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The Ubyssey Feb 26, 1980

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Array F"
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXII, No. 55
Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday, February 26,1980
Students get
fly-by-night
—•dmond o'brian photo
"WHAT AM I DOING? Seventeen bottles of Asti Spumante can really alter perceptions but after all I'm a hardened news editor and I should know a mushroom when I don't see one. God what a night. Got to get a pic of this
one but I better lay off the stuff or I'll end up putting this on the front page. Warbbleglorp-gaaahhhh. . ."
Trident 113 attempt novel defence
The 113 protesters charged with
trespassing at an American nuclear
submarine base last fall have new
hope for vindication today.
U.S. judge Gordon Thompson
Jr. will decide today whether the
Trident nuclear submarine base
protesters can use an unconventional defence based on international law, necessity, environmental
law, and moral and religious
beliefs. The peace activists had
feared the judge would immediately
rule the defence as irrelevant and inadmissible.
A spokesman for Vancouver's
Pacific Life Community, which
helped organize the protest, said
Thompson delayed the start of the
trial one day until he has made a
decision on the defendents'
evidence.
Jamie Bower said the protesters
are charged with trespassing at the
nuclear submarine base in Bangor,
Washington on Oct. 28 to 30.
Twelve Canadians and 101
Americans were arrested at the
demonstration.
Members of the Pacific Life
group began a 24 hour vigil yesterday for the arrested protesters outside the old Vancouver courthouse
on Georgia St. which will end as the
judge's anouncement is made today. Bower said the vigil, which
began yesterday at 9 a.m., was going well.
He said the defendents are hoping Thompson will allow them to
use special witnesses such as John
Freed, an expert on international
law and chief consultant to the
American prosecution at Nuremburg in 1945.
Other proposed witnesses include
Hiroshima survivor Mary Fujita
and Owen Wilkes of the Stockholm
International Peace Research Institute, an expert on the nuclear
weapons at Trident.
Ulysses Dodd, a participant in
Martin Luther King's civil rights
movement, and historian Howard
Zinn are also prepared to testify for
the defence on the effectiveness of
civil disobedience as a democratic
strategy.
A Pacific Life press release stated
that such a decision "would negate
virtually the entire defence presentation."
If Canadians are convicted they
will be declared undesirables and be
stopped at the U.S. border to prevent them from travelling to further
demonstrations.
Students earning next month's
rent by soliciting airline discount
coupons for an American corporation could face criminal charges, an
RCMP officer at Vancouver's international airport said Monday.
"My instruction is to arrest them
and charge them if they persist. It's
an act and it must be enforced,"
said RCMP constable Bob
Garlough.
The students are breaking
ministry of transport regulations by
asking customers for the coupons in
the airport terminal, Garlough said.
Students across Canada have
been employed by Genex Inc. to
solicit discount coupons CP Air
gives customers on transcontinental
flights, a Genex spokesman said.
Genex representative L.P. Bradley
said the company uses students to
solicit the coupons and then sells
the discount vouchers to companies
with a large volume of air travel.
"If they use the right approach
with customers, they get most of
their coupons free," Bradley said.
Genex has employed students on
similar ventures in the United States
to solicit United Airlines vouchers,
he added.
CP    Air    public    relations
spokesman George McBurnie said
Monday the company has no objection to the retailing the coupons.
"Those coupons are transferable. I
suppose if someone wants to sell
them or give them away it's their
business," McBurnie said.
Bradley said the students are
"fully supported" by Genex but
declined to reveal the terms of the
contract students have with Genex.
He said the students receive "handsome wages" and some receive
financial a:id to get to the airport
and to cover the cost of buying the
coupons.
Bradley said if a student is arrested "someone is overstepping a
mandate."
"I hear stories of the RCMP
coming in and rousting students
from the baggage area," he said.
A report in the commercial press
made no mention of Genex but
stated "several young people" had
seen an opportunity "to make a
quick buck" by soliciting the
coupons.
Garlough said the students would
first receive a warning and then face
charges, although the laying of
charges would be up to the discretion of the officer.
Researchers fear
Grit government
funding cutbacks
By STEVE McCLURE
The new Liberal government is
not likely to increase scientific research funding, university administrators predicted Monday.
"There's no evidence of a change
of heart from the Liberals," said J.
M. Dewey, dean of graduate studies
at the University of Victoria. "If
their past record is anything to go
by we'll have a long wait for an increase."
Dewey said he found a "general
uncertainty" at a recent meeting of
the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council in Ottawa, the body that allocates federal government research funds.
"Nobody at the NSERC was willing to hazard a guess as to what the
new government would do," Dewey
said.
And a UBC spokesman charged
that Canadian scientific research
has seriously lagged behind that of
other Western nations.
"We're still behind other developed countries in research," said
UBC research administrator
Richard Spratley.
Engineers' sexist 'rags' insult women
OTTAWA (CUP) — Campuses across
Canada are enraged at the sexist content of
engineering students' publications, including
"sick, demeaning and offensive" articles on
teenage necrophilia and prostitution.
At the University of Toronto, recent editions of the engineering newspaper Toike were
dumped on the desk of administration president James Ham in protest. Thousands of
copies of the "no frills engineering
newspaper" were collected from sites across
campus, loaded into cars and then unloaded at
Ham's office.
At McMaster University, the engineering
newspaper the Plumbline has limited its
distribution to engineering students after the
last edition brought complaints.
And at UBC, publication of the engineering
newspaper the Red Rag has spurred the
women students' office to challenge the
administration to take action against continued sexist activities by the engineers.
In the U of T protest, Andrea Knight,
students' administrative council women's commissioner, told Ham that the questionable engineers' issue included a particularly offensive
item called Teenage Necrophilia. '"It makes a
joke of violence against women," she said.
Ham advised Knight to take the issue up
with the engineering society. "I've talked with
the president of the engineering society. You
should engage those students in engineering,"
he said. "I believe students should be responsible one to the other."
Toike editor Bob Moult said staffers do not
see anything wrong with Teenage Necrophilia.
"I can't deny it depicts violence against
women but it doesn't promote it," he said. "It
is an excellent parody of the comic book love
story."
Moult questioned why Knight went to Ham.
"Do they want the administration to crack
down?" he asked. "They can say they disapprove but they can't do anything."
Knight also took her case to arts and sciences
dean Arthur Kruger, who agreed the Toike is
sexist. "There is some stuff I would label as
sick. I don't know if they (the engineering
society) should be proud of this."
See page 3: WOMEN'S
Spratley said research funding increased by over 30 per cent in the
past year but added the increase was
the result of previous Liberal
policies implemented under the
Conservative government.
But Spratley criticized the Liberals for their tight-fisted research
funding policies. "In the last 10
years or so Canada has lagged behind. In 1967 Canada spent 1.3 per
cent of its gross national product on
research and in 1978 it was down to
.94 per cent."
Spratley said Canada needs more
industrial research and development and said he hopes
Canada will eventually spent the 2.5
per cent of the GNP on research
that the defeated Conservatives set
as a target for the eighties.
But Dewey said an increase in
research funding alone will not be
enough. Decreased funding and
lower enrolment in graduate programs has made a shambles of the
system, he said.
"It's completely unrealistic to expect to double science and technology expenditures in five or 10
years if the people aren't there,"
said Dewey. "There's been no encouragement for people to go to
grad school."
There were signs that Joe Clark's
Tory government recognized the
need for more research funding,
Erich Vogt, UBC faculty and student affairs vice-president, said
Monday.
Vogt said he is unwilling to
speculate on the new Liberal
government's generosity toward
researchers at this time as they have
not made their intentions clear in
the area of research funding. But he
added he hopes they will provide
enough money to clear up the sorry
situation that Canadian researchers
now find themselves in.
"I think it would be a sad thing if
the present situation continued,"
Vogt said. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 26,1S»
Alberta legislators
to face mock trial
EDMONTON (CUP) — The
Alberta provincial government will
face charges of limiting accessibility
to a university education in a mock
trial to be held at the University of
Alberta next month.
The mock trial is the latest attempt by Alberta students to fight
tuition increases in the province.
Another attempt at stopping fee increases will be made at the March U
of A board of governors meeting
when two students from each faculty will attend to show student concern about tuition hikes.
But student organizers are
already resigned to a tuition increase in Alberta and see the actions
as necessary to head off any attempts to index tuition fees so that
there would be regular annual increases.
HAUKINS
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Why not give us a call and
find out how you can really
do the preparation you keep
thinking you'll get around to
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Vancouver, B.C. V6R 2J3
(604) 689-9000 or
call us toll free at
(800) 663-3381
"The chances are one in 1,000
that we will be successful in stopping tuition increases," said Tema
Frank, U of A student external vice-
president. Frank said if fee increases are allowed to be introduced
without opposition however, they
will "almost certainly" become annual.
The mock trial is a more interesting way to present information about cutbacks and fee increases than by simply having
speakers, Frank said.
NOTICE
Tuition Fee
Income Tax
Receipts
Available
Feb. 26
Dept. of Finance
General Service
Admin. Building
8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.
W    HAIRSTYLING    ^
w FOR MEN & WOMEN ^
10% Discount
 for    all    students    on
hairstyling by Karin. and Terry with
presentation of this ad. Offer expires April 5. 1980.
ken hipped
hair company ltd.
5736 UNIVERSITY BLVD.
(next to the Lucky Dollar
in the Village)
.DROP IN OR CALL 228-1471.
OPTIC
ZONE
Student Discounts
ARBUTUS VILLAGE
733-1722
,>*Sv is*
Arts Undergraduate
Society Presents
the second an a series ofoutdoor concerts
featuring
"COVER BOYS"
Thursday, Feb. 28, 1225 p.m.
South-West SUB Plaza
INTERMISSION SPECIAL:
A Special General Meeting of the A. U.S.,
to approve a new undergraduate society
constitution.
For Further Information
Contact Bob Staley in
Buchanan 107
DAY AT THE
BOOKSTORE
FEBRUARY 28
The new
EDUCATOR PEN LINE
EDUCATOR TECHNICAL
Introductory
Sugg. List                          Sale
4-PEN SET
33.00                              19.95
3-PEN SET
25.00                              14.95
^/^\
Featuring
w
KOH-I-NOOR LINE RAPIDOGRAPH
Sugg. List                        Sale
DCS 4-PEN SET
67.00                              34.95
Special
Price
4-PEN-SLIM PACK
46.15
29.95
A KOH-I-NOOR representative will be available to
answer your questions on KOH-I-NOOR, PELIKAN
and MONT BLANC
See us at the f|t>C bOOkstOrC
2009 Main Mall.
228-4741
Barry Friesen
Law Office
• UNCONTESTED DIVORCES* $300.00
• If married in Canada and you know the whereabouts of your spouse.
• REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS* $225.00
(CONVEYANCING)
(If done at the same time as the real estate
transfer)
• WILLS*
Fee quotations available on request.
• ESTATES*
Fee calculated at 1 V4 % of aggregate value of
Estate. Minimum Fee: $500.00
• INCORPORATIONS* $250.00
• CONSULTATIONS $20.00
(First half-hour)
• Please note: Fees quoted above do not include disbursements, which are any necessary expenses incurred on your behalf, such as government fees payable for filing documents in
the Land Titles Office or Court Registry.
For appointment please phone
683-1515
519-925 West Georgia Street
(In the old Georgia Medical-Dental Building,
opposite Hotel Vancouver. I
Copy of complete Fee Brochure available on request.
THERE ARE THREE STAGES
IN YOUR CAREER
WHEN YOU MOST NEED
FINANCIAL HELP:
1. To get through your graduating year
2. To get into practice
3. If you later branch out on your own
Through its Business Program for Professionals, specifically designed for the graduating student . . . the Royal
Bank is there with financial help when you need it.
7 branches conveniently located within the University area
• 10th & Sasamat  228-1141
• 17th & Dunbar 731-6501
• 2909 W. Broadway 733-8194
• 4th & Balsam 736-7684
• 15th & Arbutus  731 -4938
• 41 st & Collingwood    263-2308
• Kerrisdale 2208 W. 41 st   261 -1311
So don't hesitate to call on your Royal banker for advice or information on
any of the helpful Royal Bank services.
When you succeed . . . we succeed
ROYAL BAN K Tuesday, February 26,1980
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Soviets threaten Canada's lifestyle
By GLEN SANFORD
The Soviet presence in Afghanistan threatens the Canadian standard of living, Ukrainian dissident
Valentyn Moroz said Monday.
"Those only interested in gasoline for their cars must be told that
75 per cent of the world's oil is
found in the Persian Gulf. When
the Soviet Union cuts off this area,
no more gasoline," he told 150 people in Buch. 102.
Speaking through an interpreter,
Moroz said the Afghanistan crisis is
a turning point for the Soviet Union's relationship with the rest of
the world.
"The West is beginning to recognize that peace now means war later. For genuine, long-lasting peace
we (the West) must win the struggle
in Afghanistan," he said.
"We can give Afghanistan to the
Soviet Union just as we gave up
Vietnam, but where can we see an
end to this?" he said.
Moroz said the United States
should not have withdrawn its
troops from Vietnam in 1975.
"There is a logic of events that demand consistency. If the Americans
entered the war than they had to
win this war," he said.
"They (Americans) betrayed the
Vietnamese people."
He said the Soviet Union is creating its own Vietnam in Afghanistan. "Moscow came to Afghanistan
with its usual tactics of telling the
poor people to take the land from
the rich. But this time it didn't work
because the Afghan peasant didn't
sell his soul for an acre of land."
Moroz was born in the Ukraine
and received a degree in history at
Lviw University. He taught history
and geography until 1965, when he
was arrested for publishing literature banned in the USSR.
Moroz said Soviet prisons and la-
—•dmond o'brten photo
CAUGHT IN THE ACT, delinquent student Jim Henniger is captured on film by intrepid Ubyssey photographer.
Where Henniger slipped up, said UBC traffic and security official, is by not slipping giant banana peel under one of
the other displays in SUB art gallery. Henniger escaped before he could be apprehended, saying thick skin will
protect him against prosecution.
bor camps always house 50 per cent
Ukrainian prisoners to reduce the
strength of a growing Ukrainian national movement.
"National rights are the most important of human rights. It doesn't
matter whether I have comforts in
Ukraine, but it does matter that
Ukraine is Ukraine," he said.
Moroz said he is planning to
assist other Ukrainian nationalists
who are currently in jail. He said he
plans to battle for the release of
Soviet prisoner Yuri Shukhevick by
going   on   weekly   hunger   strikes
"I hope to draw world attention
to him," Moroz said.
MOROZ
no more gas
UEL park causes
mixed reactions
By GEOF WHEELWRIGHT
The public and university community have, greeted a proposal to
turn 1,500 acres of university endowment lands into an official
natural park with reservations.
The UBC administration likes the
park concept, but is concerned that
establishment of a public park will
cut down on the use of the UEL for
research and study, an administration vice-president said yesterday.
"We don't want to suddenly find
that one day the botanists or the
foresters are to be cut off from the
park," said Chuck Connaghan.
He said a UBC president's subcommittee will monitor the progress
of the Greater Vancouver Regional
District plan, and will attend the
GVRD's park open house tonight,
Wednesday and Thursday. The proposal, which calls for a GVRD takeover of 1,500 acres of UEL land,
upgrading of trails and bicycle
paths, improved park management
and better public access might not
be better for UBC, Connaghan
charged.
"The only thing that is reassuring
is that it is going to be a park," he
said. "The concept of a park makes
me a lot more comfortable than
opening it up for housing or something of that nature."
Connaghan said UBC will also be
looking for some representation in
the management of the park to ensure that it blends with the university. He added that UBC's proposed 58-acre research park, which will
border on the natural park, would
integrate well with such a plan.
"The research park would have
an environment that is conducive to
the activities going on in the UEL."
And in a statement released last
week the GVRD said they would
designate part of the park for use by
UBC students and faculty for natural research or establish special
Women's rights abused in 'sick' articles
From page 1
"As offensive as you might find
it, you must think' through the question of freedom of speech," he cautioned.
Kruger agreed that the Toike
should develop an editorial policy
on human sexuality. The distribution of a paper on campus is a privilege, he said, "and it should have a
responsible editorial board."
The McMaster paper, the Plumb-
line, was severely criticized last October when it carried a banner headline: Prostitution ring smashed —
30 nursing students arrested.
Photographs of two female
students were taken from a bookstore advertisement and placed
around the edges of the article.
McMaster engineering society
president Dave Mitges said he re^
ceived letters condemning the
paper's content.
"The students said it was offens
ive and demeaning to the public image of McMaster," he said. "They
felt the content of the paper was objectionable and should be reformed; of failing this, the distribution
mechanism should be changed."
"Due to these complaints, and
the many letters to the editor that
appeared in the (campus newspaper) Silhouette, it was my decision to limit distribution of the
Plumbline only to those students in
engineering," he said.
Proof of registration in engineering is now required before giving a
paper to an individual. If non-engineering students want to have a
copy they have to submit a letter to
the McMaster engineering society
explaining why.
Mitges said it is unfortunate such
drastic action has to be taken but
said he thinks it is necessary due to
rumored cutbacks in the engineer
ing society's grant from the McMaster student union.
"It is a lot of work to limit the
paper's distribution," said Mark
Paulter, Plumbline editor for the
past two years. He added that the
University of Toronto's Toike obtains funding by soliciting advertising.
The Plumbline tries to be different from other engineering papers,
Paulter added. Besides entertainment content, which has been described as "misogynous pornography," said Paulter, one-third of the
paper's content is news.
The Plumbline's all male staff
has made it difficult to provide the
same form of entertainment for female engineering students, although
Paulter said the latest edition carried a female writers' contest.
At UBC the ongoing battle between the women students' office
and the engineers has culminated in
an open challenge to the administration to force engineers to stop
their sexist activities. The engineering undergraduate society publishes
an annual "newspaper," the Red
Rag, and sponsors the annual Lady
Godiva ride, where a naked woman
parades through the campus on a
horse.
Women students' office director
Lorette Woolsey said there has been
no significant attempt to stop sexist
engineering activities although administrators promised to do so a
year ago.
Woolsey said the November 1979
edition of the engineering newsletter libelled several women and
gave the home telephone number of
one. The woman later received obscene telephone calls as a result, she
said.
rules that would ensure they could
conduct such research.
The GVRD also stated it would
"foster a high level of cooperation
and collaboration with the public of
the Regional District, the university, the city of Vancouver and the
local residents in decisions on park
development and management."
And a spokesman for the Society
for Pollution and Environmental
Control said SPEC was strongly in
favor of the GVRD plan, although
unsure the provincial government
will approve it. The GVRD is sending their proposal to Jim Chabot,
minister of lands, parks and housing, in late March.
"If it was (environment minister
Stephen) Rogers I would say we had
a good chance, but with Chabot I
don't know," said SPEC spokesman Greg Reif. "You can't predict
what the government would do."
Libraries to
get student
information
Tired of crawling through
Main library cobwebs in a search
for a dusty volume? Sick of finding no more book nooks to curl
up and sleep by?
If so, UBC's library survey
will give vou a chance to air your
gripes about any of the campus
monoliths. Campus libraries will
be conducting a survey at the beginning of March to evaluate
their performance and discover
needs for improvement or
change.
About 7,000 copies of the library questionnaire, consisting of
20 questions, will be distributed
among UBC's libraries, asking
students to list each library's
adequacy, services provided,
their success rate in finding
course material, user's status,
frequency and purpose of library
use.
UBC head librarian Basil Stuart-Stubbs said he is unaware of
any specific problem areas, except a shortage of space in Main
library. But he admitted: "The
survey could provide information which would help to build a
case for increased capital funds
needed for expansion."
Stuart-Stubbs said small
library changes advocated in the
survey would be implemented
immediately, but major alterations requiring increased funding cannot take effect until the
1982-83 budget is submitted.
"The results of the last survey
in 1968 revealed a serious shortage of space and provided a
good case for the construction of
the Sedgewick library," he said. Page 4
THE    U BYSSEY
Tuesday, February 26,1980
G0fl>ZlLLA-^HW! Da*
SK
Puke on profit
The insatiable appetite of corporate profit has gone sickeningly
too far this time.
It's swallowed up guileless students, chewed up their meagre
chance for some extra cash and spit out a ripe opportunity for them
to go straight to jail.
Genex Inc. has duped students nation-wide (with formal contracts) into soliciting Canadian Pacific airlines vouchers, to then be
resold to corporations, government agencies and university athletic
departments.
But there's a serious snag in the well-manipulated menu — the
RCMP has announced its intentions of arresting and charging
students who persist in marketing coupons to the public at Vancouver international airport. The nauseating realization that
students are being the exploited scapegoats in this avaricious
endeavour shows to what lengths private enterprise will stoop.
Genex head L.P. Bradley calls the RCMP proclamation
"somewhat petty", deftly shifting the blame to a competitive CP
Air whom he claims launched the voucher scheme to counter Air
Canada's seat sale. But his shallow excuses, coupled with his promise of "handsome wages" for students, won't wash down the
palate of any perceptive taster. It's a stinking recipe and it won't
fool anybody.
' THE UBYSSEY'
February 26, 1960
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and not of the
AMS or the university administration. Member/ Canadian
University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial office, is
in room 241K of the Student Union Building. Editorial departments, 228-2301; Advertising, 228-3977.
Co-Editors: Heather Conn and Tom Hawthorn
They didn't often visit paradise but when they did, God knows it was great. Verne McDonald immediately went in search of a good place for the sun worship followed by a nightly moon worship where
future and past bureau chiefs were in danger of being sacrificed to appease the masses. Peter Menyasz
couldn't make it but felt content hearing stories cuddled next to faithful companion. Share All. Geof
Wheelwright, also noticeably absent was spending his time in some bourgeois activity in the lap of his
family. Heather Conn and Kevin Finnegan were there in spirit and laughed long and loud at the antics
of a drunk Steve McClure crooning 'I Want To Hold Your Hand' as he cradled a bottle of good Scotch
in his feeble hands. Julie Wheelwright found solace under the stars and dreamed of the Eastern winter
land where abstinence and other unpleasant things were forgotten. Glen Sanford, Bob Trowsdale
Ed O'Brien tried hard to understand the concept of paradise but could not reach the golden heights
such elevated consciousness and decided to stick to marijuana instead.
itics
Jtch I
nter I
and I
i)
Chile's brutal junta exploits human life
By ROBIN VISEL
We think about the world in terms of the
national issue or international crisis packaged
for us each week as "news" by the media.
Change is news: an election or an invasion or
the takeover of an embassy. No change is not
news. So our interest fuckers from trouble
spot to trouble spot in the world. We blink
at the latest conflict with no deep
understanding of its background causes and
issues.
Of course the eruptions that become news
are evidence of a larger and slower progression of events with roots in a social and economic system. Once we start to dig, we find
that the roots of one issue in one country are
connected to a vast root system that we too
are part of.
Most countries in Latin America today are
ruled by military dictatorships which not only
perspectives
suppress political freedom and civil rights,
but keep the majority of their people struggling for the basic subsistence, the decent living
conditions, healti; care and education that
are also human rights. What these regimes
have done — Brazil and Chile are prime examples — is to institutionalize their repression, so that to assert human rights becomes a crime. The people are presented with
a constitution which allows them to unionize,
for example, within narrowly-restricted
limits; to extend these "rights" becomes a
crime. The term used for such a system is
"protected" or "restricted" democracy,
democracy "with safeguards" against freedom.
Under such a government, the more obvious brutalities: widespread torture, "disappearances," and mass political arrests, are
reduced, but the use of a secret police, selective arrests and torture during interrogation
are continued as routine deterrents to dissent.
A Canadian church group which visited Chile
last year writes in their report:
"We fear that Chile may prove to be the
testing ground for other Latin American
countries of the newest mode of institutional
repression. And, while the blatant use of torture and political disappearances immediately offend international opinion, more institutionalized forms of combined "legalized" repression and selective state terrorism do not
as easily capture world attention." (Bread,
Peace and Liberty, by the task force on the
churches and corporate responsibility and the
inter-church committee on human rights in
Latin America, p. 10.)
In the meantime, these governments are
working hard to promote a false picture of
economic growth, a rising standard of living,
and movement towards democratic reforms.
Their economic model is unrestricted free enterprise, which means that the financial-military elite of the country and the multinational corporations and banks profit from investment and development at the expense of
the majority of the people. (It has been documented that since the 1973 coup in Chile unemployment has risen, real incomes have
fallen, spending for social services has been
drastically reduced while the military budget
climbs, and malnutrition is growing. Source:
Bread, Peace and Liberty, 1979.)
There is a circular connection between the
political stability achieved by a repressive dictatorship and the foreign investment that it
attracts. The generals provide a safe, lucrative climate for investment, and the foreign
governments, corporations and banks help to
support and legitimize these regimes. The
task force on churches and corporate responsibility writes (in its pamphlet Why
Chile?):
Canadian corporations have thus far planned more investments in Chile than those of
any other country and Canadian banks are
becoming more deeply involved in loans to
the dictatorship. . . Further, the Canadian
government, while criticizing Chile in the UN
continues to permit its crown agency, the Export Development Corporation, to facilitate
and insure investment and to extend credits
for sales to Chile. This places a special re-
FREIHEIT
sponsibility on Canadian taxpayers and
citizens.
"Canadian corporations and banks ready
to invest in partnership with the junta argue
that they are politically neutral. They say
they cannot intervene in the domestic affairs
of their host countries, or sit in judgment of
the morals of another government.
"The churches and other concerned organizations find this argument unacceptable.
The Chilean junta needs foreign investment
and credits to stay in power. Canadian corporations and banks, by investing and making loans strengthen that regime at its weakest point. Further, they acquire an interest in
the staying power of the junta. To claim that
they are "neutral" is simply untrue."
At the same time that there are layoffs in
the Canadian resource and manufacturing industries, our companies move their operations to countries in Latin America where
there is a pool of cheap labor, few rights for
workers, less restriction on profits, and political "stability" based on terror. The money
that their development brings into a country
does not trickle down to the poor in the form
of social services and goods, but is skimmed
by the ruling elite, and spent on imported
military hardware, industrial technology and
luxury items.
We eat Chilean fruit and produce frorr
Mexico and Central America, while the land
that is being used for export crops is needed
to grow food for local consumption. Inco has
recently closed plants in eastern Canada to
operate mines in Guatemala. Canada is selling nuclear technology to the brutal military
dictatorship in Argentina. This issue in particular threatens all of us.
In this context, the UBC committee for the
defence of human rights in Chile has organized a week of events on Human Rights and
Human Wrongs in Latin America: the Canadian Connection, from Monday, Feb. 25 to
Friday, Feb. 29. We will have an information
display in the SUB foyer throughout the
week, and will be presenting films and speakers at noon hour. Monday: Living conditions, film and speaker on Brazil, Children of
the Miracle, SUB 212. Tuesday: Civil rights,
Central America, Amnesty International
film, SUB foyer. Wednesday: Canadian investment, CANDU in Argentina, SUB 215.
Wednesday at 7:30 p.m. coffee, wine, Latin
music and conversation at International
House. Thursday: Nicaragua today, SUB
205. Friday: What can we do? Moral and material support for human rights in Latin America. Film: Boycott, SUB 212. Friday at 8:30
p.m.: Benefit dance at the Peretz school,
6184 Ash St. (45th and Cambie) with the
Coffee Dregs steel band, $4.
Your world is not bounded by B lot and
the library. And there is more going on than
you catch on the radio news. Come to some
of our events, and think about your root?
Robin Vise! is a member of UBC's commit-
tee for the defence of human rights in Chile.
If you can unglue yourself from campus complacency to recognize flagrant violation of
human rights, let us know in a Perspectives
article. We know there's more than one voice
out there. Tuesday, February 26,1960
THE    U BYSSEY
Page 5
Art spurs philosophical slobber
Presentation House Proudly Presents
_ '   x^ Two Dynamite Performances
'"p , FEBRUARY 29 &
' \ MARCH 1
ffcf^     \ 8:30 P.M.
,.(     *^-l (programme different each night)
It was my privilege and pleasure
to experience an art display on its
opening night in the AMS gallery in
the SUB on Feb. 18.
My personal reactions to the
works of art and any attempts to
communicate those feelings admit
ART DISPLAY . . . reality loses
and disclose my uneducated artistic
instincts.
In viewing art forms I find it difficult not to judge them on the basis
of whether or not I would want to
live with them; a narrow and confining criterion. Last night, because
of the artists' labor of love, I grew a
little. I delighted in the
weightlessness of the soaring bodies
created by Marjorie Harris that, for
a moment, separated me from the
grossness of my own aging and
overindulged reality.
I really wanted to possess one of
Wendy Hamlin's banana peels.
They made me laugh from way
down deep inside and I smile now to
myself just remembering them. Nor
will I soon forget my sensation of
being too close to Wendy's turkeys
when I was trying to see the inside
of the peels, or my silly reaction of,
"Serves him right" when I saw the
one stripped of his feathers and
gaudy headdress.
Standing before Betty Wetmore's
black and white drawings I was
enveloped in the warmth of a bubble bath, the sensuous swirling
rivulets as surface tension succumbs
to foam. And now, over there, what
energetic laser has refracted such
riotous color? What disciplined
hand has defined and mastered the
flow of pigment? What is this
preoccupation with fluid lines and
translucent waves that veil the
viewer from the viewed? Are they
the remnants of the amniotic
medium of the artist in Betty still
aborning? I could not reconcile the
open, youthful and smiling face of
Scott Plear with his sombre hued
canvasses, nor was I ready to enter,
by inquiry, the personal space from
whence they originated. They haunt
me still.
A vote of thanks to the AMS
gallery committee for making the
experience possible and to the artists who have shared with us their
talent.
R. Howard
0 anna wyman
dance theatre
North Vancouver Centennial Theatre
Tickets, from Vancouver Ticket Centre and
Eaton's.  $6 and $4.50.  Call 986-1351 for info.
In SUB
Basement
Sausage Rolls
Cornish Pasties
Beef & Chicken Pies
Meat & Vegetable Samosas
Potato Chops
Also Bagels with Cream
Cheese Lox
Open from 9 a.m.-6 p.m.
'Hot and stuffy9 labyrinth is man 9s castle
Someone has slandered my
mystical castle, the Main library.
(Perspectives, Feb. 19.) Since my
first year at university, I have been
awed by its labyrinthian depths and
air of antiquity.
Yes, the hallways are narrow.
What better way to meet people
than to wrestle them for the right of
way?
Yes, the access is somewhat limited. One occasionally has to walk to
We killed 1,000 in 'clerical error9 and
vegetarian accuses us of slaughter
I find it indicative, indeed, that
The Ubyssey screwed up my article
concerning the number of animals
slaughtered for their flesh and skin
every year in Canada. Instead of the
accurate number of 242,000,000 a
year (242 million that is) the paper
wrote 242,000. Interesting, psychologically, that this was the one
figure that The Ubyssey got wrong
and when I first saw this mistake I
was furious but later it made sense
to me.
The figure of 242,000,000 is
threatening to many people and I
think on a strictly unconscious level
this was a deliberate error, because
no one, but no one, wants to face
the obscene reality of this figure.
Joanne Gilbert
psychology 3
the fifth floor to gain the privilege
of walking down to the first floor,
but what of it? If you wanted to,
you could lose yourself in there for
days. No one would ever find you.
And any time you want, you can
pull out one of the older volumes
and exclaim to yourself: "Well, I'll
be darned . . . this book was
printed in 1898!" (If that doesn't
give you insights into the meaning
of life, I don't know what will.)
True, the building is sometimes
cold and drafty and sometimes hot
and stuffy. This is not because of
poor ventilation, it is because the
building is breathing. It is the heart
and soul of UBC.
Pat McKitrick
law 2
DO YOU NEED EXTRA PRACTICE
for the
ENGLISH 100 COMPOSITION EXAM?
Improve your essay writing with a
short course in English Composition
March 4-20,1980
6 Workshops of 2 hours each
$50
UBC READING, WRITING and
STUDY SKILLS CENTRE
For Information Call 228-2181, Local 285
hair studio inc.
UNISEX HAIRSTYLES
FOR APPOINTMENT
224-1922   , VKA
224-9116   '——
5784 University (next to Bank of Commerce)
INTRAMURALS
LEAP YEAR DANCE!
featuring:
"MR. NATURAL"
special appearances by
B.C. LIONS
Larry Key, Terry Bailey, John Beaton
& Glen Leonhard
Friday Feb. 29th SUB Ballroom — tickets $2
rm 210 War Memorial or AMS Bus. office
also: Thurs. 12:30
STORM THE WALL
Fri. 12:30
AQUATICS SHOW
in the Aquatic Centre underwater video
by CAN DIVE ltd. Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 26,1980
'Tween classes
TODAY
CAMPUS PRO-LIFE
Film: Two is a Crowd, and guest speaker Anne
Waldock, noon, SUB 207.
LSA SPEAKERS
Rentalsman Jim Patterson speaks, noon, Law
101.
NEWMAN CATHOLIC CENTRE
Bible discussion, noon, St. Mark's College.
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
General meeting, noon, SUB 130.
EL CIRCULO
Dr. Karl Kobbervig, noon, Buch. 218.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION
Testimony meeting, noon, SUB 211.
RUSSIAN CLUB AND SLAVONIC STUDIES
Former CBC Moscow correspondent David Levy
speaks   on   the   Russian   underground,   noon,
Buch. 106.
CHILE COMMITTEE AND
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL
Film on civil rights in Latin America, noon, SUB
foyer.
CUSO
Ralph Torrie speaks on energy, 7:30 p.m.. International House upper lounge.
WEDNESDAY
AMS POTTERY CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 251.
NEWMAN CATHOLIC CENTRE
Nominations for elections and meeting, noon,
SUB 211.
LSA FILM COMMITTEE
Film; Enemy Alien, about the internment of Japanese-Canadians in World War II, noon. Law
101.
UBC SAILING CLUB
Genera* meeting and film, noon, SUB 207.
CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR CHRIST
Loomis security founder Charles Loomis speaks
on success and values, noon, Angus 326.
INTRAMURALS
Intramural track and field meet, noon, Harry
Logan track.
GERMANIC STUDIES DEPARTMENT
German professor Horst Denkler speaks on literary imagination in the modern world, noon,
SUB 2230,
CCCM
Anglican United SCM community meal, 5:30
p.m., Lutheran Campus Centre
BLACK & LEE
TUX SHOP
NOW AT
3110 Seymour St.
688-2481
CHILE COMMITTEE AND
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL
A talk on the nuclearization of Latin America and
the Canadian connection, noon, SUB 215.
Coffee, wine and conversation, 7:30 p.m., International House.
THURSDAY
CCF
Rev.  Moffatt speaks on denominations, noon,
SUB 207.
AMNESTY UBC
Letter writing workshop and film, noon, SUB
224.
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Lesbian drop in, 1:30 p.m., SUB IX.
EAST INDIAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION
General   meeting,   noon,   International   House
main floor.
YOUNG ALUMNI CLUB
Classical guitar and jazz music,  8 p.m.,  Cecil
Green Park.
DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY
Dr. T. G. Northcote speaks on Titicaca: Then,
Today,   Tomorrow,   noon,   Biological  Sciences
2000,
IYS
Akber Ladha lectures on meditation, noon, SUB
117.
WOMEN STUDENTS' OFFICE
Career choices for women, noon, Brock 301.
IVCF
Summer options 1980, noon, Chem. 250.
TOASTMASTERS
New members welcome, 7:30 p.m., MacMillan
278.
AMS ART GALLERY
General meeting, noon, SUB 230.
FORESTRY
Blood donor clinic, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., SUB 215.
INTRAMURALS
Track and field meet, noon, Harry Logan field.
Storm the wall four-leg relay race,  run, cycle,
swim and climbing of 12-foot wall.
CHILE COMMITTEE
Slide and talk on human rights in Nicaragua today, noon, SUB 205.
FRIDAY
CHILE COMMITTEE
Film:   Boycott   -    what can we do for human
rights in North America, noon, SUB 212.
Benefit  dance for the  Chilean  co-operative,  8
p.m., Peretz school, 6184 Ash St.
n
SUBfilms Presents
D
CLINT EASTWOOD
ESCAPE  FROM
ALCATRAZ
K0RRES
*w MOVING AND TE
PO TRANSFER LTD. J~
'STORAGE
Big or
Small Jobs
Reasonable
Rates
2060 W. 10th^
Vancouver
734-5535
Eve. and Holidays 732-9898
Also Garages, Basements, Yards
CLEAN-UPS
APPLICATIONS
for Student Administrative
Commission (10 members)
& Ombudsperson
Forms available at AMS Business
Office,Student Union Bldg.,
Rm. 266
Applications    must    be    returned   to   AMS
Business Office by 3:30 p.m., Friday, Feb. 29.
MUSIC/UBC
PRESENTS
WEDNESDAY NOON-HOUR CONCERT
12:30 p.m. Recital Hall
John Loban, Violin
Randolph Hokanson, Piano
music of: Debussy and Prokofieff
THURSDAY — BRASS CHOIR
12:30 p.m. Recital Hall
Gordon Cherry, Director
music of: Canadian and American composers
FACULTY RECITAL
8:00 p.m. Recital Hall
Pawel Checinski, Piano
FRIDAY — UBC WIND SYMPHONY
8:00 p.m. Old Auditorium
Martin Berinbaum, Director
MONDAY  — FACULTY RECITAL
12:30 p.m. Recital Hall
Dennis Miller, Tuba
music of: Bach, Schumann, Armand Russell and Wagner
Desperation. It's not ■ word alot of ua Bk» to un. But up here in SUS room 2«1k h's a way of Ufa. We toS and sweet in tha firm knowledgemm ours is tha
best tish-wrapper this side of Agronomy Road. Despite tha allure of the highflying jet sat living every Ubyssey staffer enjoys we've been having problems latety
recruiting staff. Jack Anderson and Charles Lynch have offered to down tools at their respective journals and come work on tha Ubyssey as word fitters out
along the journalistic grapevine that the paper that gave the world Himie Koshevoy is in dire straits. But we said no to Chuck and Jack, cause, well, we need
really incompetent new staffers whom we can borrow money from and generally alienate rather than anyone who actually knows what he or she j* doing. And
that's where you come in. Yea, you. You're obviously prime material for journalistic degration if you have to read this angularly unattractive block of close,
dense type. Or maybe it's not. Maybe one of the editors fucked up again, tha elitist swine that they are. Or maybe one of the mentally unstable people down
here at the printers. Or maybe me. the crazed masochist that writes this drivel. Help. Save us.
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
1980 SPRING LECTURES
BY VISITING PROFESSORS
Sir Edmund Leach
A social anthropologist with early fieldwork experiences in Ceylon, Borneo and Burma, Sir Edmunds' main anthropological interests have been in what is called Structural Anthropology. He has recently retired as provost of King's College, Cambridge,
where he was also professor in social anthropology. He is an important interpreter
and critic of the work of Claude Levi-Strauss, another eminent anthropologist, as well
as author of numerous essays, articles and reviews.
WHY DID MOSES HAVE A SISTER?
Wednesday, February 27 in Room 106, Buchanan Building, at 12:30 p.m.
MICHELANGELO'S GENESIS: AN ANTHROPOLOGISTS VIEW
Saturday, March 1 In Lecture Hall 2, Woodward Instructional Resources Centre, at
8:15 p.m. (A Vancouver Institute Lecture)
ALL LECTURES ARE FREE
sponsored by
■ The Cecil H. and Ida Green Visiting Professorship Fund i
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: Student - 3 lines, 1 day $1.50; additional lines 35c
Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $3.00; additional tines 50c. Additional days $2.75 and 46c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone'and are payable in advance.
Deadline is 11:30 a.m., the aay before publication.
Pu&ieaticmOffice, Room 241, S.U.B., UBC, Van.. B.C. V6T1W5.
5 — Coming Events
50 — Rentals
86 — Typing
ESCAPE FROM UBC. Come to see a
thoroughly entertaining film this Thursday
7:00; Friday and Saturday 7:00, 9:30 and
Sunday 7:00 in SUB Aud. Only 41.00.
10 — For Sale — Commercial
COMMUNITY SPORTS SPECIALS: Sherwood H12ROK Hockey sticks $4.96; grey
sweat pants $9.95; polyester hockey jerseys
$9.95; racquetball racquets $9.95; bicycle
panniers, $14.95; Wilson World Class tennis racquets $29.95 (strung); grey-colored
down jackets $34.95; Nike LDV Or Osaga
joggers $39.95; Waxless X-Country ski
package $79.50; and dozens of other well-
priced items at 3615 West Broadway,
733-1612.
66 — Scandals
11
For Sale — Private
WELL MADE HOUSEBOAT 54 hour from
Vancouver. Secure moorage. $9000 o.b.o.
Might finance. E. Barry. Phone UBC 2605
or 873-0869.
UNDERWOOD manual typewriter with Pica
keyboard. Great condition. Perfect for term
papers. Call 325-0359.
"OLD FASHIONED" girl wearing aqua
marine satin dress at "Blue Northern" concert — your brief dancing partner desires
further encounter. Please phone Jim
732-0969.
$987 WE'RE NOT THAT CHEAPI We gave
$198. Now, before we get shirty — the
cream pie kid.
JACK HITTRICH: An affair? No strings
attached? Apply Andrea Dumptruck, Buch
107.
"STORM THE WALL " Thursday noon
mall — why are they doing it
LEAP YEAR DANCE with MR NATURAL
Friday 8:00 p.m. SUB. Sponsored by intramurals. Tickets $2.00 in Room 210 War
Memorial Gym or AMS office 266 S.U.B. in
attendance B.C. Lions Larry Key, John
Beaton, Terry Bailey.
AQUATIC SHOW noon Friday x-rated
underwater goings-on-divers, canoers synchros and scubas.
20 — Housing
ROOMS FOR RENT 2280 Wesbrook. Phone
224-9679. Ask for Chris or Ted.
NEED TO SUBLET furnished one bedroom
apt. Pref. Kits. May 1st-Aug. 31st. Mature
non smoker. Box 20.
HOUSE   EXCHANGE   WANTED   -   BBC
producer has 5-bedroom house, Henley,
England to exchange for 3+ bedroom
house - April 20 to May 31, 1980, or part
thereof. Phone 1403) 452-9990, 9:00-5:00.
70 — Services
TYPING 80c per page. Fast and accurate.
Experienced typist. Phone Gordon,
873-8032.
TYPING. Essays, theses, manuscripts,
including technical, equational, reports, letters, resumes. Fast accurate. Bilingual.
Clemy 266-6641.
YEAR ROUND expert essay and theses
typing from legible work. Phone 738-6829
from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m.
FAST   EFFICIENT   TYPING.    Reasonable
rates. 266-5053^ 	
EXPERIENCED PUBLIC STENOGRAPHER.
Judith   Filtness,   5670  Yew   St.   9  to  5,
266-6814. Type anything.
TYPING 70c PER PAGE. Fast and accurate.
Will do rush jobs. Campus drop off and
pick-up easily arranged. Phone 228-2160.
ESSAYS, THESES, ETC. Typed on IBM
Selectric. Fast, accurate, technical typing
also. Phone Carol 980-5373. Reasonable
rates. (North Vancouver).
TYPING SERVICE FOR THESES, corres
pondence, etc. Any field. French also
available. IBM Selectric. Call 736-4042.
PREGNANT? NEED HELP? Call Birthright
for free confidential help. 687-7223. We
care about you.
DIFFERENT DAY CARE. Licensed family
care. Excellent facilities and planned program. Qualified nursery teacher. Many extras, including transportation to nursery
school if desired. Prefer two and a half to
five years, with a view to stable care until
grade one. Near 41st Ave. and Oak St.
263-8260.
90 - Wanted
ARE      YOU      HAVING      TROUBLE
keeping physically fit? If so, you are invited
to join a new program, in which we will attempt to match you with an exercise partner. Get involved, get fit, no cost. For further information call David Myrles 733-9015
(early evenings).
99 — Miscellaneous
25 — Instruction
80 — Tutoring
HOME WANTED for two adorable female
ginger kittens who are being evicted from
residence. Contact Heidi or Kathy.
224-9098.
30 — Jobs
MENI WOMENI
JOBSI
Cruiseships/Sailing Expeditions/Sailing
Campsl No experience. Good pay. Summer. Career, nationwide, worldwide.
Send $4.95 for application/info/referrals
to: Crulsaworid 141. Box 80129.
Sacramento. CA.
36 — Lost
FILIGREE CAMEO BROOCH between
B-Lot & Angus on Wed. Feb. 20. Reward
offered. Sentimental value. 434-3330,
526-7326.
CALCULATOR CALCULATOR, a T1-58
Programable, I need it, 224-9751. Simon or
message, rewardl
WINTER CLEARANCE SALE
Big Savings On ALL Ski Equipment
30% OFF ALL SKI WEAR
David S. Reid, Ditrani, K2, Rossignol. Langs, Ralchle,
Tyrolia, Geze Solomon
FEB. 19th thru FEB. 29th
40 — Messages
1999 228-0414
@HBHDL0WER MALL
A 20 YR. OLD STUDENT in 3rd year Health
Sciences is seeking female companionship.
Write box 40 this paper.
,    .,    ■    ..    ... STUDENT UNION BUILDING
r^ili"!!*]!^        "Across from the Pit" Tuesday, February 26, 1980
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
Students want prof back
HALIFAX (CUP) — Students
at Nova Scotia technical college
boycotted classes Thursday and
set up picket lines to protest an administrator's decision not to
rehire a professor.
Students will continue to boycott classes until a committee of
faculty, students and administrators is appointed to review the case
of assistant professor Larry Richards, said undergraduate student
Richard Netherton.
Richards, who taught at the college's school of architecture for
five years, was denied tenure, promotion and renewal of his con
tract, which expires in April.
"We feel that architecture dean
Peter Manning has acted in an
autocratic manner," Netherton
said. "He circumvented his own
appointments committee to bring
about a decision we do not feel is
justified."
The picketeers are also demanding the board of governors review
dean Manning's position.
Student Barry Isnor said Richards is often outspoken about
matters he does not approve of
and added a personality conflict
might exist between the assistant
professor and the dean.
WRCUPpies elect
Ubyssey co-editor
The Western Region of Canadian
University Press thwarted a move
by several member student
newspapers to cut news services at a
regional conference Sunday.
HAWTHORN
wins B.C.
Delegates narrowly defeated a
motion to eliminate news bureaus in
Vancouver and Winnipeg after prolonged debate. Newspapers from
the major universities in Alberta
and Saskatchewan supported the
move which would have cut
regional staff by two-thirds.
The weekend conference in
Paradise Valley attempted to solve
the problem of CUP fee hikes for
member newspapers as the papers'
financial resources are cut back.
Ubyssey co-editor Tom
Hawthorn, and WRCUP president
Gene Jamieson, who were elected to
the B.C. and Manitoba bureaus
respectively, were relieved to find
their new jobs still existing at the
end of the conference.
And Nancy McRitchie, former
staff member of the Douglas College's The Other Press, will serve a
second term as prairie field worker.
The conference also passed a motion to give financial restraint
priority at the August regional conference in Kelowna.
\    * * C    ••••* a.
•. J \   ••* ••.   .•* s   •• :     *•.   .•* •
THURSDAY
Men's rugby
UBC 23 Orange Co. 4
Women's ice hockey
UBC 5 Flindall 7
FRIDAY
Men's ice hockey
UBC 4 Saskatchewan 5
Men's basketball
UBC 66 Victoria 72
Women's basketball
UBC 46 Victoria 63
SATURDAY
Men's ice hockey
■ UBC 1 Saskatchewan 2
Men's basketball
UBC 69 Victoria 72
Women's basketball
UBC 55 Victoria 86
Men's rugby
World Cup
UBC 44 UCSB 3
Women's field hockey
UBC 1 Doves 1
SUNDAY
Women's soccer
UBC   2 IODE 0
Women's ice hockey
UBC 6 Kitsilano 1
id;
bounced
From page 8
Friday and 72-69 Saturday. UBC
had its shooting accuracy drop off
to 40 per cent Friday and 43 per
cent Saturday, down from a season
average of 47 per cent.
Meanwhile the Thunderette
basketball team finished its Canada
West season with two losses against
the top ranked Vikettes to finish the
league season with one win. The
women wrap up with a game Friday
against the University of Western
Washington in Bellingham.
UNIVERSITY
TEXT BOOKS
NON FICTION PAPERBACKS
NEW & USED
BETTER BUY BOOKS
4393 West 10th
Open 11-7:00 224-4144
HILLEL HIGHLIGHTS
Tues. Feb. 26th: Falafel Lunch
12:30 Hillel House
Wed. Feb. 27th: Shafa Vegetarian Lunch
12:30 Hillel House
Thurs. Feb. 28th: Hebrew Classes
Week No. 6
Sat. Mar. 1st: Hillel Minyan - 10:00 a.m.
Hardalah, Megillah - 7:00 p.m.
For more info, phone 224-4748
Previously, a petition supporting Richards had been signed by
more than 130 of the college's 145
students.
Manning said students have exaggerated the problem and do not
realize the complexity of the issue.
After refusing to attend a student
forum, he said that hiring decisions are none of the students'
business. But the dean did agree to
meet with students individually or
in small groups.
Richards has contacted a lawyer
to aa on his behalf and students
are inquiring about their rights, if
any, in the matter.
TECHNICAL COLLEGE . . . students support prof
Piss off your profs
Winks has amassed here a plethora of previously-unknown
facts, and this alone is his contribution to Canadian history.
I doubt his facts do much for either imperial or diplomatic
history.
I'm afraid, Robin Winks, that this reviewer will have to
invoke the conveniently damning label.
Join The Ubyssey SUB 241k
This amusing piece of drivel is only here to fill a space that if left unfilled would give Tom Hawthorne
nightmares for the next two weeks. At this time the staff of The Ubyssey would like to apologize for the
photograph of Mrs. Hawthorne's little Tommy that appears next to this blurb. We picked it out on purpose
but are sorry that the elevated view makes his 6'2" frame seem smaller.
• •••*•••••   •*•••••*••
* FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE *
*"    A co-production of the departments of music &     ^
Jf theatre j+
•
ALBERT HERRING
A Comic Opera
by Benjamin Britten
Conducted by French Tickner
MARCH 7-15
(Previews - March 5 & 6)
8:00 p.m.
Student Prices:
$3.00 Previews
:$4.00 Regular
BOX OFFICE*FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE'Room
207
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STUDENT UNION BUILDING, UBC
224-2344 Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 26,1980
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THUNDERETTE SOCCER PLAYER makes move around IODE defender Sunday, aided by crazy glue keeping
ball firmly on boot. Thunderettes were leading 2-0 in league game when deranged European in station wagon,
irate over North American refusal to call game by proper name of football, or fossball, or voetball, detonated explosive device planted in ball. Man has recently found employment with New York Cosmos but will be stationed in
Vancouver.
UBC jocks shine even in rain
The UBC rugby team retained the
World Cup with a 44-3 thrashing of
the University of California at Santa Barbara Saturday in California.
The 'Birds got 12 points from
Brian Bugdanovich and eight each
from Graham Taylor and John
Olesen to win the cup, which was
donated by the now-defunct Vancouver World newspaper.
One game of the planned four
game tour was cancelled by the
heavy rain which has plagued
California for past weeks.
The 'Birds return to local action
Sunday when they play Vancouver
Island representative Crimson Tide
in the second round of McKechnie
Cup action.
*     *     »
UBC fencers placed well in the annual Stephen Lazar tournament
held on campus although they won
no events.
Craig Bowlsby placed second in
the men's foil after losing a barrage
to Robert Poalst of Winnipeg,
while Patrick Tam of UBC placed
second in the sabre and fourth in
the foil. Jane Milton and Francis
Sloan   placed   second   and   third
respectively  in  the  women's   foil
while Graham Smith finished third
in the men's epee.
»     *     *
Seven gymnasts will represent
UBC at the Canadian Interuniversi-
ty Athletic Union championships at
the Universite de Moncton on the
weekend. Ed Osborne, Ralph
Bereska and Glen Harder will compete in the men's events while Patti
Sakaki, Michele Sirett, Laurel
McKay and Robin Phillips have
qualified for the women.
Vikings first,
who's next?
When the undefeated University
of Victoria Vikings show up for the
Canada West men's basketball
playoff, they might have the element of surprise working against
them.
They will not find out until the
last minute who they will play.
Although the Vikings wrapped
up first place in Canada West a
month ago, the battle for the second and final playoff spot is still
CANADA WEST UNIVERSITY
ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION
Men's basketball standings
Victoria Vikings
Calgary D'saurs
UBC'Birds
Alberta Bears
L'bridge P'horns
Sask. Huskies
W
18
10
10
9
7
0
L
0
8
8
9
11
18
Women's basketball
final standings
W
Victoria Vikettes 19
Calgary Dinnies 15
Alberta Pandas 13
L'bridge P'horns 7
Sask. Huskiettes 5
UBC Th'ettes 1
L
1
5
7
13
15
19
Pts.
36
20
20
18
14
0
Pts.
38
30
26
14
10
2
raging. With one weekend of league
play remaining the Calgary Dinosaurs,  the  Alberta Golden  Bears
and the UBC Thunderbirds all have
shots at the playoffs. Only the
Dinosaurs can make it without help
from someone else, though.
Now comes the confusing part.
Calgary and UBC are tied with 20
points after last weekend's play. If
they remain tied after next weekend
because both teams win or split,
Calgary would make the playoffs
due to the point spread in games
against UBC. But if UBC loses both
games to Lethbridge and Calgary
loses two to Alberta, the Golden
Bears would finish second and meet
Victoria in the playoffs.
If UBC wins both games and Alberta and Calgary split, or if Alberta wins both games, UBC would
make the playoffs because they
would have more points.
If UBC splits and Alberta wins
two, UBC would make the playoffs
because of the point differential in
games with Alberta.
So UBC must win and hope Alberta wins. Alberta must win and
hope Lethbridge wins. Calgary
must just win.
And the whole situation might
confuse the Vikings more than any
defence they have seen this season,
including the Thunderbirds' on the
weekend. Victoria held off the
'Birds to edge UBC twice, 72-66
See page 7: 'BIRDS
UBC again plays
second fiddle
So you've had six bouts with
English 100 and have lost them all?
Then you have some idea how the
UBC women's volleyball team
feels.
The Thunderettes finished second
in the final Canada West tournament on the weekend in Calgary
after losing twice to the University
of Saskatchewan Huskiettes.
Saskatchewan has now defeated
UBC six consecutive times this season.
"They'll get beat," UBC coach
Sandy Silver vowed Monday. "I
still don't count us out."
Saskatchewan defeated UBC in
five games during the round robin
tournament, and then dropped the
Thunderettes in four games during
the best-of-five final series between
the two top teams in Canada West.
The UBC men missed a chance to
qualify for the nationals when they
lost matches to the University of
Calgary   and   the   University   of
Alberta. The 'Birds finished third in
Canada West standings.
The Thunderettes placed Kerry
Hutchinson on the Canada West
first all-star team while captain
Chris Trainor and Marianne Branson made the second team. Silver
said Trainor played "superbly" on
the weekend.
"She really peaked at the right
time," Silver added.
The Thunderettes will meet five
other teams in a round robin tournament March 7-9 for the national
finals, with the top two teams playing a best-of-five series for the
championship. UBC will therefore
get at least one more chance at
knocking off Saskatchewan.
Canada West has historically
been the strongest university
volleyball league in the country,
with the western representatives
winning the national title five of the
past eight years and finishing second the other three times.
'Super league' could kill ice hockey at
I
By KEVIN FINNEGAN
Last week British Columbia lost its only
representative in government. Next year it
may lose its only representative in national
collegiate ice hockey.
UBC is unlikely to be included in a proposed "super league" of 12 or 16 university
men's ice hockey teams slated to commence
play next year, UBC coach Bert Halliwell
said Monday.
Both the University of Calgary and the
University of Alberta will be asked to join
the league, leaving UBC's closest collegiate
competition in Saskatchewan and
Manitoba. Prohibitive travel costs would
prevent UBC from joining the Great Plains
Athletic Conference, leaving the 'Birds to
enter the B.C. Senior Hockey League.
"That would be the death of our hockey
program," said Halliwell.
Halliwell said the future of the super
league depends on financing from either the
government or private business and added
UBC would not be included unless it was
"on a regional basis."
"With our record we wouldn't make it,"
he said.
The Thunderbirds finished in last place in
the Canada West league this year after
dropping a pair of games to the University
of Saskatchewan Huskies on the weekend.
The Huskies won 5-4 Friday and 2-1 Saturday in two well-played games that belied the
struggle for last place.
Friday evening the 'Birds pulled the
goalie in the last minute while trailing by a
goal and were rewarded with the tying
marker with 14 seconds remaining, but
Saskatchewan scored again with one second
remaining to win the game.
Saturday the Huskies broke a 1-1 tie in
the third period and held off the 'Birds to
win the game and the Johnny Owen trophy
for annual competition between the
schools.
The last place finish was "our worst
record in history," Halliwell said.
"It's the first time UBC has ever ended
up in last place."
Halliwell pointed to the 'Birds defensive
play and their home record as two major
factors in the team's poor season.
"The obvious reason is we were giving up
four or five goals a game. We were the top
scoring team in the league and we gave up
10 more goals than we scored," he said.
UBC had the top three scorers in Canada
West, with Jim McLaughlin and Rob Jones
tying for the scoring title. Bill Holowaty
was third, two points behind.
Halliwell also pointed out UBC had an
8-8 win-loss record on the road while the
team was 4-9 in the unfriendly confines of
Thunderbird Arena.
"We didn't get any fan support at home.
There was a real negative attitude on home
ice," said Halliwell.
"In our rink when we play Alberta there
are more fans cheering for them than for
us," Halliwell said.
ICE HOCKEY
last hurrah?

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