UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Oct 4, 2010

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0128738.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0128738.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0128738-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0128738-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0128738-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0128738-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0128738-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0128738-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0128738-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0128738.ris

Full Text

Array Intensely concerned about ourfruit cups SINCE 1918
TORONTO
CUPCAKE
AUTHORITIES:
TOKYO
POLICE CLUB
PAGE 5
OCTOBER 04,2010
• VOLUME 92, NUMBER X
• ROOM 24, STUDENT UNION BUILDING
• PUBLISHED MONDAY AND THURSDAY
• FEEDBACK@UBYSSEY.CA
h.    J
H
EU
BYSS
EY
.rs&*a
'/
•/> .
>*A
»»«« ^-^
RAPTORS
HOLDINTRASQUAD
'aIM
IAN TURNER
sports@ubyssey.ca
The Toronto Raptors held an in-
trasquad match at the War Memorial Gym last Sunday.
"Every year, we try to get
away from Toronto," Raptors
head coach Jay Triano said, after the game. "[UBC basketball
head coach] Kevin [Hanson] and
I have talked for several years
about us coming out here."
Triano, who was Simon Fraser University's basketball head
coach from 1988-1995, is the
first and only Canadian to
coach an NBA team. Along with
University of Southern California graduate DeMar DeRozan
and Andrea Bargnani, Triano got the loudest cheer from
the crowd.
About 2000 people showed
up for the scrimmage, leaving
1000 seats empty. Some students may have been turned
off by the $15 tickets. However, money flowed both ways:
at half-time, the Raptor's
brass presented UBC VP of
Students Brian Sullivan and
Thunderbird Athlete Council
members Emily Grainger and
Amelia Rajala with a cheque
for $10,000 to be put towards
UBC's general scholarship
fund.
Other UBC athletes saw the
floor as well. Between the first
and second quarter, UBC guards
Alex Murphy and Nathan Yu participated in a three-point shoot-
off. They were each assigned to
one fan, who was gunning for a
Whistler season pass. Murphy
and his fan got six three-pointers. Yu's crew got three.
The game itself wasn't fulB
of such goodies: dunking wasl
kept to a minimum. The Raptors don't have a superstar, but
DeMar DeRozan did show why
he's beginning to be dubbed the
franchise's face by Toronto's media. On Wednesday DeRozan &
co. wi^ace off against the Phoenix Suns, who are led by Vancouver Island native Steve Nash.
The next day the Raptors will
fly back east, which means that
BC native Triano won't be able
to attend the Shrum Bowl even
though he'd "love to go." tl
V
A
y
m 2/UBYSSEY.CA/G AMES/2 010.10.04
OCTOBER 04,2010
VOLUME XCII,  N°X
EDITORIAL
COORDINATING EDITOR
Justin McElroy: coordinating@uhyney.ca
NEWS EDITOR
ArshyMann: news@ubysseyca
ASSOCIATE NEWS EDITOR
Sally Crampton : associate.news@ubysseyca
CULTURE EDITORS
Jonny Wakefield & Bryce Warnes:
culture@ubyssey ca
ASSOCIATE CULTURE EDITOR
Anna Zoria: associate.culture@ubyssey.ca
SPORTS EDITOR
Jan Turner: sports@ubysseyca
FEATURES EDITOR
Trevor Record :features@ubyssey ca
PHOTO EDITOR
Geoff Lister: photos@ubysseyca
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Virginie Menard: production@ubysseyca
COPY EDITOR
Kai Green: copy@ubysseyca
MULTIMEDIA EDITOR
Tara Martellaro: multimedia@ubysseyca
ASSOCIATE MULTIMEDIA EDITOR
Stephanie Warren:
associate.multimedia@ubysseyca
VIDEO EDITOR
Matt Wetzler: video@ubysseyca
WEBMASTER
Jeff Blake: webmaster@ubysseyca
Room 24, Student Union Building
6138 Student Union Boulevard
Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1
tel: 604.822.2301
web: www.ubyssey.ca
e-mail: feedback@ubysseyca
BUSINESS
Room 23, Student Union Building
advertising: 604.822.1654
business office: 604.822.6681
fax: 604.822.1658
e-mail: advertising@ubysseyca
BUSINESS MANAGER
FerniePereira: business@ubysseyca
PRINT AD SALES
Kathy Yan Li: advertising@ubysseyca
WEB AD SALES
Paul Bucci: webads@ubysseyca
ACCOUNTS
Alex Ho opes
CONTRIBUTORS
Micki Cowan Rhys Edwards
Crystal Ngai Olivia Fellows
Hazel Hughes Paul Bucci
Ginny Monaco Blake Frederick
Carolyn Nakagawa Alex Micu
Karina Palmitesta
LEGAL
The Ubyssey is the official student newspaper of
the University of British Columbia. It is published
every Monday and Thursday by The Ubyssey Publications Society. We are an autonomous, democratically run student organization, and all students are
encouraged to participate.
Editorials are chosen and written by the Ubyssey staff. They are the expressed opinion of the
staff, and do not necessarily reflect the views of
The Ubyssey Publications Society or the University of British Columbia. All editorial content appear-
ng in The Ubyssey is the property of The Ubyssey
Publications Society. Stories, opinions, photographs
and artwork contained herein cannot be reproduced
without the expressed, written permission of The
Ubyssey Publications Society.
The Ubyssey is a founding member of Canadian
University Press (CUP) and adheres to CUP's guiding principles.
Letters to the editor must be under 300 words
Please include your phone number, student number
and signature (not for publication) as well as your
year and faculty with all submissions. ID will be
checked when submissions are dropped off at the
editorial office of The Ubyssey; otherwise verification will be done by phone. "Perspectives" are opinion pieces over 300 words but under 750 words and
are run according to space. "Freestyles" are opinion
pieces written by Ubyssey staff members. Priority
will be given to letters and perspectives over free-
styles unless the latter is time sensitive. Opinion
pieces will not be run until the identity of the writer has been verified. The Ubyssey reserves the right
to edit submissions for length and clarity. All letters
must be received by 12 noon the day before intended publication. Letters received after this point wil
be published in the following issue unless there is
an urgent time restriction or other matter deemed
relevant by the Ubyssey staff.
Itisagreed byall persons placing display or classified advertising that if the Ubyssey Publications
Society fails to publish an advertisement or if an
error in the ad occurs the liability of the UPS wil
not be greater than the price paid for the ad. The
UPS shall not be responsible for slight changes or
typographical errors that do not lessen the value or
the impact of the ad
5£
University
Press
Canada Post Sales
Agreement
Number 0040878022
prjnt~d onj[0.0%
reevcjedjDaaer
GAMES & COMICS
CROSSWORD
1
2
3
4
S
'
1
'
8
'
1
"
11
12
13    1
h
"
"
17
"
..
20
21
22
2i
24
2S
"
■
"
28
1
■
"
3,1
12
_
"
1
'*
lb
il
is
"
40
41
42
*'
44
4S
■
"
^
"
■;s
49
50
■
'. <
54
55
:.h
l
■
1
"
59
bO
61
62
-
"
es
66
"
PUZZLES PROVIDED BY BESTCROSSWORDS.COM.
YOUR CORPUS CHRISTI, BY ROBERT E. LEE
( Hey Lyall, check out my new single-speed bikelj
«Z     j/ (   Oh that's cool Halparin, is it cheaper?
ii
ACROSS
66. Attempt
1. Igneous rock of a lava flow
67. Dog breed
7. Barely make, with "out"
10. Resound
DOWN
14. The Muse of astronomy
1. Insect
15. Beetle juice?
2. Jackie's second
16. Sea eagle
3. Japanese honorific
17. Piquancy
4. Acute suffering
18. Genetic messenger
5. Property claims
19. Baltic capital
6. Diamond cover
20. Impartial
7. Exit
23. Big rigs
8. System of Japanese writing
26. See it...
9. Biblical birthright seller
27. Bellows
10. Portion of time
28. Folk singer Burl
11. Writer Jong
29. Goddess of fertility in Roman
12. Ire
mythology
13. Guides
30. Down for the count
21. Small sword
31. Japanese dish of raw fish
22. Lethargic
33. Fiddle stick
23. Agave fiber
34. Minor falsehood
24. Circumvent
37. Play by Shakespeare, "Much
25. Subatomic particle
 About Nothing"
29. Last letter of the Greek
38. Born
alphabet
39. Commercials
30. Fuji rival
40. This stick-up!
32. Sort of
41. Novelist Deighton
33. Dry red wine
42. Cabinet dept.
34. Demon
43. Unlit
35. Japanese immigrant
45. Defunct airline
36. Ezio Pinza, for one
46. Hunky-dory
44. Noisiest
47. Change for a five
45. Vehement speech
48. Photographic tone
46. In a gay manner
51. Part of RSVP
48. Stylish
52. Recording of acoustic signals
49. Conger catcher
53. Carousel
50. Self-respect
56. Inter
51. Deep sleep
57. News letters
52. Licorice-like flavoring
58. Yellowish brown pigment
54. Sudden blast of wind
62. Comic Foxx
55. Employs
63. Impresario Hurok
59. After taxes
64. Ancient Palestinian
60. Vane dir.
65. Corner
61. Lingus
SOLUTION
a
3
1
1
3
5
\
a
4,
3
3
a
i
3
N
3
5
s
3.
3
0
5.
a
O
3
»■■
V
N
N
3
1
V.
1
d
n
V
1
3
V
Ua
N
11°
a
0
?J*
a
il
j
1.
0
I
a
n
im~<
1
*.■*
1
i,
3.
1
s
3
H
'■
O
, ■ 1
*
1 ■
5
S
3
MA
V
a,
a
3
I
N
3
1.
V
S
1
S
a
V
3
3
N
()
tl
V
a
'.,
J,
n
0
I
1
IM
1.   H
S
V
I
■ <3
0
^■!
d
'■
J
A
i.
5
:l
V
0
v,__ 1
s
"■'
1
w.
3.
I
a
3
~>
1
9, h
r
3
1,M
N
13 ■
V
:i
1
\
V
N
a-
a
i
■1
N
1
1
3
K
il
3:
S
V
-'
V
1
N
t
a
1),
3
X
3,
4,
3.
t
3.
K
1
¥
S,
v.
9
Submit your comics to
our website at ubyssey.
ca /volunteer/submit-
a-comic.
VIRGINIE MENARD |
product! on@ubyssey.ca
tlTHEUBYSSEYca
LAND   USE   PLAN
AMENDMENTS PROCESS
UBC is proposing changes to its Land Use Plan, which are necessary to
address issues the university community identified as obstacles to UBC's
mission and vision during the Vancouver Campus Plan Review process.
Participate in our consultation events to learn more about each issue,
proposed amendments and to provide your feedback.
UPCOMING PUBLIC CONSULTATION EVENTS
LAND USE PLAN E-CONSULTATION: SEPTEMBER 27 - OCTOBER 15
• Visit planning.ubc.ca to take part in our e-consultation process.
LAND USE PLAN WORKSHOPS: OCTOBER 13 AND 14
(PLEASE ATTEND ONLY ONE)
'   Wednesday, October 13:11 a.m. - 2 p.m., SUB Ballroom,
6138 Student Union Blvd., UBC
• Wednesday, Oct 13: 6 p.m. - 9 p.m., Tapestry, Wesbrook Village,
3338 Wesbrook Mall, UBC
• Thursday, Oct 14: 6 p.m. - 9 p.m., West Point Grey United Church,
4595 West 8th Avenue, Vancouver
Please RSVP to Stefani Lu, stefani.lu@ubc.ca, and let us know which workshop
you'll be attending. For more information, please visit planning.ubc.ca.
Teach English
Abroad
Ii i  ■■ a place of mind
CAMPUS  & COMMUNITY  PLANNING
TESOL/TESL Teacher Training
Certification Courses
■ Intensive 60-Hour Program
■ Classroom Management Techniques
■ Detailed Lesson Planning
• ESL Skills Development
• Comprehensive Teaching Materials
1 Interactive Teaching Practicum
■ Internationally Recognized Certificate
■ Teacher Placement Service
• Money-Back Guarantee Included
• Thousands of Satisfied Students
OXFORD SEMINARS
604-683-3430/1-800-269-6719
www. ox f o r d s e in i n a r s. c a
Send us your
letters about
your opinions
on campus
happenings.
co ordinating@ubyssey. ca
tlTHEUBYSSEYca 2010.10.04/UBYSSEY.CA/NEWS/3
NEWS
EDITOR ARSHY MANN»news@ubyssey.ca
ASSOCIATE SALLY CRAMPTON»associate.news@ubyssey.ca
No change in childcare crisis
UBC adds 108 new spots, but demand for service as high as ever
MICKI COWAN
Contributor
Despite the fact that UBC is already the largest childcare provider of any university in North
America, many UBC parents and
childcare workers argue that
the program leaves much to be
desired.
Grad student and mother of
two Dafna Zur said that she is
unsatisfied with the status quo.
"The waiting list is still
horrendously long," she said.
"Women in general and students in particular must be
given the opportunity to go
back to work; the government
seems to want to prevent that
through limited care providers and unaffordable prices."
Zur got on the list as soon
as her child was born, yet she
still had to wait two years for
daycare. Because Zur and her
husband were new to Canada and didn't have any family in Vancouver, they had to
scramble for babysitters in the
meantime.
UBC Asian Studies professor
Stefania Burk found herself in
the same situation.
"I got on the waiting list when
I was three months pregnant,
[but] it took two years to get a
spot," she said.
"[With] one year maternity
leave, that's still one year we had
to provide outside care. I had
to move my mother here when
I had to come back to work because it was the only way that
we could afford to have full
time care that we thought was
reliable."
"When we opened a number of programs last year, the
waiting list still stayed at 24
months," said UBC Director of
Child Care Darcelle Cottons.
"What happened is we opened
up 108 spots last year and we
thought we would take on our
waiting list. [It] went down from
Many children wait years for a spot. HAZEL HUGHES PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
1600 to 1400 and by Christmas
it was back up to 1600."
Despite heavy subsidization,
cost remains a crucial consideration for many parents.
"From a student perspective,
infant care is $1055 a month,
but if we were charging full cost
recovery it would be more than
double that," said Cottons. "Parent fees just pay the teachers'
salaries, teachers' benefits, and
[for] the toys and equipment.
Staff are not overly paid, the
average is about $18-18.50 per
hour."
According to Cottons, the
university is implementing a
number of measures to ease the
burden on parents. She said that
recent renovations have helped
reduce the wait time.
"We are constructing two daycares. The university just approved the final bit of money
at the last board meeting. The
capital cost outlaid by the time
we hit next September is nearly
seven million dollars, between
the AMS's contribution to the
2009 construction, [as well as]
the University Neighbourhood
Association and the university
[itself]," said Cottons.
According to AMS VP External Jeremy McElroy, UBC currently subsidizes about 8 per
cent of the cost, while 12 per
cent is through community and
private grants that the university applies for and 80 per cent
of the cost is borne by the parent. This is up from 67 per cent
in 2006.
To help combat these rising
costs, in 2008 the AMS set aside
a million dollars out ofthe Capital Projects Aquisition and Construction Fund (CPAC) to be given over tenyears, or $100,000
per year, he said.
McElroy claimed that the real
financial issue is a lack of governmental support.
"Adjusting the overall cost
for the parent is another huge
thing, and the only way that will
ever happen is if we can get provincial commitment on operating grant funding for childcare
facilities."
Graduate Student Society (GSS)
President Arvind Saraswat said
that the GSS is also working hard
to make sure the government understands UBC's childcare needs.
"We are lobbying the provincial government to provide
greater support towards accessible childcare on UBC campus.
We discussed our concerns regarding the lack of accessible
childcare at UBC with the Minister of Advanced Education &
Labour Market Development, in
our meeting lastyear," he said.
"We co-hosted a childcare conference in May 2010 to highlight the current situation, build
partnerships and inform the
community."
Cottons argued that the high
land value at UBC makes it impractical to build child care facilities on campus. The university's location on a peninsula with
a park separating it from the
city is also an issue that makes
UBC's childcare situation unique
in Canada.
"It's just thatitreally is the job
ofthe government to be doing it.
It should be considered part of
the public education system." tl
Success for Asian immigrants not equal?
New UBC study argues female Mandarin speakers four times as likely to succeed
CRYSTAL NGAI
Contributor
Ifyou're a Chinese immigrant,
you'll be better off ifyou're female and a Mandarin speaker—
at least that's what a new UBC
study claims.
Professor Lee Gunderson,
who has studied the academic achievement of immigrant
students since 1989, argues in
a new study that female Mandarin-speaking students are four
times more likely to succeed in
high school than other Asian
students.
Gunderson, along with doctoral students Denis Murphy Odo
and Reginald D'Silva greeted
new immigrant families and acquired permission to thoroughly assess their children on various measures before they were
placed in schools from kindergarten to Grade 12. Gunderson
managed to isolate 400 Asian
students during the course of
the study.
"We look at those who were
eligible to go to university, and
the most successful students in
this group were the Mandarin-
speaking girls," he said. They
were four times more eligible
for university than Cantonese
immigrants from Hong Kong
because they were able to maintain a 76 per cent or higher average in secondary school.
Gunderson said the reason
Mandarin-speaking females
were doing better in school
was because their families were
more economically affluent than
those ofthe Cantonese speakers
from Hong Kong, and had more
support from tutors.
"It depends on how much educational scaffolding a family can provide," he said. "Many
more Mandarin-speaking families were able to afford to send
their children to tutors."
Martin Wang, a second year
civil engineering student who
immigrated from Beijing in
1998, is skeptical ofthe study.
"I find it ridiculous in
the   comparison  between
Mandarin-speaking Chinese
and Cantonese-speaking Chinese because it [makes the assumption] that all Mandarin
speakers have a high social status [and] more money, and that
Cantonese people are poor with
lower social status," he said.
However, Gunderson believes
that the Mandarin-speaking students who arrive here with an
affluent socioeconomic background will continue to do well
in school.
"Mandarin speakers who continue to arrive from the People's Republic of China are of
high socioeconomic status and
have lots of money to support
their children." vl
NEWS BRIEFS
kt^^f
CUS INVESTMENT CONFERENCE
SET TO PROCEED
The Commerce Undergraduate
Society (CUS) has decided that
the Canadian Investment Conference will go ahead despite
the sudden resignation of the
founder and chair of the event
last month. According to minutes
posted by the CUS, the Board of
Directors voted 4-3 (with 5 abstentions) to "fully support" new
chair Ethan Gold in running the
conference, for fear that if it
did not go forward or was rebranded, the CUS image would
be tainted.
At a previous emergency board
meeting, Khalil Kassam, a second-
year Commerce student, was removed as CIVC chair and replaced
by Gold. In a presentation to the
board, Gold and marketing director Kriti Dixon repeated the need
to sell enough tickets, priced at
$25, to break even. The CUS has
committed up to $49,000 to CIVC,
which is scheduled for November 12-14.
RECORD CHECK BACKLOG PREVENTS STUDENT PLACEMENTS
(CUP)-Afour-month long backlog on criminal record checks
from the Toronto police has
caused a stressful start to the
school year for nursing students
across the province.
The students require the background checks in order to begin
their clinical rotations, which are
a part of their degree programs.
The backlog has been caused
by the RCMP's new requirement that criminal records be
processed federally, said Const.
Wendy Drummond of the Toronto Police. Processing background
checks federally means a more
thorough search with enhanced
security features, such as fingerprinting to verify the person's
identity.
At Humber College in Toronto,
around 80 of the school's 1600
health sciences students were affected bythe changes, but most
students have successfully started their placements.
GRUNTING IN TENNIS LEADS TO
SUCCESS?
Young tennis players who emulate Maria Sharpova's shrieks as
much as her backhand may be on
to something.
UBC psychology professor
Alan Kingstone is co-author of
a study in Public Library of Science ONE which studies the effects of grunting or shrieking before hitting a tennis ball. According to their findings, a ball stuck
along with a loud grunt can travel an extra two feet before an opponent is able to respond. It also
caused more decision and accuracy errors for competitors, va 4/UBYSSEY.CA/CULTURE/2010.10.04
CULTURE
EDITORS BRYCE WARNES & JONNY WAKEFIELD »culture@ubyssey.ca
ASSOCIATE ANNA ZORIA»associate.culture@ubysseyca
Straight up, no chaser: Rum and Vodka at Somerset
HAZEL HUGHES
Contributor
Those involved with the dramatic arts will at some point wrestle
with the dilemma of whether to
pursue film or theatre. It doesn't
matter ifyou're an actor, a director, a writer or a technician; it's a
decision everyone makes.
For Brian Cochrane, a second
year MFA student at UBC and the
director of the upcoming show
Rum and Vodka, the choice was
simple.
"I love the immediacy of live
performance. Even if we do a hundred performances of Rum And
Vodka, each one will be slightly
different and it will ultimately be
a unique experience for each audience. This is what makes theatre
and music so special in my eyes."
Rum and Vodka is the tale of a
young man—played by Jules Mer-
cier—who is married with two
kids. Stuckbetween adult responsibilities and youthful urges, he
travels through Dublin searching for life's answers in countless pubs.
"This play is almost the simplest form of theatre and ironically it was the hardest play I've ever
directed," said Cochrane. "There's
no character-on-character conflict
to build up momentum, so I had to
figure outhow each line would trigger the next, which is a challenge
when trying to keep it dramatically
interesting. You don't want the audience thinking, 'Why don't I just
read this?' You want the audience
to feel like they had to come to the
theatre to see it."
Brian met Jules Mercier in
the BFA acting program in Saskatoon. He has directed Mercier
before and has acted alongside
him a number of times.
"When I read Rum and Vodka, I instantly thought of Jules.
He is the right age and the right
person. The character in the play
does so many terrible things,
but you still want to root for him
anyway, and Jules has this very
likable quality—kind of like a
lovable jackass."
Connor McPherson, the writer
behind Rum and Vodka, is one of
Cochrane's favorite playwrights.
"I'm not going out on a limb
here, he is one of the best English language playwrights of today. He is stupendous. He wrote
this play when he was twentyyears
old. When I came to grad school
I had a short list of playwrights
whose works I wanted to work on
and Connor McPherson was right
at the top," he said.
"I believe that in literary theatre, if the play is good, then
just stay out ofthe way," said Cochrane. "That's my top secret directing method.
"If you've got a good play, and
good actors, then you really won't
have to do much other than give
them a nudge here and there."
Cochrane's real passion is writing. "Playwriting is my ultimate
goal. If you're a writer, you just
have to write every day—which
is the hardest thing to do. I've
written a couple plays and it feels
like they are really crappy for a
long time, but the more you do
it, the more you learn to trust
yourself." tl
Rum and Vodka runs at the Dorothy Somerset Studio Theatre from
October 7-9. The show starts at
7:30 and tickets are $10, or $5 for
students.
<&
ONLINE
EXCLUSIVES
Reviews of VIFF films, Madwoman
of Chaillot and Sufjan Stevens's
latest album @ ubyssey.ca/culture.
12
^m     SH^______
_
>
\^
Rum and vodka: hard drinking and hard thinking. PHOTO COURTESY UBCTHEATRE
cimS Insider weekly
student society
a weekly look at what's new at your student society
04.10.10
D for FINES
rth
www.amsMbc.ca/services/ams-food-bank/
October 4th-17
Pay for your UBC Library Fines
with non-perishable food items
Up to a max of $20 can be waived
NEW SUB
PROJECT
Drop
bythe
Design Cube!
In the SUB by Starbucks
_\ www.mynewsub.com  _\
\J S 6 1V1C; a series of works by Andrea Van Schubert
designed to desire you, at the AMS Art Gallery.
Opening Monday, Oct. 4, from 3:30-6pm.
A
On November 10th, buy your tickets to stay at the UBC Whistler
Lodge from Dec.1 -Jan.4 only.
% See our website: www.ubcwhistlerlodge.com for new and improved
% ticket purchase details 604.822.5851 or 877.932.6604
«■*&&.&
STAY  UP TO  DATE WITH THE  AMS
Facebook:
UBC Alma Mater Society
y Twitter:
AMSExecutive 2010.10.04/UBYSSEY.CA/CULTURE/5
Let them eat cake
Tokyo Police Club talk
touring, baked goods
TPC in fighting form PHOTO COURTESYTOKYO POLICE CLUB
GINNY MONACO
Contributor
At their earliest shows, Tokyo Police Club would hand out cupcakes
to the audience as a sort of thank-
you for attending. In 2005, before
the POP Montreal show that attracted so much attention, I got
one of these cupcakes. Now itwas
time to return the favour.
So when I was given the opportunity to interview guitarist Josh
Hook, I came prepared with one
of Vancouver's greatest offerings:
cupcakes. "I'm surprised you remembered," he laughed. "Clearly
not enough bands give out baked
goods."
It shouldn't be surprising.
When a band you've seen playing at the local Optimist Hall is
suddenly on Letterman, you're
going to remember something
like cupcakes.
Newmarket, Ontario isn't
known for a lot of things. Jim Carrey was born there, Eric Clapton's
father died there and Tokyo Police Club are the new hometown
heroes. "It's a good place to grow
up," Hook said. "I mean, Hove going back up to Newmarket, but I
don't think I could ever repeat a
life there."
The band is touring in support
of Champ, their second full length
record. It's been received with the
same excitement as their first EP,
A Lesson in Crime. Hook describes
the new album as being a more
organic production. "On [our first
full-length album] Elephant Shell,
the writing process became really fragmented. With this one we
were thankfully in a position to
ask for eight months just to write.
To me, it sounds more like everything we wanted, to see the songs
all the way to the end."
For Josh, one of the best things
about Champ is how it has confirmed the band's place in the Canadian music scene. "[The media
has] finally dropped the 'Young
Canadian upstarts,' now we're
just Canadian band.' That was a
small victory."
In August, Tokyo Police Club
opened for the masters ofthe live
show, The Flaming Lips. "When
we were on, Wayne [Coyne] was
setting off confetti cannons behind us. We were in the middle
of maybe our third song and I
looked over there. He's just sitting on a chair in his full suit,
with his confetti cannon. I didn't
get nervous until that moment."
There isn't any reason for
the band to be nervous. What
their concerts lack in confetti, they make up for in enthusiasm. The audience happily claps
and harmonizes with singer David Monks, and it feels like the
way Tokyo Police Club should
be experienced. Their records
manage to capture all their energy, but the music works best
as a sing-along.
The tour behind Champ is
proof of Tokyo Police Club's
mounting success. Besides the
European leg of the tour, the
band is performing their first
shows in Des Moines, Iowa, and
other small cities. "We're playing Webster Hall in New York,
so we'll bring the production we
have now. It does feel ridiculous
when you show up in Kansas
City with your bus and all your
lights. But it makes sense when
we're on the coast!"
Besides reaching into the
smaller markets with their brand
of joyful indie rock, there's room
for the band to dabble in entrepreneurship. "[Keyboardist] Graham
[Wright] has this idea for a cupcake shop. Actually he just has a
name, the Toronto Cupcake Authority. He doesn't really know
anything about baking."
I told Josh that it wasn't a
bad idea. It's always nice when
a band sticks to their roots, tl
THE LIVE SESSIONS
featuring HAYLEY SALES
THURSDAY OCTOBER 7  | 7-8PM
TELUS STUDIO THEATRE AT THE CHAN CENTRE  |  UBC
Be a part of a live studio audience with these intimate Thursday evening recording sessions
for CBC Radio 2's Canada Live series. Each fall, some of the hottest locally-based artists
are featured on this unique series held in our Telus Studio Theatre at the Chan Centre.
Closing the series is Hayley Sales who brings to the stage her fresh folk island style.
ALL AGES SHOW!      Student tickets only $10
Ticketmaster.ca | 604.280.3311 (service charges apply) or Chan Centre Ticket Office (in person only)
WWW.CHANCENTRE.COM
____
straight
cic 105.7m
le chateau
University of Ottawa
Study Law in the National Capital
Obtain a uOttawa JD degree in either English or French with a concentration in
Social Justice •     Law and Technology
International Law •     Environmental Law
Or take advantage of our many joint programs,* including
JD/LLL (National Program) with uOttawa's Civil Law Section
JD/LLL [Programme de droit canadien) with uOttawa's Civil Law Section
JD/MBA with uOttawa's Telfer School of Management
Canadian & American Dual JD with Michigan State University College of Law
orwith American University Washington College of Law
JD/MA with Carleton University's Norman Paterson School of International Affairs
*You may be eligible for financial aid through the HENNICK tEADERSHIP PROGRAM.
We also offer LLM and PhD programs.
nm
uOttawa
L'Univcrsitt canadicnnc
Canada's university
Application deadline: November 1,2010
For more information:
www.commonlaw.uOttawa.ca
Turn th
tables on
the bad
guy. Write
for The
Ubyssey.
U THEUBYSSEYc 6/UBYSSEY.CA/ADVERTISEMENT/2010.10.04
Student Legal Fund
Society of UBC
BC Civil Liberties
Association
KNOW YOUR RIGHTS
ON CAMPUS! WORKSHOP
An informative workshop about your civic and constitutional rights on campus
addressing any questions you may have as a student including how to deal with
academic misconducts and academic disputes.
Tues Oct.12,4:30pm-6:30pm
at the Abdul Ladha Center
Please RSVP at slfsdirectors@gmail.com
S
lib
Student Legal
f/ Fund Society
Teach and Learn in Korea
TaLK (Teach and Learn in Korea) program funded by the Ministry of Education,
Science & Technology of Korea invites young, adventurous college students and
recent graduates who are seeking to broaden their horizon by expanding their
multi-cultural experiences as well as gaining a hands-on teaching experience.
1. Eligibility:
a) Nationality: Applicants must be a citizen of one of the following countries where the national language
is English: Australia. Canada. Ireland. New Zealand. South Africa. U.K. or U.S.A. b) Education: Applicants
must be enrolled in a Bachelor's program and have completed el least two years of study or have obtained
an Associate's degree in the aforementioned countries. Recent college graduates and graduate students
are also eligible.
2. Benefits:
Monthly stipendjKWR 1,500,000), round-trip airfare, accommodation, cultural experiences and more.
3. Term:
6 months or 1 year (Starting February 2011)
A. Application Deadline: December 10, 2010. For more detailed information, please visit
www.talk.po.kr or contact the Korean Consulate in Vancouver at vancouver@mofat.go.kr or 604-681-9581.
ADULT BALLET with HELEN EVANS, highly
experienced teacher: mat fitness workout and ballet
barre. At 7th ave. Dance Studio, 1555 W 7th Ave.,
and Kits and Dunbar Community Centres. Consult
Craigslist & Kijiji for schedules.
Call 604 732 5429 or evansgerry@yahoo.ca.
■
Agenda for October 5th Staff Meeting
1. Introductions
2. New Members
3. Video Editor Responsibilities
4. Hootenanny II Update
5. JHM Awards Discussion
6. WPNCUP Election
7. Coordinator Elections
8. Staff Retreat Update
9. New Coffee Machine
10. New Business
Staff meetings are every Tuesday at noon. All
UBC students are welcome to attend.
JUSTIN MCELROY |
coordinating@ubyssey.ca
^THEUBYSSEYca
Since j
Jaxon
n
Years Old!
Hannah
13 'A
Years Old!
e 1989 I
MrHBuild.com
9129 Shaughnessy St.    732-8453
J Renovations and Repairs
J Bathrooms/Kitchens
LI Roofing/Concrete Work
J Painting/PowerSmart Jobs
J All Plumbing & Electrical Work
J Decks & Stairs __^
Guaranteed
Insured
References
LSAT MCAT
GMAT GRE
Preparation Seminars
* Complete 30-Hour Seminars
* Convenient Weekend Schedule
* Proven Test-Taking Strategies
* Experienced Course Instructors
* Comprehensive Study Materials
* Simulated Practice Exams
* Limited Class Size
* Free Repeat Policy
* Personal Tutoring Available
* Thousands of Satisfied Students
OXFORD SEMINARS
604-683-3430
1-800-269-6719
www .oxfordscminars.ca
Don't be
discouraged
by the amount
of ads! Come
volunteer for The
Ubyssey anyway!
Production days
are Wednesdays
and Sundays in
the afternoon.
JUSTIN MCELROY |
coordinating@ubysseyca
tlT lEUBYSSEYc 2010.10.04/UBYSSEY.CA/OPINIONS/7
OPINIONS
DO YOU CARE? WRITE US A LETTER»feedback@ubyssey.ca
EDITORIAL
BLOOD DONATION POLICY IS DISCRIMINATORY
A court ruling last month defended Canadian Blood
Services' (CBS) policy of barring men who have had
sex with other men from donating blood, prompting the Canadian Federation of Students, among
others, to resign from a CBS queer consultation
group. Is the rule discriminatory? We think so.
The decision was part of a lawsuit against Kyle
Freeman, an Ontario man who had donated blood
after unknowingly contracting syphilis. CBS sued
him—and won—for $10,000, which they claimed
was the cost of removing his blood from circulation, based on the fact that he had lied on his registration form. The CBS policy prohibits any man
who has had sex with another man since 1977 from
donating blood because they identify this group
as being a high risk for HIV.
It is true that homosexual men have a higher
likelihood of having AIDS. And the screenings
that CBS runs on blood samples during the donation process aren't 100 per cent effective at detecting HIV. However, that doesn't mean that this sort
of discrimination is valid. While there are risks,
a blanket ban sends a terrible message, and fails
to seek any sort of middle ground which protects
Canadians. The policy institutionalizes the practice of treating all men who sleep with other men
as a sort of poisonous element whose blood is to be
avoided in all cases. But not all men who sleep with
other men pose a higher danger. There are plenty of men who are having sex with only one male
partner who are far less of a risk than heterosexual men who engage in sex with multiple partners.
The Ubyssey would like to see changes to this
policy. Men who have sex with a new male partner could also be required to go through a longer
screening and testing process. The CBS would benefit from not only an improved image, but also an
increase in its number of eligible donors. In the
past, CBS has made public call-outs for donations
during times when its blood supplies became dangerously low. The Globe and Mail reports that the
number of students boycotting CBS over the past
year led to a ten per cent drop in university blood
donations. All those donors could return, and more,
with just a few policy changes.
WHEELS ON THE BUS LOOP GO ROUND AND ROUND
UBC is a commuter university. Despite all efforts
to shape UBC into a "University Town," the reality is that the vast majority of students will continue to commute here—many for more than two
hours each day—for the foreseeable future, which
is why the building of a new bus loop is such an
important issue.
To give credit where credit is due, Campus and
Community Planning (CCP) has been treating it as
such. Despite this, there are a number of ways in
which the consultations process is falling short. The
first thing the CCP isn't addressing adequately is
cost. Despite serious design flaws, it wasn't student
opposition that killed the underground bus loop,
but insufficient financing. Yet ifyou look at the proposed options, both the first and second choices include underground components where buses will
lay over. These will inevitably require large capital
costs for construction, but CCP isn't releasing what
they would estimate these to be. How can we be sure
that the money is there for these ventures? By not
bringing cost to the front ofthe discussion, CCP is
setting up a possible exercise in futility.
At the end ofthe day, whatwe're likely to getis a
modified version of option one, which would essentially make the current bus loop facilities permanent. By routing more buses through campus, option two would generate too much opposition from
residents in the UNA neighbourhoods. Similarly,
option three is unlikely to get much support from
the AMS because by stretching out the loop along
Wesbrook, it diminishes the much-vaunted "sense
of arrival" at the new Student Union Building.
This is all fairly regrettable. Students need better bus coverage around UBC, which has one ofthe
largest campuses in North America. And an elongated, downtown-style loop would provide some interesting opportunities for turning Wesbrook into
a more student oriented area, through coffee shops
and other amenities. But this whole conversation is
moot if it turns out we don't have the cash to build
one ofthe options. At the end ofthe day, it's money
that makes the wheels on the buses go round, tl
Not pictured: Bill Murray. VIRGINIE MENARD GRAPHIC/THE UBYSSEY
COLUMNISTS
Paid vs Aid campaign doesn't encourage compassion
PAUL BUCCI
pbucci@ubyssey.ca
Congratulations. The Christians on
campus continue to create the most
interesting and engaging debate at
UBC. Left-wingers, take note: students respond to financial incentives
when considering moral dilemmas.
Of course, that's the problem. It's
also a trite and poorly framed debate.
For those of you who don't know,
Campus for Christ, through the vehicle of MyCravings, have created
a "Paid vs Aid" contest on campus.
On October 7, they'll be drawing the
name of one UBC student (nearly a
thousand have entered the contest).
Upon winning, you have a choice
of either donating your $1000 winnings to one of three aid groups, or
paying your tuition.
The contest is designed to distill
the choice between self-interest and
altruism into a distinct and public
action. Ifyou choose tuition, you are
necessarily denying a personalized
group of needful third-worlders the
essentials of life.
Ifyou choose any ofthe groups, you
are not only denying yourself $1000
of tuition money, you're denying the
other two groups the means for survival. They even go as far as to name
them, creating actual people you're
choosing to deny, rather than an abstract demographic. What a weighty
moral dilemma.
Except it's not.
I'd take the money. Why wouldn't
you? There, potential winner, take the
money for yourself. You've got one guy,
PaulBucci, on your side. I'll be the devil on your shoulder whispering immoralities in your ear. After the contest
is done, let's grab a drink or twenty
and burn a bible or two.
Ridiculous anti-Christianisms
aside, the contest defeats itself by
making a personal moral decision
public. No matter how else you look
at it, the decision is framed by what
other people think. So, we'll learn
that people tend to act nicer when
guilted into it. Great. Even as a frame
for debate, it falls flat due to the
same question.
Beyond that, giving to aid groups is
in no way an especially altruistic or
even a good action. The money goes
to GAiN Canada, a division of Power
to Change, an international non-profit. There is considerable debate in the
aid industry over whether these organizations affect real change.
An important thing to note is that
according to an investors kit by MyCravings, this project is part of a campaign costing roughly $1,070,000.
Now, I get that running organizations
costs money, and $1,070,000 for a national campaign isn't that bad, but
it raises the question of how many
lives choosing evangelism has cost?
And $1000 for aid? That doesn't buy
real social and political change overseas, but it is a significant portion of
your tuition.
Real compassion isn't bought. If
you're trying to promote a genuine ethical shift, it'll cost more than $ 1000. va
Campus for Christ asking wrong questions
BLAKE FREDERICK
Columnist
The question that Campus for Christ
is posing to students on campus this
week is whether they would pocket
$ 1000 and put it towards their tuition,
or donate $1000 to aid efforts in developing countries, if presented with
the choice. Further, the organization
is actually going to draw the name
of a student at random and present
them with this situation to see what
they will choose.
I assume that Campus for Christ
hopes that by running this contest
they will spur some kind of campus
debate about the balance between
self-interest and charity. While this
is a worthy cause, I think their campaign is somewhat misguided.
Their contest does not encourage the
right type of discussion on the difficult
issues surrounding aid to developing countries. The aid organizations
that Campus for Christ has chosen to
highlight seem to be worthwhile, highly effective causes. Who would argue
against giving money to build shelters for earthquake victims in Haiti?
Not all aid is good aid, however. The
US pledged $1.15 billion to help Haiti rebuild after the earthquake. Nine
months have passed and the people
of Haiti haven't seen a single dime of
that money.
The International Monetary Fund
has been giving loans and non-payable aid to countries for decades, but
the aid they give comes with conditions. Countries receiving money must
abide by Structural Adjustment Programs, which commonly require them
to privatize national services such
as health care and education and degrade environmental standards by
implementing free trade regimens.
This tied aid has done significant damage to these countries, and in most
cases has caused an overall reduction in their GDPs.
Instead of asking whether to give
aid at all, we should be asking what
kind of aid is good aid. We should also
be investigating the reasons why these
impoverished countries need aid in
the first place. Let's focus on the historical effects of colonialism and unfair international trade regulations,
for example, instead of asking students to alleviate poverty with their
tuition money.
Campus for Christ is well inten-
tioned and hopefully their contest will
have a positive effect. By not encouraging students to discuss the politics
of aid, however, they are unlikely to
shed much light on the causes of and
remedies for global poverty, tl 8/UBYSSEY.CA/S PORTS/2 010.10.04
SPORTS
EDITOR IAN TURNER»sports@ubyssey.ca
Longboat: 3000 students become voyageurs
ALLANA ISAACS
Contributor
Celebrating its 25th anniversary, and with over 3000 students having participated, the
Day of the Longboat is now recognized as one of the largest
voyageur canoe races in North
America.
With less than adequate preparation, and with the cold, wet
conditions dampening morale
to the point of some not wanting
to compete, the students who go
on to win epitomize the underdog, especially when you consider that to win one must have
raced three times in the span of
two days.
Those who win get a miniature longboat from which one
can drink champagne. It's not
much, but it helps compensate
for all the blisters.
Taking such a prize home
would be the cherry on top of
the icing on the cake, and not
coming last or capsizing would
be the icing. But for me, just
getting to take part is the cake,
plain and simple. And I'm a sucker for cake. Xsi
Team "Suck It" seen here approaching the beach in the final minutes of their match. ALEX MICU PH0T0/THE UBYSSEY
Student Exclusive, now until Oct 31st.
$25/month Unlimited for one year.
This unlimited talk-and-text & surfing offer is exclusively for any student with a valid student card
'til Oct. 31" at any WIND store, kiosk, or dealer No contracts and absolutely no hidden fees.
Always Shout
$4£>f0mh
limited
n<icfii-widc calling from any WIND Zone
Unlimited
Incoming/Outgoing Texts (CA/US} From any WIND Zone
Call Control
Caller ID • Hiitad cull alertt * Cull forward
Conference calling ■ call waiting • Cnfl hold
Infinite Laptop
*25
I ml ted
Internpl dntn for USB
data sticks from any
WIND Zone. Subject to
our Fair Uiagc Poh'
WI N D   The Power of Conversation -
WINDmobile.ca
1-877-WIND-403
..■::.!.-.■;!
:■:.:..'..:' ■' Im
Fan iiotal Snapping Cwrt'f
3H3 Ki*pi»y
■  ■■
Hi'j tes 9lvJ
iSSD Fra» St.
TERM* AW G<jmiT3«a APPLY LEARN MORE A3" W1NDMOB41-E CJL ,','M: «11 WiD hrt»LL —
lunriaIt Quay Martat
CnUal Mall
!■!* A1i|3W*iiiiiiii ii*ii T[ ^ snJatiiti.rnrLi
FMHftSL
!20t Kimiw*y
ttSlHastwgsSl.
_!3
AA
va-. tm= f-wch ■y - r»AWii3CT ■ i

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0128738/manifest

Comment

Related Items