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The Ubyssey Oct 20, 1966

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Array —d.rrek webb photo
RAINY DAY BLUES blast sodden students as record downfall and low temperatures made life miserable Wednesday. Note artistic effect of raindrops, reflections of
students sloshing to next class.
LUTHERAN   LAUDS  HEFNER
Bishops
quits
CUS
LENNOXVILLE (CUP) —
Students at Bishop's University Monday quit the Canadian
Union of Students, deepening
an ideological split which has
now chopped six student unions from CUS membership
rolls this fall.
Bishop's withdrawal came
after a close but unrecorded
vote taken at a stormy students' association meeting.
This most recent in a series
of withdrawals sparked by nation-wide debate on CUS involvement in political issues
has left McGill University the
lone CUS member in Quebec.
At Monday's general meeting, a strong pro-CUS faction
argued bitterly against council executive members who
triggered the vote by condemning CUS political activism.
But when the withdrawal
resolution came to a vote,
Andy Sancton, vice-president
and chairman of external affairs at Bishop's, won vindication on his stand against
CUS.
Sanction earlier told the
meeting he would resign his
post if students failed to voice
their opposition to CUS political activism and dissatisfaction with CUS services.
His stand was outlined in a
(Continued on Page 2)
SEE:  BISHOP'S
Paper-hangers
paste  U of S
SASKATOON (CUP) —
About 300 worthless cheques
amounting to $42,000 have
been passed by University of
Saskatchewan students paying fees this fall.
The U of S controller's
office said $27,000 has been
cleared so far,
No charges have (been laid
against students, an administration official said, Ibecause
it is assumed many students
just  make   mistakes.
Playboy peeks arouse cleric
A Lutheran minister said
Wednesday he experiences
"intense arousal" when he
looks through Playboy magazine.
"I find that looking
through Playboy is sustained
arousal," Rev. Herbert Fox
told a panel discussion.
"This is tyranny, not sexual freedom," the Lutheran
minister said.
A total of six persons attended the Playboy discussion,  which  concluded that
the magazine's view of life
was essentially false.
"Playboy goes only part of
the way—it gives the glossy
side," said Fbx.
He found the cartoons and
limericks in Playboy "really
funny", tout did not find the
photographic displays so humorous.
Reverend Fox lauded Playboy publisher Hugh Hefner's
statement that one should
not see life "as a vale of
tears, but as a happy time."
But he echoed the ideas of
Prof. Thomas Droege of Valparaiso University who said
in a critical review of Hefner's philosophy that "hedonism . . . has never proved
satisfying over the long
haul."
Dissent came from a male
student who spent most of
the discussion leafing
through the various issues of
Playboy lying on the discussion-room table.
"It's up to the individual,"
he said, and then went back
to the pictures.
Vol. XLVIII, No. 14  VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 1966 **g^>49  224-3916
No violatiotis,
students
By TOM  MORRIS
The head of the campus RCMP said Wednesday UBC
engineers are leaving themselves open to serious charges
if they molest individuals or damage property on campus.
Corporal George Strathdee was referring to an incident
Monday when Ubyssey columnist Gabor Mate was kidnapped by 25 engineers.
Strathdee said students are just as liable to the criminal
code as the public.
"The engineers involved in
the Mate incident could be
charged with confinement,
seizure, and assault," Strathdee said.
"An individual is liable to
seven years imprisonment if
convicted on these charges,"
he said.
Strathdee would neither
confirm or deny statements
about RCMP power on campus attributed to an officer
Monday.
The officer reportedly said
the detachment is powerless
until a fairly serious crime is
committed.
He said in similar circumstances   the   UBC   administra
tis
—al harvey photo
AGRICULTURE DEAN Blythe Eagles receives Great Trekker
award today noon in gym at homecoming pep meet.
(See story page 3.)
tion had failed to back up the
RCMP.
Strathdee said he would investigate these statements.
"Each case has to be dealt
with on it's own merits",
Strathdee said.
"If a stunt is potentially
violent we will of course investigate," he said.
"As far as I know, the incident Monday was investigated   immediately,"   he   said.
"But we can only act further if the individual involved
wants to press charges."
"In this case we would then
obtain enough evidence to
support the charges and present it to the court," Strathdee said.
Head of the student discipline committee, John True-
man, claims the present system of discipline on campus
gives the student more rights
than the public.
"Students can do more on
campus than they can do anywhere else,"  Trueman said.
"I personally don't like the
system because it sets the student further from the law
than the public off campus,"
he said.
Trueman said the discipline
committee and student court
are helpless when it is time
to enforce the law.
"We can only act after the
event has taken place," he
said.
Trueman was asked what
action the student disciplinary
committee   could   take.
"The committee takes complaints in writing and passes
a resolution recommending
charges,"  he  said.
"This resolution is then presented to the student court
which  has  two  alternatives."
"It can charge the offender
a $5 fine or recommend action to the faculty council on
student discipline," he said.
Draft profs
^unethical/
says Mac
UBC president John Macdonald Wednesday questioned
the ethics of eight UBC and
Simon Fraser Academy professors who are members of
the Committee to Aid American War Objectors.
The committee explains Canadian immigration laws to
prospective American immigrants, especially students
seeking  to  avoid the  draft.
News reports Monday claimed more than 200 U.S. citizens
are attending SFA and UBC
under   assumed   names.
Macdonald called this possibility   "highly   unlikely."
He said persons are not excluded from UBC on the basis
of religion, race or political
beliefs.
"Nevertheless, I personally
question the ethics of Canadian citizens making positive
overtures to American citizens to help or encourage
them to emigrate to Canada
for the purpose of avoiding a
legally determined responsibility as American citizens,"
he added.
"The number helped has
been very small, only fifteen
up to this weekend," executive
committee member Ronald Ri-
dell said Wednesday. Ridell
is an assistant mathematics
professor at UBC.
"We have a printed memorandum explaining Canadian
immigration laws. This is sent
to our friends and organizations like Students for Democratic Society,"  he said.
APATHETIC?
See  Focus
— page 6
r Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, October  20,  1966
'Schizos
are sane
-Willmott
By JOHN APPLEBY
If you are schizophrenic you
are sane, says UBC sociology
professor William Willmott.
Willmott told 80 students
Thursday noon "intellectual
schizophrenia" is a necessity.
He defined a schizophrenic
as "one who deals in a situation as if certain aspects of
reality do not exist."
In demonstrations against
the Viet Nam war "it is often
the demonstration that counts
more than the object," he said.
"A successful demonstration
is more the end than is the accomplishment of the purpose
of the action," he said.
Drawing the example of
Norman Morrison, an American Quaker who burned himself to death outside the Pentagon, Willmott stressed "the
strain between categories of
reality."
"What is right in the context
of the Vietnamese war where
most of the casualties are the
result of napalm bombing, is
not so rational in the U.S.
where self-immolation is not
the custom," he said.
Willmott slammed "political
activists with delusions of
grandeur."
The delusion that is their
cause fades when it comes up
against reality, he said.
"On the other hand it is just
as serious to do nothing," he
said.
—don kydd photo
WHITE HATTED cowgirl
model moseys out into Brock
during Tuesday's homecoming fashion show.
MARRIED  UNITS
Tenders called
Tenders have been called for
a 275-unit housing project for
UBC married grad students.
Bids are returnable Nov.
10 and a construction start
is planned before the end of
November.
Target date for completion
of the project is September,
1967.
The project will be on 25
acres of now-wooded campus
land south of the present
Acadia Camp and west of
Acadia Road. '
The development will eventually be increased to 350 units.
This project is the first
housing built at UBC specifically  for  graduate  students.
Plans are available to contractors on deposit of $100 at
Fournier leads PEN
MONTREAL (CUP)—-Jacques
Fournier, former internal affairs vice-president of Presse
Etudiante Nationale, has been
elected president of PEN for
the coming year.
the architect's office, Vladimir Plavsic and Associates,
675 Homer St.
Contractors may submit
separate bids on site development, construction of 175 row
units and construction of a
100-unit,   15-storey  high  rise.
Combined bids are also acceptable.
FEE ABOLITION ASKED
No way, says Thatcher
REGINA, Sask, (UNS) —
Premier Ross Thatcher refused Tuesday to abolish tuition fees at University of Saskatchewan.
But Thatcher promised to
study requests for more student housing and increased
loans to students.
The requests were made
Tuesday iii briefs presented by
Don Mitchell, president of the
students' council at the Regina campus, and Dave Tka-
chuk, president of the students'
council at the Saskatoon campus.
Students expressed d i s a p -
pointment at Thatcher's statement that he could not agree
to gradual abolition of fees.
BISHOP'S
(Continued from Page 1)
report he wrote on the 30th
CUS Congress held in September.
The report, presented to the
student assembly Monday, was
endorsed by Bishop's council
executive.
The CUS debate at Bishop's
began formally Oct. 6, when
CUS president Doug Ward
made a special trip to Lennox-
ville to defend CUS philosophy against Sancton's criticisms.
BAD BOYS
New shipment of
SUEDE &  LEATHER TIES
Also a few more 5 lb. Turtle
Neck sweaters coming in this
week.
MEL and BRYON
315 SEYMOUR ST.
BILL STONIER
(Class of '65)
L.O. CAMPUS REPRESENTATIVE
Clearing All 1966 Models at Big Discounts
SPECIAL - 3 Only - New '66 Valiant Hardtops
LA WS0N 0A TES ON BROAD WA Y
DODGE - DART - CORONET - CHRYSLER
1235 y/. BROADWAY 736-5521 and 733-1007
FILM SOCIETY PRESENTS
[fr
THE FILM VERSION OF
JEAN ANOUILH'S PLAY
ABOUT THE MURDER IN
THE CANTERBURY CATHEDRAL.
With
lU V       %_^       M        •   Richard BURTON
w^m1   ^ -^^     •   Peter O'TOOLE
auditorium TODAY a* 12:30,3:30,6 p.m., 9 p.m.-50c
Thatcher has offered to meet
students once a month if they
wish. Representatives said students probably would accept
the bid.
Students were encouraged
by Mr. Thatcher's offer to consider a step-up of student loan
programs and to study the pos
sibility of more student housing.
One brief said the average
annual cost of university education in the province in 1964
was $1,588. The average summer earnings of students was
$372, leaving a difference of
about $700.
I'm Getting Married
PLEASE SEND YOUR LATEST INVITATION
SAMPLES AND PRICE LIST BY RETURN MAIL
TO:
NAME
ADDRESS
MR. ROY YACHT, Consultant
ran CARD SHOP
Corner Robson and Burrard
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GOLF — M, T. TH. F. 10:30 FIELD HOUSE
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No Charges — Instruction Free
Faculty  Welcome  — Grads,  too
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WINTER SPORTS CENTRE
SKATING SCHEDULE - 1966-67 SEASON
Effective September 12, 1966 to April 15, 1967
TUESDAYS   —
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SUNDAYS   —
12:45
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2:45 p.m.*
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5:00 p.m.
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5:00 p.m.**
9:30 p.m.
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*Special Student Session — Admission
15c
**Except when Thunderbird Hockey Games scheduled:
Jan. 13 & 14 - Jan. 20 & 21 - Feb. 3 & 4 - March 3 & 4
ADMISSION: Afternoons —    Students .35      Adults .60
Evenings      —    Students .50      Adults .75
Skate Rental — .35 pair — Skate Sharpening — .35 pair
For further information call — 224-3205 or 228-3197
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Open daily  including  Saturday — No  appointment needed ■
«•*___■► <•--■_■» •^__-»» •*___--» «•---_-» <^__-» «■-_-_■» —*r Thursday, October 20,   1966
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
PICK  HER
TODAY
Vote noon today in gym for
your choice for homecoming
queen. They are, from left:
Brenda Bryon, science; Jean
Block, music; Gina Hawrelak,
forestry-home ec; Mary McLaughlin, frosh; Barbara Mc-
Clatchie, law; Mystery candidate, education; Dale Wood,
commerce; Pat McGuire, Acadia Camp; Johanna Rees,
medicine; Laura Townsley,
agriculture; Susan Weitjis,
Fort Camp; Cathy Johnson,
pharmacy; T r i s h a French,
Totem Park; Jill Newby, arts;
Marcia Ferworn, ATC- Melissa
Dewdney, Lower Mall- Nancy
Steinman, phys. ed.; Wendy
Latta, engineering.
AGRICULTURE DEAN
—kurt hilger photo
Eagles takes trekker
By ANN BISHOP
This year's Great Trekker
Award will go to UBC's top
aggie.
Dean of agriculture — Dr.
Blythe Eagles will receive
the award at the Homecoming Pep Meet today at noon
in the gym.
The Great Trekker Award
commemorates the Great
Trek of 1922.
It is the highest honor
UBC students can award.
Students marched in 1922
through the streets of Vancouver to protest the provincial government's lack of
action in building the Point
Grey university.
The award is a model of
the cairn made from stones
carried by the protesting
students.
The award has been made
annually since 1950, usually
to an alumnus of UBC who
has made a major contribution to the University both
as a student and after graduation.
Eagles graduated from
UBC in 1922, winning the
governor-general's medal in
arts.
He helped instigate the
campaign to build the university.
In 1929 Eagles returned to
UBC to join the faculty of
agriculture and was made
dean in 1948.
Eagles said in an interview Tuesday he thinks
students have changed little
since his undergraduate
days.
"Students have much the
same spirit that we had back
in 1922,"  he said.
"Their concern today is
the fee hike and ours was the
construction of a university
in Point Grey," he said.
When asked what he
thought of the current drive
to have student representation on the board of governors, Eagles said he thought
it was a good idea but an impractical one.
'Radicals can't do it/
free speecher warns
The Berkeley lesson for
UBC students is that the university structure cannot be
changed by radicals — not until the social structure of
North American society is
changed.
Jack Weinberg, a leader in
the free speech movement
(FSM) at the University of
California in 1964-65 told UBC
students Wednesday noon that
if they want social change in
their university they must
work to gain power through
the country's provincial and
federal systems.
Weinberg became nationally famous when he spent 32
hours in a police car stranded
in the middle of the Berkeley
campus in October,  1964.
The police car which was
blocked by hundreds of students who sat around the car
became a marathon forum for
students who decried the "university factory system" and
related grievances by standing on top of the police car
and speaking to crowds of up
to 6,000 students.
It was a key point in the
beginning of the FSM.
The   FSM   was   a   response
to pressure put on the Berke-
JACK WEINBERG
. . . FSM leader
ley administration by outside
pressure groups and passed on
in the form of restrictions on
free speech and off-campus
political activities by students
Weinberg told 200 UBC students at the auditorium.
"The power structure in the
San Francisco area felt the
best way to put pressure on
students who participated in
the civil rights movement was
through the university.
"And Berkeley, which is
controlled externally as are
most North American universities, reacted by giving in
and creating the explosive
situation which led to the
FSM.
"Before the FSM was over
the civil rights problem was
usurped by two basic grievances — the multiversity concept which sees students as
raw material to be processed
into usable economic units for
corporate industry and the restrictions on academic freedom,"   Weinberg   said.
He pointed out that most
FSM'ers were students who
had never been involved in
political  activities before.
"As FSM became organized
taking more and more direct
action the student government
became ineffective even in its
role as a mediator between
FSM and the Berkeley administration.
"But we gained important
support from hundreds. Faculty support was limited except for one instance when
FSM was at its peak and the
faculty decided the power to
control the university was in
the hands of the students.
* V '»'
■ jurw
>awm**SkmnM
R_n a r%    11 kj n it d
\JA\ U     U IN _L7 EL rt
C ON STR U CTf O N
^mmgAWF   ~ WKmrnWrnrnW/mmW
FOR. ANY
INCONVENIENCE
1 PA. GAG LARD I fflwuittei of-ffitfhuKus ■
—powell hargrave photos
SORRY, SIR, says Smilin' Phil's sign, for the inconvenience
in getting^ stuck on Southwest Marine Drive, missing your
classes, catching cold, ruining your shoes and snapping
your axle in the mud. Sorry about that.
Liberals give Lester
18 months as leader
A Vancouver Liberal organizer said Tuesday Liberals
expect Lester Pearson has 18 months to go as party
leader.
West End Liberal organizer Russell Brink was
reporting on the recent national Liberal convention
to 20 students in Bu. 214.
"In a party which e::pects a leadership change in
18 months there was no official stand taken on leadership,"  he said. THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesday!, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
the editor's and not of the AMS or the university. Member, Canadian
University Press. Founding member, Pacific Student Press. Authorized
second class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa, and for payment of
postage in cash.
The   Ubyssey   publishes  Page   Friday,   a   weekly  commentary   and   review.
City editor, 224-3916. Other calls, 224-3242: editor, local 25; photo. Page
Friday, loc. 24; features, sports, loc. 23; advertising, loc. 26. Night calls,
731-7019.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence and  editorial writing.
OCTOBER, 20,  1966
The tygers ot wrath are wiser than the
horses of instruction.
-William Blake
The destroyer
He nearly  did it.
Don Wise, intrepid arts president, nearly destroyed
the Alma Mater Society, and right in the middle of
homecoming week,, too.
Monday, Wise petulantly suggested the academic
eligibility of all councillors be investigated, to see if anyone measured up to the constitutional standards.
But council was saved by the 20 brave men who
voted against Wise's motion, to the chagrin of the four
who were willing to be tested and the one who abstained.
Glory to those who do not rock the boat.
Draft dodging
At first glance, the Committee to Aid American
War Objectors is doing the correct thing — helping
those who morally cannot stomach the American war
in Viet Nam enter Canada and find sanctuary here.
Back in 1946, at Nuremburg, Americans successfully
prosecuted and hung German officers who merely
followed orders while committing genocide.
And now, American citizens are being prosecuted
for refusing to follow orders, refusing to commit genocide against the Vietnamese people.
But to provide sanctuary in Canada tends to weaken
an already dangerously oppressed group of dissenters
remaining in the U.S.
In now independent countries such as India and
Kenya, brave men who believed they were right found
jail terms the only solution to suppression, the only way
to retain their moral integrity, as opposed to voluntary
exile in neighboring states.
In America today, the only force that can stop
the Viet Nam war is huge internal dissent, with the
dissenters suffering all the penalties those in power can
and will inflict to silence them.
Already, the Pool bill, which would outlaw public
dissent against the war,, has been passed by a House of
Representatives committee.
Humanitarian as it may be to aid individuals seeking sanctuary, the greater act of humanism would be to
aid those remaining in America to dissent.
Thus and only thus can an immoral war be stopped.
Jail the punks
Ever since columnist Gabor Mate jumped out the
engineer's window Monday, opinion among students
who bother with such things has been divided.
Some cherish the right to forcibly abduct unwilling
people for fun, and others would deny them this right.
We deny.
And we agree with Mate's solution — throw the
punks in jail.
I'm
goin
home
Hullo old grad.
Happy homecoming.
We hope you enjoy looking at all our nice new
buildings, and all the old huts that were tempotarily
with us in your day.
We hope the parade and the queens and the dances
make you feel very warm and homey about your alma
mater.
Because we hope you give the money that is the
professed reason for having homecomings in the first
place.
See ya next year, old grad.
••* SC TUB MLLMt VEtiMTSP M£
TO fc< YOU IP YOU 'P 6£ THIS. Y£&'$
SidS£TteAPT rtP STSMA CHI
■ * •
—from the UWO Gazette
BY GABOR MATE
Dead friends
tell no tales
A friend of mine hadn't
eaten, spoken to anyone ,or
moved from his bed for three
or four days. Last night I finally called the doctor.
"Doc," I said, "there is a
sick person here. In fact, I
suspect he may toe dead."
"Oh," said the doctor, "is
it very serious?"
"Well," I replied, "he isn't
complaining, but neither does
he seem very happy with the
situation."
"Keep him comfortable,"
advised the doctor. "Try to
cheer him up a bit. I will toe
over as soon as I can."
He arrived a few hours
later. He was a very jolly
doctor.
"Well, well, well," he
smiled, "how is the patient?"
"Extremely patient," 1 replied. "Hasn't once opened his
mouth."
"Good, good. Let's take his
temperature."
"No fever," he announced
with a happy grin. "What do
you suggest we do next?"
I suggested that perhaps he
should examine my poor
friend. He thought that wasn't a bad idea.
"Hey," he said, "that's not
a bad idea."
"Very   poor   reflexes,"   he
observed. "Very poor. I wonder if it is not a coagulation
of the inner labonza."
"Oh no!" I cried, "not a coagulation of the inner labonza!"
"I guess you are right," he
said, "it's not a coagulation of
the inner laibonza. I wonder
what it is."
"Mayibe he is dead," I suggested.
"Oh yes," he said. "That's
what it must be. Very clearly
it is a case of death. Give him
two aspirins and call me tomorrow if he doesn't get any
better."
EDITOR: John Kelsey
Managing Richard Blair
News    _ Carol Wilson
City                Danny Stoffman
Photo              Powell Hargrave
Page Friday    _         Claudia Gwinn
Focus . .        Rosemary Hyman
CUP  Bert Hill
Ass't News        Pat Hrushowy, Anne Balf
Ass't Photo   Dennis Gans
These swam out to find news:
John Appleby, Tom Morris, George
Reamsbottom, Rod Wilczak, Boni
Lee, Kris Emmott, Guy Grand,
Charlotte Haire, Norman Gidney,
Mary Ussner, Murray McMillan,
Ann Bishop, Allan Neil, Peter
Lincoln, and Lin Tse-hsu. Der-
rek Webb, Don Kydd, Chris Blake,
and   Kurt  Hilger   took   pictures.
All Ubyssey staffers are eligible for a free once-in-a-lifetime
trip to exotic Edmonton. Come
down and find out. Application
deadline is Friday.
Letters
Mikes  a  card
Editor,  The  Ubyssey:
Confessing a thrice-weekly
addiction to your irreverent
ramblings is unbecoming a
responsible student — suffice
it is to say this constitutes
my only truly antisocial habit, and when one reaches
senility, one major virulent
vice should be patronizingly
excused.
Imagine, then, the soul-
destroying shock which shattered "John's a Myth". I
must confess, I could not
bring myself to read further
than this title.
"It can't be true," I gasped
inwardly in true bureaucratic senatorial cliche-think.
This eminently coherent
voice, this epitome of rational discourse, this Pooh-Bah
of the Western World a
Myth?
Fortunately for the tattered remnants of my once-
proud mind, I brought myself, haggard and drawn, to
read on, paper quivering
fearfully in my nerveless fingers. The "John" of the title
turned out to be UBG President John Macdonald.
Imagine my inchoate relief; the sudden return of
life - force; the scintillating
sense of growth and security
of maturity — for I realized,
grateful for the wondrous
mercies that befall us in the
darkest, dankest pits of
gloom, that my idol was not
the subject of your icono-
clasm. And all along I'd
feared you had been writing
of Myth Kelthey!
MIKE   COLEMAN
Law II
'Appalling
Editor,  The  Ubyssey:
It is appalling to me that
the incident involving approximately fifty engineers
and one Gabor Mate and one
Nancy Corbett is to toe overlooked with only a small and
ineffectual   reprimand.
How long are we going to
let the engineers run wild
over this campus destroying
whatever they take a fancy
to; how long are we going
to let them deal out "punishments" to the few students with enough guts to
speak out against them?
How long are we going o
let them* terrorize the student councillors of any faculties but engineering?
The action of four "men"
roughing up one girl must
prove that the mass violence
inflicted on this campus by
the local red herd must be
stopped. If they are going
to act like animals, they
should be treated as such.
Perhaps a massive cage
around the whole engineering complex is the answer; if
not, police action is the only
alternative. Let's not wait until someone gets seriously injured  or  perhaps  killed.
By the way, if the "over
sensitive men" of the engineering faculty feel they
must also punish me for stat-
ing^jny opinions they better
bring more than just four
men. I'm a lot bigger than
Nancy.
ESTHER   BLUMANFALD
Arts III FOCUS-
Nobody's a hangman at home'
An open letter to UBC president Macdonald from a graduate
student in psychology at UBC.
Dear President Macdonald:
I am deeply concerned
about remarks attributed to
you to the effect that efforts
of some professors to assist
U.S. "draft dodgers" are of
questionable appropriateness.
As a doctor of law (University of Budapest, 1932) I
know just how easy it is for
a government to pass all
kinds of laws. Laws must of
course be obeyed whether we
like them or not—except  in
one case, namely, when the
law obliges us to kill, maim,
or otherwise destroy others.
Killing and "napalming" is
so serious a matter that it
would seem to demand personal conviction on behalf of
the person who does it. No
state forces anyone to become
a hangman at home. Why
should a state have the right
to force citizens to kill against
their convictions abroad?
Perhaps I have particular
sympathy for the Americans
who come to Canada to avoid
the draft . . . for two reasons.
GRAD CLASS
First General Meeting
Membership: all students in the winter session who are
registered in the final year of a course leading to a
Bachelor's or the M.D. degree shall be members of the
Grad Class.
—positions  open are: President, Vice-president, Treasurer,
Secretary, Social  Convenor,  Public  Relations  Officer,
—a meeting of the Grad class (all  graduating students)
for the first time on MONDAY, OCTOBER 24, AT 12:30
IN THE AUDITORIUM.
—nominations may be sent to the Secretary, AMS, post-
box 54.
College Life
Speaker: Josh McDowell
C.C.C.  Director - U.B.C.
SPECIAL MUSIC: Ann Mortifee
PLACE:  Alpha  Delta Phi  Fraternity
2270 Wesbrook
TIME:  9:01   p.m., THURS., OCT.  20
EVERYONE  INVITED
College life is sponsored by Campus Crusade for Christ, Intl.
First, because I consider
myself a friend and admirer
of the U.S., its global good
will and generosity, and I am
sad it got involved in Vietnam; and this sympathy extends to all U.S. citizens.
Second, because I was in a
somewhat similar situation
myself once. I left Hungary
in 1938 when it became obvious I was going to be expected to join in the invasion
of some of our neighboring
countries to help recapture
some territories which Hungary lost in the Versailles
treaty and thus re-establish
its "honor".
This, to me, seemed insufficient reason to go out and
kill, and 28 years later I feel
I was right in my decision.
Legally I wasn't a "draft-
dodger" because I took off
early enough; in fact, I was. I
came first to the U.S., then
to Canada.
Neither country asked me
whether I was a "draft-
dodger".
Promptly upon my arrival,
I did all I could to be accepted first in the U.S. Air Force,
then in the RCAF, to help
fight Hitler. A draft dodger in
one situation is not necessarily a draft dodger in another,
that is, when he believes in
the cause.
As a psychologist (UBC,
1961, M.A.), I feel humanity's
most serious and urgent prob
lem today is to learn to deal
with aggressive acts and tendencies. I respect those who
consider it ttieir moral responsibility to question orders
which direct them to destroy
lives—even if they don't want
to be martyrs and sit in jail
for five years for exercising
their  responsibility.
The minimum obligation of
a leader who asks his people
to perpetrate killing and destruction is to convince the
individuals involved of the
righteousness of the cause.
All western powers, including
the US, subscribed to individual responsibility in regard
to extensive killing when
they brought to trial at Nuremberg those who "just obeyed Hitler's perfectly legal orders" to exterminate those he
didn't approve of.
If the US should lose the
Vietnam war, many napalm-
ers and defoliators would
probably end up with convictions under Nuremberg-like
rules. The fact that the US is
unlikely to lose is irrelevant.
The US's policy in regard
to Vietnam is openly questioned by Canada as well as
by many other close friends
of the US. Under these conditions, the least we can do is
to welcome those who refuse
to fight a war which to them
—and to us—seems wrong.
I would like to question the
ethics of those who feel similarly,  but  do  nothing.
JOHN HUBERMAN
FORMAL
AND
SEMI-FORMAL
rental and sales
Tuxedo, tails, whit* dinner
jackets, morning coots.
Formal and informal business wear — complete
size range.
MCCUISH   ™»tU WEAR
STUDENT RATES
2046  W. 4st ■ Ph.  263-3610
Notice to Graduating Students in
SCIENCE
A meeting will be held in Chem. 200
Friday, October 21, at 12:30 p.m.
to hear a representative from the Placement Office
(Office of Student Services)
on the subject
GRADUATE EMPLOYMENT
JILL  NEWBY
(Miss Arts 1966)
For
HOMECOMING
QUEEN
ONCE A YEAR U.B.C. WELCOMES
GRADUATES
BUT THEY'RE ALWAYS
WELCOME TO
UBC
HOME
SERVICE
COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE
2180 Allison (in the Village)
224-3939
Thursday,  October 20,   1966
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 5 ^gm/^Kmi':.
apathy
• • •
By  TOM  MORRIS
The silent student: see him
park his car in the morning,
follow him to classes, maybe
have coffee with him, and
then follow him to his car
and watch him drive home.
He's part of a growing
society on campus.
It isn't an organized society. It never had a formal
beginning. It probably
doesn't even know it exists.
But this society is real and
very evident.
The silent student belongs
to an ever growing mass on
campus who are not involved
with anything but courses.
NO PROTEST
A student of this society
seldom belongs to a club. He
doesn't march in protest, sit
through speeches, or soap-
in anger.
How large is the society?
Student leaders generally
agree that the majority of
students at UBC are alienated from the social structure
on campus.
A brief history of student
participation proves them
right.
There are about 17,000 students  at  UBC.
300 ATTEND
In September, 1966, university president John Macdonald spoke to 300 students
in the armory. The speech
concerned all students. It was
well  publicized.
In January, 1966, 3,500 students marched downtown in
protest over fee increases. It
was one of the largest rallies held in UBC history.
In 1963, the Back-Mac
campaign drew 3,000 to a
rally. It was the best publi
cized rally and campaign in
UBC history.
FEW BUY
Every September, the various clubs on campus exhibit
their wares. Thousands barter
but few buy.
The silent student seldom
buys, joins, speaks, or in any
way  participates  in  student
functions.
Why?
Here is how one student
gave his reasons.
"I'm out here to get an
education of course, but ultimately I have to graduate.
"Society says I need that
little piece of paper, that diploma, if I want to advance.
"What does society care if
I spend five years out here
without   getting   my   degree.
TWO SIDES
"Sure I would like to be
involved. I see it as being an
essential part of my education but society sees it a little
differently."
There appear then two
parts of a student's education. The first is the in-class
and the second is the out-of-
class education. The formal
and the informal.
Society demands the formal in the form of a degree.
This student wants to be
involved more in the informal. He places a high value on
it.
The same student was asked if he thought he was receiving a total education by
not being involved.
LESS THAN HALF
"I'm getting less than half
an education right now," he
said.
"I'm not meeting other stu
dents.   I   don't   know   what
they're  thinking.
"In fact, I can't test the
validity of my own thoughts
because I'm not participating
with  other students."
The silent student is also
frustrated within the larger
university   institution.
He has dissenting opinions.
He has ideas about how he
would change the university.
But he also senses futility.
SOME   HELPLESS
Another student expresses
her sense of helplessness:
"I don't like a lot of things
that take place on this campus.
"But what can I do? The
administration calls it a matter of adjustment.
"They tell me I'll adjust to
the system and leave it at
that."
There is another expression of futility. It comes from
the student who was involved at one time.
He organized and led students. He talked and he listened. But now he has withdrawn.
FRUITLESSNESS
He was a leader in the
Back-Mac campaign. To him
the campaign was fruitless
and produced a few substantial results.
The dividend was a failed
year. He tried to participate
again the next year with few
results   and   another  failure.
"I've been out here for
five years and today I'm in
third year," he said.
"You can account that to
an attempt at involvement."
He also sees futility.
"It's like standing in a
long line-up. If you are first
in   line   you   have   it   made.
The further you get towards
the end, the more hopeless
the whole thing becomes.
"It's fine being a leader
but the followers perform
little or no role.
NO   LINE-UPS
"I never stand in line-ups
now."
This sense of helplessness
or futility seems to inform
the silent  student.
In fact, by way of some
miracle should they all meet
one day, they would probably
decide on a group slogan
reading:  'what's the use.'
It is generally agreed that
students, if they want
change, want it immediately.
For some reason, today's
student doesn't like to sow a
harvest which will be reaped by future generations.
NO CONCEPT
One student claimed that
the student union building
didn't concern her. It was a
long range project and she
would only participate if
there were immediate benefits to be gained.
"Besides others are organizing it and still others will
use it so how does it concern me?"
What does concern the silent student?
Perhaps only what directly
involves him.
Commented another student:
"If it doesn't directly affect me I won't do anything.
ALWAYS   ENOUGH
"There are always enough
people with concern who will
protest."
He    was   asked   what   he
would do if tuition fees were
doubled.
"I   would   have   to   work
microphones or musing?
The uncommitted prefer books to student battlefields.
Page 6
Art  Stevenson,   1965-6   engineering   president,   harangues   students,
but never sees members of the silent society.
THE       UBYSSEY Thursday, October  20,  1966 FOCUS
... or self-preservation?
twice as hard to get a scholarship," he said.
"The inconvenience to myself determines the degree of
sacrifice that I must make.
"I signed the housing petition that was circulating. I
was probably morally obligated to take that step.
"But there is no reason
why I should go any further.
"I've got my own place to
sleep and what other students do about getting accommodation is their busi-
. ness."
HARD CORE
What about the hard core
of this silent society?
Here the student completely disassociates himself from
all campus activity with the
exception of classes.
His life is made of professors, books, desks, and
thoughts of exams. He lives
in a personal, please-do-not-
disturb world.
"I'm out here to learn and
study," he says.
"Student organizations perform an irrelevent function
in university life.
HERE TO LEARN
"Students are here to learn
and that is done through
study."
"We are not here to socialize."
This student or student
type does not dominate the
silent society but he forms a
large faction of the group.
Some do not recognize a
need to join, organize, or
socialize.
For others there is the pro
bability of failure, the chance
of little gain, and the difficulty   of   visualizing   success.
IN-CLASS  FIRST
Finally, the demands that
society puts upon the student
forces him to concentrate on
his in-class education.
But does all this explain
why the student can't take
one hour in the university
year to hear on important
speech by the university
president?
The student becomes unin-
volved for the reasons cited
above. He soon falls into the
proverbial rut.
His attitude towards clubs
soon becomes his attitude towards rallies and that in turn
shapes his attitude towards
speeches.
The silent student is ac-
cussed of many things, one
being that he doesn't care
what happens at the university.
HE CARES
He claims he cares very
much, but he can't afford to
take his feelings beyond himself or a friend.
He  is  occussed  of  apathy.
If he is apathetic it is because apathy has been forced
on him by the pressure of
courses.
But if the silent student
isn't apathetic, he is unin-
volved.
He won't be at the next
club meeting nor will he be
seen at the next student rally.
He'll be found in the classroom by day and at his private desk in his private cellar every night.
Vancouver Woman's Musical Club
presents
GERALD moore
"The Victor Borge of the Longhairs"
In An Evening of Music and Mirth
QUEEN ELIZABETH THEATRE OCT. 28, 8:30 p.m.
Tickets at Vancouver Ticket Centre, 630 Hamilton St.,
and at all Eaton Stores — $3.00
Students $1.50 on presentation of A.M.S. card
ecuiA
RESTAURANT
and
Dining Room
4544W. lOthAve.
Vancouver 8, B.C.
Ph. 224-1351
•
Full Dining
Facilities
•
Take
Home
Service
»   •* _* -_/ •__f./it__/' . -   M. ,.
Only 300 students listened to President Macdonald
—kurt hilger photo
speak in the armory.
JJvl Jauza.
(DOSLIL 91  -%-W/L/
Bring this ad to the Frier at
4423 W. 10th any Mon., Tues., or
Wed.,    in    October    and    receive
25c OFF
On   Any   Individual
order  over $1.
P.S.   While   you're   there
Join The  Friar's 40 Club
A GO GO
at
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SuAfc
presenting
"SOUND   UNLIMITED"
and   the
A GO GO GIRLS
Dancing 9 to 3 Every
FRIDAY   and   SATURDAY
Ample Parking
821   RIVER   RD.,   RICHMOND
Available   for   Private   Functions
Monday  to   Thursday
Reservations,   CR   8-2624
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EYE-CATCHING
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you want to look your best
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4445 W. 10th
near   Sasamat
2901 W. B'dwy.
at  Mackenzie
Thursday, October 20,   1966
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 7 Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 20,  1966
Tired of life? Cool it
By MARY USSNER
Gabor and pal Actually J., you sure goofed this time.
Your 'Be Gay While You Decay Club'
(advertised in last week's Ubyssey) has had
it. Aye, Mate ! I'm one up on you. Immortality is here!
For only $15,000 you can have the deep
freeze treatment and live a second life (in
this world) — and it will probably be a lot
more comfortable than where you will otherwise go.
The "canned corpse" business is promoter
E. R. Hope's newest idea for life extension.
He wants your body.
Hope will sap your life blood, replace it
with a cooling agent and wrap you in aluminum. Then he will freeze you in a cyro-
capsule at minus 310 degrees fahrenheit.
A cyro-capsule is a long, round, steel tank
which preserves bodies not unlike the way
Egyptians buried their mummies — (but it
relies on a steady supply of liquid nitrogen
to keep you out cold.
In Phoenix, Ariz., where Hope is hopefully carrying out his experiments, one old
lady has already been stored for future
awakening. But they don't know yet whether
she will resurrect (the way they did back
in 33AD).
So far the only proof of success has been
the revival of a cat, but cats are known to
have nine lives anyway.
Hope obviously hasn't thought about other
problems, such as the population explosion.
That's enough to make your blood run cold.
Still, if you want to try it, Hope will ship
you his tank at the forementioned measly
cost. If you send me an invitation I will be
glad to sing his funeral march: "Freeze, wait,
reanimate."
Government scrounges
universities for staff
OTTAWA (CUP) — The
federal government is out
again this fall looking for
new brains to staff itself
with.
Two-man recruiting teams
will be at every Canadian
university campus screening
applicants for the 250 public
service jobs available next
spring.
They will put curious recent and prospective graduates through an examination designed to weed out
undesirables.
The exam consists of a 75-
minute preliminary test.
Those who pass this one
will demonstrate their knowledge of international political and economic affairs the
following night.
All government departments have labelled their
most senior positions as fair
targets for the future as a
new junior executive or foreign service officer.
Having determined ability,
both actual and potential,
the team of recruiters must
then sell a career in the public service to the candidate.
The government needs
graduates in arts, law, com
merce, physical sciences, engineering, biological, agricultural and forestry sciences.
It is prepared to fight with
private industry to obtain
them.
Government salaries, working conditions, health and
pension plans compare favorably with those of the
private employer.
Once the candidate has
met the required standards,
he will be placed in one of
the specially selected positions.
Following graduation, if
his job choice is not predetermined by academic
background or motivation,
he will choose the job most
suitable to himself and the
department employing  him.
Two general areas are
open to a new officer:
As foreign service officer,
he may serve either as a
trade commissioner with the
department of trade and
commerce, or in the diplomatic corps of the department of external affairs.
As a junior executive officer, he may be an economist, statistician, historian,
archivist,   management   ana-
CAMPUS FOOTWEAR
for YOUNG MEN
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228-8115
lyst, financial officer or any
one of a number of things.
His further educational
needs will be met by either
the training division of the
Civil Service Commission, or
his own departmental training unit. It will be supplemented by government-sponsored courses given at accredited universities.
STUDENTS !
UNIVERSITY
READING     LIST
TITLES
AVAILABLE!
(91   Granville SI.
OPEN DAILY
From 10 a.m.
to MIDNIGHT
(Noon to Midnight Sunday)
Out-of-towners:
Send for
catalogue.
Tel. MU 5-5814
GRAD PHOTOGRAPHS
NOW BEING TAKEN FOR '67 GRADS
MOBILE STUDIO  LOCATION:
STADIUM OCT. 20 to 31
ARTS STUDENTS ANYTIME
Hours — 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Don't Delay — No Appointment Needed — No Cost
(This Service is Covered by Your GRAD FEE)
CAMPBELL STUDIO
10th & Burrard 736-0261
I
A T TEN TION
COMMERCE '67
The Government of Canada offers unlimited opportunities for Commerce graduates, particularly those
with accounting.
COMPETITIVE SALARIES
COMPREHENSIVE BENEFITS
ASSISTANCE IN TRAINING
FOR ACCOUNTING DEGREES
Positions available with the Department of National
Revenue and Auditor General.
For further information
come to the Briefing Session
Noon, Wednesday 26 October
(refreshments will be served)
Room 214, Henry Angus Bldg., U.B.C.
t „
Can You Really Read
Effectively? ?
Effective Reading is the ability to vary both your reading rate and technique-
according to the style, purpose, importance and difficulty of the material
being  read.
In parts of our course we teach you how to read with a planned purpose,
how to remember what you have read, how to study for a test, how to read
technical materials, and how to read classics and conceptual material.
HERE IS SOME RESULTS OF SEVERAL [RECENT GRADUATES:
Name
Beg. Rate-%
End Rate—%
STEPHEN COHEN 413
PETER deVINK 354
JIM ELLIOT 353
SHIRLEY GRIFFITHS 352
80%
73%
54%
58%
1162
1705
2000
1322
Occupation
90% UBC student
78% UBC student
70% UBC student
83% student med. tech.
FREE    DEMONSTRATIONS
I
THURSDAY,   OCTOBER   20,   1966
GEORGIA HOTEL - BALLROOM
.5:00 & 8:00 p.m.
I
.    FRIDAY, OCTOBER 21, 1966 „_«.._« I
I    VANCOUVER HOTEL - SALON "A" 5:00 & 8:00 p.m.    |
I  1
How Registering For Winter Classes.
Last Series Before The Christmas Holidays.
EVELYN WOOD
READING DYNAMICS .J^U*
OF BC LTD
SUITE 210   549 HOWE STREET
VANCOUVER 1 BC    685-2374 Thursday, October 20,  1966
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 9
—derrek webb photo
GINA HAWRELAK gets giddy ride around campus
Wednesday as foresters display their choice for homecoming queen.
Board blesses Ralph,
extends leave of absence
Commerce prof Ralph Loffmark can social credit
as long as he likes with the UBC board of governors'
blessing.
Loffmark, minister of trade and commerce in the
Socred government, was granted an extension of his
leave of absence at the board's last meeting.
The extension is good until the next provincial election or until Loffmark loses his cabinet job.
The commerce prof topped the polls in the new
Vancouver South riding Sept. 12.
Boy-girl
coming
dorms
soon'
EDMONTON (CUP) — Mixed housing,facilities should
be introduced soon at the University of Alberta at
Edmonton.
Director of housing and food
services, Derek Bone, told a
meeting here recently completion of a new residence
building now ibeing planned will
bring co-educational housing to
U of A.
"An experimental period in
mixed housing could be put in
effect in the existing two
towers this year," he said.
He suggested the first step
toward mixed residences could
be a change in housing regulations which would permit male
and female students to mingle
in existing residence lounges.
Visiting' privileges are given
to residence dwellers on Sundays, he said "but a stepped-up
program is needed to ensure
the acceptanace of co-educational housing."
"Students are adults in every
MURDER
IN THE CATHEDRAL
BECKET
with
RICHARD  BURTON
PETER O'TOOLE
THURS., OCT.  20th
AUDLTORIUM
HORIZONS
Autumn   1966
Special   Issue
The Student
and Society
sense of the word and should
be treated as adults.
"Parents don't attempt this
type of segregation in their
homes," he said.
He was joined in his opinion
>by U of A's dean of women,
Mrs. J. Grant Sparling, who
said she welcomes experimentation with co-ed housing.
Women  pubsters
not  hopeless
There's hope for women
journalists  at UBC.
The Canadian Women's
Press Club is offering a $250
scholarship to women students interested in such a
career.
The award is open to all
women in second or third
year.
Undergraduate application
forms are available in Dean
Gage's office, and must be
completed by Nov. 10.
Single Copy
Yearly Sub.
.    .50
$2.00
HORIZONS
44 Stafford St.
Toronto 3, Ont.
SCIENCE and ENGINEERING GRADUATES
For:
• Production
• Engineering
• Research
MacMILLAN  BLOEDEL LIMITED
"Canada?s largest integrated Forest Products Company"
Invites you to discuss Career Opportunities in our Wood
Products, Logging, Pulp and  Paper and  Research
Group
Interviews will be held on campus October 31,
November 1, 2, 3, 4
For informatios and appointments please  see your
Student   Placement  Office
_yv <J-jiamond with L^onhden
ence
Special 10%  Discount to all UBC Students
on Diamond Engagement Rings
llltllWK S
DOWNTOWN
BRENTWOOD
PARK ROYAL
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
CANADIAN AMERICAN SEMINAR:
C.U.S. Committee "is receiving applications for the
Canadian American Seminar to be held at the University of Windsor, Nov. 2-4,_1966, on "An Independent
Canadian Foreign Policy: Fact or Fiction?" Applications must be in by Oct. 20th, Box 153, Brock. More
information is available from the CUS office, Brock
Extension 258.
COMPANY OF YOUNG CANADIANS:
Students interested in (a) programming or (to) recruiting for the Company of Young Canadians, and
interested in forming a local U.B.C. committee to
form a communications liaison with the national headquarters are asked to apply in writing (stating interest,
experience, faculty and year) to the A.M.S. Secretary,
Box 54. Brock Hall.
HIGH  SCHOOL VISITATION
COMMITTEE:
Students interested in participating in a joint U.B.C.-
S.F.U. student high school visitation committee are
nsked to apply in writing (stating interest, experience,
.acuity, and year) to the Secretary, Box 54, Brock
Hall. First and Second year students are particularly
encouraged to apply.
ASSISTANT PUBLIC RELATIONS
OFFICER:
Applications are being received for the position of
Assistant Public Relations Officer for the Alma Mater
Society. Qualifications is a belief in the value of active
student participation in university and community
affairs. Apply in writing to Box 54 or to Brock 210
for further information.
FINANCE COMMITTEE:
Grant Request Forms for conferences to be held during the first term, 1966-1967, will be accepted by the
Treasurer until 4:00 p.m., Thursday, October 27, 1966.
("Request Forms" are available from the Accountant,
Mrs. Hyslop, in the A.M.S. Office).
DISCIPLINE COMM.
NOTICE OF HEARING
Take notice that the Discipline Committee is investigating into the matter of an alleged abuse of rules of
conduct of the Games Room to wit:
1. Failure to pay for use of the tables, and
2. Disregard for the authority of the Games Room
Manager on Friday, October 14, 1966 at app.
5 p.m.
Persons desiring to give evidence in this matter are
directed to the hearing to toe held Oct. 21, 1966 in
Board Room, Brock 'Hall. Page  10
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 20,  1966
COUNCIL   JOLLIES
BY KRIS EMMOTT
Arts & science yo-yos
Lome Hudson says I'm a
high school journalist.
I'm a high school journalist because last week I said
he was one of the four councillors who does any work.
He says the others work
too, only I don't realize it.
Well, Lome baby, I do
realize it. I know that it
takes more time to run a
blood drive than to draw up
a motion, that a medical student can't put aside studying for agitating, that science president Flynn only
gets to three classes a week.
I realize there's a lot of behind - the - scenes committee
work that I never see.
But Lome baby, the purpose of this column is to tell
the world what the councillors do in council. To
quote Lome Hudson, there
are the administrators and
the representatives, and I
say those representatives
don't do much representing
while at meetings, nor do
they do much work.
Surely you noticed, Lome
'baby, that during your lucid, enthusiastic speech
about your own beloved
SUB Monday night, nurse
Alison Rice was teaching
the aforementioned Flynn
how to knit?
That animated conversations were going on at several points, and that some
councillors actually rose and
strolled about to chat with
friends?
Now when councillors do
pay attention, then the fun
begins. With all the personal
bickering that goes on, it's
no wonder that president
Braund gets nasty enough
about demanding order to
earn another disrespectful
nickname  —  Gavel  Peter.
Take last Monday's eligibility farce. The aforementioned Flynn hotly denies he
started it, pinning the whole
thing on law head John
Trueman. Well, Frank, you
know you did start it by
sailing into Don Wise's new
arts constitution. You know
you hate Wise because he
called you a yo-yo.
Wise hates sciencemen.
The feud between arts and
science is too funny not to
repeat. It seems that several
years ago the two were all
one faculty. They were divided in 1962 and given separate constitutions. Now
some sciencemen believe to
this day that the old arts-
and-science constitution was
never legally changed. So
sciencemen should be able
to run for the arts executive,   right?   And   they   did.
Don Wise called an election recently, but three of
the candidates turned out to
be sciencemen. Wise called
the election off. Around this
time The Ubyssey noted
that the arts executive consisted of Don Wise, and
wondered when he was going to call  an election.
Wise, outraged, blamed
the delay on those goddam
persistent sciencemen. He
was also bitter about last
year's arts general meeting,
which was disrupted by sciencemen.
Not only that, but right
after    that    meeting    last
LORNE HUDSON .
. . . shameful reflection
year's science president
Dave Williams moved that
it be investigated toy student court. Williams claimed that sciencemen should
have been allowed to vote,
and there was no quorum,
and a few other things. Wise
had it deferred several
times and finally thrown
out.
To be completely honest,
it was indeed law head John
Trueman who first suggested Wise might be ineligible.
Charlie Boylan moved to
send him to student court.
Peter Braund declared that
out of order, and Lome
Hudson moved to send him
to the eligibility committee.
Wise was hurt. He challenged anybody to get 100
artsmen to petition for his
resignation. To quote the
recent arts newsletter, "Our
consitution and my mandate
have been challenged unofficially by various ignorant
students for a variety of al-
terior (sic) motives, but I
have not yet been confronted by an artsman . . . . "
These ignorant students
were obviously stirred up
iby "... The Ubyssey's consistent slams at the arts U.S.
with specific reference to
myself . . . ", Wise said.
He said he might be sound-
Pre-Christmas Sale
Friday and Saturday Only
October 21st and 22nd
SLIMS SUITS
SKIRTS DRESSES
SWEATERS FORMALS
BLOUSES HOUSECOATS
MANY GIFT ITEMS
a good time to do your
Christmas Shopping
ALL SALES FINAL
JhSL
ctnh&kL
Ladies Wear
4511 West 10th Ave.
Open Friday till 9:00 p.m.
ing paranoiac when he accused council of picking on
him, and there are those
who say he's not far wrong.
Be that as it may, Wise
retaliated by challenging
everybody's eligibility, and
the brawl that ensued had
to be seen to be believed.
Flynn claimed Wise would
have to check all the society
constitutions, and Braund
put Flynn straight, and
Wise challenged the chair,
and the chair was upheld,
and Wise said "you're all
scared", and Hudson was
very short with Wise, and
at the end of it all Hudson
snarled, "This whole question is a shameful reflection
on this body and on the
seriousness we attach to our
laws  and constitutions."
Well, Lome, baby, it sure
is pretty shameful that council has to spend hours and
hours fussing about a gag
Dave Williams made last
year. But we all know better than to expect high
seriousness and hard work
out of playpen politicians
and  bored  representatives.
FLY CF-SEX
and other exciting airplanes
LEARN TO FLY
NOW
For —High Paying Summer Jobs
-Pleasure and Sport
—Airline Careers
KS S^&iVfcS^ffWXS'
Harrison Airways Ltd.
VANCOUVER AIRPORT
Phone 273-3131
Homecoming '66 Ball
to be held at the
ARMOURIES FIELD HOUSE
Vancouver Accents Kentish Steele and the Shantelles
Big Band Sounds of Phil Stansfelt Eric   Sandquisfs  Tenette
FEATURING "SANDY AND JEANIE" AND
THE CROWNING OF THE HOMECOMING '66 QUEEN
Tickets available at A.M.S. Office or phone 224-3242
RECORD SALE
Bfl-UfW
FAMOUS
Gvuue
LABEL
Our Entire $4.20 Group
NOW
ONLY
each
Thousands to Choose From
Here are a few examples:
• Bob   Dylan    • Blues   Prefect
• Elvis Presley • Simon & Garfunkel
• Jose Feliciano    • Josh White
• Peter, Paul & Mary    • Animals
All the Great Artists—Latest Hits—
Broadway Musicals—Rock and Roll—
Popular—Folk Music, Etc.
Hurry down — pick out your favourite record
and save. Choose from Pops, Classics, Showtunes.
All  are  now in stock at our Record  Department.
LOWEST PRICES IN TOWN
A*B SOUND
Open Friday Until 9 p.m.
571   GRANVILLE   (at Dunsmuir)
MU 2-4846 Thursday, October 20,  1966
THE    UBYSSEY
Page   11
HUNGRY SOLDIERS aren't too fussy about their meat, Calvin Cook explains to admiring
UBC home ec co-eds touring Chilliwack armed forces base. Girls got facts on career as
dietician in forces.
Administration censure
threatens student press
MONTREAL (CUP) — A
memo submitted to Loyola College president Rev. Patrick G.
Malone by the faculty adviser
to the board of publications
could result in curtailment of
Loyola's student press.
Submitted over a month ago,
the memo, termed "confidential" by its author, Father
J. E. O'Brien, is reported to recommend that all publishing
rights of student publications
at Loyola be taken from the
student iboard of publications
and be placed under the supervision of a sub-committee
of the college Committee on
Student Life.
Any "conclusions" contained within the memo were formulated by last August, Father
O'Brien was quoted as saying
last week.
"Since   last   March,   I   have
been completely bypassed by
the board," he said, "despite
the fact that I was its faculty
adviser. For this reason, it was
completely up to them, to use
their responsibilities properly.
It is obvious they have not used or applied in a responsible
manner the authority they
have," he said.
The memo — submitted three
weeks preceeding publication
of Loyola's controversial
"handbook" — indicates Father
O'Brien's opinions were based
on his experience with the
board prior to the handbook
affair.
The handbook, issued to
freshmen Sept. 16, contained
alleged personal attacks on
three college officials. Nine
hours after it hit the campus,
the students' council seized
more than 2,900 copies — an
unprecedented action at Loy-
Publications board
fights editor ban
HAMILTON (CUP)—The McMaster University student
board of publications has backed a student editor fighting
a ban against his participation in students' union activities.
John Hofsess,
ola.  Three  days  later, it  was
released for distribution.
editor of the
literary magazine Muse Quarterly and a senior editor for
the Silhouette, student newspaper at McMaster, has been
banned from union privileges
by the McMaster student council because he isn't a registered
student.
The publication board Monday rejected the council decision, saying that while it accepts the contention Hofsess
can't hold an executive position, it can't agree he should
be banned from all students'
union activities.
Two students who now hold
positions in McMasters students' union activities have
threatened to resign unless
Hofsess is re-instated.
A student petition objecting
to Hofsess's firing was expected to be in circulation Wednesday.
/
Classical Guitar
Instruction  in  Technique
and  Repertoire
W. Parker, 682-1096 or 8744547
Studio   at  2695   W.   Broadway
RE   3-4022
The House of Seagram
Interviews
will be conducted
NOVEMBER 7th
for students graduating  in
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
BACTERIOLOGY
BIOCHEMISTRY
CHEMISTRY
FOOD TECHNOLOGY
®
See The University Placement Service
for Information and  Interview Apoinlment
Six months or nothing
for students at expo
MONTREAL (CUP) — So you figured you had that
job at Expo 67 all lined up to start as soon as exams
are over ?    ,
Too bad. Expo officials in Montreal have decided
that only those students who can work for the entire
six-month run of the fair will get jobs.
(Expo 67 begins the last week of April.)
Officials said students not returning to university
in the fall will still be eligible.
Be Sure
It's The
&:
tvCR
See It!
Handcrafted Jewellery • Jade • Gems
• Crystals • Artifacts • Fossils
• Outstanding  Special   Exhibits
•  Dozens of beautiful Prizesl
• SEE Argillite Totem Poles and Exquisite Cameos being created by expert
carvers — the fabulous Star Sapphire Necklace — the vibrant colours in
Fluorescent Rocks!!
IT'S FASCINATING, BEAUTIFUL AND EDUCATIONALI
the B.C. GEM SHOW
FOOD BLDG.,
Friday, Oct. 21st
6:30 p.m. - 11 p.m.
DOOR PRIZES!
"The Show of the Rockhounds"
P.N.E. GROUNDS,
Saturday, Oct. 22nd
10 a.m. - 11 p.m.
Adults - $1.00
VANCOUVER
Sunday, Oct. 23rd
10 a.m. -8 p.m.
Children (6-16) - 25c
l«K?y giving the
impression   that she
is a paraxon of
affluents*.
J.&ppy ■
difference £etween_a
jxtnuqK and a
parody.
happy lappy clasps
coins closely and
Mntemjrfaies tbe Subtle
difference between a
i and pecuniosiiy.
MY BANK'
TO 3 MUUOfTAUO CHE
camapiAhs cocm7iA<f joke
ttiiS is lap.rtefcfe.
lapinefcte is a youtu5
and frisky french0
type o£ bunny who
deals with the
c&mtni$ branch o£
the batik, of
iriontreal.
this is lapmefcfre,
before diecfcmg iter
hanJfo balanced
Wii is lapinette.
Who has siiddeniy
learned tlie tnea.nin&
o£ the word Mr iff. u
this is laj>metb&,
-Who lias j as t decided
that" bailie managers
scire basically kind
of 'kind, yott see, he
advised her sfoowk
studsnir loons. truth is,
our b&nk martagjers
can't stand to near
araiJbiTr ctt*y.
all students- evert
r&bUHa - qualify.
■Why nob-
Jicp over S
we'll mind your
inaney for you if?
you can't stay.
B°-fm
a tttumpiiil fiod place* \o bznkon.     I
cattijntsbank branch
in \\t adminighralion, building Page 12
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 20, 1966
'TWEEN CLASSES
Anglicans congregate
ANGLICAN  CHAPLAINCY
Meeting of Anglican students
and faculty to discuss future of
chaplaincy, noon, Friday, Hen-
nings 304.
VCF
Masquerade and skating
party at Thunderbird arena
7:30-9:30 Monday night, fol-
. lowed by food and songs at
International House.
CREATIVE WRITING
Poetry  reading  by Greydon
Moore   noon,   Friday,   Angus
104.
NEWMAN CLUB
Important meeting for children's   Christmas  party   noon
Friday, St. Marks.
CAMPUS CAVALIERS
Square dancing noon today,
hut L-5, near field house.
AUS
Applications now being  received for chairman,  committee members for new arts curriculum reform, BE 359.
PRE-LAW SOCIETY
First general meeting Thursday noon, Bu. 223. New members welcome.
WOMEN'S  BIG  BLOCK
Meeting noon Friday, women's gym.
WUS
Committee   meeting   noon
Monday, Bu. 226A.
FULL GOSPEL
Meeting noon today for those
WIMfl
SATURDAY
NIGHT
INDOOR
AUTO RACE
FOREIGN STOCKS
A cross between  stock car
racing  and a  demolition
derby.
AGRODOME
Time trials 7:30 - Races 8:30
Adult $2.00, Student $1.25
Child  under  12  FREE with
Adults
IMAM
Some things
You DESIRE . . .
Some You Need!
And one of these is education. Imperatively! Once it
was a prerequisite of success. Now you need it just
to get by! YOU know this.
Consult us. Vancouver's
first tutoring college. (Still
here because we get results). To third year University — Our staff is fully
qualified. Success rate?
Above 90 per cent pass in
subjects tutored.
Universal Tutoring
College
(Vancouver) Ltd.
571 Howe Street
683-8464
interested in Wayfarer, Angus
417.
VCF
Films of VCF Southeast Asia
trip   5   p.m.   tonight,   Mildred
Brock, food.
CIASP
Opportunity to participate in
community     development    in
Mexico, today, noon, Bu. 102.
SCIENCE U.S.
A placement officer will
speak on grad employment,
Friday, noon, Chem. 200.
VOC
Short-long    hike    meeting,
noon, today, Angus 104.
FILMSOC
Becket with Richard Burton
and Peter O'Toole, today noon,
3:30, 6 p.m. and 9 p.m. 50
cents, auditorium.
VIET NAM COMMITTEE
Meeting noon today, Bu. 212.
CHRISTIAN   SCIENCE
Testimony meeting Friday,
Hut 0-12.
'BOTANY* 500*
WWl bj DAROFF
Get that "leaned-on" feeling ... in Natural Gentleman
Sport Coats and Slacks. You're sporting soft shoulders.
Subtle shades in custom-type luxury fabrics. And the
exclusive Daroff slim silhouette that's the new tradition
for today.
Wear them. Compare them. Even to higher-priced clothes.
See what the Daroff Personal Touch can do for you.
Sports Coats from 49.50.
DISTINCTIVE MEN'S
STORES
4445 West 10th Avenue
(East of Sasamat)
2901 West Boardway
(at Mackenzie)
0*
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, $.75—3 days, $2.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Publications Office: Brock Hall.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost & Found
11
LOST RAINCOAT AND WALLET
outside BI. 3001. Phone B. Bale,
738-0550.
WILL PERSON WHO TOOK UM-
brella by mistake (hah!) return
to   Aud.   entrance   Friday   10:30.
LOST — BLACK BRIEFCASE IN
Gym parking lot Oct. 15. Finder
please   phone   939-0102   urgent.
LOST—GREEN LEATHER PURSE
containing $10. Fri. Oct. 11. Phone
Stephane   736-6907.	
SCHAFFER        FOUNTAIN        PEN
corner    Westbrook    on    Monday,
Oct.   17.   Apply  Publications  Office.
LOST — GIRL'S WATCH WITH
brown strap. Reward. Phone
Kathie  987-7739.	
FOUND
The    ideal    candidate    for    '66
Homecoming   Queen
Miss  Fort  Camp  Susan  Wientsis
LOST — GOLD BRAIDED RING.
Size 4 in Freddie Wood or Buchanan.  224-9872.  Andrea Rose.	
FOUND — MAN'S WRIST WATCH
in C lot Mon. A.M. 731-8832 after
10 p.m.
Coming Dances
12A
HOMECOMING '66 BALL, SAT.,
Oct. 22. Tickets on sale now at
AMS Office, $3.76 per couple,
Armouries  &  Fieldhouse.	
DANCE TO THE EXCITING NEW
sound of the brave new world at
The Black Cat Ball, Saturday,
October 29 (the Armory. 8:30 to
12:30. Admission $1.25 per person.
Special  Notices
13
WHY PAT HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance rates? If you are over 20
and have a good driving history
you quailify for our good driving
ates.  Phone  Ted Elliott,  224-6707
GEOLOGY MUSEUM — F&G-116
open Monday-Friday 12.30-1.30.
Students Faculty and Staff Welcome. 	
PIZZA PATIO CONTINUES TO
expand, specializing in Pizza
take-out and delivery. Pizza Patio's normal policy of making
part-time employment available
to those students over 21 with
clean drivers' licences to work
one or two evenings a week is
again in effect. Openings are
available at any one of their six
locations. For further information contact 681-2822, 10-4. P.S.—
For   campus   delivery,   736-9422.
HEY ! !  !
It's New. It's Camp. Vote Marcia
Miss     A.T.C.     for     Homecoming
Queen.	
STEVESTON HOMECOMING
Dance Fri., Oct. 21. 8:30-11:30 p.m.
in  the gym.  All  Steveston Grads
are  welcome.	
FOR THE BEST HOMECOMING
Queen   ever,    vote   for
SUSAN  WIENTJIS
Miss Fort Camp	
THIS IS A GROWING BUSINESS,
you grow it and we'll cut it!
Campus Barber Shop. 153 Brock.
SHADES OF HUXLEY! THE
B.N.W. means brave new world.
Hear them October 29 in the
Armouries.
BLABNIGHT AT THE ADVANCE
Mattress Coffee House (10th and
Alma) Make your own harangue
or comedy on stage tonight and
every Thursday.
Transportation
14
RIDE WANTED:   14th  AND ALMA
8:30 Mon. to Sat. Phone 224-3692.
WANTED DRIVER — (1 DAY) OR
rider for N. Van. Upper Lonsdale
Carpool.   YU  8-4418.
Wanted
15
WANTED !  !  !
Votes for Marcia, Miss A.T.C.  for
Homecoming Queen.	
WANTED
Votes  for  SUSAN  WIENTJIS  for
'66 Homecoming Queen
AUTOMOTIVE   ft  MARINE
Automobiles For Sale * 21
FOR SALE — NICE BODY — '56
Chev. — $350 or highest offer.
Phone  731-8497  after  6.	
1959 VOLVO, VERY GOOD CON-
dition, radio, six good tires (2
snow*).   327-3584  after  6 — Ron.
1957 PLYMOUTH, V8, AUTOMATIC
transmission,   winter  tires,  best  offer, call Ken at 224-7230 after 5:00
58-TR3 GOOD SHAPE, NEW. PAINT
runs good, best cash offer. Phone
Martin at  733-5286.
CAR FOR SALE "55 PLYMOUTH
New battery etc. Needs adjust-
ments. Must sell 228-8425 evenings.
58 AUSTIN HEALEY.  PHONE 731-
0243.  Radio,  W.W.  Highest offer.
53   CHEV.   RUNNING ORDER.   $50.
cash. 733-2687 after 4 p.m.
Automobiles for Hire
24
Motorcycles
27
'66 YAMAHA 80-CC. 3,200 MI.
Good condition. $250 or offer.
327-5056.
BUSINESS  SERVICES
Scandals
39A
MURDER IN THE CATHEDRAL.
See it done by Richard Burton
and Peter O'Toole today in the
Auditorium. 12:30-3:30, 6-9 p.m. 50c
THE
NEW
BRAVE
WORLD
SOON!
Typewriters ft Repairs
42
Typing
43
SPEEDY SHORTHAND TYPIST
available at reasonable rates. West
End. Sorry, no pick, no car. Phone
685-3647.
TYPING,    ESSAY    AND    THESIS.
Call Joan 228-8384.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
FREE PRIVATE ROOM AND
bathroom for mature female student in exchange for light household duties. Also some remuneration — 224-5253.
"BECKET"—THE FILM VEKSIOK
of the play by Jean Anouilh. Today
Auditorium. 12:30, 3:30, 6 p.m.,
9 p.m. 60c.
INSTRUCTION —
SCHOOLS
Auditions
61
Instruction-Tutoring
64
ENGLISH, FRENCH, HISTORY
lessons by tutor, B.A., M.A.,
B.L.S. Also pronunciation lessons in French, Spanish, German, Russian, qualified tutors.
736-6923.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
BIRD CALLS—the most useful book
on the campus. Student telephone
directory available latter part of
October. Limited Number. Order
now, only 75 cents from Phrateres
or publications office, Brock Hall.
FOR SALE: SEVERAL PROFES-
sionally completed manuscripts —
Authors Agency, 767 Kingsway,
TR  6-6362. 	
STARVING STUDENT MUST SAC-
rifice new black vinyl raincoat for
food money. Cut price. Call Paula
228-8929.  Leave  phone number.
MUST SELL BASS GUITAR AND
30 watt bass amp. Like new. Asking $355.00. Phone 738-6730 after 6.
RENTALS  ft REAL  ESTATE
Rooms
81
ROOM FOR EVERYONE TO SEE
"Beckett' today in the Auditorium
12:30,   3:30,   6 p.m.,  9  p.m.   today.
60c. 	
GOOD ROOM NEAR GATES. MUST
be non-drinker, non-smoker. Ph.
224-3096.
LARGE BEDROOM WITH BATH
near UBC gates for one student.
Meals optional. Phone 224-4202.
BEDROOM AVAILABLE FOR Women student In apartment near
University. Telephone after 6 p.m.
224-4674.
Room ft Board
ROOM AN DBOARD ON CAMPUS.
Male. Five minutes from Classes.
Phone   Al.   224-9660.
Furn. Houses ft Apts.
83
SENIOR STUDENT HAS SUITE
wants to share (male) RE 1-4219
between 5  &  7.
LIGHT - HOUSEKEEPING BASE-
ment room; toilet shower; fridge;
male student; non-drinker. 224-
6908.	
WANTED — SR. FEMALE STU-
dent, quiet non-smoker, to share
suite with two of same. Granville
and Matthews. 731-8832 after 10
p.m..   Car-pool.
CLASSIFIED
BUY -  SELl -  RENT
WITH
UBYSSEY
\

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