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The Ubyssey Sep 13, 1979

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Array UBC hands over 46 acres
THS ft IRY^^FY
Vol. LXII, No. 2
Vancouver, B.C. Thursday, September 13,1979
228-2301
Kenny announces
research park
— ross burnett photo
MALCOLM TOMLINSON AND BAND entertain 120 out-to-lunch students in SUB auditorium Wednesday.
Concert was first in noon-hour series sponsored by AMS, Gary Taylor's Rock Room and C-FOX radio. Proceeds
donated to Children's Hospital. Blue Northern will perform next Wednesday.
UBC and the provincial government have agreed on plans for a
46-acre research park on university
land, administration president
Doug Kenny said last night.
Kenny told a meeting of senate
that an agreement on the park,
which will be located south of 16th
Avenue and Wesbrook Mall near
the TRIUMF research facility,
should be signed within two months.
"We will largely be in control of
what happens out here," Kenny
said. "This will be a big gain for the
province and this will also be a gain
for the university."
Kenny said that a UBC committee will control the day-to-day
operations of the park, and UBC
will have to approve all new
tenants.
The provincial government has
indicated that it wants to set up
research parks for private industry
near B.C.'s three public universities
and   near   the   B.C.   Institute   of
Technology.
Kenny had said in 1978 that UBC
was considering giving 16 acres of
land to the provincial government
for a research park, but Kenny said
Wednesday 46 acres was a better
size. The 46 acres will allow the
buildings to be spread out in a parklike setting.
"This is an exciting endeavor.
The discovery park will be
dedicated to attracting high-
technology industry to this area."
He said all facilities in the park
will have to meet UBC environmental standards and he stressed that
the park will not be built on the
University Endowment Lands but
on a section of university land.
Kenny said industries in the park
will be related to forestry, pharmaceuticals and high-technology industry related to research at the
faculty of engineering.
Chilean protest
ends in victory
By JULIE WHEELWRIGHT
A two-day hunger strike by a
group of Chilean-Canadians ended
yesterday in victory as information
about the murder of 15 political
prisoners was finally released to
their families.
Fifteen Chilean-Canadians, who
fasted at UBC's Lutheran Campus
Centre, joined a world-wide hunger
strike to protest the flagrant violation of human rights in Chile. The
strike ended at noon Wednesday
when the protestors received a
phone call from another striker in
Chile with the news that one of their
demands was met.
"We were on strike for two days
but we were prepared for longer,"
said Igor Pezoa, a former Chilean
student.
At least 50 other groups worldwide and more than 200 Chileans
fasted in churches and in the Danish
embassy in Chile as part of the protest, Pezoa said.
The demand met by the Augusto
Pinochet government was for the
felease of the names of 15 political
prisoners whose bodies were found
in an abandoned mine shaft, after
being reported missing for six years.
The bodies will now be returned
to their families, said Pezoa.
Protestors are still demanding
that the police responsible for the
massacre of civilians during the
1973 junta be returned to prison.
They are also asking for information about 2,500 "missing" people.
A similar strike held a year ago
last May lasted much longer before
Chilean officials agreed to
demands, said George Hermanson,
chaplin of UBC's co-operative campus ministry.
"I think the world-wide pressure
is increasing against the Chilean
regime and that is helpful to people
that suffer this kind of repression,"
he said.
The protest marks the sixth anniversary of the assasination of
president Salvador Allende. Both
the Canadian Labor Congress and
the B.C. Federation of Labor are
boycotting the handling of Chilean
products and imports this week.
Today the CLC and the federation will be staging a parade
demonstration beginning at noon
and starting at the Holiday Inn
Harborside.
Transporation unions are also
refusing to handle any cargo to or
See page 2: LABOR
Funding principles go by the board
By PETER MENYASZ
Bruce Armstrong is seriously compromising his
position as a student member of the UBC board of
governors.
Armstrong is using about $5,000 given him by administration president Doug Kenny to carry out a
series of pet projects that carry the name and stamp
of approval of the Alma Mater Society.
Analysis
But they are not AMS projects if the university administration is paying for them.
Today's AMS barbecue, the new calendar of AMS
activities, and a proposed AMS annual are projects
financed wholly or in part by administration money.
These are not essential student services, but simply
luxuries, designed to improve the image of the AMS.
AMS president Brian Short says these are services
the AMS would like to provide, but are too expensive.
But what are the obligations the AMS is accepting
along with the money?
Armstrong is quick to point out that Kenny offered the money with "no strings attached." But
even Short is not completely convinced, and
although there have been no problems to date, he
says he is concerned about the possibility of such
obligations.
And how does Armstrong's relationship with Kenny affect his performance as a student board
representative?
"If you take money from the university for projects, especially ones that aren't academic, I think
you leave yourself open to a lot of suspicion," said
Glenn Wong, the other student board member. "I
think it's particularly dangerous for board reps
because it can be used against them in a board
meeting."
Valgeet Johl, AMS external affairs officer, is worried her effectiveness in dealing with the administration is being jeopardized by Armstrong's actions.
"I'm going to be in a difficult position to justify
why I feel that tuition fees should not go up when the
See page 3: FRIENDSHIP
DOUG AND BRUCE
strange bedfellows Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, September 13, 1979
Labor groups begin
Chilean boycott
From page 1
from Chile and the labor groups are
urging consumers to leave Chilean
wine, food products and motor
parts on store shelves.
The CLC and the federation protests are putting extra pressure on
the Chilean junta to meet the
demands of the strikers, said Hermanson.
He also questioned UBC's investments in Chile in light of the
political situation.
"There is an intimate connection
between the knowledge we gain at
university and our investment portfolio and there should be discussion
about it in an intellectual community," said Hermanson.
"The fact that tuition fees are
low is due to our investment portfolio."
Pezoa said the victory is also a
sign of better things to come in
Chile.
"The whole political situation is
changing, the mass movement is
struggling against dictatorship and
soon it is going to be weaker," he
added.
The people aren't afraid to protest anymore and in that sense the
government has to give some
response, which is very important.
The experience of Nicaragua was
very healthy for Chile."
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The Vancouver office of our expanding national practice is seeking 1980 graduates in accounting, licentiate in
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pursuing a challenging career as Chartered Accountants.
Interested applicants should leave a copy of their
U.C.P.A. form and most recent transcript at the Canada Employment Centre in Brock Hall by October Sth.
You will be contacted regarding campus interviews
which will take place November 5th through the 9th.
Additional information is available at the
Canada Employment Centre on campus.
LSAT
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call us toll free at
1-800-663-3381
OPTICAL SHOP
OPTICAL SHOP
1535 West Broadway - 731-8188
I Conveniently located on U.B.C. bus route at Broadway and Granville)
PRESCRIPTIONS FILLED OR DUPLICATED
PRICES TO MEET YOUR BUDGET - FRAMES AS LOW AS $5.95
CONTACT LENS SPECIAL - SEE INSIGHT 79
(Student Discounts Available On Eyeglassesl
Other Locations: 341 North Road. Coquitlam, 931-7441
10330 - 152nd St.. Surrey, 581-8888
UNIVERSITY
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NON FICTION PAPERBACKS
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BETTER BUY BOOKS
t:!9:s West 10th
Open 11-7:00 224-4144
NOTICE
TO ALL CLUBS
Club's Day will be Sept. 20 and 21. If you will be
participating in this event please have a representative from your club contact the clubs commissioner in SUB 246 by Friday, Sept. 14.
THEATRE DEPARTMENT
AUDITIONS - AUDITIONS - AUDITIONS
for
"OUR TOWN"
by THORNTON WILDER
DIRECTED BY CHARLES SIEGEL
Open lo all U.B.C. Students, Faculty and Staff
Tuesday, September 11 4:00-6:00 p.m.
Wednesday, September 12 10:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m.
2:00-5:00 p.m.
Thursday, September 13 12:00-3:00 p.m.
ALL AUDITIONS IN ROOM 206, FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
Audition appointments may be arranged in advance through
the Theatre Department Office — Telephone 228-3880
THIS IS YOUR BIG CHANCE TO LIGHT UP THE STAGE
* Come One — Come All *
AUDITIONS - AUDITIONS - AUDITIONS
ROYAL BAN K
When you succeed . . . we succeed
CANADA STUDENT LOANS
NEW LOANS  •   DEPOSIT ACCOUNTS
TRANSFER ACCOUNTS FOR CONVENIENCE
SAVINGS WITH CHEQUEING PRIVILEGES
UNIVERSITY AREA BRANCH
Don Routley, Manager
Brenda Flack, Senior Loans Officer
Heather Betker. Loans Officer
10thatSasamat
228-1141 Thursday, September 13, 1979
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
East schools told to get loans
OTTAWA (CUP) — Ontario
universities suffering from funding
cutbacks made by the provincial
government have been told to borrow money from banks if they cannot make ends meet.
The Council of Ontario Universities announced Monday that
Laurentian and Carleton Universities might be forced to borrow
money to cover large budget deficits
this year.
Ontario education minister Bette
Stephenson said there is no money
available to assist the universities in
financial trouble and said she had
no objections to them borrowing
money.
"Why should I object to them
going to the bank," Stephenson
said. "They are autonomous financial institutions and can make
whatever financial decisions they
think necessary."
Carleton administrative vice-
president Albert Larose said the
university will have a deficit of
more than $1 million by the end of
the school vear.
Stipend cuts hit
college nurses
Nursing stipend cutbacks will
drastically affect college enrolment
of lower-income students but won't
hurt UBC nurses, says a UBC nursing spokeswoman.
Prospective nurses in two-year
programs, who have only one summer month off to earn tuition fees,
will simply drop out due to lack of
pay for services, says Star Mahara,
president of the UBC nursing
undergraduate society.
"This could change the type of
person in regards to the profession
through the two-year program,"
she said. "Women from a lower
socio-economic class will probably
be turned off from even trying."
Sally Thorne, a nursing faculty
member, agreed that the new program could have a drastic effect on
lower-income families. Thorne said
that while it is hard to argue why
nursing students should receive extra benefits above and beyond other
students, the stipend cutbacks increase the nurses' financial load.
Graduate students who plan to
return to college to receive their
Masters degree in nursing will also
be hard-hit since they may not
receive the full $200 monthly
allowance that they once had, she
said.
The new nursing program differs
from the old in one crucial way
students who previously were
guaranteed $150 per month now
must show their financial need
before receiving any money.
But things are not as bleak for
students as they might seem, said
Mahara. She says nursing students
at UBC and the University of Victoria should feel little, if any effect,
from the cutbacks.
These students can still receive
the $1,800 per year previously
granted if they need it.
Students who have enrolled at
UBC before Feb. 15 will still receive
the full $150 a month until graduation, she said.
In the heat of a
long summer . • •
Beer under $1?
Don't give up on drinking cheap
beer in the Pit.
Student politician Bob Staley is
making a last ditch effort to resurrect the old 85 cent price for a bottle
of domestic beer, which jumped to
$1 last week.
Staley will present a motion at
Wednesday's student representative
assembly meeting calling for a
return to the cheaper price.
"It's totally hypocritical after
begging for money last year to increase the student fees to turn
around now and increase the price
of beer," arts representatives Staley
said   yesterday.
Student housing
Students looking for off-campus
accommodation near the campus
are facing inflated prices and a
shortage of suitable housing.
And the blame for the high cost is
being placed squarely on the
shoulders of the provincial government for removing rent controls.
"Landlords can make a killing
and they are doing it," says off-
campus housing director Dave
Johnson.
He says landlords are taking advantage of the shortage and some
are charging $350 monthly for one-
bedroom suites.
Johnson is also urging students to
avoid commercial rental agencies
and to ignore all their advertisements.
Thirty vacancies in Totem Park
will soon open up for male
students, said residence administrator Mary Flores.
There are 1,800 students on the
residence waiting list.
IH recovery
International House is in the final
steps of recovery from an upheaval
which left it in a shambles more
than a year ago.
Ever since executive director Colin Smith was fired in the Spring of
1978, International House has
operated without a full-time chief.
After last year's internal problems
and staff shuffle, the university is
now on the prowl for an "energetic
self-starter" to fill the post.
The new director will be hired by
the university based on the recommendations of an advisory committee of board of directors members.
The committee will probably have
six members, with only one student,
said Vogt.
— glen sanford
No more cards
Tired of flipping through worn
card catalogues to locate the books
you need?
Well, now you can scan about
100 books at once on one of the 60
new microfiche machines in UBC's
library system. The estimated five-
year conversion will transfer UBC's
two million book listings to
microfiche and improve service at
no extra cost, says librarian Doug
Mclnnes.
— cecilia mcvea
Larose blames the problem on insufficient government funding and
a decline in enrolment, especially in
the arts and science faculties.
Larose said it was impossible to
make further cuts without looking
at staff firings because 80 per cent
of Carleton's budget goes to salary
and benefits.
"1 don't know what the answer
is," he said. "Something has to
give. It can't go on the way it is."
Stephenson denies the government has reduced funding to
universities but admits government
grants have not allowed the universities to keep pace with inflation.
Laurentian president Henry Best
said the university currently has a
debt of more than $500,000
which   will  become  almost  a   $1
million deficit by the end of the
school year.
"I don't want to go to the
bank," said Best. "I don't like
deficit financing. It doesn't make
much sense if it's going to be an
endless process."
Funding shortages were the topic
of a meeting between Ontario's 15
university presidents and the provincial government last Friday.
— ben wong photo
UNAUTHORIZED COURSE MELLOW 100 takes place outside Sedgewick library Wednesday with most participants oblivious to senate ruling banning bootleg courses. Outraged academic body ordered megalitres of rain
dumped on offenders but request was sent through physical plant bureaucracy, delaying delivery at least several
days. With luck, purchase order number will prove invalid.
Sf udents' friendship worth $5,000
From page 1
the administration is cooperating
with us on certain services," says
Johl. "They'll demand the same
cooperation from us."
Armstrong denied his actions
confict with his board duties.
"My dealings with the president
have nothing to do with the board.
My effectiveness is probably a great
deal better than when I got onto the
board."
It is surely naive to think that
these dealings have no effect on
Armstrong's credibility in the eyes
of other board members. And of
course Kenny himself sits on the
board.
But there is always the possibility
the administration will not offer to
provide money for such projects in
the future.
"There has been some talk of
making it a line item in the (university's) budget," says Armstrong.
This is difficult to believe considering the confusion surrounding
the source of this year's contribution by Kenny.
Short, Wong, Johl, and even
Armstrong himself, were convinced
the money was from a contingency
fund in the university's budget.
Kenny says the money is part of a
fund provided by contributions
from the alumni association's annual fund drive and private contributions by friends of the university-
Senate learns lesson
UBC's senate, the body responsible for approving new courses,
discovered last night that courses were being taught at UBC that they
had never even heard of.
The courses, being taught in the faculty of Arts, were immediately
cancelled by Arts dean Robert Will, who said the teaching of illegitimate
lessons was "inexusable."
Will was told about the courses at the meeting, after plant sciences
professor Victor Runeckles protested their existence to UBC administration president Doug Kenny.
Kenny said he was not worried about the "bootleg courses" because
he trusts university deans to ensure that only approved courses are being
taught.
The meeting also approved a wide range of new courses, programs
and requirements, including a bachelor of fine arts program in theatre
and a linguistics major program in speech sciences. The programs were
approved with unanimous consent of the senate.
v: Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, September 13, 1979
*&S£=>
Death sale
UBC's investment dollars aren't green — they're red.
Blood money.
This university's investment committee members think nothing
of buying and selling their way into oppressive regimes like those in
Nicaragua and South Africa — as long as it reaps financial gains.
Their actions are hinged totally on a profit motive, blatantly ignoring the moral and social implications of dealing with dictatorships. This is evident in the remark of one board of governors
member after UBC's sale this spring of 8,000 shares in Noranda
mines, with operations in the repressive regimes of Nicaragua and
Chile. "We did it because we felt that the stock had reached its optimum level. We've bought other shares with the revenue from the
sale."
Nowhere is there a mention that their consciences had recognized
the oppression and human rights violations in that country. Instead, they saw a nation toppling under dictator Anastasio
Somoza, threating the security of their hefty interests.
Despite pressure from the university community, UBC's boardroom boys have made no move to sell their shares in oppressive
regimes. They've issued regrets, but not withdrawals. Our administration president Doug Kenny and bursar William White say
they're at the mercy of board members in deciding where to invest.
They scream innocence, but their hands are red.
Bill Wood, chairman of UBC's investment advisory committee,
says UBC's Noranda shares did "very well". Yes indeed. The
$66,000 sale profit did very well reinforcing tortures, political
discriminations, murders, unlawful imprisonments in Nicaragua
and Chile.
Shhhh. The corporate boardroom doesn't want its secret known.
After all, it's making money for all of us. Countries where
workers live in subhuman conditions, making wages well below
poverty levels, nations condemned by Amnesty International as
gross violators of human rights, are letting us reap in the bucks so
we can live comfortably.
It works out well for us, doesn't it?
Stand up for civil liberties. Join in the anti-Chile parade sponsored by the Canadian Labor Congress. It starts today at noon
from the Holiday Inn, 1110 Howe.
Don't turn a blind eye to a bloody one.
Letters
Children deserve a home
1979 has been declared as the International Year of the Child.
Translated into local terms, it indicates that there should be greater
community awareness of children's
rights and needs. Normally we in
Canada think only of children in
other countries as needing our help,
but in reality there are many
children in Vancouver who are in
the care of the British Columbia
ministry of human resources who
need help. Approximately 35 per
cent of these children can be placed
in group homes, and another 50 per
cent of these children are placed
with foster parents. But due to the
shortages of foster parents approximately 100 to 200 children are
waiting to be placed at any given
time.
You don't have to be rich,
famous,   married   or   living   in   a
Staley errs
Bob Staley is WRONG (Perspectives Sept. 11, 1979). I am newly
involved in the AMS this year and I
have nevec met a bunch of more
hard-working and conscientious
people in my life. I am not a
political hack either. My loyalities
are to the students of UBC. The
SRA has its indvidual problems, it
always will. But these problems will
be worked out if everyone would
only go halfway. Halfway is not a
lot to ask from anyone.
What the AMS needs is students
to get involved — not criticism on
particular issues. If criticism is constructive it is welcomed. But
negative criticism just perpetuates
more bad feelings and we don't
need bad feelings. We need unity
and cooperation to make the AMS
work. As the sign says — AMS
FOR THE BEST.
Susan Hughes
Arts 3
50-room house to be a foster
parent. You just have to care, and
be willing to share your love and
home with a lonely and bewildered
child. These children range in age
from babies to teenagers. The one
thing they all have in common is a
need for a warm, stable family for
temporary periods of time. Many
people including students, rule
themselves out unnecessarily. These
people can meet the needs of
children in their own communities
by being a foster parent.
Ewa Halina Caldwell
foster home recruiter
B.C. ministry of human resources
'Yahoos' liked L.J.
L. J. Muenster died June 11,
1979. Mr. Muenster taught practical organic chemistry to countless
"knuckleheads," "yahoos," and
other incorrigibles such as
ourselves.
Yet, here was a different kind of
a teacher. Thousands of students
received their first abrupt lessons on
organization and efficiency under
his baleful glare, and later, learned
to laugh at the antics of the plucky
little man who had so cowed them.
There will probably never be an
L.J. Muenster day, yet every day
the effects of his instruction show in
the work of people from doctors to
engineers. This is the way he would
have wanted it.
You can always go back to the
smelly old lab in the Chemistry
building, walk around, and look
behind the water baths or the con-
densors. You will never find
another Mr. Muenster — or will
you? For those of us who had the
privilege of having him as an instructor, he's still there.
Doug Demetrick
science 4
John Broadhurst
engineering 3
THE UBYSSEY
September 13, 1979
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and not of the
AMS or the university administration. Member, Canadian
University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices is
in room 241K of the Student Union Building. Editorial departments, 228-2301; Advertising, 228-3977.
Co-Editors: Heather Conn and Tom Hawthorn
Though lowly born it was destined to become the savior of the world, lor at least the UBCI. It all
began somewhere in a little office when maid Heather Conn and her charming cohort Tom Hawthorn
the second gave birth to their creation. As the child lav in the cradle onlookers came from far and wide
to view the wonder. Glen Sanford, Brad Mennie and Cecilia McVie came bearing gifts, typewriters,
paper and words. Ross Burnett, Ben Wong and Rory Munro marvelled, 'look at its' lovely features," as
the old man Mike Bocking commented, 'it's like nothing I've ever seen.' Kevin Finnegan brought the
child basket balls and nourishment for its growing body, 'it's a cute little type isn't it,' he cooed. The
old prophet Bill Tieleman came bearing an M ruler and chuckled as he noticed his own features imprinted on its face. Arno Neumann, Maxime Sevak though shy at first were overawed by the
magnificence radiating from the small creature. Dave Francis and Verne McDonald and Keith Baldry
brought a whole bag of goodies and in the tradition of such deliveries everybody got high. Chris Gainor
smiled proudly at the parents for he had known them when they were' mere  children.
Sexist sees no evil
Ah, back to school again and the
girls are prettier than ever. UBC
undeniably has the most attractive
female population of any Canadian
university. Unfortunately, thanks
to the article by Thorne and Andrew about the "real threat" of sexual assault on campus, I will probably be physically and verbally
threatened if I approach anyone in
the hopes of a meeting.
If the over-reactive sentiments of
these two are shared by the majority
of women on campus, we males are
in for a lonely and frustrating year.
I realize that the article was written to warn and inform women of
the possibility of a sexual attack
but really now, isn't three rapes
over two years a little less than a
growing trend? Personally, I would
like to see a few more instances of
women attacking men on campus.
Please girls, don't get mad, get
even.
Chris K.
arts 3
I am curious Swedish
Hi.
I'm a 20-year-old girl from
Sweden who wants a pen pal, male
or female.
I'm in my first year studying at
the University of Stockholm, taking
subjects as computing, programming, statistics, mathematics, systems
analysis, management information
systems, etc.
I'm probably an ordinary
Swedish girl, with blue eyes and
blond hair, who likes skiing, dancing, music, corresponding and so
on.
Agneta Jansson
Soderbyvagen 14
S-150 24 Ronninge
Sweden
Buses for all
Those buses that are planned to
run from the centre of campus to
the nether reaches of B-Lot, Totem
Park, etc. late at night had better
transport 'people' rather than just
'women', or the human rights
branch is going to hear about it.
Ian Cameron
grad studies Thursday, September 13,1979
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Neither rain nor sleet
Nor admin heat
will keep The Ubyssey
off the street.
We're here to give you the news.
If you're not happy with our
coverage, write a letter. Give us
your views — pro and con.
We welcome letters from all
readers. They should be signed and
typed. Pen names will be used when
the writer's real name is included
for our information but valid
reasons for anonymity are given.
Letters should be addressed to
the paper care of campus mail or
dropped off at The Ubyssey office,
SUB 241K.
BLACK & LEE
TUX SHOP
NOW AT
1110 Seymour St.
688 2431
JAZZ DANCE CLASSES
Thursday, 12:30-1:30 p.m.
Gym E starting Sept. 20
Register Rm. 203,
War Memorial Gym
STUDENT REPRESENTATIVES
FACULTY OF ARTS
NOMINATIONS ARE INVITED FOR STUDENT
REPRESENTATIVES TO THE FACULTY OF ARTS:
a) one representative from the combined major, honours and
graduate students in each of the departments and schools
of the Faculty of Arts.
b) two representatives from each of First and Second Year
Arts.
Student representatives are full voting members in the meetings
of the Faculty of Arts, and are appointed to committees of the
Faculty.
Nomination forms are available from School and Department Offices, the Dean of Arts' Office, the Arts Faculty Advisor's Office,
and the Arts Undergraduate Society Office.
Completed nomination forms must be in the hands of the Registrar
of   the   University   not   later   than   4:00   p.m.,   FRIDAY,
SEPTEMBER 28, 1979.
3rd
AII       ANNUAL
September 2Q/20   SALE
All
September
• 20% OFF All Prescription Glasses . . .
(Frames and Lenses)
• 20% OFF All Sunglasses . . . Get the
Best Eyewear Money Can Buy at Substantial Savings . . . Don't Delay, Eye Examinations Arranged!
Invisible Bifocal Specialists]
• High water content, soft contact tenses $160.00.
• We believe these are the best soft contact lenses available
• Come in for a free trial fitting with no obligation.
THE OPTIC ZONE
Arbutus Village Square
733-1722
St. Mark's
Anglican Church
Kitsilano
West 2nd & Larch
Sunday Celebrations
8 a.m. & 10:30 a.m.
Phone: 731-3811
A.M.S. WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
invites all interested women
to attend the
1st MEETING OF THE TERM
TUESDAY, SEPT. 18 12:30
Women's Centre SUB 130
(just inside the north doors)
THE VANCOUVER INSTITUTE
Free Saturday Night Lectures At The University Of B.C.
September 15
THE DAL GRAUER MEMORIAL LECTURE
Mr. Amory Lovins
London, England
SOFT ENERGY PA THS
September 22
Professor Joseph Campbell*
Sarah Lawrence College, New York
PSYCHE AND SYMBOL
September 29
Ms. Jean Erdman
New York, N.Y.
THE DYNAMIC IMAGERY OF DANCE
Lecture and Demonstration with Music
October 6
Professor William G. Unruh
Physics Department
The University of British Columbia
BLACK HOLES -
THE EDGE OF THE UNIVERSE
October 13
Professor Robert Solomon
Department of Philosophy
University of Texas, Austin
EMOTIONS AND HUMAN NATURE
October 20
Dr. Donald W. Seldin
Chairman, Department of Internal Medicine
Southwestern Medical School
University of Texas
HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE:
PREVALENCE, RISKS, TREATMENTS
October 27
Professor David Kahneman
Department of Psychology
The University of British Columbia
JUDGMENTS AND PREFERENCES:
THE PSYCHOLOGY OF IRRATIONALITY
November 3
Dr. Patricia Baird
Acting Head, Department of Medical Genetics
The University of British Columbia
HEREDITY AND YOUR FAMILY
November 10
Professor Eugene Wigner
Department of Physics
Princeton University
EINSTEIN:
THE MAN AND HIS WORK
November 17
Dr. Donald A. Schon
Ford Professor of Urban Planning and Education
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
WILL THE PROFESSIONS SURVIVE?
THE AGE OF UNCERTAINTY
November 24
Dr. John H. Young
International Monetary Fund
Washington, D.C.
WHAT IS HAPPENING TO MONEY?
THE INTERNA TIONAL MONETARY SYSTEM
December 1
Sir Fitzroy Maclean Bart, C.B.E.
Argyll, Scotland
HOLY RUSSIA
Vancouver Institute lectures are held on Saturdays at 8:15 p.m. in Lecture Hall No. 2 of the
Woodward Instructional Resources Centre at the University of British Columbia. Admission to
lectures is free and the public is invited to attend.        	
PLEASE CUP FOR FUTURE REFERENCE
WOMEN'S ATHLETICS
STARTING
DATES:
TEAM TRYOUTS
WOMEN'S ATHLETICS
1979-80
Badminton
Thurs., Sept. 13 6:30-9:30 p.m.
Gym A
Basketball
Mon., Sept. 17 4:30-6:30 p.m.
Memorial Gym
Cross Country
Tues., Sept. 174:30 p.m.
Meet in Memorial Gym
Curling
Thurs., Oct. 11 5:00-7:00 p.m.
Winter Sports Centre
Fencing
Mon., Oct. 1 7:00-10:00 p.m.
Gym E
Field Hockey
Mon., Sept. 10 to Fri., Sept. 14 4:30-6:30
p.m.           McGregor Field
McGregor Field
Golf
T.B.A. Check at Athletic Office.
Gymnastics
Thurs., Sept. 13 12:30-2:00 p.m.
Gym G
Ice Hockey
Thurs., Sept. 13 5:00-6:15 p.m.
Winter Sports Centre
Rowing
Thurs., Sept. 13 12:30 p.m.
Sat., Sept. 159:00 a.m.-12:00 noon
Meet at the Memorial Gym
Vancouver Rowing Club
Sailing
Mid-Sept., first meeting of UBC Sailing C
lub                            T.B.A.
Skiing
Thurs., Sept. 13 4:30 p.m.
Gym A
Soccer
Thurs., Sept. 13 12:00 noon
P.E. Centre Field
Squash
Tues., Sept. 18 5:00-6:30 p.m.
Winter Sports Centre
Swimming
and Diving
Thurs., Sept. 13 12:30 noon
Aquatic Centre Classroom
Tennis
Mon., Wed., Thurs. to Sept. 27
4:30-6:30 p.m.
Thunderbird Park
Tennis Courts
Track & Field
Thurs., Sept. 13 4:30 p.m.
Meet in Memorial Gym
Volleyball
Mon., Sept. 17 7:30-10:30 p.m.
Memorial Gym
Cheerleaders
Thurs., Sept. 13 - 12:30 p.m.       Meet ir
l Memorial Gym, Room 208 Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, September 13, 1979
'■^■.V- V*-  ' M\"*AF
Tween classes
videotape,   noon,  Buch.
George & Berny's
VOLKSWAGEN
REPAIRS
COMPLETE SERVICE BY
TRAINED
MECHANICS
FULLY GUARANTEED
AT REASONABLE RATES
731-8644
2125 W. 10th at Arbutus
TODAY
MENS ICE HOCKEY
Organizational  meeting for newcomers,  noon,
War Memorial gvm room 25.
UBC GAY CLUB
Organizational    meeting,    noon,    SUB    117.       ISM
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Jazz sandwich evening of jazz, 8 p.m.. International House upper lounge.
Renewal of international student visas, 9 a.m. to
4 p.m., IH room 400.
AMS/SRA ORIENTATION COMMITTEE
Barbeque  and  dance  with  administration  and
student leaders, 4:30 to 11:30 p.m., SUB plaza.
SUS
Science   used   book   sale,   noon   to   2:30,   SUB
ballroom extension
TM PROGRAM
Group meditation
217
AIKIDO CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 212A
BAHA'I CLUB
Organizational meetinq   noon, SUB 113
FRIDAY
INTRAMURALS
Joggers thie.: ki'omelrp run   r i. Mclnnes field
opposite SUB
ISM
ntroductoty  barbeque,  6 p in ,   Lutheran Cam
[jus Centre
DEBATING SOCIETY
General meeting, noon, SUB 215
Hot
flashes
tern fo reed,
rife an sfucfcfy
Now is yure chunce to stump
owt the rissing tyde ov alliteracce at
UBC. The UBC Centre for Continuing Education is offering reading
and writing improvement, grammar
and composition and vocabulary
development courses at their
reading, writing and study skills
centre. For more information contact Mardee Gait at 228-2181.
A BBQ bargain
If you're tired of expensive eats,
the Alma Mater Society has a
bargain for you.
Today at 4:30 you'll get your
big chance at a barbeque and dance
in the SUB plaza. The food costs
$1.50 and the dance is free. And
you can bet that the Westside Feet-
warmers jazz band will be cooking
at the dance.
Cheap defective
Tired of hiring expensive private
eyes and over-priced gumshoes?
Then come and see the Cheap
Detective, a Neil Simon movie playing all this week in the SUB
auditorium. Admission is 50 cents
and all proceeds will go to the
United Way campaign. It might be
the start of a beautiful friendship.
SATURDAY
YOUNG TRUTHKEYITES
Autumn  solidarity  and  clean-up  day,  all day,
Trutch House.
Rummage sale,   10 a.m.   to 6 p.m.,   Lutheran
Campus Centre.
SUNDAY
LUTHERAN CAMPUS MINISTRY
Speaker Amory  Lovins on Moral  Dilemmas in
Energy, 8 p.m., Lutheran Campus Centre.
Celebration of  Holy Cross and communion,  9
and 11 a.m., Lutheran Campus Centre.
MONDAY
UBC KENDO CLUB
Organizational meeting, 7 p.m., SUB ballroom.
UBC FENCING CLUB
Executive meeting, 7:30 p.m,, Gym E.
TUESDAY
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
First meeting of the term, noon, SUB 130.
UBC MEN'S VARSITY TENNIS TEAM
Organizational   meeting,   noon,   War   Memorial
gym, Room 213.
WEDNESDAY
SRA
SRA meeting, 6 p.m., SUB 206.
SCIENCE BOOKDAY
Come & Get a Good
Deal on Used Textbooks
TODAY    12:30 P.M.    S.U.B.
BALLROOM EXTENSION
ARTS
BEAR GARDEN
Friday, Sept. 14
FREE BEARS
GREAT MUSIC
4:00 - 8:00 p.m.
Buchanan Lounge
LISTEN, JAKE, AMD LISTEN AS YOU
WOULD TO YOUR OWN MOTHER!
THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS IS
MEETING IN ONE HOUR! THEY
WANT TO KNOW THE NEWS AND
YOU HAVE TO TELL THEM .. .
TEQUILA SAUZA IS NUMBER ONE
ACROSS THE COUNTRY - Nl/MERO
UNO, RIGHT? NOW CLEAN YOUR
GLASSES AND GET IN THERE!
ARE   YOU   FIT?
Complete Physical Fitness
Appraisal and Counselling
Available Now
Apply at Room 203, War Memorial Gym
U.B.C. 228-3996 for information
J. M. Buchanan Fitness
and Research Center
Season Opening
SKI SALE^
All last year's stock on sale!
25 - 50% OFF
New arrivals 10% off
San Marco Boots 40% off
Can-Ski Sports Shop
569 Seymour (across from A&B Sound)
Lutheran Campus Ministry
5885 University Blvd.
Friday Sept. 14 — L.S.M. Bar-B-Q at 6:00 p.m.
Saturday Sept. 15 — Thrift Sale for
students, 10:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m.
Sunday Sept. 16 — Worship at 9:00 & 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Sept. 16 — Amory Lovins...
Energy and the
Moral Dilemma
5V
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES:    Campus - 3 lines, 1 day $1.50; additional lines 35c.
Commercial -  3 lines,  1 day $2.50; additional lines
50c. Additional days $2.25 and 45c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m., the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room 241, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C.  V6T 1i\'5
5 — Coming Events
THE GSA folk night returns Friday. Sept. 21 Good
music Bat Free admission. Open stage after
11 30. Everyone welcome
PART TIME babysitter needed for two active onys
Fuil and halt days   Kerrisdale area   263-766/
40 — Messages
ABUNDANCE ANO PROSPERITY
seminar   which   increases  your   ability   to   create
wealth in your life
Sept   14 16   $96 00   Phone ARAS 437-3334
70 — Services
READING SKILLS, -eadnu; comprehension, retention and speed Plus note taking, study lecfini-
ques   1 day coutse   Ideal for students. 266 6119
10 — For Sale — Commercial
COMMUNITY SPORTS. Excellent puces for ice-
skates, hockey, soccer, togging and racquet
sports equipment 733 1612. 3615 West Broadway, Vancouver. B.C.
POSTERS, reproductions, photo blowups, latgest
selection The Grin Bin 3209 West Broadway,
Van   738-2311   Opposite Super Valu.
85 — Typing
11 -
For Sale -
- Private
MICROSCOPE FOR Sfi
A 1 condition. Phone
p m.
LE. Carl Zeiss stanc
437-4103. 324-7725
ard 14
after 4
20 -
Housing
30 -
Jobs
THE NATIONAL TESTING CENTRE is seeking a
highly motivated student with an interest in
business or law to serve as national co-ordinator
for its LSAT and GMAT Review courses across
Canada. The part-time position offers an excellent
opportunity for substantial income. For further information call 689-9000.
SECRETARIAL SERVICES. Theses manuscripts
and resumes professionally and efficiently typed.
References   Phone 594-9383.
TYPING 80 c per page. Fast and
accurate. Experienced typist. Phcne Gurdon,
873-8032
TYPING: Essays, Thesis, Manuscripts, Reports, etc.
Fast and accurate service. Bilingual. Clemy
324-9414.
USE
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED
NUMERO UNO IN MEXICO AND IN CANADA
MEDICAL OFFICE
Part-time receptionist position in
Vancouver physician's office.
Approx. 20-30 hrs. per week,
mainly mornings. Send resume
to: 812 Millbank, Vancouver,
B.C., V5Z3Z4.
To Sell -
Buy -
Inform
^'^ft.3 Thursday, September 13, 1979
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
UBC sports face cutbacks
By KEVIN FINNEGAN
UBC basketball and ice hockey
teams face cuts in this year's
schedules because of a reduction in
federal travel subsidies, UBC men's
athletic director R. J. Phillips said
yesterday.
The reductions will also cause
undetermined cuts in the schedules
of other sports.
The former Liberal government
had promised $500,000 in travel
subsidies to be split by the western
conferences and the atlantic conference. The Canada West University  Athletic  Association  and the
Great Plains Athletic Conference
were to receive 70 per cent, or
$350,000, and were planning to
sponsor interlocking schedules.
The present Conservative government has cut the grant to $290,000,
of which the western leagues will
receive $203,000.
"It appears the interlocking
schedule will go by the board," said
Phillips, who is also president of the
CWUAA. The men's ice hockey
team will have 10 games cancelled
and both the men's and women's
basketball teams will lose two mat-
c
Upcoming
j
FRIDAY
Intramurals
3 km. run
Maclnnes field, noon
SATURDAY
Men's soccer
UBC vs. Saskatchewan
2:00 p.m. Stadium
Men's Rugby
UBC vs. University of Cork
2:00 p.m., Brockton Oval
SUNDAY
Men's soccer
UBC vs. Calgary
2:00 p.m. Stadium
"Hello, Ubyssey? Why the hell didn't our
team's game make the schedule in last Thursday's paper?"
"Sorry, but only special teams make the
schedule section."
"Ah, you guys have never cared about our
midget frisbee team. All you care about are
football and soccer and rugby."
"Right, because those are the special teams
with organized managers who read our letter
to them and told us when their games were so
that we could tell everybody else."
"Oh. Is that how we become a special
team?"
"Yup."
"Hello, manager? Why the hell didn't our
team's game make the schedule in last Thursday's paper?"
Catch the drift?
ches as a result of the move.
Cuts in other sports will not be
known until after a meeting today
in Regina when the CWUAA and
the CPAC will decide how to split
the reduced subsidy. UBC women's
athletic director Marilyn Pomfret
will be one of the two Canada West
representatives at the meeting.
"Once we know what (the split)
is, we will look at our other programs and decide where the cuts
will be," Phillips said.
Phillips said he sent a telegram
appealing the cutback to federal
fitness and recreation minister Steve
Paproski Sunday but was told
Paproski would not be back in Ottawa until Sept. 22.
Phillips also said he has written
all B.C. members of parliament and
has received several "encouraging
responses."
The athletic conferences are
refusing to discuss the situation further until they receive a reply from
the federal government.
SPORTS
Bird Droppings
The Thunderbird soccer team will
play their first league game this
Saturday at 2:00 p.m. against
Saskatchewan at T-Bird Stadium.
Sunday the 'Birds will face Calgary,
also at the stadium at 2:00 p.m.
The soccer team won its first exhibition game against Croatia last
Sunday with a score of 3-1. Gord
Johnson led the scoring with two
well-placed shots.
*    *    *
The UBC rugby team will host
Ireland's University of Cork this
Saturday 2:00 p.m. at Brockton
Oval. The team is looking for new
players, especially juniors, according to coach Donn Spence. Any
interested players should direct
their enquiries to Spence at the
athletic office.
* * *
The UBC women's rowing team
didn't quit when classes ended last
spring and won four of the six
regattas they entered this summer,
including the Canadian national
rowing championships in St.
Catharines in early August. They
also won the Western Sprints in Los
Gates, California as well as the
UBC Invitational Regatta and the
B.C. Championships.
Decorate With Prints
MOVEMENT
WITH
MUSIC
Adults Level I: Tuesday & Thursday 7-8 p.m.
Level II: Tuesday & Thursday 8-9 p.m.
at University Hill Elementary School
Preschoolers (3-5 year olds):
Games and songs to develop rhythm and coordination
Tuesday & Thursday 10-11 a.m.
at University Hill United Church
6-8 year olds: Monday & Wednesday 3:30-5 p.m.
Location to be announced. These classes will include
work on gymnastics and ballet skills.
9-14 year olds: Tuesday & Thursday 5-6:30 p.m.
at University Hill Elementary
REGISTRATION — Thursday Sept. 13, 6-9 p.m.
University Hill United Church,5375 University Blvd.
COST — 24 Sessions: $48
Classes run September 17-December 6 Come and Enjoy!
\J<y     grin. ,
bin
THE Poster & Print
PLACE in B.C.
738-2311
3209 W. Broadway, Van
Decorate With Posters
BICYCLE!
STUDENT SALE
LTD.     10 Speed
THE HOT NEW RALEIGH FOR FALL!
SALE 169.95
Look at the Raleigh Ltd. Compare the features, and then check
the price — it's simply the best way back to school!
POINT
YC££S
Est.  1930
3771 W. 10th
224-3536
Also The Peddler
620 E. Broadway 874-8611
4256 E. Hastings 298-4322
WOMEN'S ATHLETICS
ARE INTERESTED IN YOU
Welcome back! On September 18, we are having a
social for all coaches, managers and interested
players. It will be an excellent opportunity for
everyone to meet the newcomers as well as to chat
with old friends. This function will be held from 7:00
p.m. to 10:00 p.m. in SUB Room 212. Refreshments
will be served.
K0RRES
*'MOVING AND i-
51 TRANSFER LTD.
fsi
MOVING AND i-
STORAGE" "^
Big or
Small Jobs
Reasonable
Rates
2060 W. 10th^
Vancouver
734-5535
Eve. and Holidays 732-9898
Also Garages, Basements, Yards
CLEAN-UPS
T/Shirts
Sportshirts
Custom screenprinting
for
Clubs, Residences, Faculties
Special low rates
for UBC students
And just off campus
LA SCOUSE
4406 West 10th
(10th at Trimble)
Tel.: Day: 224-4616
Eve: 736-5835
(0
0)
a
a
c
J*
New to the Village
Hair cutting for
men and women
At the Company we
believe in quality,
allowing 45 minutes for
that quality to be
achieved in your cut or
style.
Our products are the
best — Shirmack,
Redken, etc.
You may obtain this
fine service by calling
for an appointment or
dropping into our salon
Mon.-Sat., 9:30-6 and
Thurs. 9:30-9.
ken hippert hair
company ltd.
5736 university bivd.
228-8942
or
228-1471
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
ROSENCRANTZ & GUILDENSTERN are dead
by Tom Stoppard
SEPTEMBER 21-29
(Previews Sept. 19 & 20)
8:00 p.m.
Directed by Robert Graham
Setting £r Lighting by Robert Dahlstrom
Costumes by Phillip Clarkson
[STUDENT SEASON TICKETS (5 Plays for $10)]
AVAILABLE FOR ALL PERFORMANCES
Sept. 19-29
Oct. 24-Nov. 3
Nov. 21-Dec. 1
Jan. 23-Feb. 2
March 5-15
ROSENCRANTZ & GUILDENSTERN (Stoppard)
OUR TOWN (Wilder)
THE FATHER (Strindberg)
A MIDSUMMER NIGHT'S DREAM (Shakespeare)
ALBERT HERRING *A Comic Opera* (Britten)
BOX OFFICE * FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE * ROOM 207
Support Your Campus Theatre Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, September 13, 1979
UBC in
dollars
Your tuition °Arnerica
at
work
in
Latm
Assets
$'000
ComPanY
Tfce Bn
anciaiPost
500     40
Ftn»
ncial
40.904.&16
38,272.3s1
32,090.^6
27.686J1*
23J8t.5f
5,831,266
5 150.830
4>83.460
^rfSnK oi^tdaftkol Commerce
Cattf£^^ •
S*9^^"** ••■;*;• •;■...
CanaTJovtciale*2!2^---
Het income j
$'000
223.902
193.525
193.616
153.884
129.190
29.700
28,842
31.644
18,852
UBC's board turns a deaf ear
to cries of oppression but
continues to hear coins jingle
By BILL TIELEMAN
Special to The Ubyssey
When the repressive regime of
Nicaraguan dictator Anastasio Somoza
fell in July of this year so did the value of
UBC's investment portfolio.
And while the UBC boardroom may
seem far removed from the popular uprising in Nicaragua, it's a lot closer when one
considers UBC's sizable investments in
two corporations that were heavily involved in propping up the Samoza government.
Both the Royal Bank of Canada and
Noranda Mines, a company which has
also come under fire before for its investments in Chile, were interested in seeing Somoza continue to run the Latin
American country.
The board sold its 8,000 Noranda
shares this spring, but that certainly was
not done in sympathy towards the growing uprising against the Somoza government.
As one board member said: "We did it
because we felt that the stock had reached
its optimum level. We've bought other
shares with the revenue from the sale."
The shares were sold for $326,929,
showing a $66,000 profit for the university-
The morality of the university investing
in firms which operate in and support the
economies of countries whose governments consistently and flagrantly violate
human rights has come up before but
UBC's board of governors, who are
directly responsible for UBC's $30 million
investment portfolio, has refused to sell
off its shares in such firms despite
pressure from the university community.
When the committee for the defence of
human rights in Chile launched a campaign on campus last year calling for the
board to at least give its vote as a
shareholder in Noranda to a church group
protesting the firm's support for Chilean
dictator Augusto Pinochet's government,
the  board  refused,  arguing that  if the
Canadian company was not breaking
Canadian laws there was no reason to be
upset. Under pressure from student board
member Paul Sandhu the board did pass a
resolution of regret over human rights
violations in Chile.
UBC's indirect connections with
Nicaragua have come through Noranda
Mines' majority ownership in the El
Setentrion gold mine, from which it has
received several million dollars profit annually.
According to Canadian Dimension
magazine, the top pay for El Setentrion's
workers was 56 cents an hour, under
working conditions that former
Nicaraguan congressman E. Molina called
"subhuman — the worst in the country."
El Setentrion had good connections
with Somoza. In 1977 his notorious National Guard were called in to end worker
protests for better wages and working
conditions. Protest leaders were beaten
and jailed.
But Noranda Mines' interest in
Nicaragua pales by comparison to that of
the Royal Bank's. The bank is
Nicaragua's third largest creditor, having
lent more than $42.8 million lo the country and holding about 15 per cent of
Nicaragua's outstanding private bank
debt.
Somoza expressed his gratitude for the
Royal Bank's aid to his regime when
before his ouster he told the CBC program the Fifth Estate "that the attitude of
the Canadian bank has been very profitable for Nicaragua."
According to Bill Wood, the commerce
and business administration professor
who chairs the president's advisory committee on investments, UBC's investment decisions are up to the board.
The committee, whose members include
administration president Doug Kenny,
vice-president and bursar William White
and three prominent finance and
securities experts, is responsible for the actual   running   of   UBC's   portfolio   and
meets quarterly, he says.
"We have looked at what defines a
socially acceptable stock but leave
guidelines to the board," Wood said in an
interview earlier this year. "If they want
us to not buy a type of stock, we would
follow their wishes."
About 23 percent of the portfolio is
commonstock, the rest bonds and debentures.
Wood said UBC bought into Noranda
about four years ago and has "done very
well' on its investment.
If Noranda Mines and the Royal Bank
are two particularly blatant examples of
companies taking advantage of operating
in repressive countries, they aren't the only ones UBC invests in. Although the
number of companies UBC invests in and
the rapid buying and selling in the market
makes it difficult even for the university to
know what stocks it holds, it is known
that UBC either holds or has recently held
shares in the following controversial
firms:
• The CANADIAN IMPERIAL
BANK OF COMMERCE, the BANK OF
MONTREAL and the ROYAL BANK
OF CANADA. These three major Canadian financial institutions deal heavily in
apartheid South Africa. At UBC in the
past church groups and student politicians
have led campaigns urging students to
remove their savings from the banks to
protest their support of the institutionalized racism of South Africa.
• ROTHMANS TOBACCO, the lung
cancer people, who also have strong
financial ties in South Africa.
• ROBIN HOOD MULTIFOODS.
Robin Hood, ironically named, is best
remembered for its hiring of an armed
security squad during a strike in 1977 by
115 Montreal flour workers. Eight
workers were injured in July when the
shotgun-toting Robin Hood security
guards opened fired into a crowd during a
mass picket in front of the plant. The
violence led to a boycott against Robin
Hood products, organized by the Canadian Labor Congress, the Confederation
of National Trade Unions and the Quebec
Teachers Federation.
• NORANDA MINES. In addition to
its operations  in  Nicaragua and  Chile,
Noranda,  directly  and  through  various
partially and wholly owned companies,   j
has dealings in South Korea, Columbia,
Peru and Brazil. All four countries are   \
regarded   by   Amnesty   International   as   j
trouble spots in the field of human rights,   I
and are governed by repressive regimes.
• The MOORE CORPORATION, the
world's largest manufacturer of business (
forms and related products. Moore '■■
operates in, among other countries, Brazil
and El Salvador, where the disappearance
of any who oppose the government has
become commonplace.
• MASSEY FERGUSON LTD., the
farm machinery company, has strong connections with South Africa, Rhodesia,
Brazil and Argentina.
Opponents of UBC's controversial investments say it is ironic for a university,
society's most highly-regarded institution
in the pursuit of knowledge and freedom
of thought, to support firms who directly
prop up governments who systematically
deny their citizens basic human rights.
UBC's board of governors have
disagreed in the past, saying that so long
as a firm is a good corporate citizen in
Canada and is breaking no laws UBC will
continue to invest in it, regardless of
where the firm puts its money.
The likelihood that UBC's policy will
change seems small. And for UBC-backed
corporations in South Africa, Rhodesia,
Brazil, Argentina, El Salvador, Chile,
South Korea, Peru and Columbia, it's
business as usual.
Bill Tieleman is a former Ubyssey news
editor and is currently living in exile as national bureau chief for Canadian University Press in Ottawa.

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