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The Ubyssey Oct 18, 1985

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Array THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXVIII, No. 12
Vancouver, B.C. Friday, October 18,1985
228-2301
Enrolment ups and clowns tax UBC
By DAVE PASIN
Total enrolment in the faculty of
arts has jumped 22 per cent from
last year while overall UBC enrolment has decreased 2.6 per cent.
Arts dean Robert Will said the increase in arts enrolment can be attributed to more first year students
entering the faculty.
"Unfortunately the increase was
largely unexpected," he said. "We
are finding it very difficult to maintain adequate service and accommodate all the students, however,
we have managed to do so," he
said.
Will said decreased funding has
frozen staff recruitment for over
two years and the arts department is
suffering from the lack of recruitment, he said.
"What we have now is an unacceptable situation where we are
making increasing use of seasonal
and part-time faculty," he said.
"This situation puts an undue increased strain on the full-time faculty and staff."
Class sizes have once again increased and the number and
availability of teaching assistants
and support services have dropped
said Will.
"The methods and modes of
teaching have had to change as a
result of the situation and we have
had to adapt to it, not necessarily
for the better," he added.
Education undergraduate studies
dean Douglas McKie said Thursday
budget cuts have also adversely affected the education faculty.
"Decreased budgets, enrolment
restrictions and in some cases enrolment increases are all affecting
morale which is at an all time low
and is adversely affecting the faculty and staff much to the detriment
of the university," he said.
The education faculty which has
had three programs eliminated and
nine faculty members layed off this
year due to budget cuts has seen a
total enrolment drop of 9.75 per
cent of 1,110. McKie attributed the
decrease to the elimination of first
year education this year.
By tightening graduate study entrance requirements, eliminating
the first year programmed other
education programs, "the department has been able to maintain
class sizes and services to students
at an acceptable level," said McKie.
Faculty of commerce enrolment
was "less than expected" said
Catherine Vertesi, acting director of
commerce undergraduate programs.
She said there was an increase in
the number of "no shows" this year
for first year enrolment. Over 400
notices of acceptance were sent out
but only 360 actually registered
where in the past about 375 would
show up, she said.
Total enrolment is 1,600, slightly
down from last year's 1,617.
"There is extreme pressure in upper level specialty courses such as
marketing and finance," she said.
Vertesi said elective courses for
third and fourth year students have
been "severely restricted". These
restrictions are limiting their educational backgrounds and could also
limit their futures in the job market,
she added.
Forestry, the smallest faculty on
campus, has slipped in enrolment
levels. Total enrolment is 265
students, 48 of them from first
year.
"Enrolment has been dropping
over the last five years but has probably now bottomed out," said
dean Robert Kennedy.
He added that the recession and
the "doom and gloom" attitude of
the media have both contributed to
the dropping forestry enrolment.
Budget passed
GRACEFULLY OBEDIENT .   .   .   Intimidated UBC under-graduates rehearse to  pay homage to inspecting
UBC Governors in order to avoid further tution raises and program cuts.
UBC's $212 million budget was
finally ratified at a board of governors meeting Thursday.
The university had been operating
without an approved budget since
the April 1 start of the fiscal year.
The $3.2 million shortfall at the
beginning of September has been
met through one time cash savings
and the removal of an inflation provision for non salary expenditures
in the budget such as equipment
and library books, said Bruce
Gellatly, UBC financial and administration vice-president.
The removal of the inflation pro-
New athletic council to supervise UBC sports
By STEPHEN WISENTHAL
UBC's board of governors approved a new university athletic
council Thursday to administer all
sports activities on campus.
The council of five AMS appointed students, five board of
governors approved university appointees, four alumni (two appointed by the AMS; two by the
university) and the director of
sports services will administer a $2.5
million athletic budget including
over $1 million in direct levies from
students.
The budget includes the $32 per
student activity fee imposed by the
board last spring, the $7 per student
in athletic fees and the $4.50 per
student intramural fee. The administration will contribute
$525,000 this year to the budget
with no guarantee for future years.
The council will be in charge of
interuniversity and intramural
sports, Recreation UBC and sports
services.
"I like the terms of reference of
the committee," said student board
member Don Holubitsky, who
helped the AMS negotiate the structure.
Holubitsky said it is good the
council will bring together administration of all sports activities
under one body, providing a
"forum for student and community
input in the budget process."
He added he likes the possibility
for the council to save budget
surpluses for future capital projects.
"What I don't like is the absence
of a firm committment from the
university in the form of providing
a fixed block sum of money
(guaranteed for future years)," he
said. The-$32 fee was imposed by
the administration whose contribution to athletics has fallen 40
per cent over two years, he said.
AMS president Glenna Chestnutt
said she is glad "at least in principal
they said they would keep their
committment to athletic fees" but
she is concerned about funding.
"Student  council  will  have  to
decide if they want to appoint people to the committee without an
agreement on the guaranteed half
million (for athletics from the
university)," she said.
UBC interim academic vice president Daniel Birch said the AMS has
played a very important role in
planning the council, adding the
board broke with precedent in imposing the $32 fee without a student
referendum.
"Activities in these areas have
become quite fragmented in their
administration. It became clear it
would be very advantageous to have
everything together," he said.
UBC interim administration
president Robert Smith said the administration would try to maintain
athletics funding levels.
"It is not our intention that the
subsidy from the operating grant be
further reduced as it was substantially reduced this year," he said.
Student council decided by a narrow margin last summer not to sue
the university for unilaterally imposing the $32 athletic fee.
vision will save $900,000 and the
university has already accrued one
time savings of $2.4 million in
salaries for positions unfilled
because of the hiring freeze, he
'said, adding a further $625,000 in
salaries won't have to be spent until
next budget year.
The approved budget allows for
the two per cent net salary increase
the administration is offering faculty but Gellatly said he is concerned
the lack of an inflation provision
for non salary expenses will mean a
decrease in purchasing power.
He said the one time sayings will
balance the budget for this year but
a structural deficit of $3.2 million
still remains.
"It leaves us in a significant bind
for next year," he said.
He said the university's provincial government grant has been cut
$13.2 million or 7.3 per cent in the
past three years.
The universities council of B.C. is
holding $940,000 in a reserve fund.
The reserve remains from a $3.4
million special university projects
fund, which UBC didn't get any of,
he said.
If the university got money from
that fund they could at least provide
an inflation allowance, there could
at least be a provision for inflation
in non-salary expenditures, he said.
New $9.7 million Acadia housing project approved
By STEPHEN WISENTHAL
UBC's board of governors approved a $9.7
million, 158 unit Acadia family housing project
at their meeting Thursday.
The project, to the Southeast of campus, will
eliminate thirteen 1940's vintage huts now used
for family housing and 20 per cent of UBC's
daycare capacity.
The university will seek provincial government approval and then call tenders on the project which will include 15 one bedroom and
study units, 117 two bedroom and study units,
and 26 four bedroom units.
"If construction started early in the new year
occupancy could start in the next academic
year," said Neil Risebrough, UBC student services vice-president.
He added the cost per square foot would be
similar to Richmond area prices.
Academic vice president Daniel Birch said
childcare needs should be recognized in family
housing projects.
"As a university each time we start a project
which will require daycare we should allow for
it," he said, adding daycare for the new Acadia
project could be incorporated in the plan for
complete replacement of existing daycare
facilities.
Risebrough said "if student rents are going to
pay for construction (of daycare) then it should
be student priority daycare." He added the
university would be sure to find some accomada-
tion to hold the Acadia daycare, which will be
demolished, until new facilities are built.
*    *    *
Bruce Gellatly, UBC financial and administration vice-president, told the board
lighting in the recently paved B-lot may not be
ready until Nov. 21.
The poles are delivered now but the fixtures
won't arrive until Nov. 7. A force of three
security guards will patrol B-lot from 7 to 12
p.m. with the $7700 cost being charged to the
parking office, he said.
'We must do something to safeguard our
students using these lots," he said.
Gellatly also said UBC's fee revenue would be
up about $200,000 this year.
He added the TRIUMF nuclear particle
research facility on campus is considering
becoming separately incorporated from UBC.
It is a $33 million per year institution with 350
to 400 employees, he said, adding TRIUMF's
federally funded employees are better paid than
UBC's employees, creating some problems.
Birch said many faculty members use the
facility for their research.
After the athletic council proposal passed, a
number of spectators left the board room and
board chair William Sauder said "we've managed to bore the press right out of the room."
"That's the best place to have them," said
government appointed board member Peter
Brown. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 18, 1985
Vancouver CECs face cuts
By DEBBIE LO
A recent federal government announcement to cut funding for
Canada employment centres on
campus by 30 per cent after April 1,
1986, has caught local CEC supervisors unprepared.
"I'm not sure how reductions
will be made," said UBC CEC
manager Pat Brand.
He said the cuts could mean
reductions in campus CEC staff, or
closing the office for a number of
months.
Brand said the campus CEC provides "a necessary service and function," and offers students and
employers a year round service,
unlike the employment centres for
students set up annually for the
summer months.
"The services we provide would
have to be picked up from
somebody else, (if the campus centre was closed)" he said, adding it
would be costly for employers to do
their own legwork and the university would have to provide the service.
The UBC CEC currently handles
company recruitments, direct
listings, and finds temporary and
permanent employment for
graduate and under graduate
students and coordinates the work-
study program.
During the 1984-85 year 3,138
students were placed and Brand
said the number of placements have
steadily increased "every year since
1982".
Michael Cardinal, acting
manager of professional and
technical CECs, who supervises the
three branches in Vancouver said
the announcement will not affect
this year's operations.
"Right now we don't know the
entire picture," he said.
Cardinal said the campus centres
offer employers a specialized service
by streamlining their hiring process.
"Campus centres deal with a
clientele that others don't deal
with," he said.
The three centres, which have
provided services to students at
UBC for 8 years, SFU for 20 years
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and BCIT for 15 years have all
steadily "slowly" increased in student placements over the past three
years, he said. /
National director of campus .*
CECs Fergus Thomson has said
deputy prime minister Erik
Neilson's Ministerial task force on
programs review ordered the cuts in
May. The 1985 report said campus
CECs were "seen as duplicating
and to some extent competing with
services offered by regular employment centres."
UBC
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The Sally Ann experiments with
battered women shelter story in the
October 16 edition of The Ubyssey
incorrectly reported the women
presently occupying transition
house are the previous workers in
Transition house. The workers have
not and have never been occupying
the house. The "Women's house
saving action ad hoc group of over
100 women is presently occupying
the house.
The Ubyssey reporter has had
their right arm cut off as penalty.
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Works by LAWREN HARRIS,
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RECEPTION: Mon., Oct. 21: 7-10 p.m.
GALLERY HOURS: Mon.-Fri. 10-4 p.m.
SUB MAIN CONCOURSE Friday, October 18, 1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Nice Slice of Live is Hardly Satisfying
By RONALD STEWART
Dim Sum (a little bit of heart) is a
nice movie. It has a nice story, a
nice message, and nice characters.
It's hard to say anything not nice
about it. However, like most really
nice things, the film turns out unsatisfying and banal. I'm not being
very nice, am I?
The film follows a brief period in
the life of a Chinese-American
family. The widowed mother (Kim
Chew) wants her daughter
Geraldine (Laureen Chew) to get
married soon. However, Geraldine
feels obliged to look after mom
before marrying.
Director Wayne Wang counters
this familiar plot with the film's two
strengths: well-developed
characters and an insightful portrayal of Chinese culture in
America.
The characters avoid the usual
Chinese stereotypes; no crimelords,
spastic martial arts experts, dragon
ladies, or wise old men here. These
are real people with real, almost
universal problems. Neither mother
nor daughter can find a solution in
either culture. At the same time,
their dilemma — while cliched —
FOUR CHARACTERS IN search of . . . The Bat!
Whodunit The Bat is a ball
By LISE MAGEE
Are you one of those poor,
tormented souls who, at an obnoxiously wee hour of the morning,
distractedly flips the dial of your
television set to a low-budget
murder mystery and then can not go
to bed until the culprit is incarcerated and the clues pieced
together? Have you ever found
yourself hopelessly preoccupied
with an Agatha Christie novel right
in the middle of your exam
schedule?
The Bat
at Studio 58 Langara College
directed by Kathryn Shaw
until November 10th
No doubt about it, there is
something irresistible about "a genuine, blood-curdling, hair-raising
thriller" and Studio 58's latest production 'The Bat' is a fine example
of the genre.
The action takes place in the
1920's on a Long- Island estate
recently rented for the summer to
an old spinster aunt, Miss Cornelia
van Gorder. To her fascination,
and her maid's consternation,
strange things begin to happen:
rocks with threatening notes attached crash through windows, doors
close by themselves and mysterious
men are thought to lurk in stairwells
and around the grounds. Either the
place is haunted or there is
somebody who doesn't want them
to be there.
Combined with the recent robbery of the Union Bank which the
owner of the house just happened
to be the president of (he has also
curiously and conveniently died just
before the robbing of the bank)
makes for a complicated plot appropriately riddled with clues, contrivance and a multitude of possible
motives. And then there is the
notorious and cunning criminal The
Bat lurking in the shadows.
Although the story is hardly
believable it is certainly enthralling
if only because you too want to
discover "whodunit"!
The acting is painfully overdone
but then of course that is a
trademark of this particular brand
of melodrama. Beatrice Zeilinger as
Miss van Gorder is suitable
persnickety as the amateur sleuth
spinster and Roman Podhara as Dr.
Wells (the doctor/coroner whose
integrity becomes somewhat questionable) is capable of amazing contortions of his anatomy. Mike
Stack as Reginald Beresford the
pretentious, effiminate, rich-boy-
next-door is "weally wiotous".
David Jarvis is probably guilty of a
little upstaging with his hunchback,
Peter Lorrie-Munster-esque interpretation of Billy the butler
(goodness knows the notorious
reputation of butlers in these stories
makes you highly suspicious of him
from the offset). Besides all that he
has one great grotesque staring eye!
Ted Cole is (or is he?) squeaky clean
as the unjustly accused Brooks, the
ail-American boy with silk socks
and Rod Nagel is wonderfully
sleazy as Richard Fleming.
Technically the production is
noteworthy. The set (designed by
Paul Williams) and the costumes
(designed by Pam Johnson) are
evocative of the era and, like the acting, appropriately overdone in a
cartoon-like fashion. The organ
music, the thunder and lightening,
the bats, the flickering lights, and
the black outs all lend an eerie,
mysterious sense to the production.
Director Kathryn Shaw has a huge
sense of the melodramatic.
The Bat is great fun and what
makes it even more appealing is a
cunning bit of audience participation. The programmes contain a
ballot on which one writes one's
guess as to "whodunit." At the intermission after the second act it is
time to cast your vote and the foyer
hums with conversation — "How
could she have done it? She was in
the  room."   "Who  is  the  other
obvious." "It must be her, she's the
least likely of all." "He's so obvious, of course its him". "Oh quit
squabbling the butler always does
it." "Pshaw."
Go   ahead   and   indulge   your
snooping sensibilities and discover
the length and breadth of your deviant imagination. And, if it's any
consolation, I didn't guess
whodunit . . . but it was great fun
trying just the same.
appeals to audiences of any culture.
Through thorough characterization, the film makes an appealing
statement about Chinese in
America. First, they are like anyone
else; they have problems and
predicaments like WASP's, Germans, or blacks. Second, they are
also different; they have a culture
that stresses the importance of their
own family, duty, and tradition.
The film also makes it clear that
the problems and the culture are
very closely related — especially
when American culture provides a
contradictory alternative.
Dim Sum (a little bit of heart)
directed by Wayne Wang
Royal Centre
In other words, the film is very
nice. But it has problems.
Terrel Seltzer's screenplay tells a
slice-of-life story — low-key and
subtle. In fact, the story is so subtle
that I didn't know what it was until
the second half of the movie. The
story moves slowly and follows
many diverse elements. Some of
them, like Geraldine's siblings, are
completely irrelevant. Slice-of-life
stories need something to invoke interest; this story doesn't have it.
Even though the sympathetic
characters keep your attention, for
long periods of the movie nothing
happens. The pace slows down and
your interest peters out. The film
doesn't even have a clear resolution
— not that I have anything against
ambiguous endings, but this one is
confusing rather than thought-
provoking.
Despite a sincere effort, director
Wang fails to breathe life into a
hackneyed plot. Dim Sum is interesting, but never enthralling or
exciting. Arguing that the movie is
just a "little film" is no excuse; little films can captivate and entrance
(go see The Gods Must Be Crazy if
you don't believe me).
In the end, Dim Sum is a lot like
most university classes: it's OK, but
you'd really rather be watching
something else.
unknown
couldn't
person.'
be    him.
"No,    it
He's   too
Preachy farce still important
By MICHAEL GROBERMAN
George Bernard Shaw's wit and intelligence is still
refreshing and topical today. His war satire Anns
and the Man written only a hundred years ago has
much to say to our generation.
Arms and the Man
by George Bernard Shaw
at the Arts Club Granville Island
Bluntschli (Ric Reid), a Swiss mercenary escaping
the final Bulgarian assault takes refuge in the
bedroom of Raina (Denyse Wilson), a young
Bulgarian lady whose fiance Sergius (Jon Bryden) is,
ironically, the triumphant leader of this final assault.
Raina falls secretly in love with Bluntschli and aids
his safe escape from Bulgaria. When he returns mon-
ths later and encounters Raina's father, Major
Petkoff (Bernard Cuffling), farcical chaos ensues.
Ric Reid oozes cool intellectual arrogance in the
role of Bluntschli. His glib remarks are delivered with
an enviable casual disinterest in the lives of the
earnest romantics who surround him. Reid's difficulty lies in his inability to resolve the apparent anomoly
of his character's being an intellectual observer and a
mercenary of fifteen years. He quite ignores the rugged, soldier side of Bluntschli and adopts an air of
gentleness that simply does not work in places.
Denyse Wilson as Raina is delightfully romantic,
pursing and pouting as she challenges Bluntschli's
audacious assertions that her Sergius is anything less
than god-like: "I don't believe the first man is a
coward, I know he is a hero."
Jon Bryden is good as the swaggering, condescending Sergius. He is Shaw*s Rambo: "Shall I kill
myself like a man, or live and pretend to laugh at
myself?"
The supporting cast sparkles. Jon Brydert's buf-
foonish Major Petkoff, Donna White's doting,
secretly clever Catherine Petkoff, and the slapstick of
Christopher Gaze and Kim Horsman as the family's
servants are all convincing.
The cast may be good, but the production has
serious problems. It is clever, witty, funny for the
first half, preachy and monotonous for the second
half. Ric Reid's jests and remarks are entertaining
and intelligent, but 20 consecutive, glib, insightful,
perfectly timed and delivered witticisms grow boring
and predictable. The' problem is too pervasive to
blame it on Reid alone.
Shaw is partly to blame for the monotony of acts
two and three. He never relaxes the didacticism and
the audience becomes attuned to his style and can anticipate his next off-the-cuff remark. But his
weakness in the script presents the director with a
challenge.
Director Mario Crudo approaches Shaw with such,
an anti-intellectual attitude that he refuses to notice
the weakness, let alone do anything about it. The
play cannot stand as a farce. The farcical humour is
passable, but Shaw is only adopting the genre as a
vehicle for his satire. He does not bring nearly
enough complexity to the developing chaos.
Crudo refuses to see this play as primarily satirical,
perhaps out of deference to what he assumes to be a
generally stupid, farce-loving public. So he sits on the
fence, ignoring the powerful satire but producing little in the way of rea) theatrical farce.
As a result, the performances are bright but stang-
nant. After act one we have seen all that these
characters can or will do. Director Crudo has created
cartoon characters when he should be striving for
character variation.
The sets by Ted Roberts are massive and impressive. The full stage is enveloped by each of the
three sets. Raina's bedroom is fully and carefully furnished in the style of the uncultured aristocrat. Shaw
calls it "half rich Bulgarian, half cheap Viennese".
Mauves, purples, and dirty pinks create the tone. The
final scene in the library has a back window that
looks out on a full watt-size mountain mural. The effect is striking.
This play has important things to say to its modern
audience, and for the most part it is presented with
wit and intelligence. Where this production fails, the
brilliance of Shaw's banter offers partial compensation. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 18, 1985
\t*nrr rs imiel
rt sfCLi- Th*/
*.»»'lMSTli.fKt*.'
"OH, OuTT YOUR SNIVELLING!   YOU KNEW YOU'D HAVE TO
PAY BACK YOUR STUDENT LOAN WHEN YOU GOT fT!"
Fairly stuck
Heard about the latest Expo screw-up?
Now they're giving corporate bigwigs
the breaks (as if they weren't doing so all
along). For an extra $50, your average
financial fatcat can buy a special pass. It
will enable him/her to break into the front
of most line-ups at Expo, allowing him to
avoid the common rabble (read: you and
me).
Won't it be wonderful to stand in line
for hours to see an exhibit (not uncommon at these affairs) only to have an aging yuppie cut in front of you, laugh in
your face, and spit on your shoes? (read:
Nikes).
The entire event has been rife with
these sorts of callous decisions. First, the
government spent millions of bucks on
the self-indulgent mess while people lined
up at food banks (when will the rich be
butting into those line-ups?). Then came
the decision (rescinded, bless their little
hearts) to ban bagged lunches. Then,
thanks to this year's Japanese Expo,
came the realization that the event would
probably lose money. Huge gobs of it.
Let's fact it: Expo is going to lose
money and we will inevitably end up paying for it with higher taxes, less money for
vital services such as education and
longer food bank line ups.
The problem is, if we avoid Expo or encourage others to, we end up with a
mega-defecit. But if we go, the SoCreds
might start thinking they were right all
along. We end up paying either way.
So we're stuck with the damn thing.
Maybe in the next election those of us
who didn't have the extra $50 will stick it
to the SoCreds.
Israel and U.S. uphold liberty and democracy
1 am astounded by Dave Chapman's lack of understanding of
mideast history and politics. Where
were his "human ethics" when
these "great liberators of the
modern free world" (incidentally in
the pay of the Soviet Union) namely
the PLO, were massacring children
by blowing up school buses and the
like, only a short time ago.
Typical of many of his ilk, he
delights in likening the very
democratic, very liberal country of
Israel to the bloodstained regime of
Herr Hitler. Israel is no less
democratic than the countries of
our western world and as such is included among them.
All of the many wars the Israeli
people have had to fight in and, in-
cidently, die in since the formation
of Israel in 1948 have been started
by the Arab states on three sides of
hostile borders. The PLO have been
using these countries as home bases
for ages. Most recently, Lebanon,
where they sat cosily, just across the
border from Israel bombing the
crap out of the Israelis without
thought of retaliation. When Israel
finally moved in to end the onesided killing, left-wingers such as
Chapman cried "foul!" Does this
mean that anyone may kill Israelis,
the more the better, but if an Israeli
bops an Arab terrorist on the head
to slow the progress of extermination of his friends, relatives, and
children, this person must be tried
in an international court? Yes, says
my friend Mr. Chapman, thai
seems fair.
I'm suprised that he of all people
is saddened by the fact that the U.S.
supports Israel. Geewhiz, if you
didn't have these two free speaking
nations to poke your "ignorant of
mideast politics" nose into, you
would have to deal with real problems, such as millions starving in
Africa, or Vietnam's ironlike grip
on Kampuchea, or if you like,
South Africa's antiquated apartheid policies. Millions (yes,
millions) died in Pol Pot's exter-
Frats' image boosted
Just a quick word of thanks to
the members of the Zeta Beta Thau
fraternity, who on the night of
Wednesday, Oct. 9th, rescued my
car from the jowls of immobility,
and saved me the cost of a $40 tow.
The  simple  but  co-operative  act
restored in me the high regard I
have for the fraternal system, which
in recent weeks has come under certain question.
Thanks, I owe you one.
Kevin McKechnie
arts 2
mination of intellectuals and others
in the mid-seventies to early
eighties. Where were you?
The Soviet Union is killing
Afghan rebels, who in turn are
fighting for their country and way
of life. Where are you? You're sending Israelis, who unlike your
freedom-fighting PLO, are fighting
military force with military force,
yes civilians are hurt, but they are
not the prime targets; you, sir, are
sending pilots of fighter/bomber
aircraft to the Hague for war crime
trials. Maybe they should move the
court to Nuremburg for this trial,
th°se guys are so damn Nazi-like.
The pilots were rounding up innocents and slaughtering them in
ovens and showers.
Oh, that's right, one may do this
to Jews but don't let a Jew touch a
hair on an Arab terrorist's head.
Finally, may I point out, Mr.
Hypocrite that the Ubyssey has proven its openmindedness by allowing
a forum for the presentation of
both sides of this story, Michelle
Tessler's "right-wing rhetoric" and
your left-wing bullshit.
Bruce Kadonoff
engineering 1
Tenure guards freedom
Sanctions could prevent war in S. Africa
Jouni Tanskanen's letter (Total
Economic Sanction Unwarranted,
Oct. 11), echoes President Reagan's
policy of 'constructive
engagement', of which Desmond
Tutu has stated "in its condone-
ment of the South African government, it is as evil as apartheid
itself."
One has only to look at South
Africa's record in Namibia to
realize that economic sanctions
"wielded with patience and over
time" will do nothing to move the
South African government to begin
dismantling Apartheid. South
Africa's mandate in Namibia was
declared an illegal occupation at the
end of WWII. Since then, the
United Nations has recognized the
South West African People's
Organization (SWAPO) as the
legitimate representative of the people of Namibia, and in 1975 upheld
the right of the Namibian people to
seek by whatever means necessary'
— including force — the liberation
of their country.
Despite increasingly heavy
diplomatic pressure by the UN and
the rest of the world, South Africa
continues to occupy Namibia and
has instituted the apartheid System
there.
Last week a party of white
businessmen met with African National Congress leaders to discuss
the possibility of future negotiations. This was planned after the
failing economy forced the temporary closure of the South Africa
stock exchange and the South
African government had threatened
to transfer the effects of internal
strife and economic sanctions to it's
neighbors — Botswana, Zimbabwe,
Zambia, Angola, and Mozambique. Taking these facts into consideration, it is clear that if the
white minority is to feel their effects, economic sanctions must be
applied quickly and totally.
In Botha's latest speech, he stated
South Africa will pursue a policy of
independent coexistence, which
means all black people will be made
citizens of the various homelands
and will be permitted to leave them
only to work in white South Africa.
The homelands constitute a total of
thirteen percent of the most arid
land in South Africa containing no
industry, fishing areas, harbors,
railways, or mineral deposits. Fifty
percent   of  black   South   African
children die of malnutrition before
the age of five, while white children
enjoy a standard of living comparable to North Americans.
Botha's solution to Apartheid will
only make the problem worse.
Buying anything from South
Africa, be it canned fruit or gold
Kruggerrands (sale of which constitutes fifty percent of South
Africa's export earnings) implies
approval of the status quo in a
country where 73% of the people
earn 26% of the income, where
65% of the black families earn incomes below the subsistence level,
and where blacks unemployed for
longer than four months-are sent to
work camps with no pay. Current
studies show that 85% of South
African prisoners are assaulted or
tortured, many of whom are held
indefinitely without charge and
without access to legal representation (New York Times Oct. 14).
If the black majority does not see
changes at home, or world support
in their favor (through economic
and diplomatic sanctions) they will
have no option but a long and
bloody civil war.
Jeannette Arthur
science 2
Kurt Prensperg launched an interesting attack upon academic
freedom in a letter to your paper
Oct. 16th, but his claim that
sheltered monopolies worsen the
unemployment crisis, failed to react
to anything but symptoms.
Tenure at universities has a tradition older than that of the nation-
state. Academic freedom protected
professors from religious persecution long before it defended their
pay cheque in a society
preponderately dominated by the
market of commodities. We should
not throw out babies with
bathwater and because there are
bad solutions ignore the original
problem.
The real problem is a chronic
political one, and as profound as
the question of the freedom of
thought and consciousness.
Prensperg offers no analysis of why
university budgets are under severe
restraint, and more importantly
does therefore not consider who
would be deciding to fire faculty if
tenure was totally abridged.
Prensperg's plan would end
ageism perhaps, and that is surely as
r
valid as ending sexism, but while
reducing university politics to complete cut-throat competition, who
would remain the referees in an increasingly vicious game?
Attacking academic freedom by
undermining tenure is a bad solution to the worst problem, namely
the political values which have cut
funding to universities in half in absolute terms since 1967 to now.
Prensperg is unquestionably right
that getting a professorship in the
sixties was much easier than now,
and therefore there are in fact more
capable younger people who are not
employed while less capable older
people do have a tenured university
post. But it is a co-opted strategy of
divide and be conquered which
Prensperg suggests.
Younger academics should not
cut the throats of older academics,
or else they find it is the Socrude
provincial government which is
directing their mercenary murder . .
. and their suicide will be the last
command.
Blair T. Longley
3rd year arts
THE UBYSSEY
October 18, 1985
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Friday throughout
the academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff
and are not necessarily those of the administrataion or the
AMS. Member Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey's
editorial office is SUB 241k. Editorial department,
228-2301/2305. Advertising 228-3977/3978.
Elegie: Exhausted editors Stephen Wisenthal, Debbie Lo and David Ferman ended existence.
Everlasting exclaims by ecstatic Lise Magee, Robert Douglas and Gordon Clarke had exterminated
energies eventually. Echoes of Dave Pasin and Evelyne Jacob's exaggerated empathy were anxiously
entered and explained by Kenneth Sallitt. Explicit enrolments in endless excuses. Norm Rawin and
Ron Stewart emphasized the effects. Dan Andrews and Michael Groberman exerted in elaborate
endeavors to ease ex-editors. Educated environment had erased exhiliarant enthusiasm. Eventually the
extraordinarily extravagant exodus was excluded effectively. Ruth Gumpp and Ed Mau appealed to
Photosoc's evident excellency. Editors and everybody excited excessive exhibition of exorcism.
Jim Chow especially eeked eeyoohh. Friday, October 18, 1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Horror and humor lie Beyond Mozambique
By EVELYN JACOB
A subversive would identify with
it. The Church would cringe at it. A
nihilist would love it.
Whatever your persuasion,
George Walker's Beyond Mozambique is not what you would expect:
through the juxtaposition of the
profound with the trivial, Walker
tickles our funny-bones and makes
us roar with laughter at the sight of
human misery. Through exagera-
tion of human capabilities, both
author and director push the play
far beyond the world of farce, into
the realm of the absurd.
Beyond Mozambique
by George F. Walker
directed by Robert Garfat
at Dorothy Somerset Theatre
until October 19
As you enter the theatre, you are
quickly drawn into the depths of
Africa. Your eyes immediately
drink up the gnarled branches and
twisted trees of the jungle which
hang overhead, in between the
lights and the stage machinery. Im
mersed in the darkness, your imagination is lulled by the sounds of
distant beating drums. You close
your eyes and dare not open them
for fear that this world will vanish.
But as you submerse yourself into
Walker's play, you become aware
that you are not confined to Africa,
but are anywhere, anytime — far
beyond Mozambique.
Walker sets his play in the jungle
in order to examine carefully,
human nature in its primitive, most
naked form. One is reminded of
Joseph Conrad's Heart of
Darkness, the story of human corruption and lies, of human frailty in
isolation.
Walker's characters, like Conrad's, lose their sanity in the jungle
and perish by their own corruption
and evil. They are overwhelmed by
their inflated sense of themselves,
and are blinded. No character is exempt from corruption, though
some are more ignorant of their sins
than others.
Dr. Enrico Rocco (Philip Sped-
ding), the infamous neo-Nazi
murderer   for  example,   performs
human experiments in order to
satisfy his obsession with "finding
a cure to end all cures." But Rocco
does not so much as flinch as he
parades around the stage flaunting
a bloody human foot, or a mangled
arm in between the morning tea. He
defends his ruthlessness by blaming
God: In full seriousness, he askes,
"Where was the Church when I
needed her?"
The entire cast of characters in
Beyond Mozambique are tossed on
to the rough seas of existence
without anchors; each has her or his
own reality in the illusory worlds
they construct for themselves. But
none of them have what makes existence real and meaningful: a
selfless belief in something or someone other than themselves.
Walker raises a profound question that has haunted Ihe modern
world since the beginning of the
nineteenth-century: How should we
behave in a world in which God is
dead? Rocco thinks he is the solution, for he claims he is "the
absence of God."
Rita   (Tanja   Dixon-Warren),
Academic Nest is for the Birds
By NORM RAVVIN
A Nest of Singing Birds is mostly
a catalogue of quaint one-liners and
well-detailed scenes in which a
group of smart-assed professors
tear one another apart.
The fact that Susan Haley's novel
of academic life in a prairie city centres on a woman allows the book to
include some brooding over the
place of women in the academic
profession. And there is even a
chapter or two concerned with this
woman's wish to assert her own independence and not rely on her
professor-lover's marriage offers as
an escape route. But these are only
token efforts at including any real
social comment in the novel.
It is hard to guess at what Susan
Charlote Haley's aims were in
writing this book. Within her narrative the publish or perish theme
returns continuously, and Haley's
heroine's eventual good fortune
comes from a well-timed acceptance
slip. Maybe Haley was caught by
the idea of the profits that can arise
from a well-timed nicely bound
publication.
A Nest of Singing Birds binds all
of the cliches of academic life into
one whole: a drinking department
head; budget problems; professional rivalries; and sexual exploits.
But these things are played out
amidst an emotional background as
bleak as the prairie winter that
covers Haley's fictional campus.
The book reveals nothing, since it
clings to a bitter mood that makes
every event and interaction seem
petty. Sex is simply promiscuity,
and academia is little more than
chair throwing at department
meetings and "sticky styrofoam
cups" in the coffee room. Haley
skins her subject down to the bones
until there is nothing left but details
and jokes.
A Nest of Singing Birds also
manages to say nothing about
Canada's own brand of academia.
There is no sense of place in the
novel, past the snow and the odd
r	
shrub, and Haley never connects
her narrative with the landscape.
Such an effort might have removed
some of the artificiality and
queerness from its scenes.
In the end, the book simply condemns. And Haley's condemnation
seems to be in bad faith, because it
is so cute and petty. Whatever her
reasons are for being disappointed
with academic life, the author
refuses to move past cliches in her
effort to explain them.
5 MINUTES WALK
EAST FROM EXPO
THE^
VANCOUVER
FLEA MARKET
685-0666
40,000 SQ. FT. INDOORS
8:00 A.M.-4 P.M. SAT. & SUN. & HOLIDAYS
FREE ADMISSION WITH THIS AD ON
OCTOBER 19 & 20, 1985
A FUN PLACE TO SHOP
AUDITIONS
AUDITIONS
AUDITIONS
MEN     MEN     MEN     MEN     MEN
Needed for
MAJOR BARBARA
By George Bernard Shaw
Directed by Antony Holland
(to be presented January 15-25, 1986)
TIMES: Monday, October 22 (4:30-9:00 p.m.)
Tuesday, October 23 (6:00-9:00 p.m.)
PLACE: Frederic Wood Theatre, Room 206
(OPEN TO ALL UBC STUDENTS, FACULTY & STAFF)
Arrange audition appointments In Room 2*077
FredejjcJ/VoodJThe^atre,_or^hone2^-2678
AUDITIONS   GET INTO THE ACT   AUDITIONS
gives a marvellous performance as a
smuggler and a female pimp. She
sums up the unreflecting natures of
the characters: as she eludes all
responsibility of her dastardly
deeds. She insists that she "had no
choice," "It was either do it up
vulgar or blend in with the
scenery."
As we laugh at the characters' ignorance, absurd mannerisms, and
rhetorical speech, we, as detached
onlookers, carefully defend
ourselves from the human baseness
that Walker unmasks.
Sitting safely in our chairs, we
join in the laughter, but not in the
responsibility of murder, corruption, and the slandering of human
life — when suddenly, Thomas the
Greek (David Garfinkle), Dr. Rocco's assistant and patient, leaps on
to the stage wearing two wigs,
holding a massive cross, disguised
as a priest. One of the characters
turns to him and asks in horror,
"Who sent you?"
With a gleam in his eye, the false
messiah beckons us towards him,
hoping that we will share in the
responsibility, or rather the irresponsibility of mankind.
In Beyond Mozambique, we are
asked to look upon horror with
both joy — and horror, through a
discerning eye. As we look through
Thomas' disguise, we wonder
"What rough beast, its hour come
at last, slouches towards Bethlehem
to be born?"
Human nature in its primitive, most-
naked form.
OPEN EARLY
OPEN LATE
* passport pictures
• specialty papers
* volume discounts
kinkcs copies
5706 University Blvd. 222-1688
M-Th8-9       FH8-6       Sat9-6       Sun 11-6
STUDENT SPECIAL
20% OFF
THE REGULAR PRICES
OF ALL MERCHANDISE
IN THE STORE.
With a copy of this ad
or the presentation of
an AMS Card.
Big savings on hockey equipment, soccer   boots,   racquets,   running   wear,
sports bags, day packs, etc. etc. etc.
COMMUNITY SPORTS
3615 West Broadway
733-1612
OPEN SUNDA YS NOON TO 5:00 P.M. Page 6
Friday, October 18, 1985
BEYOND MOZAMBIQUE, directed by
Robert Garfat, at Dorothy Somerset Studio
(downstairs from Freddy Wood. 228-2678),
until October 19th, at 8:00 p.m.
I'll Be Back before Midnight, a popular
thriller, at the Richmond Gateway Theatre
(270-1812), until October 20th, Tuesday to Friday at 8:00 p.m., Saturdays at 5:30 and 9:00,
and Sunday at 2:00 p.m.
Arms and the Man, a comedy by G.B.
Shaw, at the Arts Club Granville Island
(687-5315), until November 9th, at 8:30 p.m.
Dear Liar, a dramatic reading of G.B. Shaw's
correspondence, at the Arts Club Revue
Theatre (687-5315), October 20th and 27th,
at 8:00 p.m.
One More for the Road, a new George Ryga
play, at the Firehall Theatre (250 E. Cordova,
687-1644), until October 26th, at 8:30 p.m.
The Bat, a whodunit thriller, at Studio 58
(Langara, 324-5227), until November 10th, at
8:00 p.m.
Goodnight Disgrace about the friendship
between Malcolm Lowry and Conrad Aiken,
produced by the Vancouver Playhouse, at
the Queen Elizabeth (872-6622), until October 19th, at 8 p.m.
Broken Hearted Losers, back by popular
demand, at the Firehall Theatre (250 E. Cordova, 687-1644), until October 19th, at 10:30
p.m.
I Do Not Like Thee, Doctor Fell, produced
by Stage Eireann, at James Cowan Theatre
"5450 Gilpin, 263-7800), October 16-19 and
23-26, at 8:30 p.m.
Self-Accusation, a speak play by Peter
Handke, at the Pitt International Gallery
(36 Powell St., 681-6740), October 19th, at
8:30 p.m.
Haul
Ftdelio, Beethoven's opera produced by the
Vancouver Opera at the Queen Elizabeth
Theatre (682-2871 and VTC), October 19, 22,
24 and 26, 8:00 p.m.
Rita MacNeil, folk singer sings of life and
love, at the Van East Cultural Centre (1895
Venable,  254-9578),  October 22-26,  at 8:00
p.m.
Ian McConkey, at the Classical Joint (231
Carrall,  689-0667),   October  18th  and  19th,
10:00 p.m.
Kendra and Co., at the Landmark Jazz Bar
(1400   Robson   Street,   687-9312),   October
15-18.
Ocheami, Music and dance of West Afrika,
at   the   Van   East  Cultural   Centre  (1895
Venables,   254-9578),   October   17-19,   8:00
p.m.
Joseph Petric, contemporary accordian, at
the   Vancouver   East   Cultural   Centre
(254-9578), October 20th, 8:00 p.m.
Amadeus, the music of Mozart and Salieri,
produced by the Vancouver Chamber Choir,
at the Orpheum (738-6822), October 18tli,
8:30 p.m.
Beaux Arts Trio, popular chamber ensemble
plays Haydn, Ravel, and Schubert, produced
by the Friends of Chamber Music, at the
Queen Elizabeth Playhouse (VTC,
280-4411), October 22nd  8-30 n m.
Dissolving Images, slide shows with music,
at the Unitarian Church (49th and Oak), October 19 at 7:30 p.m., all donations go to the
Vancouver Food Bank.
Dan Joy, proclamation of war at the Pitt International Gallery (36 Powell) from October
21 to 25 at 8:30. The Last Sex On Earth at
9:00.
Dance, an audio visual installation by Violet
and Catherine Costello of their "classical" rendition of Swan Lake at the Pitt International
Gallery (36 Powell St. 681-6740), from October 21 - November 2 at 8:00 p.m.
Flown - paintings universale at Pots, Stews
and Fondues (1221 Thurlow at Davie
681-9812), opening October 20, from 1-3:30
p.m.
Sally Michener: Ceramic Sculpture, a
bizarre tableau vivant, at the Surrey Art
Gallery (13750-88th Avenue Surrey 596-7461)
from October 26 -November 24.
Arthur Erickson: Selected Projects, an exhibit of architectural drawings and models at
the Vancouver Art Gallery (682-5621), until
January *2th.
Japanese Folk Textiles, dolls and Kimonos
at the Museum of Anthropology, until
December 21.
TODAY
NOP CLUB
Pub night, 5-9 p.m., SUB 205.
INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS STUDENTS-
ASSOCIATION
Lecture  and   seminar,   "Response  to  crisis  in
Africa",   Charles   Bassett   of   CIDA,   speaker,
noon, Buchanan A100.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration for fall term of classes, noon-1:20
p.m., SUB 208.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Practice, noon, SUB party room.
ARC MAGAZINE
General meeting, noon, B uTo 597.
ST. MARK'S COLLEGE
Twilight   retreat   —   silence   and   awareness:
discovering God in the present, 4:30-9 p.m., St.
Mark's College music room.
*ioooc0^     ot£c£;pW.
SATURDAY
GAYS AND LESBIANS AT UBC
Skating party, 7:30 p.m., Kitsilano skating rink.
EAST INDIAN STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Sports   tournament,   8   a.m.-5   p.m.,    David
Thompson high school, dance, 8 p.m.-1 a.m.,
SUB ballroom.
THUNDERBIRD VOLLEYBALL
UBC senior female high school volleyball tournament, come out and see your old high school
play, all day, War Memorial Gym and Osborne
Center.
UBC MOTORCYCLE CLUB
Beer garden with videos, 4 p.m., SUB 211.
UBC WINDSURFIN
Come windsurf, for beginners Through pros,
phone 228-3930, noon, SUB 57.
THUNDERBIRD FOOTBALL
UBC vs. Manitoba Bisons, battle for playoff berths, UBC students free-with AMS card, 7:30
p.m., Thunderbird Stadium.
THUNDERBIRD VOLLEYBALL
UBC Sr. girls H.S. volleyball tournament, come
out and see your old high school play, all day,
War Memorial Gym, Osborne Centre.
UBC  STUDENTS   FOR   PEACE  AND  MUTUAL
DISARMAMENT
Slide show and discussion about 12th World
Festival of Youth and Students in Moscow this
summer, noon, SUB 205.
Movie    night,
phone 228-4638
(who   are   they
AMS ROCKERS
J.A.M.. noon-9 p.m., SUB 211.
SUNDAY
GAYS AND LESBIANS AT UBC
Hike,    leaves   from    VGLCC;
"Another Country", 7:30 p m
for more info.
THE UBYSSMAL
CUP   48   meeting,    11    a.m.
kidding?), Karen's house.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Practice, 12-5 p.m., SUB party room.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Worship service,  10 a.m., UBC Daycare Gym,
2845 Acadia.
MONDAY
UBC DANCE CLUB
Practice, noon, SUB party room.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration for fall term of classes, noon lo 1:30
p.m., SUB 208.
UBC WINDSURFING
Learn to windsurf,  everything  supplied,   noon,
SUB 57, or call 228-3930.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Brief   discussion,   "Coming   Out",   7:30   p.m.,
Lutheran campus centre.
FILM SOCIETY
Film:   Polanski's  "Repulsion",   S2,   7:30  p.m.,
SUB auditorium.
TUESDAY
THE INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR THE
EXCHANGE OF STUDENTS FOR TECHNICAL
EXPERIENCE
Information meeting, noon to 1:30 p.m., CEME
1202.
SIGMA XI SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH
SOCIETY
Dr. Robert Henklin, speech on taste and smell in
health and disease, all welcome, 4 p.m., WOOD
3.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION
Weeking   Testimont   Meeting,   all   are   invited,
noon, SUB 215.
UBC DEBATING SOCIETY
In-house debating and coaching, noon,  BUCH
B223.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Fellowship and discussion, noon, Brock 304.
ANARCHIST CLUB
Anti-Expo leaflet, bring text, noon, SUB 224.
UNDERWATER HOCKEY
Practice and drop-in, all welcome, 7 p.m., SUB
Aquatic Centre.
UKRANIAN STUDENTS' CLUB
Meeting, noon to 1:30 p.m., SUB 212.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration for fail term of classes, noon To 1:30
p.m., SUB 208.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Practice, noon, SUB party room.
HOMECOMING WEEK'85
OCTOBER 21-27
"*iu\<&
"WE'VE STILL GOT THE SPIRIT" is this year's
theme for HOMECOMING '85. Read the following list of events and you'll soon discover why!
ALL WEEK: Pictorial Display - SUB
Main Concourse, Main Library.
MON:    Reception   for   opening   of
AMS   Art   Collection   at  AMS   Art
Gallery at 6:30 p.m.
TUES: Cairn Ceremony at Brock Hall
at 2:30 p.m.  "Meet the Board of
Governors" at The PIT, 8:00 p.m.
WED:  Forum on University Education   in   SUB   Conversation   Pit   at
noon. "Just Desserts" at Cecil Green
at 6:30 p.m.
THURS: The Great Trekker Dinner
— SUB Ballroom at 6:30 p.m. Franc
R. Joubin is receiving the Great Trekker Award.
FRI: Info Day - SUB Main Concourse. Blue & Gold Day. Participate
in the half-time events at the football
game — 5:00 p.m. and hockey game
— 7:30 p.m. Rowing Team & Field
Hockey Team Dance — SUB
Ballroom at 8:00 p.m.
SAT: BBQ & Beer Garden at UBC.
Old Boys Rugby Game — Thunderbird Stadium — early afternoon —
Student Tuition Lottery Draw —
halftime.
SUN: Phrateres Reunion Brunch —
Cecil Green — early aft. Chair-a-thon
fundraising for Acute Care Hospital.
FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT GLENNA CHESTNUTT228-3972^
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: AMS Card Holders — 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; Additional lines, 60c. Commercial —
1 day $4.50; Additional lines, 70c. Additional days, $4.00 and 65c.
Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the day before publication
~   ~ Publications, Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
■Charge Phone Orders Over $10.00 — Call 228-3977
COMING EVENTS
THE VANCOUVER INSTITUTE
Free Public Lecture
Saturday, Oct. 19
President William Saywell
Simon Fraser University
on
RELEVANCE AND OUR
UNIVERSITIES:
RESPONSIBILITY OR
RED HERRING?
Lecture Hall 2, Woodward
Building at 8:15 p.m.
11 - FOR SALE - Private
1969 ALFA COUPE 1750. Beautiful, stereo,
Abarth, $5200 obo. 984-6744.
25 - INSTRUCTION
PIANO LESSONS by Judy Alexander,
graduate of Juilliard School of Music. Near
38th & Cambie. 321-4809.
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CHEERS to all our big and little sisters at
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USE UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIEDS Friday, October 18, 1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Intramural sports wrapup
Page 7
Cycle Sports
On Thursday, Oct. 3, 1985, 27
cyclists tackled the torturous hill
from Tolmie and Marine to third
and Bianca, in the Intramural Cycle
Hill Climb. In the men's novice
division Ralph Buchal (Mech. Eng.)
continued his dominance in cycling
events with another victory in a
time of 2:15. Buchal also won the
novice cycle sprint on the
preceeding Sunday. Janene Toneffe
(E.U.S.) easily outpaced her competition winning the women's division in 2:49. In the closest finish of
the cycle events, Alec Black (Fiji)
and Bruce Marshal (Cycling Club)
both completed the climb in the
time of 2:04 to share the men's Advanced title.
Alex Steida, a well known professional cyclist, was present for the
event and congratulated the well-
deserved winners.
Following the Cycle Hill Climb,
Intramurals recognized the best all-
round riders from the Cycle
Criterium, Cycle Sprints, and Cycle
Hill Climb. To become the aggregate award winners, cyclists had
to demonstrate both endurance and
strength. In the men's division,
Alec Black (Fiji) was the easy winner with two firsts and a second in
three events. Lindsay Hall (P.E.)
became the women's champion
with one first place and two second
place finishes.
Cycle sprints
Cyclists pushing themselves to
their limits were seen racing along in
the Cycle Sprints on old Marine
drive, Sept. 29. Thirty participants
circled the gruelling 1 km track to
set record times for subsequent
years.
In the novice category, Ralph
Buchal, #285, (mech) completed the
first sprint in 85.7 seconds, the second fastest time in the first heat
behind Mathew Murangarah, #287,
(mech eng. grad) with 85.6 seconds.
Buchal's consistency in the second
heat enabled him to capture first
place overall as he crossed the line
in 85.9 seconds. His total of 171.60
seconds clinched the first place
position. Mark Hobday, #317, with
times of 85.0 in heat one and 86.7
seconds in heat two, placed second
in the event with a cumulative of
171.70 seconds.
In the men's advanced category,
Bruce Marshall, #330, cycled to victory with top time in both heats.
His times of 78.0 seconds in heat
one and 79.5 seconds in heat two
led to a cumulative time of 157.5
seconds. Alec Black, #309, (phed)
was a close second with times of
78.2 and 80.0 seconds, totalling
158.20 seconds.
In the women's category,
Whitney Steber, #289, (arts) completed heat on in 95.5 seconds giving her the front position. Although
she placed third in heat two with a
time of 97.9 seconds, Whitney
maintained her lead and placed first
with a cumulative time of 193.40
seconds.
CYCLE HILL CLIMB - THURS. OCT.
Men's Novice
1. Ralph Buchal — Mech. Eng.
2. Tom Szauer — Forestry
3. Mark Hobday - Betas
4. Brian Kirkhope - V.S.T.
5. Dave McEachern — Fiji
6. Brent Murdoch — Fiji
7. Andy Zalkow - Z.B.T.
8. Matthew Murnaghan — Mech. Eng
Men's Advanced
1. Alec Black — Fiji
2. Bruce Marshal - Bike Club
3. Kirck Hancock — Fiji
4. Cam Finnigan — Bike Club
5. Anders Ourom — Staff
6. Chris Brown — Betas
7. Marshal Wilkinson — Science
8. Tom Gomez — Rehab. Med.
9. Rick Boase — Betas
10. Kevin Rutherford - CPSC
11. Stephen Chu - E.U.S.
12. John Suk - Bike Club
Dave Robinson — Betas
14. Paul Quinn — Betas
Women's Finals
1. Janene Toneffe — E.U.S.
2. Lindsay Hall - P.E.
3. Carolyn Daubeny — P.E.
4. Sherry Wright - P.E.
5. Val Poulter - P.E.
Run the United Way Road Run
On Friday, Oct. 4th, the Run The
United Way Road Run attracted
over 180 participants. With each
participant donating $2.00, almost
$200.00 was raised for the United
Way Campaign. Janene Toneffe
(EUS) dominated the women's 5
km run with a strong time of 15:40,
a full minute before second place
runner Heidi Wippich (rehab,
med.) who finished at 16:43.
Carolyn Daubeny (P.E.), a strong
runner in our program, won once
again with a time of 12:44 in the
women's 3 km.
Paul Rapp (georox 111) triumphed for the third time this season with
the winning time of 10:34 in the
men's 3 km. Stephen Chu (EUS)
finished first in the men's 5 km race
with a time of 13:36, a mere 3
seconds ahead of Seamus Parker
(mech. IV) who crossed the finish
line at 13:39.
Rich Hansen's Man In Motion
tour will be saluted by the noon
runs program on Friday, Oct. 18,
1985 during the University Gates
road run. All participants are asked
to donate $5.00 toward the spinal
cord research fund.
3/85
2:15
2:24
2:27
2:28
2:36
2:43
2:46
3:10
2:04
2:04
2:17
2:19
2:22
2:27
2:28
2:29
2:34
2:38
2:42
2:51
2:51
2:55
2:49
3:07
3:19
3:14
0:00
SPORTS EVENTS THIS WEEK
UPCOMING EVENTS
SPECIAL EVENTS
Arts '20 Relay Race
SUB PLAZA — race centre
12:30 — Opening Ceiemonies
RACQUET SPORTS
Alpine Squash Grand Prix
Round 1
Thunderbird winter sports centre
NOOIM RUNS
University Gates Road Run
SUB PLAZA - race centre
3.0 km, 5.3 km - 12:30
Drop-i
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SEC Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 18, 1985
Apartheid: A policy of separation
By ROBERT DOUGLAS
Reprinted from the Champlain Bugle
Canadian University Press
By now most Canadians must be familiar
with images of violence in South Africa as it
is a popular subject on the evening news.
While an announcer reads the numbers of
dead, injured and imprisoned black South
Africans, footage of riots and angry faces
flash behind him.
But this is an incomplete picture as there is
no explanation of why the blacks are rioting.
A Gallup poll conducted in July of this
year showed 52 per cent of the adult Canadian population had not heard of the racial
policies of the South African government. To
these Canadians, the riots they see on the
evening news are no different than the conflicts occurring anywhere else in the world.
But South Africa is different. Racism exists in many countries but it is only in South
Africa that discrimination based on colour
and race is enforced by law and officially entrenched by the organs of political and
economic power as an essential part of national policy.
The word apartheid is an Afrikaans word
meaning "separateness." It was adopted as
the official policy of the Nationalist Party on
May 26, 1948.
Apartheid is comprised of four elements:
• The enforced separation of whites and
blacks.
• The control of African movement and
employment.
• The "separate development" of black
groups.
• A police-state apparatus, controlled by
the white majority, designed to curb
resistance and opposition from the black majority.
The government has maintained a policy
of apartheid through a series of legislative
acts.
Population Registration Act — which
divided the population into racial categories.
Law and administrative structures separate
whites and blacks in every walk of life. South
African citizens are classified White, Bantu
(African or black) and Coloreds. There are
seven subgroups of Coloreds, Malay, Gri-
qua, Chinese, Indians and other Asians. The
Japanese are the only non-white group who
are classfied white because of Japan's trade
relations with South Africa. As of 1966, the
government made it mandatory for all
citizens to carry passbooks with their full in-
dentification.
The Native Resettlement Act — empowering the government to move blacks from the
white districts such as Johannesburg, into
black townships.
The Group Areas Act — dividing the country into regions and stipulating that each
racial group must live in a specified region.
Under the terms of the Group Areas Act, the
white minority, comprising 14% of the
population, are assigned the principal cities
such as Johannesburg, commercial farms and
the rich mining areas in South Africa. This
comprises 87% of the total land.
• The Coloreds numbering 9% of the
population are situated in Cape Province,
principally around Cape Town.
• The third class of citizens, the Asians,
account for 2% of the population, descendants of Asian labourers brought in to work
on the sugar plantations. They are located in
Natal Province.
• The last and by far the largest group are
the Bantu or blacks, making up 75% of the
population, have been assigned demarcated
areas called homelands or Bantustans.
These Bantustans are typically located in
the underdeveloped regions of the country
and account for only 13% of the total land
available.
The physical appearance of apartheid is
everywhere. Signs which read "Whites only,
Blankee alleen" (in both official languages to
ensure that the blacks understand) appear on
park benches, entrances to post offices,
railway stations, cinemas, theatres, libraries,
museums, even on the entrance to zoos.
Instead of making concrete changes, the
government of South Africa introduces
measures aimed at buying time and making
apartheid look nicer to outside observers.
One such example is the white only referendum held in August of 1983. The South
Africans approved a new constitution, which
for the first time, extends political rights to
Asians and Mixed race colored, making
available to them limited representation in
the South African Parliament. The new con-
stitition extends political rights to 2.8 million
Coloreds and 850,000 Asians, mostly of Indian descent, but continues to disenfranchise
the 23 million black majority.
The result of the new constitution is a
racially segregated three-chambered parliament. The new charter creates a separate 80
seats for the coloreds and a separate 40 seats
for the Asians. It enables them to discuss
issues directly concerning their community
but gives the 166 seat white parliament the
power to veto any of their resolutions. In
sight of mounting world criticism, the South
African government has offered to restore
citizenship to only eight million out of their
23 million blacks. All government reforms
have been aimed at dividing the anti-
apartheid forces and defusing international
criticism.
NORRIS BOOKS
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History, Law, Sciences, The Liberal Arts
Learned Works of all Kinds
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731-8514
OPPORUNITIES IN
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with Dr. Karin Millett-Sorensen
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 26
9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Capilano College, Room A-117
Fee: $40.00, Students $30.00
Phone 986-1911, Local 321 for Information
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