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UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Oct 14, 1966

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 GETTING INTO THE SWIM of new lifesaving technique are towee
Angela Raino, education 3, and tower Melanie Kamm, P.E. 3, who
claim wrist hold tow is safer and easier for drowning victim. Damp
—dermis gam photo
duo, tryir j for Royal Life-saving Society diploma, plan to suggest
method be adopted by official lifesaving qriyjpSj They developed new
method themselves. ,-."':
Vol.  XLVIII,  No.   12       VANCOUVER,  B.C.,  FRIDAY,  OCTOBER   14,   1966   <*gl^48   224-3916
McGregor off base'
By BO HANSEN and RON SIMMER
Vancouver high school principals Thursday put forth strong opposition to classics
head Malcolm McGregor's airy dismissal of
B.C. high school graduates.
McGregor's statement this week that first-
year students would be unable to contribute effectively to discussions in the new
program was refuted almost unanimously
by the principals.
The arts curriculum changes proposed by
dean Dennis Healy would substitute semi-
RELATED STORY. Page 3
nars and discussion for the present lecture
system, and abandon factulty divisions for
first year students.
"Some administrators have been in their
ivory towers too long," said David Thompson principal H. S. Johnson.
"We have been moving in the direction
of  seminar  instruction   ourselves   and   our
students are getting experience in independent research and discussion," he said.
"Dr. McGregor should come back and see
some of our grads," said Windermere principal E. A. Couch.
"I think he is too far removed."
A lone dissenting view came from Magee
principal A. B. Wright.
He   felt   that,    although   some   students
could profit from the revisions, most of his
students would fit better into the present
system.
"The failure rate for freshmen at UBC
is high enough already," he said.
"I would be very critical of any statement such as this," said Prince of Wales
principal W. L. Bazeley.
"Students graduating on the university
program would be very capable of participating in this sort of program."
Norman Clark, principal at Sir Charles
Tuppcr, agreed.
"Many of our graduates have been
brought to a level of independent studies
and could profit by the demands of this
program," he said.
—powell hargrave  photo
GETTING   TO   BOTTOM   of   football   strategy, gregarious gals mix it up in practice for
big nurse vs. home ec Teacup Game Oct. 27.   Girls'   grid   tilt   will   be   broken   up   by
engineers-sciencemen chariot race.
can
plan'—Mac
Students got a pledge from president John Macdonald
Thursday they can help plan new UBC residences.
Macdonald made the promise during a 90-minute grilling by Alma Mater Society representatives.
AMS president Peter Braund, first vice-president
Charlie Boylan and newly-elected second vice-president
Carolyn Tate walked in on Macdonald's first open-door day.
With them were AMS housing co-ordinator Ray Larsen
and council architectural adviser Judah Shumiacher.
Macdonald has promised an open door day once a month
when students can visit without appointment. Only other
visitors Thursday were two student bureaucrats — one from
World Universtiy Service and one from engineers undergrad  society.
Student influence a must
The council members told
Macdonald student opinion
must have an influence in
planning layout of new residences.
Larsen has repeatedly attacked UBC residences as
"sterile and inhuman." He
said residences should be part
of an academic plan, not ancillary enterprises.
The administration is forming a clients' committee to advise on layout of new residences.
"I will invite students to join
the clients' committee," Macdonald said Thursday.
He promised to inform university architect Rene Negrin
that students will participate
in forming plans.
Board has final say
But Macdonald refused a
concession asked for by council that would have allowed
students to see architects'
recommendations at the same
time as the board of governors.
Before any start on the design for new residence buildings, Macdonald said decisions
are needed on location, population, density, and relations
with owners of nearby homes.
Macdonald said any final decisions on construction must
be made by the board of governors.
"I don't want students to
take over the board's decisionmaking function as set out in
the universities act," he said.
Involved in decisions on new
construction financing arrangements, the time element, and,
according to Macdonald, "getting the most for the least."
That versatile computer
does Bird Calls, too
There will be no room for human error in Bird
calls this year.
The author and compiler is a computer.
All names and numbers are sent directly from the
computer to the printer.
The finished book known as Bird Calls or the student telephone directory, or alternately the movers'
handbook, will be on sale in the publications office in
about two weeks. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 14,  1966
INTERNATIONAL   BROADCAST
UBC prof joins Toronto teach-in
UBC Asian Studies prof
Rene Goldman joins an all-
star lineup of China experts
at a University of Toronto
teach-in this weekend.
Goldman will take part in
a panel discussion — The Revolution and the Chinese Student.
The teach-in, which has run
all this week and concludes
Sunday is entitled China: Coexistence or Containment.
Local Chinaphiles can hear
it over CBC at 7:30 p.m. Friday. Coverage will continue at
9:30 a.m. and 2 p.m. Saturday,
and at 6:20 p.m. Sunday.
Other teach-in stars include
'South Africa will
sink under Vorster
LONDON, Eng. (CUPI) — A
student leader banned under
the Suppression of Communism in South Africa has predicted conditions there will
deteriorate under Prime Minister Balthazar Vorster.
Ian Robertson, 22, president
of the National Union of South
African Students — the only
multi-racial organization left
in the country—is now studying at Oxford on a scholarship.
The day Robertson arrived
in London, Vorster was appointed South Africa's new
prime minister, following the
assassination of Prime Minister Verwoerd earlier this
month.
Robertson told reporters
recently he is shocked a man
"of Vorster's calibre" could
hold office.
"He has an insatiable lust for
power," the student said.
"He wears it like a cloak."
Robertson called Verwoerd
"a man of considerable intellect" who was making some
attempt at a policy of separate
development of whites and
negroes, tout Vorster is a man
committed to the doctrine of
white supremacy.
"Now  he  has   a   completely
free hand. I think things will
be very much worse."
The banning order was placed on Robertson by Prime
Minister Verwoerd. Under its
terms, the student leader had
been confined to the magisterial district of Durban, his
home town.
He was not allowed to take
part in any political activity or
attend a social gathering.
Under South African law, a
social gathering is defined as
consisting of more than two
persons.
former Toronto Globe and
Mail China correspondent
Charles Taylor (son of sportsman-millionaire E. P. Taylor);
author-lecturer Felix Green;
Canadian ambassador and
Hanoi-visitor Chester Ronning;
and U of T president and
China traveller Claude Bissell.
James Endicott, a United
Church missionary to China
for 25 years, will join a discussion titled: Why Mao Won
Where Chiang Failed. Endicott
was an advisor to Chiang Kai-
Shek.
There will also be Han
Suyin defender of the communist revolution and author
of the novel Love is a Many
Splendoured Thing.
Academic speakers are coming from universities in Chile,
Transportation Problems?
Lease-A-Honda
$28.95 per month
Incl. helmet, insur., servicing
MU 2-7912
Vancouver Woman's Musical Club
presents
GERALD MOORE
In An Evening of Music and Mirth
QUEEN ELIZABETH THEATRE OCT. 28, 8:30 p.m.
Tickets at Vancouver Ticket Centre, 630 Hamilton St.,
and at all Eaton Stores — $3.00
Students $1.50 on presentation of A.M.S. card
The Masculine look of the year!
WIDE WALE CORDUROY IN CLASSIC
3 BUTTON SPORT COATS:
oIajd showing* JthsL
nowsat patt&ruu in.
Apto/it cocdtA, in.
thsL popudcUL
owl and. two
button. modsdA,
$bS. Jb $59.95
COLOURS - TAN, BROWN
TEAL,  BURGUNDY,
NAVY & BUCK
$35.00
If your choice is
Mod - Pea Jackets,
wool slacks
& cords
-LIONS DEN
771 Granville St. MU 1-2934
Open Friday nights till 9 p.m.
Tokyo, Yugoslavia, Britain,
and the U.S.
The broadcast will be carried by stations in Detroit,
Miami, Chicago and San Francisco as well as 100 stations
across Canada.
A total of 50 universities
will carry closed circuit broadcasts — excluding UBC.
UBC radio society says it
lacks funds and facilities to
carry the broadcast.
Beatlemania
packs  em in
The Beatles were still packing them in at the auditorium
Thursday.
UBC's Film Society presented three showings of "Help"
and "A Hard Day's Night".
Giggling girls scurried for
seats at the first showing.
Eight hundred students filled the auditorium and spilled
out into the aisles.
Students roared with laughter at the Beatles' film antics.
There were no screams or
fainting fits.
HARVARD BUSINESS
SCHOOL VISITOR
Assistant Dean Anthony G. Athos, Director of Admissions, of the Harvard Graduate School of Business
Administration, will visit the University of British Columbia on Thursday, October 20th, to talk to students interested in business as a career of excitement and creative
opportunity.
Requirements for admission to the two-year course,
leading to a degree of Master in Business Administration
(MBA), include a college degree in any field of concentration, a standing in at least the top third of the
class, and a record of progressive achievement in campus activities, business, the military, or elsewhere.
The MBA Program at the Harvard Business School
is based on the experience-oriented case method, pioneered at the Harvard Business School to develop the practical, analytical, and decision-making capacities that are
the key to managerial effectiveness.
For outstanding students in each first-year class
(of roughly 690) there are 60 fellowships available. Approximately, 40 per cent of the Harvard Business School
student body also makes use of the Deferred Payment
or Loan Program which enables all students admitted
to the Harvard MBA Program to attend even though
their sources  of funds are inadequate.
Seniors, or others, wishing to talk to Dr. Athos may
make an appointment through the office of Mr. J. C.
Craik, Placement Officer.
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
CANADIAN AMERICAN SEMINAR:
C.U.S. Committee is receiving applications for the
Canadian American Seminar to be held at the University of Windsor, Nov. 24,1966, on "An Independent
Canadian Foreign Policy: Fact or Fiction?" Applications must Ibe in by Oct. 20th, Box 153, Brock. More
information is available from the CUS office, Brock
Extension 258.
COMPANY OF YOUNG CANADIANS:
Students interested in (a) programming or (to) recruiting for the Company of Young Canadians, and
interested in forming a local U.B.C. committee to
form a communications liaison with the national headquarters are asked to apply in writing (stating interest,
experience, faculty and year) to the A.M.S. Secretary,
Box 54, Brock Hall.
HIGH  SCHOOL VISITATION
COMMITTEE:
Students interested in participating in a joint U.B.C.-
S.F.U. student high school visitation committee are
asked to apply in writing (stating interest, experience,
faculty, and year) to the Secretary, Box 54, Brock
Hall. First and Second year students are particularly
encouraged to apply.
ASSISTANT PUBLIC OFFICER:
Applications are being received for the position of
Assistant Public Officer for the Alma Mater Society.
Qualification is a belief in the value of active student
participation in university and community affairs.
Apply in writing to Box 54 or to Brock 210 for further
information
FINANCE COMMITTEE:
Grant Request Forms for conferences to toe held during the first term, 1966-1967, will be accepted by the
Treasurer until 4:00 p.m., Thursday, October 27, 1966.
("Request Forms" are available from the Accountant,
Mrs. Hyslop, in the A.MjS. Office). Friday, October 14, 1966
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
CUS remains in grave,
Alberta revival fails
EDMONTON (UNS) — No
quorum meant no CUS for Edmonton Wednesday at a students' union general meeting
here.
Only 644 students appeared
at the meeting called to try to
force University of Alberta
back into the Canadian Union
of Students.
At least 10 per cent of more
than   10,000   members   of   the
THEY LIKE ENGLISH
Arts students
go for changes
By NORMAN GIDNEY
Most artsmen polled by The Ubyssey like Dean Dennis
Healy's proposed curriculum revisions — but almost all
want to keep English.
—derrek webb photo
UBC PRESIDENT John Macdonald listens to AMS councillors'
demands for student voice in residence crisis decisions.
Student president Peter Braund (foreground) led delegation
taking advantage of Macdonald's first monthly 'open-door'
day.
Housing crisis report
ready in two weeks
Chief Vancouver planner
Bill Graham promised Thursday he will submit his report
on the Point Grey housing situation in two weeks.
Graham said: "A committee
is working on findings and observations and there is a difference of opinion on some
points.
"Statistics differ from records and there seems to be a
wide difference of opinion as
to how critical the situation
really is," he said.
Graham said he has appointed two assistants to prepare
the report.
"So far I do not know what
they have come up with."
Alma Mater Society president Peter Braund said recently he plans to mobilize support
among Point Grey homeown-
~And Sudden Death
Did you know that car accidents, last year, brought sudden death to almost 5,000
Canadians and injured another
150,000? Each one of those
numbers meant HORROR —
and unless you're careful your
number might be included in
this year's figures. The current
Reader's Digest features a
startling article, "AND SUDDEN DEATH." It's something
you should read and it may
well save your life. It originally
appeared in the Digest thirty-
one years ago and it shocked
the world with its gory details;
but it saved many lives! It's
now reprinted by special request. The article will shock
you because the facts are revolting. But, if you have the
nerve to drive fast and take
chances on the highway you
ought to have the nerve to read
"AND SUDDEN DEATH" in
October Reader's Digest — on
■ale now.
ers to endorse UBC's cause.
"But we can't do anything
until we find out what the
planning director is doing in
his report," Braund said.
"We have to find out if he
will or can be influenced toy
petitions. If so then we will
get as much petition support
as possible," he said.
I Alice Gomez, arts 3, said
she is very interested in the
new program now under debate in the arts faculty.
"It's the right trend. I like
the idea of greater discussion
— it's sadly lacking now."
"English should toe compulsory," said Heather Ogilvie,
arts 1. "Being English-speaking
we should be able to read and
write intelligently."
Ricky Burns, science 1,
agreed: "But I would wipe out
the foreign language requirement. It shouldn't be compulsory in high school anyway."
Arthur Dolsen, arts 3, favors
either just discussion groups
or lectures but not both:
"The program is entirely too
nebulous to work — the topics
are too wide. I feel English
100 should still be compulsory
and that a foreign language be
required for a BA."
"There are too many regulations aibout what courses you
have to take," said Graham
Farstad, arts 2. "I'm all in favor of smaller classes."
Arts 1 student iBob 'Purcell
said: "I'd dump the foreign
language tout I feel that at least
one year of English is necessary."
Other arts students generally agreed. "You need some
training in English. Most students are pretty lousy at writing. I don't have much use for
a foreign language," said one.
"I don't think the dean's program is a good idea for first
year. Coming out here is a
shock in itself without having
a totally different program,"
said another.
students' union were required
to attend before a motion
could be introduced to reverse
the recent decision to withdraw
from CUS.
Branny Schepanovich, student president, said the decision to withdraw will remain
in effect until March, 1967,
when a referendum is scheduled on possible re-entry.
Council notified CUS last
May that the university might
pull out of the national student body. Delegates to the
CUS congress in September in
Halifax attempted to reverse a
CUS trend towards international rather than national
status.
Schepanovich said Alberta
representatives felt CUS was
concerned with international
problems at the expense of national student problems.
Fall Campus
RAINCOATS
CROYDON
$1995
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All Young Men
Regularly $29.95
Take advantage of this
Manufacturers   Clearance
UNITED  TAILORS
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A Career For You In
CANADA'S  FOREIGN  SERVICE
Trade Commissioner Service Diplomatic Service
with with
Department of Trade Department of External
and Commerce Affairs
QUALIFYING EXAM - October 19 - 7:00 p.m.
Room 2225, Buchanan Bldg.
EXEMPTION: Only for those with Master's or Doctorate Degrees in  1967.
FOREIGN SERVICE EXAM - October 20 - 7:00 p.m.
Room 2225, Buchanan Bldg.
To  be   written   in   addition   to  Qualifying   Exam.
NO EXEMPTIONS
TO APPLY: It is preferred that you send, in advance of the examination,
Application Form CSC 100 (available at the Placement Office)
to the CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION OF CANADA, UNIVERSITY RECRUITMENT, OTTAWA 4, ONTARIO. It will
be possible also to complete an Application Form at the
examination.
DICK: No. This is what I call
"soft shoe".
LOIS: That's why I like you, mild-
mannered.Dick.
DICK: Go ahead, but just don't
remove my jacket or you'll release my super human powers.
LOIS: Don't you ever take off
your jacket?
DICK: Only in dark phone booths
because Hardy Amies designed
this proud English wool sweater
with atomic magnetism.
C.-3-66
this exclusive, made in England,
better stores
everywhere.
BYFORD DESIGN CONSULTANT: HARDY AMIES THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
the editor's and not of the AMS or the university. Member, Canadian
University Press. Founding member. Pacific Student Press. Authorized
second class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa, and for payment of
postage in cash.
The   Ubyssey   publishes   Page   Friday,   a   weekly  commentary   and   review.
City editor, 224-3916. Other calls, 224-3242: editor, local 25; photo. Page
Friday, loc. 24; features, sports, loc. 23; advertising, loc. 26. Night calls,
731-7019.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence and editorial writing.
OCTOBER 14, 1966
An Englishman thinks he is moral
when he is only uncomfortable.
—Bernard  Shaw
i -    -  - ,«W
Participation
"Youth today is no longer content to sit on the sidelines
and observe. Your young workers today want to play a
participatory role in your operations. Youth understands this
all-at-once world of ours."
Marshall McLuhan, Canada's own medium-is-the-
message man, spoke this message last summer to a
group of business executives — which included three
company presidents and several vice-presidents — at
a retreat in the Quebec Laurentians.
For university students, it was the gauntlet tossed
to the floor with a reverberating clank.
Because one suspects McLuhan spoke more from
wishful thinking than with the words of a man describing a fait accompli. He said . . . clearly: this is
youth's role.
The university student can take his education, his
degrees. He can listen to all the propaganda about him
being the leader of tomorrow and have his mind stuffed
with leadership responsibility.
And the truth is this: it's all true. As the student's
mind is moulded and made up now, so will Canada's
mass-think be moulded tomorrow. {
Professor McLuhan speaks of a new world with
new goals.
Richard Needham, columnist for the staid, Bay
Street-oriented Toronto Globe and Mail, speaks of
people being the only wealth.
Young men and young women from solid middle
class homes are being attracted to the Company of
Young Canadians, are buying CYC's message: come and
participate, come and work with people (at $35 a month
for two years).
This is a new world.
It is world facing not only unemployed people
but also a whole new class of unemployables — people
unable to cope with the technological complexities of a
highly mechanized,  artificial society.
It is a world where the Indian still lives in squalor,
where the Eskimo still lives walled off from the white
man's society, his teeth rotting from the white man's
sugar, a world of indigent slums where breeding is the
only apparent justification for being alive.
Too, it is a world where half of Canada's population
will be less than 25 years old in 1970. It is a world where
youth will have its say,  where  youth must be heard.
There are a few people, a few far-sighted people,
who call for new ideals, who ask for more important
goals than a moon-race, a second car, a wall-to-wall
carpet and a bigger life insurance policy.
These same few people say man has forgotten how
to live with his fellow man, how to understand his
needs, his troubles, his cries for help — and not just the
cries! from the slum derelict or the drunken Indian: but
from the next-door man in the $20,000 house.
Our society has been talking, pushing, defending,
earning, fearfully fighting for a long time. It has spent
little time listening. It has spent little time participating,
involving its people with each other.
So now we have new goa^s, perhaps goals born of
the same feelings as motivated other men in history but
not, perhaps, felt so consciously.
We can participate, we can believe other people are
the real wealth ... or we can go on being observers.
We can at least think of the company president who
commented on Professor McLuhan's talk: "I wish I was
J young again."
On the block
A few weeks ago we lauded several AMS executives
for daring to soap-box in front of the library at noon.
That single harangue session shot them off their collective rump and into the housing action fray, which
might yet succeed.
But that one bit of action must have promoted
rigormortis — they haven't been back since.
Since their very own leadership conference starts
tonight, maybe today would be a good day . . .
UCC petition
Editor, The Ubyssey:
The petition for a UCC seat
on AMS Council has been
postponed to January, pending the results of the AMS
decision to draft far-reaching
constitutional revisions.
If such revisions have not
been brought down by that
date, UCC will proceed with
seeking the referendum as a
'stop-gap' measure to alleviate the present situation,
which entails, we feel, a highly ineffective, nonfunctional,
and unrepresentative structure.
We also feel our action in
helping to initiate the broader study of the inequities of
present system has assisted
in galvanizing some AMS
action; and if there is effective reform, we feel that the
hundreds who have already
signed our petiion will be
satisfied that we have attempted to act in the best
inerests of the student body
by hot proceeding at this
time with a measure which
was admittedly aimed at only
a partial cure of the general
apathy inherent in our moribund form of student government.
MIKE COLEMAN
UCC President
Apology?
Editor, The Ubyssey:
An open letter to the president of the Engineering
Undergraduate Sodomity {or
whatchamacallit).
"Dear Mr. Newell (or what-
zayurname),
There are a few points I
would like to raise about
your letter in yesterday's
Ubyssey.
One. You said you wished
to express 'consternation and
ire' about an article. Now, if
you are constipated (or what-
dehell), why write letters
publicizing the fact?
Two. You stated, Mr. New-
gears, that the column in
question was written by 'one
Gabor Mate'. Would you have
preferred, Sir, to have it
written by two, or perhaps
seventy-five Gabor Mates?
(Or is it Gabors Mate?)
Three. You said I slandered a lady friend of yours. You
are right, Mr. Newhack, and
I apologize. I should never
have mentioned her name in
the same sentence with the
word 'engineer.'
Sorrowfully yours,
GABOR MATE
Utah  troubles
Editor, The Ubyssey:
I read with interest your
paper, which we receive
every week, and was particularly interested in your
September 20th issue discussing your housing and food
problems. While we don't
have all of the troubles you
may have, and I'm sure you
don't have ours, these are two
which we share as I'm ser-
tain many Universities do.
I was particularly amused
by your page 11 picture of
an attractive young lady telephoning to find lodging, with
an article immediately under
it telling about "locker space
for rent.
From your front page picture of the student sacked out
under a tree, this might be
your answer. At least you'd
have a place to store stuff
during the day.
DON A. CRANDALL
Editor, The Resident
University of Utah
New way
to die-
easy terms
By GABOR MATE
When local funeral parlors
heard that I considered their
ads too staid and boring, they
immediately hired me as a
ghost writer.
Here are some ads you will
soon see:
"Good morning children.
Krazy Kathy's
Kadaver Kor-
ner will now
present the
Krazy Kathy
Kiddie Kadaver Hour. Re-
memlber mothers, no job is
too small for
us."
"Folks, Red Fred's Dead
Bed offers you more comfort
than old fashioned coffins.
Our motto: Better Fred When
Dead."
"For the utmost care in the
handling of your favorite
corpse, trust in Happy Henry's
Hell House. At Happy Henry's
a leper never changes his
spots."
"Are you parting from a
dear friend? Be sure he travels in comfort and luxury.
We recommend the new Ca-
davrolet for 1967."
"Is the cost of funerals
keeping you from doing something you've always wanted
to do? Are you afraid to die
young? Don't wait until you
save enough money for a fancy
burial. Our efficient team of
vultures will do the job at
your home, at your convenience."
"Join our Corpses' Co-op
Funeral Hall. Pay less, and
enjoy interesting company in
our air conditioned mass
grave. Private and semi-private accommodation also
available."
"Visit Heinrich's Incinerary.
You'll wish you were dead."
"Join our exclusive men's
club. Our motto: Be Gay
While You Decay."
EDITOR: iohn Kelsey
Managing Richard Blair
News Carol Wilion
Cify Danny Stoffmon
Photo Powell Hargrave
Pago Friday Claudia Gwinn
Features     Rosemary  Hyman
Ass'l Newt,_Pat Hrushowy, Anne Balf
Ass't Photo Dennis Gans
Reporters roved. Man-in-Buch-
anan Norman Gidney grilled arts-
men. Ron Simmer and Bo Hansen
talked over their principals.
Broads came down and wrote like
mad: Maria Oiardini, Mary Ussner,
Boni Lee, Charlotte Haire, Sue
Gransby, Angela Ottho, Val Zuker
and Gloria Tse-hsu they were
called.
Camera creeps were Chris Blake,
Kurt Hilger, Don Kydd, Derrek
Webb and Al Harvey.
Sportsman was Jim Maddin.
Pneumonia or not, party is on
as planned. Come to Brock basement for time and place.  ^«^^^^^s^^s^»^»
Festival needs raison d'etre
and student support, say
judge Watson and Knight
By GRAHAM OLNEY
With little more than a polite
whimper, the Vancouver International Film Festival wound up its
ninth season last month after weathering 10 days of nondescript features and scores of worthless short
films. The festival, in which only
short films can compete is one of
the few festivals recognized by the
International Federation of Film
Producers' Association, but there was
little to show for the reputation.
Typical of the short films shown
was Invitation To Japan, a run-of-
the-mill travelogue which Japan's
national tourist association turns out
by the hundreds. There were few
pleasant surprises in the entire program and most critics now consider
the festival a virtual write-off for
this year.
In a manner similar to someone
flogging a long-extinct corpse, one
of the three festival judges, Arthur
Knight, wrote this epitaph in the
Oct. 8 Saturday Review: "Frequently, during the 10 days of the Vancouver festival, its hard-working
committee people lamented that neither
their city nor their
community was giving them proper support. I wonder if
any of them stopped
to ask just what
there was about
OLNEY their festival that
was actually worth supporting."
The only really happy person was
UBC's own Larry Kent who walked off with the festival's Centennial
prize for the best British Columbia
film.
On a rainy Saturday afternoon,
just hours before the festival's final
collapse, four people discussed what
went wrong.
Late-arriving judge Patrick Watson sat in the corner and insisted he
wasn't going to say anything but
did anyway. The 36-year-old former
host of This Hour Has Seven Days
said he wasn't bitter about the CBC
kafuffle and would take a year sabbatical studying and teaching at Waterloo to complete his doctorate.
Arthur Knight, author of The
Liveliest Art, a film appreciation
primer, is currently working on a
21-chslpter series on Sex in the
Cinema for Playboy magazine. He
lounged in one corner of his hotel
suite with his wife, Mary Ann. (Mrs.
Knight has done costume design for
which she picked up a couple of academy award nominations.)
I asked Knight if he considered
Vancouver one of the dime-a-dozen
festivals and the harangue started.
Arthur Knight: Film festivals are
a dime a dozen and I think to justify a film festival you need some
unique reason for being. To have
a film festival consisting of the dregs
of other festivals plus whatever commercial things happen to ibe around
makes very little sense unless you
can supplement it in some way —
and the best way is by accenting
what does happen in Canada. The
fact that you have in competition
the short films gives you a unique
opportunity to single out the ibest in
Canadian production.
Graham Olney: What would you
do to make it a better festival? I
gather, of course, you think the
festival can toe much better.
Knight: Yes, I would say that is
an understatement.
Mrs. Knight: Patrick hasn't said
a word.
Patrick Watson: Well, Arthur's
very good at criticizing the festival.
Knight: 'Believe it or not, the
judges who come to a thing like
this tend to take it very seriously.
We obviously don't do it for the
money. We do it because of the interest in the medium itself and the
belief that these things can be useful. We've had repeated discussions
among ourselves about things that
can be done if the festival is to toe
as  meaningful  in Vancouver  as  it
seems to be outside.
Vancouver's judges have given a
certain stature to the festival which
seems to be completely out of proportion with' what
we found when we
arrived here.
Mrs. Knight: This
includes  the  film
festival people. They
seem to feel no one
WATSON     knows   about  them
outside.
Watson: This certainly isn't true
—film producers have heard about
the Vancouver festival for a long
time. But you come here and find
that taxicab drivers haven't heard of
it.
Olney: You've seen an actual
Canadian feature at the festival,
When Tomorrow Dies. What about
it?
Knight: We were talking about
this earlier. When we got here and
since we've been here we've heard
nothing except how disappointing
When Tomorrow Dies is and then
we saw the picture and were astonished at how good it was. The film
is a very respectable beginning.
Olney: But it's Kent's third film
and is considered a semi-professional
effort.
Knight: Well, it's still a beginning
for Vancouver.
Watson: Nobody in Vancouver
came to us and said, "Here's a film
that has some faults but there's a
first-rate performance by a Canadian
acrtess".
Nobody had this kind of enthusiasm: And everyone said, "well, you
konw, don't take this too seriously.
j You probably should
see it. It's interesting in an academic
way."
But the stress was
always on the fault.
Knight: You know,
this is a festival
without any festival
events.
Mrs. Knight: Or without a festival
atmosphere.
Watson: Another thing that struck
me strongly was the absence of
young people — students — at the
theatre. There should be a student
subscription and a student single
ticket arrangement that is extreme-
KNIGHT
ly cheap and that would attract so
many students they'd compete for
subscription tickets.
Olney: To get back to the festival,
do you think it would be wise to
have a festival of Canadian films?
Knight: Well, no. I think from
what I have seen of Canada and
Canadians it would attract absolutely nobody. The promise of seeing a
Canadian film seems to be the very
thing to send them all screaming
in the other direction.
Olney: Don't you think Kent's
treatment of the subject is somewhat melodramatic?
Knight: Well, I don't agree because Larry Kent has taken a situation that faces many women today
and has not treated it in a soap opera
style. I'm not sure that he has given
an adequate answer to the problem.
But he has raised a very important problem of our time that few
film makers, and certainly the slick
commercial boys, would not be concerned with. Or, if they were concerned with it, would turn it over
someone like Doris
Day to cope with and
she'd end up in the
sack with Rock Hudson in the last reel.
Watson: There is
a preoocup at i o n
^^^^^^ with trivia in the
** mWmWmmmW assembly of that
MRS. KNIGHT show which is both
a strength and a weakness. It has
tremendous versimilitude but at the
same time it's too long and becomes
boring. He's too interested in ordinary things and so there's a lot of
scenes that ought to toe cut down.
The theme is, in a sense, an old
one. It's written about extensively in
the ladies' magazines. It may not
have appeared in a feature film. It
has appeared, I think, in a lot of
television plays. And one does have
the impression that Larry Kent is
like a novelist who has never read
a book.
Knight: Except that he has avoided that slicked-up feeling of the
ladies' magazines.
Mary Ann Knight: But he works
under a disadvantage — he was not
given encouragement in this country.
Knight: I think it is shameful that
he is not able to get distribution in
Canada.
Watson: I think it's disgraceful.
Pf
is a weekly magazine of
commentary and review.
OCT. 14, 1966
ON THE COVER: Four Spanish
faces from the fine arts gallery's
current show, photo by Dennis
Gans. See review, pf S.
editor: claudia gwinn
assistant: judy bing
photo: dennis gans
powell hargrave
kurt hilger
derek webb
don kydd
cartoons: judy hirt
rae
Draft dodgers aided
by Vancouver group
"l have nothing against
them personally ... but
would you want your daughter to marry one?"
By BOB CRUISE
Hippies may soon have a
new phrase . . . "Will your
parents let you take a draft
dodger to dinner?"
As of last week the rate at
which Americans are leaving
funland for draft-free Canada
was over one a day in Vancouver alone. Students, married couples, and general
workers are coming here, says
Benson Brown, member of
the Vancouver Committee to
aid American war objectors.
It is unfortunate, Brown
says, that so many people
think these exiled Americans
have sneaked into Canada.
Quite the contrary. Most
are applying for either student status or landed immigrant status and are in Canada as legitimately as a citizen.
Many have taken advantage
of the pamphlet which the
War Objectors Committee
printed and which states the
necessary steps required for
a Yank to get legitimate landed immigrant status in Canada.
It does not make any difference whether the person has
received Uncle Sam's induction notice or not. One can
still properly obtain landed
immigrant status.
But don't take my word for
it if you have some pen-pals
in freedom-land sitting nervously by their mailbox each
day.
Take advantage of the detailed preparation of this committee and the fact that the
local CUS committee will
soon have copies of the revised brochure available in
its office.
And, anyone with travel
posters of Beautiful British
Columbia should send them
to the committee.
mmmctv- ■^^j^*v-^mm?¥>^z<f.w^:^m*# a^»»*«w
'A-*£- ",€■.„-
Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 14, 1966 Gabor unearthes good deal
of Conservative humbug
"I would rather not answer a question than
answer it fasely or misleadingly," says the man
with the Rusk-like face and the soft voice. "You
could cover the whole thing with snow and invent an answer, but I would rather not."
The professor of such laudable honesty is one
of the most important men in Canada, Dalton
Camp, national chairman of the Progressive Conservative, Party. He is being interviewed by a
humble Page Friday columnist in the sound studio
of UBC's Radsoc.
The room is filled with Camp followers, members of the Young Conservative club.
Does he think his party represents any special
group?
"At certain times in its history it has represented special groups because of special national
problems. In '57 and '58 it represented the
special problems and anxieties of the western
farmer, and perhaps even to this day they feel
they are more represented by the Conservatives
than by any other party." But he doesn't like to
think his party represents any particular interest
group.
It is different with the Liberals. Clearly,
they represent big business. "Bay Street, whatever it is or it isn't, you can't say historically, has
been allied to the Conservative Party." (The
Young Conservatives laugh politely, understanding^.)
Who else do the Liberals represent? "With
certain exceptions which only prove the rule, the
French speaking people in this country put their
primary allegiance in the Liberal Party." But this
is not necessarily a permanent situation. "At the
present time both parties have failed to produce
quality leadership in Quebec."
"I am not sure that either party today has a
relevant policy towards Quebec," sighed Camp.
What, the humble columnist wanted to know,
would be a relevant policy?
"All of Canada must psychologically and
more cheerfully accept a more meaningful interpretation of biculturalism."
A more meaningful interpretation, said Camp,
"would be the expression of the two races within
the nation. I think we've got to find a more pervasive bitculturalism or bilingualism or whatever
you want to call it, a more pervasive national
policy.
"It has to be expressed in terms of our national communication system, of media, of the
federal bureaucracy throughout Canada. I think
the city of Ottawa can become what it isn't now,
thoroughly bilingual."
If the national chairman thinks there is anything else to the solution of the Quebec problem
than a few French-language TV programs, civil
servants, and Ottawa street signs, he doesn't say
so.
From Ja belle province we turn to the doughty
Saskatchewan lawyer.
"Diefenbaker made a unique contribution to
Canadian democracy. He restored in 1957 some
confidence in parliamentary institutions, and restored for a brief period the two party system.
"He changed for the better the public image
of the Conservative party, in that the party came
to represent many Canadian minorities, not just
racial but economic minorities. For two years he
had one of the greatest periods of achievement in
policy."
But alas, it is the twilight of the gods. "Mr.
Diefenbaker made his place in history because he
became one of the greatest victors, but I think he
paid heavily for that in the mass withdrawal of
confidence by the Canadian people."
A lesser man than Mr. Camp would have said
that the Canadian people no longer trust in the
leadership of John Diefenbaker.
"Mr. Diefenbaker's concept of leadership is
his, but I don't know how contemporary, how
realistic that concept is. I think it is a question we
have to ask ourselves."
The humble reporter wanted to know if Mr.
Camp has asked himself that question. Mr.
Camp has, but he would rather not answer it.
Lester Pearson is a more conspicuous failure
about whom Camp has no reservations in criticizing. "He was never able to muster any clear purpose in government policy and he certainly never
could rally the nation. He had three opportunities, and his failure is quite unique."
Camp talks much about public apathy. The
humble columnist wanted to know if he thinks
this apathy can be attributed to the leadership
of Pearson and Diefenbaker.
"The Canadian people have the idea," said
Camp, "that there is private animosity between
the two leaders, and this does affect the parliamentary system and public confidence in it."
"I asked you what you thought," remarks
the humble columnist, "you told me what the Canadian people think. Can you tell me what you
think?"
The national chairman of the Progressive
Conservative Party cannot tell us what he thinks.
"You can't help being a prisoner of your experience, you know."
Fortunately, he is free to express an opinion
on our foreign policy.
"Right now we belong to a host of nearly
obsolete alliances. Our policy is a hypocrisy. I
think we have compromised ourselves on the nuclear question. I don't think we can talk disarmament with nearly the conviction that we could
have, if we had taken a separate course."
Separate from Uncle Sam, presumably, but
not too separate.
After all, the Americans are protecting our
interests in Viet Nam.
"You can't as a human being look on that
thing and not have twinges of conscience, but on
the other hand we have to face the fact that the
DALTON   CAMP
. .  .  conservatively  speaking
Americans are carrying an enormous burden, an
enormous responsibility."
Why, the humble columnist wants to know,
should we not help the Americans by sending
troops?
Camp is somewhat unsettled by the question.
"Because I don't think this is our role, or our
function, or within our capacity. Politics and
diplomacy are the art of the possible, of what's
practical, and this would be repugnant to our
condition, our outlook, our history and our relative policy."
If our interests are really being defended,
are we not being hypocritical in not aiding that
defence?
Camp becomes even more uncertain.
"No, I don't think ... I think there is a good
deal of humbug in our attitude. I think that . . .
I think our efforts to examine ... to ... to ... a
couple of years ago to lecture the president of the
U.S. on his obligation publicly. I am afraid I consider it hypocritical, yes. But I . . . There again I
think that some of the mistakes we made in
foreign policy in the past and our failure to maintain our own initiatives or even to contain those
initiatives within the U.N. have made any kind
of useful role in Viet Nam for Canada very unlikely.    We have Mr. Romning but I don't . . ."
We will never know what Dalton Camp
doesn't, for at this point one of the Young Coik-
servatives interrupted mercifully, saying it is
time to go.
The humble columnist thinks there is a good
deal of humbug in our attitude.
Finger of fate  lands on Mate
Humble reporter GABOR MATE
EDITOR.  PAGE  FRIDAY:
Before the fickle finger of
Mate exposes any more international injustices perpetrated
by his arch-enemy, the establishment, he should try to see
the great balancer through his
pot fogged eyes.
The other side of the coin re
France — who the hell's still
polluting our air with the needless detonation of primitive
nuclear devices? This is especially aibsurd when one considers that efficient perfected
thermo-nuclear weapons are
available for France's defence.
Or perhaps defence alone does
not interest notre cher gener-
ale.
And why does Gratey Matey
not apply for admission to the
great workers state's universi
ties for a couple of semesters?
His Red Guard buddies would
soon expose the other side of
China.
The radical views he expounds so fceely here would
get him booted all the way
back to the borders of South
Viet Nam where, if he were
lucky, a U.S. Army field hospital run by those parochial decadent criminals for South
Viet Nam's civilian population
would put his broken bum-
bone in splints and fly him
home.
Then our hairy friend could
espouse some really noble
cause, such as founding a Canadian chapter of The Flat
Earth Society and wreaking
vengance on all those engineers
who have not yet penetrated
the simple obviousness of such
a truth.
Or he could start a new fashion which might be added to
the 'beatnik uniform, by trimming his finger nails and other
parts of his anatomy with pinking shears.
In any event keep publishing his columns. If we can't
laugh with him we can always
laugh at him.
ROBERT  WHITE
Arts 2
pf 3hree
Friday, October 14, 1966
.y*^^&*■*"*M|vh*.-■*?>   ^ i*.$y».t^-..j^n-* ?*>&,,
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 7 THE DEATH OF GOD
IN OUR TIME
TALK BACK
St. Anselm's
Church
University Boulevard
Sunday Evenings
7:00 to  8:00
Death  of  Morality
- Oct. 16
Death of Prayer
- Oct. 23
Death of God
- Oct. 30
Short address followed by questions
and  comments  from   the  congregation,   concluding   by  8:00   p.m.
Coffee  Hour follows for those
interested in further discussions
>~>L
Design it yourself.
Your very own
individually tailored
suit.  Pick from  over
250 action swatches in
silk & wool, Venetian
gaberdines & hopsacks
Tailored to Measure
by Tip Top Tailors
only  $85  &  $95
DISTINCTIVE MEN'S STORES
4445 W. 10th
near   Sasamat
2901 W. B'dwy.
c.   Mackenzie
"*re..
>*K " 4"^«>^mW»». >m i*«- « •.- ^^*Jg$Mf!%£S>££lMX,. V "mM
Sage and kook turns on
By BERT HILL
So you just got out of a
dreary lecture delivered by a
dreary professor.
It was full of facts, reason
and logic and ended, "This
will be on the exam."
To top it off, the prof suggested you pick up a $10.95
textbook written by a colleague from whom he will
get a kickback on every volume sold.
You'll never get any human use out of it so don't
buy it.
Instead pick up Needham's
Inferno at $4.95.
It alone might just get you
through this year at UBC
with humanity intact. Then
again it might show you the
ridiculousness of the present
rat race and you'll get out of
UBC as fast as possible.
Toronto Globe and Mail
columnist Richard J. Need-
ham's subject is homo sap-
iers; each with his own little
chrome plated screw loose.
The author oversees the
world from his daily corner
of the Globe's editorial page.
Confirmed Needham addicts may also pick up his
column three times a week
in the Globe's Report on
Business.
Recently Needham has
been discovered by several
publications including Time
(gasp), which are all amazed
at the fact that Needham lives
the life he preaches.
Letter: why fm quitting
the university morass
Last Friday, Lyn Bowman wrote about his experiences
at the Joan Baez institute for the study of non-violence.
The  institute  prompted  him  to write  this letter,  and  to
opt out of university studies.
Editor, Page Friday:
Jiddu Krishnamurti observes that "the function of
education (is) to prepare us while we are young to understand the whole process of life". The present function of
universities is to produce a steady flow of new members
of the middle class, people who fit in our society.
However, "to understand life is much more important
than merely to prepare for examinations and become very
proficient in mathematics, physics or what you will".
When I registered I intended to get an education in my
spare time. Now I find that my studies take up all my time.
I cannot allow my university training to keep me from getting an education.
There are no courses within a university curriculum
which help a student discover the truth, love and nonviolence which are his nature. Student is pitted against
student in examinations. Professors and instructors institute harsh penalties against students who fail to observe
arbitrary rules of discipline.
No prisoner who remains within the walls of his prison
can bring about any true revolution. He may change conditions within the walls but the walls remain. Only by
attacking our society from without can I hope to break
down its walls.
To do so I must not participate in society, therefore,
I am withdrawing from university and encourage all others
to follow suit.
LYN BOWMAN
Arts 2
They can't get their corporate minds off his closet in
a cheap Toronto Chinatown
rooming house, or the delight
he gets from presenting flowers to any and all women he
happens to meet — mostly on
the subway.
He even accepts the picture
of himself as a scurrying
chipmunk or dissipated racoon.
Unfortunately this gets
him shoved into a neat little
pigeon hole generally labelled friendly old anarchist.
People miss the skillful
play with language and the
unveiled realities accompanying his boundless humor.
His subjects are widely varied but more often .than not
centre on the peculiar Canadian twist of male-female relationships, liquor laws and
other hypocrisies.
Needham will turn you on
as fast as any psychedelic
drug.
■ is..*" ,»>V
;? * is im_ ■". i". ?; ¥»«'**>
C
A
N
A
D
I
A
N
CUISINE AT ITS BEST!
MODERN CAFE
Bavarian Room   -:-  3005 W. Broadway   -:-   RE 6-9012
WEST POINT GREY
BAPTIST CHURCH
Eleventh at Sasamat
9:45 A.M.-COLLEGE AND CAREER CLASS
11:00 A.M.  & 7:30 P.M.-WORSHIP SERVICES
8:45 P.M.-COLLEGE AND CAREER FELLOWSHIP
FREE    -    FREE    -    FREE
—    A staged reading of a new play    —
Do You Remember
One September Afternoon
by David Watmough
directed by Moyra Mulholland
with
Dorothy Davies, Rae Brown and Barbara Tremain
Monday, October 17 - 12:30 p.m.
Some tickets for Sunday, Oct.  16 al 8:00 p.m.
Available Room 207
FREDERIC     WOOD     THEATRE
UNIVERSITY CHURCH
ON THE BOULEVARD
LAYMEN'S SUNDAY
UNIVERSITY HILL ST. ANSELM'S
(United) (Anglican)
11:00 Morning Worship
"Churches Where
the Action Is"
8:00, 9:30 and 11:00 a.m.
Holy Communion
"Crisis in Communication"
Dr. C. P. S. Taylor
7:00 p.m. TALK-BACK - St. Anselm's
"DEATH OF MORALITY"
HAROLD MacKAY JIM McKIBBON
OPTICAL DEPT.
Bring your optical prescription
to us and save!
9.95
49.50
Glasses   Single vision  from
PRESCRIPTION
Contact Lenses	
(ANY COLOUR)
NOW 2 LOCATIONS DOWNTOWN ONLY
677 Granville, opposite The Bay Phone 681-6174
1 Hour Free Parking at Rite Park
New Westminster
675 Columbia, Opposite Army and Navy
Phone LA 1-0751
Page  8
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 14, 1966 .' S
. '..I'.f.'.jmt,'^',-
Sophisticated paintings
from South America say
more and more on less
and less, critic finds
By CLAUDIA DIENER
Two major exhibitions The
South American Biennial and
Spanish Gouaches are now
snowing at the Fine Arts
Gallery through October 22.
Both, though representing
contrasts in style and mood,
are in danger of falling into
the cliches of modern art.
The South American paintings, generally, are crudely
assembled and the Spanish
abstracts are highly sophisticated.
Quite evident in both is a
trend by the artists to say
more and more about less
'and less. The same motifs
compulsively appear over and
over again.
There are those artists who
use the same personal images
in different situations. Jorge
de la Vegas' amusing sequences of the same faces,
Atturo's emergences of color,
and Leufert's dull circles fit
into this category, as do the
Spanish gouaches.
Caro seems "hung up" on
skeletal lines on a muscle-like
structure of space, and Vent
on a mucky exposition of the
unseeable and unknowable.
Of the Spaniards, only
Mendina seems to have a few
more images on his mental
palette.
Some of the artists concentrate strictly on translating
mathematical or optical relations into art. Such is the
highly mobile op art of Jesus
de Soto — interesting and intricate with a new use of
frame space.
The paintings rarely startle
or even offend. Even Borges
confetti-like explosions of color can't jar our color-jaded
eyes.
It is that they are in danger
of perpetuating stereotypes
akin to those of 19 century
academy artists. Art is becoming a total immersion — a
total experience. These two
exhibitions have not gone far
enough.
HHHD
C A IM A D A
CfttpUijtneht %teri)ieu>A
Our representatives will be visiting the campus
7th, 8th, 9th and 10th November
to interview graduating and post-graduate students in
the following disciplines who are interested in a career
in industry.
Regular Employment:
Mechanical Engineering
Chemical Engineering
Mining Engineering
Engineering Science
General Arts or Science
Mathematics
Electrical Engineering
Engineering Physics
Chemistry   and/or   Physics
Commerce or Business
Administration
Statistics
Econometrics
An interview appointment can be made at your Placement Office on campus where you may obtain position
descriptions and information about the Company. If
supplies of these are depleted, please fill in the coupon
below and forward to us for immediate attention.
Summer Employment:
We will have a number of interesting openings for undergraduates in chemical, mechanical and electrical engineering, one, two and three years from graduation as
well as for undergraduates in chemistry, commerce or
business administration.
Summer employees, particularly those who will be entering their senior year provide the additional technical
manpower required to carry out many important investigations of a challenging nature.
DU PONT OF CANADA
Personnel Division, P.O. Box 660
Montreal, P. Q.
COUPON "~~
Dear Sir:
Kindly forward immediately information on openings
for 1967 graduates and a copy of your booklet "From
University to Industry With Du Pont of Canada".
NAME  _  _
ADDRESS
-FACULTY & YEAR
(please print)
This and more at current gallery show
,- ,,*". *f~
ARMSTRONG & REA
OPTOMETRISTS
EYES EXAMINED
CONTACT LENSES
2 Convenient Offices
■BROADWAY at GRANVILLE
•KERRISDALE   41&t at YEW
Slacks Narrowed
Suits Altered
and Repaired
Tuxedos   Remodelled
Expert Tailoring
UNITED TAILORS
549 Granville St.
GO! GO! GIRLS!
The 2nd Best Shape To
Come Out of Italy!
COME ON DOWN TO
THE INTRODUCTION  OF THE
67 JUNIOR FERRARI 850 FASTBACK
SPIDER by  FIAT
STARTS 10:00-4:00 SAT.
OCT. 15th #1966
ASCOT MOTORS LTD.
West   Broadway
8
Special H.P. Test Movie & be early for
Special Door Prizes every hour
"THE PRETTIEST GIRLS IN B.C. WILL GREET YOU"
Friday, October 14, 1966
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 9 Curling Anyone?
T, W, Th, F-9:30 a.m.
T,W, F- 11:30 a.m.
No Charges — Instruction Free
Faculty  Welcome  — Grads,  too
School of PE & REC,
Voluntary Rec. Program
Phone 228-2401
PLEASE NOTE:
The Voluntary Rec. Program does not include bowling as
was advertised in yesterdays Ubyssey. So bowlers —
why not try curling.
Attention: Members of International
House
NOTICE OF 3RD ANNUAL
GENERAL MEETING
Tuesday, November 1, 1966 - 8 p.m.
Lower Lounge,  International  House,
U.B.C.
Annual Reports
Amendments to the Constitution
(copies available after October 18)
Election  of Board  Members
COFFEE  7:30  P.M.
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Really arts? Come on,
cowboy Wise and crew
By LORENZ VON FERSEN
Are you for real? ... definitely an open question
when considering the Arts
Undergraduate Society and
its president, Don Wise.
Maybe the problem with
AUS is that the students are
apathetic and the executive is
out of touch ... an illusion
run by a farce.
• •     •
There are 5,469 studehts registered in arts. They include
the bulk of the politically
articulate leftists, and all
those in the humanities and
social sciences.
So far, the only contact between them and the AUS is
when they rent a locker.
On the other end is the
AUS president. He is concerned about getting an office and a telephone. Ssshh
. . . don't disturb him, he's
waiting for a phone call from
god. He was elected by 2.5
per cent of the entire faculty.
Psst . . . perhaps god will
phone after all; he rules toy
Divine Right. The rest of the
executive holds office by
acclamation.
Thus, a question of legitimacy. The point is not so
much that the AUS executive
holds office on a non-representative mandate; rather it
is the lack of leadership by
the executive in creating a
sense of legitimacy through
informing and taking the
initiatives.
• •    •
Case in point: Dean Healy's
curriculum reform. How can
students criticize his proposals if the only copy of
this outside of the faculty is
on Wise's desk and stay's
there? If Carolyn Tate and
George Reamsbottom hadn't
asked for more copies, the
proposals might still be there.
Those of us who attended
the AMS general meeting last
March might remember Wise
saying,   arts  is  going  to  be
a    totally    different    animal
next year.
We are going to be actively involved in all that's going
on at UBC. I'd also like
to state now that we intend
to put out a weekly newspaper dealing with all aspects
of the campus. I intend to call
a general meeting immediate
ly after registration to demand more representation on
the AMS." All this from the
March 26, 1966 Ubyssey.
This Wednesday Wise said
no general meeting will be
held because he could see no
justification for it. Concensus, the AUS paper, might
appear this month if editor
Tom Mason can get staff and
money.
The lack of leadership, according to Wise, has two reasons: two members of the
executive elected last spring
didn't return this fall; and
"the machine isn't there" —
that there is no continuous
organization from previous
years which knows what has
to be done and how to do it.
Both points are entirely just,
but they misinterpret the condition AUS is really in.
Appointing riders for a dead
horse is more of an escape
than a solution.
•    •    •
AUS is no longer a coherent
group. It has no aims, few
supporters, and no leaders.
Before it gets more bureaucrats it needs a credible leader. Instead of sitting in his
office and waiting for people
to drop in (or God to phone a
solution) Wise should call a
meeting to affirm his leadership.
He should analyze AUS as
he sees it and explain himself in front of the library.
If nobody shows up at a
general meeting, Wise should
realize that nobody cares and
should dissolve AUS for the
year.
Page 10
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, October 14,  1966 ST*?FTV.'~ «~ j y<-
-&?~
Fitzgerald revived,
but it's not worth it
By LAWRENCE MILLER
Fitzgerald is currently suffering a revival.
This could happen to any author. The
problem is worse in this case, though, because so many academics feel a mythic kinship with the-man. Such feelings are generally specious, based on memories of (or long-
FITZGERALD—F. Scott Fitxgerald; A Crit-
ical Portrait. By Henry Dan Piper. New
York, Holt, Rbinehart and Winston.
1966; $10.95.
Lawrence Miller is a graduate student at
Hamilton's McMaster University.
ings for) the roaring 20s, an obvious desire
to be thought of as secretly romantic, or a
degree conferred more than 25 years ago
from Fitzgerald's university, Princeton.
Most such critics are certain to miss the
point in attempting serious re-evaluation of
Fitzgerald's work.
No clear understanding of Fitzgerald as a
person emerges, but only a representation
of Fitzgerald as the object of various forces
—Zelda, liquor, his desire for money, the
standard writer's passion to transform experience into art.
Putting it bluntly, Piper lacks the insight
and imagination Arthur Mizener displayed
in The Far Side of Paradise in 1951.
Their respective treatments of the Fitz-
geralds' move to St. Paul in 1921 is a case
in point.
Piper claims Fitzgerald "felt a compulsion to return and make his peace with Summit Avenue". He cites no authority for the
remark and none of the published letters or
other materials bear him out.
Mizener provides 5Vz lively pages and
proves Zelda's feelings by quoting her letter
to Ludlow Fowler: "We are simply mad to
get back to New York . . . This damned
place is 18 below zero and I go around thanking God that, anatomically and proverbially
speaking, I am safe from the awful fate of
the monkey".
Such vigorous scholarship is not demonstrated by Mr. Piper.
The prize for blind misunderstanding must
go to his plaintive cry on page 93 as he
scores Fitzgerald for slipshod work:
The Beautiful and Damned "never received the final polishing it should have
had. For example, at one point Gloria tells
Anthony that she is pregnant — but we
never hear anything more about this interesting development. Whatever happened to
her baby?"
In the novel, Anthony goes to his grandfather for advice or money or something to
face the prospect of this onrushing baby.
When he returns Gloria clearly wants to
speak to him but impatiently waits till the
servant has gone:
"It's all right," she announced, smiling
broadly, "and it surprised me more than it
does you."
"There's no doubt?"
They rejoiced happily, gay again with reborn irresponsibility."
Either careless reading or an astounding
ignorance of life would be required to miss
that one.
No, it's not worth it. There is room for a
lot of good work on Fitzgerald but most of
the ground covered here has been covered
before—and better.
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Now is the time to subscribe for
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Catalogues and contest details
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Friday, October 14, 1966
THE    UBYSSEY
Page  11 * &&H&KS-WV011&I!**.
-■.a
Failure Alfie flunks out
as modern Tom Jones flick
Alfie is a failure.
Publicists referring to it as
the modern Tom Jones ignore
the film's lack of subtlety and
finesse to link it to Tom by
theme . . . Alfie's constantly
on the make. Unlike his be-
ruffled counterpart however,
Alfie's non-plot succession of
women in and out of bed and
trouble is an unimaginative
drudge.
There's the case of the poor
pregnant girl who keeps their
baby, marries another man
and lives domestically ever
after — hardly an innovation.
Almost as tedious is the wife
of Alfie's hospital roommate
who aborts their child (hers
and Alfie's).
Hardly an innovation either
considering she has three
other   children at  home  and
Plummer plucks
Sunday  strings
Special events committee
has made another special
event available to UBC students for a low, low price.
Symphony devotees can
now hear the Vancouver
Symphony's Sunday concerts
for one dollar. All you have
to do is present your AMS
cards at the ticket booth.
It's like magic!
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Page  12
husband Harry has been confined for nearly a year.
The facts are there but
they're neither revealing or
authentic.
Michael Caine as Alfie is
unchallenged in the role of
the callous, unsentimental but
sof t-and-chewy-in-the - middle
lover boy ... an insult to the
talent and ability he showed
in the Ipcress File.
Poor color quality suggest
the director might have saved
a few pounds, obviously at a
minimum, by filming in black
and white thus sparing the
viewer the nuances of gaudy
make-up and photography.
Instead the producer chose to
budget directing technique
with close up monologues in
the Jones' tradition.
Only the occasional dialogue escape cliche. As tubercular Alfie seduces pretty
nursie, Lily says to husband:
"Harry have a banana."
Is Your Reading Load
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*EFFECTIVE READING IS THE ABILITY TO VARY BOTH YOUR READING
RATE AND TECHNIQUE ACCORDING TO THE STYLE, PURPOSE, IMPORTANCE AND DIFFICULTY OF THE MATERIAL BEING READ. Here are
comments from some of our students who have lightened their reading
load: — Ed Morrisroe (High School Student) — "After learning the study
method, it is the first time I have actually gotten a great deal out of
my reading and enjoyed it."
Morag Machlachlan (Teacher) — "This week I read 30 articles and  3
books. This is additional to homework."
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THE      UBYiSSEY
Friday^ October 14, 1966 Focus
CAMPUS COPS:
the benevolent
dictatorship
SIR OUVRY
By CHARLOTTE  HAIRE
Sir Ouvry Roberts is the
czar of 10,000 cars.
Director of the university
patrol, he has authority, under the board of governors,
to impound cars, assess
fines and adjudicate all
appeals.
"My personal adjudication
works very well," he said.,
"because I deal with the
appeal quickly and very
leniently."
If the verdict is guilty,
failure to pay the fine results
in the student's marks being
withheld, or his car being
impounded.
CONFORM
"If a student is not willing
to conform," said Sir Ouvry,
"he is not the kind of student
we want at the university."
The board of governors established the patrol in 1962
to cope with the "unsatisfactory traffic conditions", which
included a $12,000 per year
towing bill.
The towing bill now is less
than $1,000; parking fees paid
by students help with other
expenses.
"The   patrol,"    said    Sir
Ouvry, "is mainly concerned
with the protection of the
public, not with meting out
punishments."
He said that at the beginning of the year the patrol
stops numbers of cars proceeding illegally on restricted
roadways. "This is for the student's own protection as a
pedestrian."
RESTRICT CARS
"It is our policy," he said,
"to restrict in every way pos-
iwW.
sible the number of cars driving on University roads."
The patrol's authority to
impound comes from Section
20 of the Traffic and Parking
Regulations issued by the
board of governors.
SMALL EUROPEAN  CAR
enmeshed
Friday, October 14, 1966
Section 20 (d) states that
vehicles may be impounded
"when normal enforcement
action is proving ineffective."
This   regulation,    said    Sir
Ouvry, can be applied to almost anything.
MUST APPROVE
A patrolman does not have
any authority to impound, he
said, but must receive the approval of Sir Ouvry himself
or the supervisor.
He said the cases of the
girls who last week ran
through patrol barriers on
Chancellor Boulevard were
now being dealt with.
"We will interview them,
and, depending on the nature
of the offense as we assess it,
we will deal with it.
"Punishments could range
from being taken before the
Faculty Council, to being released with a warning," he
said.
RCMP DIFFERS
"Regulation 20 (d) is not
under the Motor Vehicle Act,"
he said, "Neither does the
RCMP have it because of
their differing enforcement
action."
Sir Ouvry said that the most
frequent student offenses on
campus are illegal acquisition of parking stickers, illegal parking, and interference
with the patrol's duties. Meter
offenses are committed primarily by faculty and visitors.
"However, if a student has
done something detrimental
to the entire student body, he
is recommended to the AMS,"
he said.
"If the students can deal
with their own problems, so
much the better for everyone."
FEW HOSTILE
Sir Ouvry said that there
was little hostility to the
patrol on campus. "When we
did find it," he said, "we talk
to the student and explain
the reasons for the regulation, and the importance of enforcement. Invariably, the
student goes away with an
entirely different attitude."
Does the patrol require
more power in certain areas
of enforcement?
"No," said Sir Ouvry, "I
feel we have sufficient power."
THE     UBYSSEY
ARCHIE CAMERON
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at traffic point  1
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Page 13 Page   14
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 14,  1966
Protests flay
Mike, minister
TORONTO (CUP) —  Prime  Minister  Lester Pearson
opened Glendon College at York University recently while
student demonstrators there protested federal and provincial
scholarship policies and the Viet Nam war.
About    20    placard-carrying
students greeted the prime
minister and Ontario Unver-
sity Affairs Minister William
Davis as they arrived at the
college's main gate for the
opening ceremonies.
They were angry with Pearson because his government
has postponed its university
scholarship program.
They were cross with Davis
because they believe the Ontario Student Award Program
is inadequate.
They were not alone in their
protest.
Escott Reid, principal of
Glendon College, presented
both Pearson and Davis with a
petition signed by 550 faculty
members and students.
"We deplore the indefinite
withdrawal of scholarships
promised to students in the
past two federal elections, and
condemn the inadequacies of
the current Ontario Student
Award Program," the petition
said.
An editorial in the student
newspaper Pro-Tem called for
the resignation of both Pearson and opposition leader John
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Diefenbaker, calling their retirements the greatest contribution which either could
make to Canada's best interests.
While Pearson spoke to a
limited number of students
and about 400 guests, 10 students could be seen through
the auditorium windows, pacing up and down with placards setting out another
cause.
These placards demanded
that Canadian arms not be exported to the United States
for use in the Viet Nam war.
IlllliU
lilfltU
Honor
follows
merit
The honorary science
award has been awarded to
last year's winner of the
alumni merit award.
Joan Arnold, who completed her exam for a PhD
in chemistry Thursday, received the award for outstanding achievement in
chemistry.
Last spring, she was the
first girl to win the alumni
award, given annually to the
student who best advances
student-administration-alumni relations.
The science award last
year went to university president John Macdonald.
Don't be violent,
Quebecois told
MONTREAL (CUP) — University of Montreal students
have been told the fight for
Quebec independence must be
won through the democratic
process without resort to violence.
Gilles Gregoire, fiery leader
of the right-wing separatist
Ralliement National, told Quebec students he "preaches independence for Quebec
through peaceful action to convince the people that it is in
their  own  interest.
"I object to any use of violence," he told his audience.
An independent MP, who
broke away recently from the
Creditistes, Gregoire said his
party     seeks    total    political
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CAREERS    FOR    TOU
with the Civil Service of Canada as
• Economist or Statistician
• Historian or Archivist
• Management Analyst
• Finance Officer
• Personnel Administrator
• Administrative Officer
• Commercial and Industrial Analyst
• Foreign Service Officer
QUALIFYING EXAM
OCTOBER 19 - 7:00 P.M.
Room 2225 - Buchanan Bldg.
Exemption: only for those who hold Master's
or Doctorate Degrees in  1967.
FOREIGN SERVICE EXAM
(To be written in addition to Qualifying Exam
OCTOBER 20 - 7:00 P.M.
Room 2225 - Buchanan Bldg.
No Exemptions
TO APPLY: It is preferred that you send, in advance of the examination. Application Form CSC TOO (available at the Placement Office) to the
CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION Of CANADA, UNIVERSITY RECRUITMENT, OTTAWA 4, ONTARIO. It will be possible also to complete
an Application Form at the examination.
and monetary independence
from Confederation.
"Independence is not simply
a word," he emphasized. "It's
the conscience of a people who
want to profit from their own
resources. This is the positive
program we offer to the Quebec population and to its
youth."
The separatist chief said his
party has already begun fund
raising campaigns in 12 areas,
and by 1969 all parishes and
electoral constitutencies will
have RN organizations.
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THE    UBYSSEY
Page  15
GNUP FEARS PASS
Birds must keep
their heads up
Frank Gnup's football  Thunderbirds  face  a  14-hour
bus trip to Walla Walla, Wash., for their game Saturday
with Whitman College Missionaries.
But when they arrive, they'll
have  to  concentrate on  the
perils of air travel.
For the Missionaries have
a demon of a passing quarterback, Dan Patterson, who has
thrown 108 passes in Whitman's last two games.
SIXTY PASSES
The Missionaries' areial exploits haven't been enough tc
win, though. Patterson completed 22 of 60 tossess against
Williamette College last week,
but Williamette buried Whitman 50-0.
But Williamette is known
in the Northwest for burying
people, and Gnup fretted
Thursday about stopping the
Missionaries.
"If they're going to throw
60 times, they can kill anybody on a given day," he said.
"Anything can happen — if
the ball gets tipped up into
the air, or the defensive
backs get so  used  to  seeing
the ball in the air that they
get lazy.
"It only takes one or two
slips to lose a game to a club
like that."
BIRDS WILL ADJUST
Gnup interrupted his nightmare long enough to acknowledge that the Thunderbird
defence would adjust to Whitman's attack by dropping off
all but four or five men from
the line of scrimmage.
"Our scouting reports tell
us   they've   got   phenomenal
pass   blocking,"   Gnup   said,
"so we'll try to stop them by
covering their receivers."
He added that the Missionaries boast two  good receivers, both ends.
KILLEEN STAYS
Guard Paul Killeen won't
make the trip to Walla Walla.
He's resting a recurring knee
injury.
Jim Blair, up from the Junior Varsity, will start in his
place.
COACH HOPEFUL
Soccer men need win
UBC soccer coach Joe Johnson feels that even though his
Thunderbirds lost three of
their last four games, they are
due for their best season yet.
He attributes the team's recent losses—one the night before they left "for St. Louis,
one in the tournament there,
and one a day after their arrival home—to  this  trip.
Excitement before the trip
brought about a 5-2 loss to
Burnaby   Villa,   the   substitu
tion rule of NCAA soccer in
the U.S. beat them in St.
Louis, and fatigue helped North
Rugby goes
The UBC rugby Totems and
Thunderbirds will be at home
to the Vancouver Blue Bombers and the Vancouver Rugby
League Trojans Saturday on
Thunderbird playing fields.
Totems play at 1:15, the
Thunderbirds get going at
2:30.
QUAKER MEETING FOR WORSHIP
SUNDAYS  11   A.M.
FRIENDS' HOUSE, 535 W. 10th AVE.
Visitors Welcome
Graduate Student News
GSA ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING. Thursday, Oct. 27,
12:45 p.m. in lower lounge of the Grad. Student
Centre.
MAJOR ISSUES of vital interest to Grad. Students
must be resolved at this meeting. Attendance of a
large number of the Grad Student body is required
if the affairs are to be handled in accord with majority wishes.
CLUB NIGHTS. Club nights at the GSC will be held as
usual on Saturday nights until the end of October.
During November they will be held on Friday nights.
This change will become permanent thereafter unless opinion demands otherwise.
BEERGARDENS. The popular Grad. Student Beergar-
dens are continuing to be held every Friday from
3:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m. in the GSC's lower lounge. One
guest may be brought by each card carrying member.
MEMBERSHIP CARDS. Grad. Students without GSC
membership cards should pick these up at the centre
office during regular office hours. Entry into the
GSC and participation in the Beergardens will require members to show their cards.
**
Overseas Auto Parts
1 2th and Alma
736-9804
DRIVING AND  FOG LAMPS
Lucas — Machal — Cibie
$14.95 to $29.95
Complete Stock of Sports Car Accessories, including:
VOLKSWAGON, MUSTANG and CORVAIR
10% Off with AMS Card
Shore beat them  1-0  Wednesday night.
But with two reserves and
the rest of his regular starting
lineup, Johnson is looking for
a win Saturday at Varsity
Stadium when the Birds take
on St. Andrews. Game time is
2:30.
■LWIM
SATURDAY
NIGHT
INDOOR
AUTO RACE
FOREIGN STOCKS
•
SEASON OPENER
AGRODOME
Time trials 7:30 - Races 8:30
Adult $2.00, Student $1.25
Child   under   12   FREE  with
Adults
"IMAM
Sweat Shirts - Crested
To Your
Specifications
VARIETY OF STYLES
- Va ZIPPER
- SHORT SLEEVE
- LONG SLEEVE
COLORS: White, Gold, Royal Blue, Navy
Kelly Green, Red, Wine and Black
HOW ABOUT MATCHING SETS FOR
YOUR OPTION, CLUB OR GROUP
A  GREAT  IDEA FOR   RESIDENCES
MINIMUM ORDER QUANTITY  Vi  DOZ.
UBC RINGS
ORDERS NOW BEING TAKEN
Men's Signet - $5.95
Ladies' Signet - $4.95
Ladies' Split Shank - $3.95
10 Carat Gold
Men's - $30.00
Ladies' - $22.95
New! Education Jackets
Orders  Now  Being
Taken  in  Education Building
COLLEGE SHOP
ot
course
BROCK HALL EXTENSION Page  16
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 14,  1966
'TWEEN CLASSES
Revisionism hits arts
ARTS U.S.
Arts curriculum revision
committee meeting. All interested students welcome. Noon
today, Brock conference room.
CREATIVE WRITING
Milton   Acorn   reads   poetry
noon today, Ang. 104.
MUSSOC
Meeting for persons interest-
de in technical and costume
committees to discuss homecoming parade. Clubroom
aibove auditorium stage, noon
today.
IH
Those interested in  helping
with   fall   fair   meet   Tuesday
noon in IH 400.
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
Meeting  noon  today at  IH.
Conversation, coffee and film.
Image de La Grande Guerre.
RECREATION STUDENTS
Recreation students' general
meeting noon today in Bu. 316.
GAMMA DELTA
Fireside Sunday, 7:15 p.m.
Pastor P. Wildgru'be speaks on
My week as a bum in Chicago.
LUTHERAN STUDENTS
Is faith possible? Discussion
in Bu. 104, Monday noon. Dean
Wilburn  of Carey Hall  guest
speaker.
DANCE CLUB
First mixer tonight in dance
club lounge, 8:30 p.m. to midnight. 30 cents.
UN
Black and White in South
Africa, a film studying apartheid Monday noon in Bu. 100.
Admission 10 cents.
LIBERAL CLUB
Executive meeting Monday
noon, Brock conference room.
NEWMAN  CENTRE
Dance to The Mods, 8 p.m.
to midnight, St. Mark's College.
Girls free, others 25 cents.
MUSSOC
Meeting Tuesday noon in
clubroom above Auditorium
stage for people interested in
working on revue to be produced in November.
DEBATING UNION
Team needed for upcoming
McGoun Cup competition. All
interested please leave name,
phone, etc., Box 30, AMS office before 4:30 p.m. today.
CHAMBER MUSIC
Student tickets available at
Vancouver ticket centre. Seven
concerts $5 or three concerts
$3.
PRE-SOCIAL WORK
General meeting noon Monday, Bu. 203.
VCF
Cathy Nichol speaks on God,
AGO GO
at
the
Suhg.
presenting
"SOUND   UNLIMITED"
and  the
A GO GO GIRLS
Dancing 9 to 3 Every
FRIDAY   and   SATURDAY
Ample Parking
821   RIVER  RD.,   RICHMOND
Available  for  Private  Functions
Monday to  Thursday
Reservations,   CR   8-2624
Our   Contemporary.   Noon   today, Ang. 110.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
Testimony meeting noon today, hut 0-12, between education building and West Mall.
BOWLING CLUB
More bowlers needed, UBC
bowling   alley  under   gym,   5
p.m. Monday.
IH
French language day, upper
lounge of IH noon today. Dance
in lower lounge 9 p.m. Admission 25 cents, free refreshments.
JUDO CLUB
Meetings every Monday and
Wednesday  at   7  p.m.   in  the
apparatus gym.
ALPHA OMEGA SOC
Meeting Monday noon,  Bu.
223 or 225.
WUS
General    meeting,     council
chambers, noon Monday.
UN CLUB
Meeting Wednesday noon, IH
402.
NDP CLUB
MLA Tom Berger (Vancouver-
Burrard) speaks on the future
of NDP, noon today, Brock
lounge.
DEBATING UNION
Debating clinic for all interested, noon today in Bu. 217.
CURLING CLUB
Students interested in  curling Sundays meet in Bu. 223,
noon today.
VIET NAM COMMITTEE
General meeting today, Bu.
212.
REGIONAL PLANNING
Moshe Safdie, architect of
Habitat '67, speaks on The Urban Way of Life, noon today,
Laserre 104.
•CONTACT LENSES
AVAILABLE ONLY AT OUR OFFICES
Only Vent-Air invisible lenses are designed with four
air vents that permit better circulation of the eye's
natural moisture and air so necessary for proper wear.
NOW AN UNPRECEDENTED EXTRA-with every new
pair of Vent-Air contact lenses you will receive a spare
pair at no extra charge... tinted grey, blue, green, or
brown as desired. '10%  Student Discount'
Learn all the advantages of our unique "No-Risk"
wearing plan. Come in for your personal no-obligation
demonstration today.. .You may see without glasses
tomorrow! Remember, Vent-Air invisible lenses are
only available at our offices.
CHECK-UP ♦ REPLACEMENT • DUPLICATION
Of All Types of Contact Lenses.
<2B>  KLEAR VISION CONTACT LENS CO.
HOURS:  9 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily  incl.  Sat.; Monday to 8 p.m.
BIFOCALS
TOO!
No
| Obligation!
| UH TODAY
| rOR FREE
■ KUSTUTEO
j BOMUT
■ lay-away pfai
*<_-_,.—-.-.-
sfmP
Suite 616, Burrard Bldg. "UBC " u. l^
1030 W. Georgia St., Vancouver, B.C.
MU 3-7207
Pleait KM me your new Illustrated booklet
and the cost ol invisible lenses.
Mr.
Mrs.
Mise i	
Address-
-Zont-
Phone
City	
OfflCES TMMKHOUT *.$.«. JUW CMUM
CLAP YOUR HANDS
A SERVICE OF CELEBRATION
featuring
Camerata Chorale-debut appearance
brass ensemble
Works by
Bach    —   Willan    —    Flor Peeters
WEST POINT GREY UNITED CHURCH
8th & Tolmie
Sunday, Oct. 16 7:30 p.m.
Phone 228-8562 for transportation from dorms
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, $.75—3 days, $2.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Publications Office: Brock Hall, Ext. 26. 224-3242
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost 8c Found
11
REWARD OF $25.00 FOR INFO
leading to return of two tandem
bicycles. Call Cap's Cycles and
Museum  Centre  at  524-3611.
LOST BLACK RIMMED GLASSES,
Last week on campus. Call Peter
Smith   224 9668.
FOUND LADIES' WATCH BLACK
strap. Owner phone Doug Mc-
Latchie at 224-9975 or 224-9803.
Coming Dances
12 A
HOMECOMING '66 BALL, SAT.,
Oct. 22. Tickets on sale now at
AMS Office, $3.75 per couple.
Armouries   &   Fieldhouse.
NEWMAN CENTRE PRESENTS
"English Leather" with "The
Mods" Friday, Oct. 14, 8-12, St.
Mark's College, $1.00 a person. Re.
freshments available. Girls free;
others 25c.
Special  Notices
13
WHY PAT HIGH AUTO INSUB-
ance rates? If you are over 20
and have a good driving history
you quailify for our good driving
ates.  Phone  Ted  Elliott,  224-6707.
GEOLOGY MUSEUM — F & G-116
open Monday-Friday 12.30-1.30.
Students Faculty and Staff Welcome.
Typewriters  8t Repairs
PIZZA    PATIO     CONTINUES    TO
expand,      specializing      In      Pizza , ^_	
take-out and delivery. Pizza Pa-; .Sewing & Alterations
tio's normal policy of making'
part-time employment available
to those students over 21 with
clean drivers' licences to work
one or two evenings a week is
again in effect. Openings are
available at anyone of their six
locations. For further information contact 681-2822, 10-4. P.S.—
For   campus   delivery,   736-9422.
TO ALL MOTORCYCLISTS WHO
have been given tickets for Inadequate exhaust mufflers":
Meet Hugh Macdonald at Suite
207—2190 Bellevue, West Vancou
ver, B.C., on October 15 at 1 p.m.
THE VANCOUVER INSTITUTE.
Sat., Oct. 15, 8:15 p.m. Buchanan
106. Dr. Eric Webb will speak on
his experiences In Nigeria.
AUTOMOBILES  (Cont.)
58 RAMBLER 4-DR. STANDARD
trans., radio, pulmanized, eity-
tested,   $350.   733-7108.	
1960     VOLKSWAGEN,     $550.     TEL.
921-7059.
FOR SALE — NICE BODY — '66
Chev. — $350 or highest offer.
Phone  731-8497  after  6.
Motorcycles
27
'66 YAMAHA 80-CC, 3,200 MI.
Good condition. $250 or offer.
327-5056.
1966   SUZUKI  80   CC   TRAIL  BIKE
$300   or   offer   922-4812.	
HONDA 50 CC 1965, ONLY 2,700
miles. Excellent condition. Phone
224-0160 evenings.	
DUE TO AN ADVERSE CIRCUM-
stance, I am forced to part with
my vintage Honda 50, (year of
'59). Any offer for Its removal
from Its present residence will be
accepted. Phone Danny at 876-
6963,  Sun. morn.  9:00-1:00.
BUSINESS  SERVICES
Scandals
39A
iitii?ft?itTijt;t
\    THE  B — N — W   SOON    !
TfTtttlfTITTfft..
FROSH. PLEASE RETURN MY
Sleeping bag bperoweS- for tenting to Brock -Extension 257. Dave.
40
42
Typing
43
GOOD EXPERIENCED TYPIST
would like home work. Call 277-
5640.
EMPLOYMENT
Auditions
61
TALK BACK AT ST. ANSELM'S
CHURCH SUNDAY, 7 P.M.
HAROLD GODWINESON — KING
of England died at Hastings October 14, 1066.
IN MEMORIAM. HAROLD, DIED
defending England from bi-ling-
ualism and bi-culturalism 900
years ago today.	
LECTURE ON THE PHILOSOPHY
of Human Behaviour. Oakridge
Auditorium Oct. 19th. 8 p.m.
Tickets  $1 at A.M.S.
Transportation
14
RIDE NEEDED FOR TWO FROM
Marpole 8:30's staying late three
nights   a   week.   Kathy,   277-2996.
RIDE WANTED FOR 8:30's M-F,
from Arbutus and S.W. Marine.
Can  drive  one  day.  263-3457.
RIDE NEEDED FROM MARPOLE
area 8:30 classes M, W, Th, F.
Ph. 261-7560.
AUTOMOTIVE   & MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
CORVAIR CORSA 2 DR. H.T. 140
H.P. Posi-traction, adj. steering,
reverb. HE 3-6906.
'61 SIMCA HARDTOP, LOW MILE-
age,   lady-driven,   phone   988-8668.
1963 M.G. Midget, 21,000 miles; engine, body & accessories in excellent condition. Best offer. RE 8
9661.
1959 VOLVO P.V. 444, IMMACU
late condition. Phone 738-0685
after  5   p.m.  Ask  for  Wally.
OPEN AUDITIONS THUR. 12:30-
2:30, Tues. 7:00-9:00, Fr. Wood 16,
casting 4. Short plays by UBC
authors   for   public   performance.
Instruction-Tutoring
64
ENGLISH, FRENCH, HISTORY
lessons by tutor, B.A., M.A.,
B.L.S. Also pronunciation lessons in French, Spanish, German, Russian, qualified tutors.
736-6923.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
BIRD CALLS—the most useful book
on the campus. Student telephone
directory available latter part of
October. Limited Number. Order
now, only 75 cents from Phrateres
or publications office, Brock Hall.
FOR SALE: SEVERAL PROFES-
sionally completed manuscripts —
Authors Agency, 767 Kingsway,
TR  6-6362.
6 STR. ELEC. GUIT. WITH CASE,
exc. cond., orig. $70, now only
$30.  224-3380,   Chris.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
NEW TRAILER AVAILABLE
Oct. 17th. Two girls or young
married couple, abstainers. For
particulars   phone   224-9139.	
ACCOMMODATION IN PRIVATE
home, two male students. 4453
W.   12th.   Phone   224-3391.	
LARGE SLEEPING ROOM, LIM-
ited use house, breakfast optional.   261-1873.
'53 CHEV. FOR SALE. GOOD-
shape. Good motor. Clean. 584-
5170.
CAR LOCATOR: TAKE ADVAN-
tage of me! What price and type
of vehicle do you want?—new or
used. Use my time to get the
best possible deal for yourself.
NO CHARGE! Phone Ian, 261-
2503 after 6 p.m. •	
'58 V.W. NEW ENGINE, BRAKES,
muffler, brakes, tires. Best offer
over   $500.   684-3050   evenings.
MUST SELL 1956 CHEV. FOUR-
Door V-8. Blue and white. Good
campus car. Phone Bill Phillips,
224-4814  day,   or  731-6921   after  5.
MALE SENIOR STUDENT, SGLE.
room, pri. ent.; shower, kit. priv.
Non-smoker,   end   Oct.    $40.    733-
8778.
Room & Board
62
ROOM AND BOARD FOR MALE
on campus, 5 minutes from class.
224-9660,   ask   for   Barrie.
Furn. Houses & Apts.
83
Real Estate
86
IN GOOD PROXIMITY U.B.C.
parking space required with electrical pickup for small trailer —
study  purposes — Terry  6814969.

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