual Santa
Clause." He was infinitely kind and
generous, sharing his wealth of
knowledge and ideas with any eager
listener.
Having had the privilege to know
Michael personally, I will always
remember his wonderful model
railway, and I will remember him as
a merciless croquet player, a
humanitarian, and a dear friend. 1
will always consider Michael my
first and perhaps foremost mentor.
Bradley Walters
grad. 1986 (zoology)
"Ylesolc, siht hctaw," said quickly
six times, sounds like "Christ died
for your sins. Convert now!"
My own personal experiences of
searching out and researching
Christian messages of the
subliminal kind are varied. One day
last week, after listening to some
AC/DC Hell's Bells, I sat in my
satanically designed easy chair, considering my next human sacrifice.
While making the decision between
vestal virgins, or newborn babies, I
came across an old copy of an Osmond Family record. I listened to it
while drinking some unholy blood,
and to my r-.rprise and chagrin, I
saw the light!
Come on, Maranathas. Aren't
there more interesting things to do?
Aren't there sinners and non-
believers to be converted? Isn't
there a flock to be led, or fleeced, or
whatever?
Leave the b.s. rock and roll intrigue to the t.v. evangelists.
David Young
arts 3
Zone fares unfair
The residents of Delta, Surrey,
etc. and all municipalities surrounding Vancouver cannot derive any
benefit from the Skytrain/ALRT
with its present routing. The cuts
in bus service to these areas have
already inconvenienced residents
sufficiently and there is no justification in making this group further
pay for a rapid transit service that
only serves residents of New
Westminster, Burnaby and Vancouver.
ALRT fares should be increased
so that users of the rapid transit
system pay for the service. Zone
fares being in effect at all times will
cause undue financial hardship to
college and university students
presently commuting from the
above municipalities and facing
high enough transportation costs
since they are not entitled to subsidized fare cards.
Another group that will suffer
undue financial hardship are the
unemployed. Zone fares being in effect at all times will discourage
riders from using the system
thereby increasing traffic volumes
on the highways; overburdening the
parking system and finally causing
loss of jobs to bus drivers driving
little used routes.
The proposed change of service
eliminating the 316 route via 64th
Ave. scheduled to go into effect in
April is unacceptable to large
numbers of Surrey and Delta
residents who work in the South
Granville area or attend UBC or
Langara and whose jobs and classes
start at off peak hours.
The decision of Metro Transit to
maintain the 312 to Vancouver at
peak hours only, routed along Scott
Rd. and No. 10 to freeway 99 is
totally inadequate.
Hourly service to Vancouver
should be maintained to serve
business men and women, students,
the unemployed, the elderly and our
visitors from out of town and the
entire general public; and the obvious route to maintain is the 316
via 64th due to the density of
population along this route.
Johanna Scott
arts^
All letters must be typed, triple-
spaced, on a 70 character line.
Please keep letters to under 500
words. Letters will be edited for
spelling, grammar, and brevity.
Letters must be brought, in person, to The Ubyssey office, SUB
241k, and presented with a piece of
identification that suggest the writer
is the person delivering the letter. Tuesday, March 24,1987
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Will someone adjust Gage TV reception?
My name is David Juliusson, and
I am writing this letter because I
want to air my biggest grievance
about living in Gage Towers. That
is our terrible television reception.
I first moved into Gage in
September 1985, and at that time
the reception was fine. In October
of that year, our reception became
bad, and has not gotten better
since. I decided that I would go to
the Student's Housing Office and
register a complaint, where I was
promptly assured that it would be
fixed in a couple of weeks. Since
then I have been down on
numerous occasions and made
many complaints about our lousy
reception, but to no avail. All that
happened is that I kept getting
assured that it would be taken care
of.
In February 1986, somebody
finally came over to check what the
problem was. I had managed to get
this done by circumventing the
Housing Office and getting in touch
directly with someone named Rudi
who was working for whoever supplied the TV reception to Gage. The
person that came took one look at
the wiring, and then at my TV set
and promptly told me that since it
was an old set, it wasn't capable of
picking up all of the signals. Since
the set really was old, I took his
word for it.
In September, however, one of
my new Quad mates had a TV set
that was almost new. However, our
reception is not better than last
year, so I complained once again.
Just attach your resumes to these
It is once again the time of year
when students are sending out
resumes for summer jobs. Given the
forecast of high unemployment for
students this summer, we encourage
students to draw back their bow
and aim their arrow straight up.
The importance of preparing a
good resume cannot be overemphasized. All too often,
however, it is the cover letter which
is the deciding factor in whether or
not a student will obtain work. For
your edification, we provide you
with the following samples of exceptionally good cover letters:
Dear Mr. Mulroney,
It has come to my attention that a
number of positions are soon to
become available in your cabinet. I
am a student currently looking for a
summer job, and would like to offer myself for a ministerial position.
My primary qualification is that I
am an ignorant, self-centred
hypocrite. In addition, I honestly
believe that the American free-trade
negotiators have Canada's best interests at heart. I also believe in the
tooth fairy.
As for creative solutions to pressing national problems I have
developed a recipe for tainted tuna
casserole with Cabinet leeks.
Anxiously awaiting your form-
letter,
XXX
(your signature here)
Dear Premier Vander Zalm,
I am a UBC student currently
looking for summer employment. It
has come to my attention that you
have launched an international
singing career. Not wanting to
deprive the world of the "Dutch
Julio Iglesias", I am offering
myself for the position of premier
TREAT
YOURSELF
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of the province of B.C.
As for qualifications for this
position, I have an excellent
understanding of international
politics gleaned from my regular
reading of the Sunday Province. In
addition to this, my boyfriend
wears a headband and plays oom
pah pah tunes on the accordian.
In view of my indulgence in post-
secondary education, I realize that
it would be only fair for me to
receive a lower wage than you. In
fact, like most university students, I
would be offended if an employer
offered me more than the minimum
wage (maybe you could make it tax-
free for 25 years).
Awaiting your prompt reply,
XXX
K. Hunt, graduate studies
K. Garneau, applied science
Peter Gabities, education
Neil Brooks, arts
This time the Student Housing Office staff was not very nice about
taking my complaint. I was informed by the woman at the men's
residence desk that I should not be
requesting special television stations, not wasting their time with
trivial complaints. I got so mad
that I left. I have been down once
this term, and they were even less
civil. I was told that I could see Bob
Frampton only at 8:30 on a Monday morning, as he is too busy to
see me at any other time during the
week. I was also informed that I
should be studying and" not watching television anyways.
I feel that something should be
done about our reception, I personally do not feel that NBC
qualifies as a 'special station in the
Vancouver area, nor do I feel it is
unreasonable to expect clear reception on ABC or CBS. I feel that my
TV viewing is my own business, and
feel they are not ones to comment
on my viewing habits. I also feel
that it is time that they stop making
excuses about the reception and do
something about it.
The reason I wrote this letter is
that I am hoping that it will embar-
ass somebody in the Housing Office into doing something, even if it
is simply responding to my letter. I
especially hope that it will embar-
ass Mr. Bob Frampton whom I
talked to last year about our reception, and whose job it is to make
sure that problems of this kind are
handled. Finally, I hope it will em-
barass the staff of the Housing Office into being more helpful and less
hostile towards students who have
legitimate complaints.
David Juliusson
arts 4
All letters must be typed on a triple-
spaced, 70-character line and
delivered in person, with ID, to The
Ubyssey office, SUB 241k. Letters
will be edited for spelling, grammar
and brevity.
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THIS PARTY
COULD CHANGE
YOUR LIFE
If you are in third or fourth year and you're looking
for a career in the business world, come see us. We're
Chartered Accountants from downtown firms who will be
on campus March 26 to talk about career possibilities in
one of the most stable professions — chartered
accountancy.
There are jobs available in chartered accountancy for
non-Commerce grads from all disciplines. Chartered
Accountants come from all backgrounds, bringing new
skills and diversity to this growing dynamic profession.
Chartered Accountants set the standard for
accounting and auditing in Canada and, because of their
education and training, are in demand by business around
the world.
Here is an opportunity to talk to CAs on an informal
basis and explore opportunities. You may be an ideal
candidate for Canada's fastest-growing profession.
You're invited to:
Salon B
UBC Faculty Club
Thursday, March 26
5-7 p.m.
For more information contact Eileen Pearkes
at 681-3264, The Institute of Chartered
Accountants of British Columbia.
Wfl
The Institute of Chartered Accountants
of British Columbia Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 24, 1987
Aid to victims increased
TORONTO (CUP) — The Ontario government plans to spend
$1.2 million this fiscal year to raise
awareness of sexual assault and
treat its victims.
The new money was announced
March 13 in a joint statement by the
Ministry of Health, the Solicitor
General and the Ontario Women's
Directorate as part of a package of
new initiatives on Women's health
issues.
Rape crisis centres across the
province will receive $300,000 —
twice as much money as they received last year from the Ministry of the
Solicitor General.
"Volunteers at local rape crisis
centres provide support referral,
liaison and other services to the victims and their families," said
Solicitor General Ken Keyes at a
Queen's Park news conference Feb.
13. "A lot of this much-needed
work is done at considerable personal sacrifice by these individuals.
Today's announcement recognizes
the critical importance of their efforts."
Some centres which have never
before received government funding are now eligible to apply
directly to the Ministry.
"Since 1980, we have been flowing money to the centres through
the Coalition of Rape Crisis Cen
tres," said Bev Ward, a policy Advisor the Solicitor General. *
"Today there are a number of
centres which do not belong to the
coalition and we are hoping these
others will apply for funding."
Twelve new sexual assault treatment centres will be established in
hospitals in Brockville, Orangeville,
Guelph, Toronto, Mississauga,
Peterborough, Sault Ste-Marie,
Scarborough, Sarnia, Sudbury,
London and Whitby, with annual
funding of $300,000 from the
Ministry of Health.
The province currently has only
three sexual assault treatment centres located in Hamilton, London
and Toronto hospitals.
The Ontario Women's Directorate will spend $600,000 to launch
a public education program on sexual assault. The Directorate launched a similar program three years ago
called "Break the Silence" which
focussed on family violence. According-to Manager of Public Relations Annette Snowdon that campaign drew advertising awards and
a strong public reaction.
"We got a tremendous response
from children and women who were
victims of family violence. Some
women wrote in to say: "After seeing your campaign, I decided to
leave my husband and go to a
shelter for battered women," said
Snowdon.
The Break the Silence campaign
included a poster with a photograph
of a kitchen: a chalk outline of a
woman's body on the floor and the
caption, "Keeping her in line." The
Directorate also sponsored a television commercial in which a woman
who had been a victim and a man
who was a convicted wife batterer
spoke about the crime.
"The primary purpose of this
kind of campaign is to change attitudes. People tend to respond to
wife abuse with statements like:
'Oh, she probably deserved it' and
'Well, he was drunk'. Our message
was 'It's never all right'," said
Snowdon.
She added the program on sexual
assault will also be a multi media
campaign and should be underway
by fall of 1987.
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substitutions please! Good 'til April 1/87.
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6066 THUNDERBIRD BLVD. 228-6121   I
1.
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4.
5.
UBC GRADUATE STUDENT SOCIETY
ANNUAL GENERAL 1HTNG
Wednesday, April 1, 1987—4 p.ni.—
Graduate Student Centre Dining Room
AGENDA
Report of Council.
Introduction of new executive.
Accepting the 1986 financial statements as audited.
Reappointment of the Auditor-General of B.C. as the Society's auditor.
Motions: Special resolutions (these require a 75% vote in favour and quorum).
I. CONSTITUTIONAL CHANGE TO QUALIFY FOR SPECIAL TAX STATUS:
i) To amend section #2 of the Constitution of the Thea Koerner House Graduate Student Centre Society so as to read as follows:
"The purposes of the Society are:
a) to promote & serve the academic, social, intellectual, cultural & recreational interests of its members, the University of B.C. and persons associated
therewith, and without restricting the generality of the foregoing, in particular, to promote inter-departmental activities wiihin the University.
b) to promote the principle and practice of graduate si udent representation ai all levels of decision making at the Universily of B.C. and at all agencies
or other bodies with deliberate on the affairs of graduate students,
c> to provide, maintain and operate the Thea Koerner House Graduate Student Centre as a centre for the recreation and convenience of members of
the Society and their guests,
d) to do everything incidental and necessary to promote and attain the foregoing purposes, "and
ef to carry out the foregoing without purpose of gain for its members, and
f)  to use any and all profits or accretions to the Society for the promotion and attainment of the foregoing purposes.''
II. FEE RESOLUTION
To amend Bylaw 2.9 (a) to read: "Fees for ordinary members may be set from time to time by ordinary resolution of the ordinary members through
referendum and subject to the approval of the Board of Governors of the University.
III. EXTERNAL AFFAIRS DIRECTOR
To amend the Bylaws to add as Bylaw 6.6 (g>, "The External Affairs Director shall:
i) be the chairperson of the External Affairs Committee,
ii)   be responsible for the representation of the Society to external organizations,
iii)   develop and maintain contacts with organizations lhat deliberate on the affairs of graduate students, and
iv)    perform such other duties as directed by the Council or members.
AND to add to the list of officers in Bylaw 6: Officers
g) External Affairs Director
IV. FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES REPS.
a) "To amend the Bylaws to add the following as voting member of the Council:
5.2 a) v) the graduate student representatives in the Faculty of Graduate Studies".
V. HOUSE COMMITTEE AMENDMENTS:
"To amend the Constitution and Bylaws to add the following items to Bylaw 7, House Committee #2 to read: the House Committee shall:
e) have primary responsibility and authority for capital improvements to the building subject to Council approval.
0 have responsibility for hiring of permanent staff subject to Council Approval".
RECEPTION FOLLOWING
WITH HOSTED BAR Tuesday, March 24,1987
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
The
Great Ubyssey Survey
Fill in. Tear out. Drop off.
We know you're full of opinions about your student
newspaper. And, believe it or not, we want to hear
them. Please take the time to fill out this survey (attach
another sheet of paper if you're feeling verbose) and bring it to The Ubyssey table in SUB concourse, from 12
to 2, or SUB 241k all day. And tear the contest entry
form off the survey and deposit in the contest box, to
win dinner for two at The Eatery. Contest deadline is
April 1, at noon.
Please answer any or all questions. Only one
answer per line.
A. The Ubyssey regularly contains a number of different
sections or elements. Mark whether there should be
more, less, or the same, of the following aspects in the
Ubyssey:
more less same
News  	
Sports              !	
Entertainment  	
Opinion  	
Letters  	
Features  	
Photography/Graphics                    	
B. The Ubyssey carries a variety of news items in every
issue. Please mark whether there should be more, less,
or the same amount of coverage of the following:
more less same
Student activities
on campus   	
UBC Administration   	
Student Council
and Faculty societies
(eg. EUS, SUS)   	
Academics/Research    	
Clubs         	
Frats/Sororites   	
Speakers    	
Student Services
(Housing, Parking)  	
Other Student news
Events at other
B.C. campuses  	
Events at other
Canadian campuses  	
Events at campuses
outside Canada     	
Municipal news     	
Provincial news     	
Federal Student news     	
News from other
provinces     	
C. The Ubyssey covers Sports each Tuesday edition.
Please mark whether there should be more, less or the
same amount of the following aspects:
more less same
University Athletics             	
Intramural             	
Club Athletics  	
Professional Sports             	
Features/Interviews             	
Stats            	
D. The Ubyssey covers entertainment in each Friday edition. Please mark whether there should be more, less,
or the same coverage of the following:
more less same
Campus   	
Mainstream   	
Alternate/Underground         	
Features/Interviews         	
Reviews         	
Arts News         	
Rim         	
Theatre         	
T.V.         	
Live Music         	
Records         	
Dance         	
Visual Art         	
Video/Performance         	
Literature         	
Cultural Policy   	
E. The Ubyssey runs a number of special editions
throughout the year dealing with specific issues.
What is your opinion of the following special editions run in 1986-87?
liked disliked
Peace (Nov. issue)       	
Provincial Election (Oct. issue)       	
Students in 1987 (Feb. issue)       	
Gays and Lesbians (Feb. issue)       	
Women's (Mar. issue)       	
Do you have any suggestions for other special editions?
F. Photography/Graphics. Mark whether there should be
more, less, or the same amount of photography and
graphics of the following:
more less same
News     	
Sports     	
Entertainment     	
Campus Shots     	
Editorial Cartoons     	
Cutlines
(beneath photos)
Serious             	
Humourous             	
Do you have any comments about the overall appearance of The
Ubyssey?	
G. Do you feel the following sections are adequate or
inadequate?
adequate       inadequate
Tween Classes       	
Vista  	
H. Readership Habits. The following section deals with
general readership patterns. How often do you read
The Ubyssey?
always sometimes rarely	
How often do you read the following sections?
always sometimes rarely
News     	
Sports     	
Entertainment     	
Features     	
Letters     	
Editorials     	
Freestyle/Perspectives     	
Tween Classes     	
Vista     	
Advertisements     	
Classifieds     	
I. Please include any general comments about The
Ubyssey.	
We would appreciate the following personal information to help us analyze the survey results with greater
accuracy.
Age _ Sex	
Faculty and Department	
Year	
Club or other campus organization member (please name)	
| Contest Entry Form. Please drop off entries before noon
| on April 1 at The Ubyssey office or at The .Ubyssey tables
| in SUB Lower concourse, Tuesday to Friday, noon to 2:00
I p.m. Prize is dinner for two at The Eatery.
I
J Name:
j Phone #
£^*£2____*43i„i*___i.:
__|_i3__i__'1*-?i«_E Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 24, 1987
Health plan includes Pill
■NQMOtEMTS: tta awaat ofaavan da_oata4 wro»%»ri, tba blood otMlaaaf four dta-
Ino ty pewrKara, at laaat tan aatorlaa laaa than tha normal human baing raquhraa to
raraamctHtaciotta. pc*m^t0Orra^0vt*k)^m.tbtm'i>iKiou»tvmon,tumtot»ait>t
matahaa. „u» panta ef rtgafattaa, •wain tabtata of nkatana gum, natural and artificial flaaw_ antf vtuai aa__*Jaaa awNruaacaa _t_rit im • prafar not va wiamton..
HALIFAX (CUP) — Students at
one of Nova Scotia's most conservative universities voted to add
coverage for oral contraceptives to
their 1987-88 health plan.
More than 60 per cent of the 282
University of King's College
students who voted in a recent
referendum were in favour of the
coverage.
"There was a lot of controversy
over the referendum," said student
council vice-president Mike Davie.
Students reacted negatively last
month to comments made by
Anglican priest and assistant professor, Wayne Hankey. Hankey —
who also opposes the ordination of
women the Anglican Church — said
"including oral contraceptives into
the health plan might encourage
more sexuality."
The Pill "is no protection from
the AIDS epidemic?' and "according to the best possible sources
there are four possible male carriers
of AIDS on campus," said Hankey.
Some students said they didn't
want to pay for someone else's
"leisure activity." King's President
John Godfrey asked students if they
wanted to "subsidize one sixth of
the population that wish to engage
in this activity."
Davie said he thinks students are
mainly concerned that health insurance will increase by more than
$5 per student to cover the cost of
oral contraceptives.
All full-time students must pay
for the coverage. Half of King's 600
students are women. About 100
students are predicted to use the
pill.
In order to pay the increased cost
of health insurance, the King's Stu-
PARTY
Attention all Ubyssey hacks living and dead!
Spring is here and so it is time to come out from under your
I dark warm rocks, however far flung they may now be from
SUB 241k, and meet with your own kind once more.
Yes, as surely as the penguins come home to roost at
Capistrano the hacks must miraculously return once more to
'The Ubyssey year end banquet.
St. Mark's College banquet room
Saturday, April 4
7 p.m.-1 a.m.
Please no flash cameras.
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We care about your stomach, and so every Sunday,
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dent council will either subsidize
students or increase the $93 student
fee, said Davie.
"Some lower level or administration have threatened to stop collecting fees if they are raised?' said
Davie.
"It's not the first time the administration has threatened us over
student union fee?' he added.
"It's their (the student union's)
money?' said Godfrey, who admitted "it's conceivably a problem" if
the student council raises its fees.
King's College, an affiliate of
Dalhousie University, has a general
policy of keeping fees in line with
Dalhousie.
Godfrey said he didn't know
what the university will do if a
group of students don't want to pay
for the coverage "by reason of principle."
As well, Godfrey was unsure
whether the Board of Governors
would oppose the result of the
referendum on moral grounds.
Members of the Anglican Church,
including the Bishop of Nova
Scotia, sit on King's Board.
King's College is the first Nova
Scotia university to include birth
control coverage in its health plan.
Last year Mount Saint Vincent
University voted against including
birth control in its university plan.
Send Your Belongings Home
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5706 University Blvd.
222-1688
MTH 8-9 F 8-6 Sat 10-6 Sun 11-6
A
ATTENTION
UBC SCUBA DIVERS!
Inventory Reduction Sale Now On
INCREDIBLE SA VINGS
ALL OVER THE STORE!
—80K Aluminum Tanks    v IO9
— US Diver's Regulators from    v IO _?
— Stock Brooks Drysuits, Reg. $950    $729
— Chronosport Watches    15 /O off
— Ex-Rental V*" Wetsuits    $100
Special Savings on Masks, Fins, Snorkels, Knives,
Lights Ef Accessories
UBC Aqua Society
Lower Floor, Student Union Building
228-3329
CATCH THE NEXT WAVE TO THE THUNDERBAR'S
Pre-Summer Beach Party
Friday, March 27th - 8:00 p.m.
Women's Bikini & Men's Bathing Suit Contest
$75 FIRST PRIZE FOR EACH
$25 PRIZE FOR BEST SUMMER OUTFIT
LIVE ENTERTAINMENT by
THE NOTABLES
Vancouver's Beach Boys
Call Mark at 228-6121 to register for the contest.
THUNDERBIRD WINTER SPORTS CENTRE
6066 THUNDERBIRD BLVD., VANCOUVER Tuesday, March 24,1987
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 9
Students can prevent AIDS spread
UBC
It seems funny that only now,
with the possibility of a widespread
AIDS epidemic, that public interest
in a comprehensive sex education
programme has arisen. For years
there have been other, very serious
and widespread sexually transmitted diseases (STD's) like the incurable herpes or the sometimes
fatal syphilis. But, only now, with
Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and its sensationalised media bandwagon, has the
teaching of sexual methods for
preventing the spread of STD's,
specifically AIDS, been considered.
AIDS is an STD and, like other
STD's, it is transmitable to anyone.
AIDS is a breakdown in the body's
immune system; it is caused by
Human T-Lymphotoro-
phic Virus-Ill (HTLV-111), a virus
that affects humans by attacking
the T-Lymphocytes of the body's
immune system.
The human immune system is the
body's natural defense system
against diseases. Without such a
defence system, the body is
vulnerable to illnesses that an otherwise healthy immune system can
prevent.
The two most common illnesses
that lead to death in AIDS patients
are Pneumoncystis carinii and
Kaposi's Sarcoma. Pneumocystis
carinii is a type of pneumonia that
is caused by a parasitic infection of
the lungs and is the leading and is
the leading cause of death in AIDS
patients. KS is a form of cancer,
causing tumours to arise on the
skin; it is the second most common
cause of death amongh AIDS patients. There is evidence to suggest
the HTLV-111 may also attack the
nervous system causing damage to
the brain and spinal cord.
Of all the people who risk contracting AIDS, there are particularly high risk groups. These high risk
groups include:
1. Homosexual and bisexual men
2. Intravenous drug users
3. hemophiliacs
4. Persons from countries outside
of North America where
HTLV-111 infection is very
common
5. Sexual partners of any of the
above groups
6. Babies born to parent in any of
the above groups
7. Health Care workers who have
parenteral exposure to infected
patients
8. Persons who have received
blood transfusions between 1977
and the beginning of Red Cross
screening for the AIDS virus in
November 1985 have a very
slight risk of infection
Any person can become infected
with the AIDS virus. The most
common means of infection is by
sexual encounters that involve the
transferral of body fluids, such as
blood, semen or vaginal secretions
from one person's body to another.
HTLV-111 cannot be spread
through the air by coughing or
sneezing. Physical contact that does
not involve exchanging body fluids
will not transmit the virus (ie. hugging, shaking hands, social (dry)
kissing). Insects do not spread the
disease. The virus cannot be transmitted by swimming in the same
pool, using the same toilet, using
the same telephone, or sitting beside
an infected person. No one has yet
contacted AIDS by living closely
with an AIDS patient as long as
there has been no sexual activity or
an infected mother has passed on
the disease during pregnancy or
birth.
The AIDS virus can be transmitted in a number of ways. Sexual intercourse involving unprotected
anal, oral or genital sex is extremely
risky. There is a slight risk in
"deep-kissing," that involves exchange of saliva. Any activity that
involves semen or blood entering
the body of a partner by way of skin
cuts or body orifice is of a high risk.
It is important to know the health
condition of your partner; if he or
she is in a high risk group, that person should practice safer sex, or
abstain from sex altogether. The
use of dirty or used needles is also a
high risk activity. Infected mothers
can pass on the AIDS virus to the
child when it is in the womb, during
birthing or through breast-milk.
"Always place the condom on the penis before
entry into the vagina, or
other body orifice."
Since November 1985, all blood
donations have been tested for signs
of the AIDS virus antibodies. If
found, this blood will not be used
for transfusions. Transfusion of
blood and the use of blood based
by-products is an extremely low risk
at present.
There is no easy test for AIDS
itself. There is however, a test for
the antibody to the virus. The present testing, done to detect possible
AIDS carriers is for this antibody,
not for the disease itself. The
presence of the antibody, after
testing, does not necessarily mean
that an individual will develop
AIDS. While some people will
develop the disease, this is not true
for all who test positive for the an
tibody. However, people who test
positive should assume that they are
capable of passing on the AIDS,
virus to others through the exchange of blood or semen.
A person who takes a test for the
AIDS antibody will have a "reactive" or "non-reactive" response.
A "reactive" response means that;
1. You are infected with HTLV-111
and that you can transmit the virus,
or 2. You were exposed to the virus
in the past but are no longer infected, or 3. You have a "false
positive" due to a cross reaction of
substances in your blood. This is a
rare occurrence.
A "non-reactive" test result
means that: 1. You are not infected
with HTLV-111, or 2. You are infected but your body has not yet
had tome to produce enough antibody to make the test reactive. It
takes 2-6 months to form enough
antibody to make this test reactive.
You may need to be re-tested in a
few months, or 3. You are infected '
but incapable of forming antibody.
This is a rare occurrence.
An individual who has tested
positive should not donate blood,
plasma, organs, tissue, sperm or
breast-milk. One should not share
toothbrushes, razors and other
items that can be contaminated with
blood. Do not share needles or syringes. A woman who has tested
positive for the antibody should not
See page 12: AIDS
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Accepting Spring/Summer
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All clothing must be
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HOURS: Tues. to Sat. 10 -6
Sunday 12-5
Call for an appointment
or just drop in
TELEPHONE: 224-5050
4476 WEST 10th AVENUE
(3 BLOCKS EAST OF UBC GOLF COURSE)
^S^    AMERICAN
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ENJOY YOUR BURG AND HAVE A NICE DAY!
I
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^3431 WEST BROADWAY
738-5298
TUDIO
FREE
u GRADUATION PHOTO SESSION
• For Grad Photography That Is Different •
This is your invitation to have a guest sitting and see a complete selection
of colour previews without cost or obligation. This offer is valid to all 1987
UBC graduating students. Phone now for an appointment.
• UNIQUE FRESH STYLES FOR 1987 •
Purchase only whatever you wish. Prices start at $6.95.
o
2111 West 16th Ave.    *
TUDIO
VANCOUVER, B.C.
736-7281 or 731-1412.
<
THINKING ABOUT AN
INTERNATIONAL CAREER?
Graduates of 1987 in Arts, Sciences, Applied or
Professional programs have the opportunity to apply
for the one year INTERNATIONAL STUDIES
CO-OPERATIVE PROGRAM at Capilano College.
This diploma program offers direct experiential training for a career in Pacific Basin countries.
Interested? There will be an information meeting on
Thurdsday, March 26 from 12:30-1:30 p.m. in
Henry Angus 225. Or you can write for a program
brochure and application form to:
Coordinator
INTERNATIONAL STUDIES CO-OPERATIVE PROGRAM
Capilano College
2066 Purcell Way
North Vancouver. B.C.   V7J 3H5
Telephone: (604) 966-1911
WHOLESALE
PRICES!
■   1*      1
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1111
Up-to-the-Minute quartz analog watches by Emerson ... for him, for her,
or a matched set! Rich gold-tone case, dial; genuine leather strap. 3 hands.
1-year module warranty. Gift-boxed for grads.
"GRAD '87 MOMENTO"
Also, for an additional $15.00 per watch, we will imprint "your school name"
and "Grad 87" on the watch face for you. This is one graduation momento
you will keep for life.
No refund on custom orders
$
49
.99
-t-tax
VANITY JEWELLERS Ph. 681-1533
204-1242 Robson Hours:
Vancouver, B.C. Mon.-Sat. 9:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Page 10
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 24, 1987
tween classes
TODAY
JEWISH STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Lunch, noon, at Hillel House.
PACIFIC RIM CLUB
Elections  for   1987-88  executive,   all   positions
open. Members please bring club membership
cards, noon, Asian Centre 604.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Film — "The Prodigal," 7 p.m., Buchanan A104.
UBC SPORTS CAR CLUB
General meeting,  executive elections,  7 p.m.,
SUB 213.
UBC PERSONAL COMPUTER CLUB
Amiga meeting, noon, SUB 111.
UBC PERSONAL COMPUTER CLUB
IBM meeting: worthwhile expansion projects for
the IBM PC, noon, SUB 205.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Co-op supper, 6 p.m., Lutheran Campus Centre.
ZEN SOCIETY UBC
Meditation and Instruction, all welcome,
8:30-9:30 a.m., Graduate Centre Penthouse.
UBC SCHOOL OF MUSIC
UBC Opera Theatre - French Tickner, director
-The Rake's Progress by Igor Stravinsky, general
admission, $10 students/seniors, $5. 8:00 p.m.,
UBC Old Auditorium.
SUBFILMS
"My Fair Lady?' starring Rex Harrison, and
Audrey Hepburn, 5:00 and 8:00 p.m., SUB
Auditorium.
JAPAN EXCHANGE CLUB
Meeting for anyone interested in hosting or
organizing events for the Japan Exchange
Students this summer, noon, SUB 249G.
WEDNESDAY
GRADUATE STUDENT SOCIETY
Workshop on sexual harassment with reps from
SFU speaking on recently released report on sexual harassment at SFU, noon, Grad Centre
Garden Room.
GRADUATE STUDENT SOCIETY
Music night with James Hill, 8:30 p.m., Grad
Centre Fireside Lounge.
HANG GLIDING CLUB
Ground school — level I theory, new members
welcome, 6 p.m., SUB 211.
SCIENCE FICTION SOCIETY
Presidential and secretarial elections, all day,
SUB 249A. Get out and votel
ZEN SOCIETY UBC
Mediation and instruction, all welcome,
8:30-9:30 p.m., Grad Centre Penthouse.
UBC SCHOOL OF MUSIC
UBC Opera Theatre — The Rake's Progress,
general admission $10, students/seniors $5, 8
p.m., UBC Old Auditorium.
UBC SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Noon hour concert, John Loban, violin; Lee
Kum Sing, piano; free admission, UBC School of
Music Recital, UBC Women's Centre, budget
planning session, noon, SUB 130.
CINEMA 16
Osaka Elegy, 7 p.m. and 9:30 p.m., UBC SUB
Auditorium.
UNIVERSITY CHRISTIAN MINISTRIES
Street drama from Western Washington University, noon, SUB ???.
UBC PERSONAL COMPUTER CLUB
Atari meeting, welcome to Andre's, 4:30.p.m.,
SUB 212A.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Gallery night, 4:30 p.m., Gallery Lounge.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Rock and roll seminar, 7 p.m., Buchanan A104.
THURSDAY
UBC SCHOOL OF MUSIC
UBC contemporary players, free admission,
noon, UBC School of Music Recital Hall.
NEWMAN CLUB
Fr. Albert Zsigmund on the Significance of
Scriptures, noon, St. Mark's College Music
Room.
ZEN SOCIETY UBC
Meditation and instruction, all welcome, 10
a.m.-11 a.m., Grad Centre Penthouse.
UBC SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Collegium Musicum Ensembles, free admissions,
-   8 p.m.. School of Music Recital Hall.
STAMP CLUB
Bargain mania, noon. International House Boardroom 400.
UNIVERSITY CHRISTIAN MINISTRIES
Peter Dunn addresses God, Christians and Suffering, noon, SUB 205.
UBC FLYING CLUB
Final meeting — summer plans and elections,
noon, Hennings 301.
JEWISH STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Taking the Mystery Out of Exams, with
Jonathan Berkowitz, noon, Hillel House.
UBC PERSONAL COMPUTER CLUB
Commodore meeting, everyone welcome, noon,
Buchanan B319.
UBC PERSONAL COMPUTER CLUB
Apple meeting, noon, SUB 213.
UBC ARCHERY CLUB
No shooting this week, 6:30 p.m., SUB
Ballroom.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Love, Sex and Dating, Part I, 7 p.m., SUB 212.
PACIFIC RIM CLUB
Year end social, UBC president Strangway on
faculty involvement in Pacific Rim, 7:30-10:30
p.m.. International House.
FRIDAY
ZEN SOCIETY UBC
Meditation and instruction, all welcome, 3:30
p.m., Grad Centre Penthouse.
UBC SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Collegium of Music Ensembles, free admission,
noon, UBC School of Music Recital Hall.
VARSITY OUTDOOR CLUB
Spring banquet, 5:30-1:30 p.m.. Graduate Student Centre Dining Room.
UBC SPORTS CAR CLUB
Navigational Car Rally, free pizza at finish, 7:30
p.m., outside the Bookstore.
SEXUAL HARASSMENT COMMITTEE
Presentation of Sexual Harassment in the
University Setting by speakers from sexual
harassment clinic, all women welcome, noon,
Asian Centre 604.
UNIVERSITY CHRISTIAN MINISTRIES
Skits   from   Western   Washington   University,
noon, SUB ???.
UBC NEW DEMOCRATS
Bob Williams, NDP Forest Critic, on recent
forestry developments, noon, MacMillan 166.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Love, Sex and Dating Part 2, 7 p.m., SUB 212.
UBC SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Opera Theatre, The Rake's Progress, 8 p.m.,
UBC Old Auditorium.
10% OFF
UBC STUDENTS
ONLY
12 Exp   $4.95
24 Exp      8.95
36 Exp    13.95
C-41 Process "Glossy"
RUSHANT
CAMERAS
4538 W. 10th Ave.
224-5858
_       Outside Gates      *
&_)   ON THE BOULEVARD
hair and suntanning co.
SUNTANNING *£QQ    A
(on regular beds)   10 Sessions—Yw*%/    A
HAIR SERVICES-20% Discount     !
|     5784 University Blvd.
j      (in UBC Village) '/* Blk. away
i.     "Offer valid with presentation of this ad
1 ^^
224-1922
Exp. Apr. 30/87     {
'. J
A Humorous yet revealing account
of how professors choose
their exam material
Guest Speaker:
Dr. Jonathan Berkowitz
)epartment of Statistics, UBC
Lunch Available
Thursday, March 26
12:30 p.m.
Hillel House
Last Program of the Year
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: AMS Card Holders - 3 lines, 1 day $2.75; Additional lines, 60c. Commercial
1 day $4.75; Additional lines, 70c. Additional days, $4.25 and 65c.
Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications, Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van,, B.C. V6T2A5
Charge Phono Orders Over $10.00 - Call 228-3977
5 - COMING EVENTS
COME AND DANCE for Rick Hansen Sat.
March 28 11 a.m. - 3 p.m. Sub partyroom.
For more info call 263-0703.
30 - JOBS
75 - WANTED
SUMMER JOBS
Information Presentations
TUESDAY. MARCH 24
12:30 p.m.
Henry Angus 213
College Pro Painters
WE ARE LOOKING for enthusiastic
people (female preferred) for full-time summer employment at University Golf Club.
Successful applicants will enjoy working
with the public in roles traditionally held by
males. Golf background helps but not mandatory; . Send brief outline of qualifications
to: Jim McLaughlin, Golf Professional,
P.O. Box 46138, Station G, Vancouver,
B.C. V6R 4G5.
CENTRAL AMERICA
WEEK AT UBC
March 23-27
Tues., Mar. 24: Oscar Romero
commemoration and vigil for peace.
12:30 p.m., Main Library.
Wed., Mar. 25: El Salvador -
Speakers and Film, 12:30 p.m., SUB
213.
Thurs., Mar. 26: The Guatemalan
Holocaust — Speakers and Film,
12:30 p.m., SUB 111 (rear of
cafeteria).
For info 681-9756 or 263-5692
United Church Campus Ministry
11 - FOR SALE - Private
TAKECARE
Quality condoms. Shop in the privacy &
convenience of your home. Discretion
guaranteed. Prices/box of 12(7% p.s. tax
incl.): Sheik non-lub. $6.50, Sheik lub.
$6.50, Ramses Sensitol $7.50, Ramses
regular $7.50, Ramses Fiesta $8.00; Add
$1.50 shipping each box. Cheque or money
order payable to: TakeCare Personal Products, Dept. U.B. P.O. Box 7520, Victoria,
B.C. V9B 5B8.
'81 DATSUN 310, H.B., 4 sp.,
FWD, regularly maint. AM/FM cassette, 2
new all-season radials, rear brakes, muffler.
2 snows on rims. $2950. 689-1529.
Great Car!
14" COLOUR TELEVISION, was $400, selling for $199. 224-9535, Kyoko, 1935 Lower
Mall Van (Place Vanier residence Tweed,
#322).
1979 YAMAHA 660XL 35,000 kms. Great
shape. Baggage rack windshield. Rebuilt
engine, new battery, runs good. Asking
$800 obo. Call 681-6090.
COMPLETE  SANYO  STEREO  SYSTEM,
immac. cond. incl. tuner, am/fm tape deck,
record changer & 2 speakers. Orig. price
$2400. A sacrifice at $750, 4 drawer legal
size filing cabinet with lock $200, 3 large
indoor plants (jade, palm, hybiscus) $25
ea. IBM Selectric Typewriter (avail. Apr.
15) $150. 222-3032. On Campus, Gage
Apts.
20 - HOUSING
SUMMER ACCOMMODATION - Beta
House, 2140 Wesbrook Mall. Close to
classes, full kitchen, inexpensive. Apply
Nowl!
♦156/mth. Beaufrful, Shaughnessy home
with 3 furn. br, 2 full bathr, microwave,
laun. facil., Ige yard, near 41st & Granville.
We need a female UBC student to share
main floor with same in mixed house.
266-2636 eves, wknds or leave message for
Lisa or Tom.
MONTREAL — Downtown. Lge, furnished
studio apt. near McGill, Concordia. Avail.
May 3-Aug. 31. Rent negot. For more info
call 732-1432.
30 - JOBS
MARINE BIOLOGIST Lab. Tech: Job
continuous to B.Sc. degree, $10/h, wknds
& holidays, Sept.-April. Full time summer.
1st or 2nd yr. Biology/Oceanography
students call 685-3364. Dr. Marliave.
OWN ROOM & BATH in family home
plus remuneration in exchange for hsekeep-
ing & babysitting most morns & some
eves. Refs. req. 873-4151.
REQUIRED IMMED. PT. GREY. Responsi
bie person to care for 8 mth. old. Our home.
Afternoons 5 days/wk., occasional eves.
Hrs. may be flexible. Pay negot. 734-3692.
OPENINGS IN VAN., N. Shore, Victoria &
throughout B.C. for College Pro Painters.
Earn $3000 to $6000 plus. Professional
training provided. Call 879-4105 or visit the
Employment Centre.
MATURE STUDENTS NEEDED for full
summer time employment. No direct sales
but must be sales oriented and enjoy people. Pre-set appts. for our consultants
through mall displays, stores, etc. Should
average $500-$600/wk. Good opportunity
for on job experience. Call Bob at 590-3151,
9-4:30 p.m.
JAPANESE SPEAKING
TOUR GUIDES
We are looking for people who can work
as tour guides in Greater Vancouver and
Victoria from early May to end of August.
Applicants   must   be   fluently   bilingual
(Japanese-EnglishJ and be able to work in
Vancouver & take short trips to Victoria.
Experience is a plus, but we will train promising applicants. Send resume to:
TOURLAND TRAVEL LTD.
200- 900 W. Georgia St.
Vancouver, B.C.
V6C 2W6
Resumes should be written in native language of
applicant but follow traditional Canadian resume
format.
40 - MESSAGES
LADY HIT by door Thurs. Mar. 19 10:05 a.m.
Sub basement south entrance (near Pit).
Please write to: Box 1000, c/o The Ubyssey
Rm 266, SUB, Campus Mail.
CYCLIST PLEASE CALL. Cyclist who helped
a cyclist after a bad fall on S.W. Marine
Drive at Tamath on Feb. 24/87 bet. 5-5:30
p.m. call 688-3150.
70 - SERVICES
AMS CUSTOMER OPERATED
WORD PROCESSING CENTRE
Lower Level SU B Rm 56 228-5496
50% OFF FIRST MONTH
Economical heated units. Monitored burglar
alarm & sprinklers. 325-5400.
KEEP SAFE MINI STORAGE
1680 B Southeast Marine Drive
ROBERT ALLIN
COMMUNICATIONS
• Resume specialists
• Editing & writing
• Word processing
738-0456
EXCELLENT EDITING SERVICES. Professional editing for clarity, readability,
organization. Theses, articles, etc. 327-7547
or 327-4761.
AMS COPYRIGHT
Why wait for the rush?
We copy class notes NOW!
Lower Level SUB     228-4388
DO YOU NEED TO GET
A GROUP TOGETHER
FOR A WORKSHOP,
CONFERENCE OR
RETREAT?
West Coast Camping Consultants has
26 camping ft conference facilities
throughout B. C. to meet your group's
budget 8- needs.
Get started on your seminars today
980-4263
9 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday
THE ANGLICAN STUDENT
MOVEMENT AT UBC
CHORAL EVENSONG
7:30 p.m. Alternate Sundays
SUNDAY, MARCH 29
Morna Russell
& Evensong Choir:
AFRICAN FREEDOM
SONGS
For transport from student residences
call 224-5846, 4:30-6:30 p.m. Sunday.
Everyone is Welcome
ST. ANSELM'S CHURCH
University Blvd.
HAVE YOU OR A FRIEND experienced any
unwanted sexual contact while dating or in
a relationship with a boyfriend? We would
appreciate being able to talk with you. We
are researching this area, & hope to create
resources for women in dating realtion-
ships. Please call the SFU Ciminology
Research Centre at 291-4127 between
8:30-4:30 p.m. weekdays to set up a
TELEPHONE interview with either Karen or
Cindy. All interviews will be kept strictly
confidential.
STUDENT   WITH    TECHNICAL   SKILLS
wanted to draw maps and plans for thesis.
Pis call Heather at 222-2173 ASAP.
80 - TUTORING
ENGLISH TUTOR: G. Harding-Russell
(PH.D) will tutor or give help with essays.
Phone 594-0960 after 6 p.m.. $10/hr.
FRENCH OR SPANISH with Franco-
Argentine ph.D. Student. Oscar: 738-4102.
85 - TYPING
MINIMUM NOTICE REQUIRED - Essays,
term papers, resumes, editing. UBC location. 224-2662 or 732-0529.
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST. 30 yrs. exp.
Wordprocessor & IBM typewriter. Student
rates. Dorothy Martinson, 228-8346.
UNIVERSITY TYPING - word processing.
Papers, theses, resumes, letters, P-U & del.
9 am - 10 pm. 7 days/wk. 734-TYPE.
STUDENT/FACULTY RATES: $1.50/pg.
dble spaced text. Equations & tables:
$14/hr. Resumes: $5/pg. 50 personalized
form letters only $35. Cerlox Binding &
photocopying. Fast professional Service.
Jeeva's Word Processing. 201-636 West
Broadway. 876-5333. M/C & Visa accepted.
ADINA WORD PROCESSING for resumes,
essays, theses. Discount for students, 10th
& Discovery. Phone 222-2122.
WORD    PROCESSING   SPECIALIST.    U-
write, we type, theses, resumes, letters,
essays. Days, eves., wknds. 736-1208.
JUDITH FILTNESS
Quality Typist
263-0351
AMS CUSTOMIZED
WORD PROCESSING SERVICE
Lower Level SUB Rm. 60 228-5640
WORDWEAVERS - Word processing
(multi-lingual). Stud, rates. Fast turnaround. 5670 Yew St. at 41st, Kerrisdale.
266-6814.
ACADEMIC AND BUSINESS WORD
PROCESSING/TYPING. Quality work,
very reasonable rates. Days/eves.
263-4862.
ARE YOU LOSING MARKS BECAUSE
OF YOUR WRITING STYLE? Call a professional writer with M.A. for quality word
processing, editing _ writing services.
Resumes, theses, essays, letters, etc. Hand
in work you can be proud of! 324-9924.
WORD PROCESSINGI Xerox 860 system.
Student rates. Editing avail. Erika Taylor,
B.A. 734-1105 (o); 327-0026 (h).
TYPING Quick Right By UBC $1.25/page
Rob 228-8989
K.E.R. WORDPROCESSING. 1633 E. 12th
Ave. Using IBM-XT with Word Perfect. Call
Kerry Rigby 15 876-2895.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING at $1.50 per
page. Dunbar area. 263-8857.
WORD PROCESSING fast and reliable
editing and graphics available. Call Jack
eves. 224-0486.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING - essays,
theses, resumes, etc. UBC Village, behind
Kinko's Copies. 224-0763. Student rates.
YEAR-ROUND expert essay, theses typing
from legible work. Spelling grammar corrected. 738-6829, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. King Ed.
bus route.
WORD PROCESSING, fast, expert, quality
service. If you want the best call: 266-2536.
ON-LINE TYPING SERVICE. Fast, accurate
typing on IBM Word Processor
@$1.25/dble-sp. pg. Richmond &
downtown p/u & drop-off. Call Glenna
277-0410.
TYPIST.   Will   type   reports,   theses,   etc.
$1.00/pg. Call 738-0704 evenings.
READ
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED Tuesday, March 24,1987
Page 11
FANS CHEER THE hockey 'birds on with the eleven-man wave. The wave works as the 'Birds defeat visiting
Hosei University from Japan.
U. of G.
houses
Olympians
CALGARY (CUP) — A committee of University of Calgary and
municipal officials is working on
plans to accommodate the 900
students who will be in residence
when athletes descend on campus
for the 1988 Winter Olympics
Games.
Theresa Goulet, chair of the
Olympic Liaison Committee of the
university's alumni association, is
confident lodging for more than
400 students will be found with
volunteers reached through a mail-
out recruitment campaign in the city.
However, planners are not being
too confident, following the experience of a similar project during
the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los
Angeles. Only one-third of the projected participants provided space
in their homes because unexpected
relatives and friends showed up as
the Games started.
Besides "no room at the inn"
scenarios, organizers are also trying
to avoid problems for the 400 to 500
students who start school in
January 1988. These students may
not find guaranteed accommodation, or could be the victims of suddenly escalated rental rates.
"There is a potential for high
rates," said Peter Fraser, university
housing manager. *.
Students' union president Dave
Hoff suggests a "buddy system" be
established so that no students are
left lugging their luggage about
Calgary when the Games begin.
"I think students would (provide
space) if they knew there was a need
and they knew where to go," Hoff
said.
MARK TROTZUK SWOOSHES bv a soon to be unemployed referee in
hockey 'Birds final game of the year.
*
•
•
•
•
*
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*
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•
•••••••*•••••••••••*
Engineering Undergraduate Society for Rick Hansen  *
Presents +
*
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
••**•*•*••••••*•**••
a tribute to the Blues Brothers
8 pm, FRIDAY, MARCH 27
SUB BALLROOM
TIX $4 box offic«/__s rap $5 at the door
Happy Hour 8-9
NO MINORS
OFFICE FOR WOMEN STUDENTS
Career Series for Women
Interview Techniques
12:30-2:20 p.m.
Thurs., Mar. 26, 1987
Brock 106 A, B & C
BEST PRICES IN SIGHT
GLASSES
FROM
CONTACT LENSES
FROM
mm*
50% OFF
2nd PAIR OF CONTACT LENSES
CHEEPER PEEPERS IN THE VILLAGE
5736 University Blvd. with CAMPUS CUTS
222-2055
THIS WEEK AT UBC:
1. THE PRODIGAL
* A newly released motion picture with
a powerful message on family relationships
TUES., MARCH 24, 7 p.m., BUCH A104
2. ROCK & ROLL SEMINAR
* 600 slides * Backmasking
* Group symbols   * Occult Influence
WED., MARCH 25, 7 p.m, BUCH A104
3. LOVE, SEX & DATING
* A two night seminar
THURS. & FRI. MARCH 26 & 27,
7 p.m., SUB 212
Maranatha Christian Club
228-8654 Page 12
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 24, 1987
AIDS spread can be put in check
From page 9
become pregnant unless otherwise
advised by an obstetrician.
An individual who has tested
positive should: Keep in regular
contact with a doctor; restrict their
sexual activity to a known existing
partner, one partner is preferable;
inform sexual partner of their
positive antibody result and advise
them to seek medical testing; inform health care attendants such as
physicians, dentists, obstetricians
and acupuncture practitioners, as
well as electrologists, tattoo artists
and others about their status; practice "Safe Sex."
People who should consider being tested for AIDS include any person at risk for HTLV-111 infection.
Anyone with symptoms possible
related to an AIDS virus infection,
males who have had sex with more
than one male since 1979, males
whose male sexual partner has had
sex with more than one male since
1979; all these people should consider being tested for the AIDS antibodies. Others who should be considered for antibody testing include
past and present abusers of intravenous drugs; hemophiliacs,
especially those who received Factor VIII prior to July 1,1985; sexual
partners of persons in the above
groups or of people with verified
AIDS antibodies in the systems;
infants of the above groups; recipients of blood transfusions between 1979 and November 1985 who
have developed signs or symptoms
suggestive of an AIDS infection;
prostitutes and health workers who
have sustained exposure to blood or
body fluids of HTLV-111 infected
individuals: all of these people
should also consider being tested
for the AIDS antibodies.
One may not wish to take the test
however, as it is by no means a
perfect test. An individual may not
be prepared for the results. There is
also the problem that the test
results, while they are a part of your
$32.50 Athletic Fee
AMS  Speakers aj
UBC Debating:
Present
Dr. Bol
Hindm;
Director of Spc
Vi
TSKY
jdent Board
Irners Rep.
EBATE-
EDNESDAY,
MARCH 25
12:30 pm
rSUB BALLROOM
confidential medical records, if the
result become known by others'; it
may be used to deny that individual
of life insurance, employment or
continued employment, or other
personal rights.
Much is still unknown about
AIDS but it is important to
remember that any person can contract the disease. Condoms are the
best protection against contracting
this disease but other safer sexual
practices will help to prevent infec-
tion. Abstinence from sex
altogether is the only 100 .per cent
sure way not to become infected.
"Safe Sex" is actually a misnomer, there is no such thing as safe
sex. Safer sex is a much more accurate term. While the idea of safer
sex has arisen primarily to combat
AIDS, it can also help to prevent
the spread of other STD's as well.
Because AIDS is transmitted by
contact with semen, blood or other
body fluids, safer sex prevents contraction of AIDS by interfering
with the transference of these body
fluids.
The most important thing about
using condoms for safer sex is to
use them properly. Always place the
condom on the penis before entry
into  the  vagina,  or other  body
orifice. Always leave a half-inch of
the condom as a resevoir for
ejaculation unless the condom has a
built-in reservoir in the tip. Before
rolling the condom onto the shaft
of the penis, squeeze the reservoir
of the condom, this allows for expansion as semen is ejected into the
condom. Roll the condom out to
the base of the penis. Withdraw
both the penis and condom immediately after ejaculation by
holding the rim of the condom at
the base of the penis. Always use a
new condom each time intercourse
is repeated. Make sure the penis is
as dry as possible before putting the
condom on. A wet penis will allow
the condom to slip during intercourse.
While condoms should be used in
all intercourse, to maintain a certain level of safety, it is important
to know that there is an increased
rate of condom failures in anal
penetration. Because of this failure
rate, anal intercourse with a condom is still quite unsafe.
Other safe sex methods vary in
their safety. Safer sex is anything
that will not put your partner at risk
of developing as STD. It is alright
to be imaginative or creative as long
as you are responsible
;«■_«■_««--_ __«-»-_-_« __L__L_J
•  ROLE PLAYING GAMES
COLLECTORS COMIC BOOKS
AND MORE . . .
Golifetj Age Collectdbles
830 Granville St. Mall
Phone 683-2819
l
«
n
n
i
n
*
n
*
2551 Alma St.      «
Phone 222-2141    "
*■_-»-_-»■__•■*»■■-_-_■»•_■_ _____ __-»■_■_-» g _ _-_-»*_*_-»-»%i
GOT A PROBLEM?
NEED TO TALK?
SPEAKEASY
UBC's Peer Counselling Centre
Confidential Anonymous
Mon.-Fri.: 9:30 a.m.-9:30 p.m.
SUB CONCOURSE
228-3700
HOORAY!
American Express makes it especially easy
for Graduating Students to qualify for the Card!
Now, before you leave school, American Express
lets you qualify for Cardmembership under
special criteria.
American Express believes you, as a graduating
student, have a future to be proud of. We'd like
to be part of it.
So, if you are graduating this year and have
accepted career-oriented employment at a minimum annual salary of 110,000, we have created
special acceptance standards for you.
Perhaps you've thought of the American Express®
Card as the one you'd like to carry some day.
But the truth is that NOW may be the most important time for you to have its benefits.
Why you need the Card now
The Card can help you take control of your
finances as you move into your new life. In most
cases it provides you, not just
with a listing of expenditures,
but with actual duplicate copies.
Record-keeping becomes easy.
And, since it is not a "credit" card,
you aren't encouraged to get in over
your head. You pay your bill in full each
month.
Apply right away - before you leave school -
and take advantage of our special Graduating
Student Criteria.
Look for the special "Take One" stands on
bulletin boards.. .and take one. Or call this toll
free number:
1-800-387-9666
' Cnnyr.ah: Arrercan F *oress Car-ad
!pc   1987 All r ^h!s reserved

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