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The Ubyssey Oct 8, 1985

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THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXVIII, No. 9
Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday, October 8,1985
■8<a*5K
228-2301
Value questioned as costs soar
By LAURA LOWDEN
UBC tuition fees have more than
doubled in the past five years, helping drive the cost of learning up far
faster than the inflation rate.
Students living away from home
must come up with an average of
over $6,600 this year to cover tuition fees, books, transportation and
living expenses based on admissions
guide figures. This is a 67 per cent
jump from $3,900 in the 1980-81
academic year. The Vancouver consumer price index rose 43 per cent
over the same period.
"UBC is in danger of pricing
itself out of the competitive
academic market," says Don
Holubitsky,    student    board    of
governors representative.
The cost breakdown is:
• Tuition and student fees
average $1,347, up 107 per cent
from $650 in 1980-81;
• Living expenses including rent
and transportation average $4,960,
up 61 per cent from $3,080;
• Books and supplies are $320,
up 28 per cent from $250.
Holubitsky says he thinks
students will not be able to pay
higher fees, adding they will likely
head to community colleges which
have lower tuition fees than UBC
and appear to offer more value for
students' dollars.
"UBC is not serving the province
partially because of the cost factors
involved," he says.
"Tuition fees have risen about as
high as they can go."
But Duncan Stewart, AMS external affairs coordinator, says tuition
fees are not the greatest burden on
students. For the more than 80 per
cent of students who live beyond
the endowment lands, living expenses are the highest toll.
"Student loans do not allot
enough money for a student to survive a full eight months as well as
pay tuition. Tuition is not the major
problem."
Stewart says students must be
worrying about the declining quality of education, in addition to making  ends  meet.  Overcrowding in
classrooms, overworked professors
and dropping morale are all forcing
learning conditions to deteriorate,
he says.
UBC's financial director Byron
Hender, however, says UBC still
imately 6,000 students who apply
for student aid every year are
receiving substantial value for the
high cost of education, he argues.
"(And) high tuition fees are all
relative if you study the increase
has a good reputation. The approx-    over a 15 year period," he said.
Woman assaulted
By GORDANA RASIC
A woman was assaulted in the
Sedgewick library lower level
washroom last Friday evening.
Sedgewick head librarian Joan
Sandilands said a woman reported
the incident Friday at 10 p.m. She
said the woman saw the male enter
the washroom as she was leaving
EMERGING FROM THEIR ancestral homelands in the hills beyond Hope,
two representative of the Dolby I Lung tribe made a rare appearance on
Steve engler photo
campus this week. They will be lecturing to Anthropology 400 students on
the potential of having Rambo invade and destroy Point Grey area.
Vancouver overdue for major earthquake
By STEVE ENGLER
The entire structure of UBC
could be shaken visibly in the near
future, according to a campus
geophysicist.
"Vancouver is overdue for a major earthquake," said David Vogt
of the UBC Department of
Geophysics and Astronomy. Major
earthquakes occur approximately
every thirty years in this area. The
last one struck in June of 1946, and
measured 7.3 on the Richter scale.
The epicentre was near Courtenay.
"At any time, an earthquake as
large as any, ever, could happen
here. The continental area (the
lower mainland and southern Vancouver Island) tends to release its
earthquake strain in single large
events rather than in many small
events," said Vogt.
Such an earthquake would most
likely be centred about 200
kilometres offshore where the continental plates meet, he said.
However, it is possible the epicentre
could be beneath Vancouver. In the
early 1870's the area experienced an
earthquake estimated at 7.4 on the
Richter scale whose epicentre was
just south of Coquitlam.
Liam Finn of the UBC Department of Civil Engineering said,
"you never have an earthquake
without damage." Certain older
buildings built before the modern
building codes would be the most
likely to sustain damage, but is
unlikely any major building in Vancouver would collapse, he said.
"They will have been designed
according to standards like those in
California ... a very good code
. . . The main thing that we try to
guard against is loss of life," said
Finn.
Vogt said UBC would probably
lose several buildings in a major
earthquake.
"Cecil Green, the Museum of
Anthropology, and the president's
mansion would all go down the
hill," he said.
Ironically, the geophysics
building is perhaps the most likely
of those on campus to collapse in
the case of an earthquake, he said.
"This is of great concern to all
the scientists in this building. I'm
tempted to leave my window open
all the time ... so I could dive out
if an earthquake hit," said Vogt.
"People in Vancouver aren't experienced with earthquakes," said
Vogt. A person's intitial reaction is
crucial. "Here in Vancouver people
would run out in the streets to look.
They should be running to hide . . .
It's not quite like riding a bicycle,
but it's the same flavour. Until
you've been through a few, you
don't consolidate your experience."
her cubicle. After she asked him
what he was doing there he grabbed
her around the waist and began
pushing her back into the cubicle.
"The woman screamed and
somehow got away," said Sandilands. "We don't exactly know
what the man's motives were."
The RCMP describe the man as
oriental, 5'6", 150 lbs., wearing a
blue velour shirt and blue jeans.
Sandilands warned people should
be aware this washroom area is an
isolated one which can be especially
dangerous in the evening.
Women's studies office director
June Lythgoe said this was the first
such report this year she was aware
of, adding several tapes have usually been reported by this time of
year.
Lythgoe said she wrote a list of
dangerous areas or the campus last
year, suggesting ways to improve
those areas.
These ideas included closer parking to residences fer females, better
lighting in several campus areas including behind the law building, by
the home economics building, and
on other shortcuts around campus,
a better patrol system by the Main
library and better advertising of the
night shuttle bus to B-lot parking.
She said even tnough there are
safety measures su:h as the shuttle
bus on campus, they aren't advertised well enough and women don't
use them because ihey don't know
about them.
"There's no earthly way that this
campus can be made safe," she
said. "With all hese trees and
bushes it's a set-up."
Lythgoe said it is the responsibility of the individual to take care.
"No question, it's a problem. If
UBC spend $1 million on the problem I don't think it could be solved," she said. "If one can't go to
the washroom, where is it safe?"
Report says high youth unemployment to remain
OTTAWA (CUP) — The 1986
economic forecast of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation
and Development says unemployment among Canadian youth will
not change much in the coming
year.
"Even though the youth population is down, youth employment
will not grow in 1985-86," reads the
UBC hosts anti-apartheid vigil
National Students' Day Against Apartheid won't be ignored by
UBC students Friday, October 11.
A vigil and service at noon in front of the Bank of Montreal at the
north end of the. student union building wifl feature a speech by Ray
Schultz, Lutheran Campus Minister, and speeches by members of
Students for Free South Africa.
"We're encouraging all students to come out in a show of solidary
ty against the apartheid system," said SFSA president Leslie Roosa,,
Arts 3. She said students from SFU and Langara will also attend the
vigil.
"Worldwide apartheid is the only institutionalized racism since
Nazi Germany, Our responsibility as individuals of the world is to
work toward freeing South Africa," said Roosa. Students can sign a
petition urging the AMS to ban South African products at an information table run by SFSA.
Roosa said UBC students by not buying their products are pres -
suring South African businesseswho in turn are pressuring their gov-
ernment."Previous wars were fought on the battlefield. In 1981 with
nuclear weapons wars are fought on the economic front," she said.
Schultz said he will speak on "what it means to be a person."
South African music wit! follow the speeches.
OECD's Economic Outlook released in Paris, Sept. 24.
Employment among Canadians
under 25, this year, is slightly higher
than last year after four years of
decline. In 1980, 86.8 per cent of
Canadian youth had jobs. By 1984
this dropped to 82.1 per cent, currently 82.75 per cent of Canadian
youth have jobs, this will rise to 83
per cent next year, the OECD
predicts.
The organisation, which studies
the economies of the seven largest
Western nations, also said long-
term unemployment (being continuously out of work for a year or
more) is now affecting many young
people and prime-age workers.
The forecast dispels the "long-
held view, that multiple spells of
unemployment among youth are a
normal part of the transition from
school to work, and hence of little
concern.
"The study finds youth
unemployment is as concentrated as
adult unemployment, indicating the
seriousness of youth unemployment, and the fact that some of
these youths are likely to be experiencing labour market difficulties," the forecast said.
In addition, service industry
work and part-time work, the areas
where most young Canadians find
jobs, will continue to grow faster
than industrial and full-time work
in Canada, the OECD predicts.
Last week, Statistics Canada had
some qualified good news for Canadian youth: there are slightly more
young Canadian families above the
poverty line than there were last
year.
"Young families' incidence of
low income, at 31.3 per cent in
1984, is down from 34.7 per cent in
1983. This appeal's to break the
trend of steadily increasing low income rates for this group since
1979, when the figure was 20.5 per
cent," according to a Sept. 30
StatsCan release.
Low-income cut-offs are relative
levels based on income and expenditure patterns in 1978 and vary by
size of the area of residence and by
size of the family. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 8, 1985
AIDS'discoverer informs
By KEITH STRINGER
Acquired Immune Deficiency
Syndrome was present in Africa in
1963 or earlier the immunologist
credited with discovering the
disease said Saturday.
Dr. Michael Gottlieb told over
600 people in Woodward IRC 2 at a
Vancouver institute lecture on
AIDS. "While AIDS is a new
disease in Canada and the USA, it
may be an endemic disease in Africa
which simply went unnoticed to
some exent," he said, adding the
disease is especially prevalent in
central African countries including
Zaire and isolated parts of Uganda
and Kenya.
Gottleib said AIDS has not been
shown to be spread by kissing,
routine social contact, aerosol projection (sneezing and coughing) or
occupational exposure. He added
the disease can be found in the
saliva of infected individuals but
quantities too small to spread the
disease. He said the routes of
transmission of the AIDS virus fall
into three categories: first, venereal,
involving intimate sexual contact;
second, through blood and blood
products; or through maternal
transfer, to an unborn child.
"Clearly mothers who have exposure to the AIDS virus are at increased risk of giving their babies
AIDS.
He said six groups of people have
a greater risk of catching AIDS:
homosexual and bisexual males and
intravenous drug users where
among the first to be recognized;
hemophilia patients receiving factor
concentrate, transfusion recipients,
sexual partners of AIDS patients
and Haitians also suffer increased
risk.
Studies of serum taken from
Ugandan children in 1973 indicate
the children were exposed to a
retrovirus, indicate the children
were exposed to a retrovirus, but
not necessarily the AIDS virus. The
history of the AIDS virus is still
unclear," he said.  "It may have
BEYOND
MOZAMBIQUE
By George F. Walker
A Lurid Canadian Comedy{
Directed by Robert Garfat
OCTOBER 15-19
8:00 p.m.
Student Tickets: $4
Box Office—Room 207
Frederic Wood Theatre
Dorothy Somerset
Studio
University of British Columbia
Res. 228-2678
till
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been a change in the genetic
material of one of these retroviruses
which caused increased aggressiveness to the human immune
system. Alternately, a primate
retrovirus, not causing serious infection in them, may have jumped
to man where it did."
The "AIDS virus" is a
retrovirus, which means its genetic
material is encoded in RNA instead
of DNA as in animals and plants.
"One of the modes of attack will
be the development of specific
drugs which inhibit the enzyme
reverse transcriptase," which is
necessary for the virus' reproduction and is not found in human
cells.
However, Dr. Gottlieb emphasized "the growing concensus is that
antiviral agents represent the most
rational response. The first step is
to control the viral infection."
"A vaccine for the AIDS virus remains a distant horizon despite the
advances. A vaccine would involve
envelope proteins surrounding the
virus."
The AIDS virus does its damage
to people indirectly, in that it essentially destroys our immune system
so that we are susceptible to other
infections (bacterial, fungal and
protozoan) and cancers (Kapos's
Sarcoma, brain lymphomas) that
the immune system normally
prevents," said Gottlieb. "The immune system is divided into several
arms, including T cells and B cells.
AIDS patients have a near total
wipeout of their T helper cell
populations," he said.
"On September 12 there had
been 12,910 cases of AIDS reported
to the Center for Disease Control in
the United States," he said citing
figures for cases for the "full
blown" syndrome. "AIDS
represents the tip of the iceberg of
infection caused by the AIDS virus.
As many as ten per cent of individuals exposed may ultimately
develop the full blown syndrome."
HaHay'a comtt la an intaiataNar aoamiMozokt an a collision courts with Mother Earth.
Rav. Jerry Fahwall, in *rj effort to circumvent the unfortunate re»ult» of a premature tecond
eummino. frantteatty urgad that the Ipace ahuttle'i Canadarm be urnd to encomtpaee the
glob* with epermiclda! foam. FatwraN aakf, "Contraceptive measure* are warranted, in tM*
ca*a. at iaaat until it ha* been determined whether the comet hat been circumcieed."
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SALE EXPIRES OCT. 31st
UJ
BOOKSTORE
228-4741
Your father did say he expected some performance out of you this term, didn't he?
You've always depended on Long Distance to put you
in touch with those not-so-near but dear to you. Now,
calling Long Distance could put you in touch with a new
1986 Fiero Sport Coupe in Telecom Canada's national
"Student Long Distance Contest.'' Four students, two
per academic term, will talk themselves into a brand
new, mid-engine Pontiac Fiero Sport Coupe.
Here's how to enter. Make 3 Long Distance calls,
record the numbers you called on one of our entry
forms, send it along and you're in business.
Each additional set of three calls makes you eligible to
enter again. It may not be the kind of performance
Dad had in mi«d, but then he didn't really specify,
did he?
}
11
Draw dates: November 27,1985 and March 12,1986.
Please enter me in the Student Long Distance Contest.
Make 3 Long Distance calls, enter the numbers you called on
this entry form, send it along and you could be one of four
fortunate students to win a fiery Pontiac Fiero.
Each additional set of 3 calls makes you eligible to enter
again. So go ahead, talk yourself into a fiery Fiero.
Area code  Number called Date called
1 L_L_
2 CZ±
3 Q" j_
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J_L_LJL.1_L
Name_
Address.
City	
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_Prov._
Postal code.
 Telephone No	
(Where you can be reached)
College or Univ. attending	
I have read the contest rules and agree to abide by them.
Signature	
Rul6$ and RCQUlatiOnS.' 1. to enter, print your name, address and telephone number on an official Tefecom Canada entry form or on an
8 cm x 12 cm (3" x 5")piece of paper, as well as the telephone numbers (including area codes) and dates of three (3) Long Distance calls* completed
between August 16,1985 and February 12,1986. Each group ot three (3) Long Distance calls may be entered only once OR, provide a handwritten
description, in not less than 25 words, explaining why you would like to make a Long Distance call Only original hand written copies will be accepted
and those mechanically reproduced will be disqualified
Mail to: Student Long Distance Contest, P.O. Box 1491, Station A, Toronto, Ontario M5W2E8
"Calls to any point outside the entrants local flat rate calling area.
2. Enter as often as you can, but each entry must be mailed in a separate envelope, bear sufficient postage, and be postmarked no later than
February 26,1986, the contest closing date. The sponsors do not assume any responsibility for lost, delayed or misdirected entries. Only entries
received prior to the draw dates will be eligible for contest participation.
3. There will be a total of four (4) prizes awarded nationally (see Rule #4 for prize distribution). Each prize will consist of a 1986 Pontiac Fiero Sport
Coupe with all standard equipment plus the following options: AM/FM Stereo Radio and aluminum cast wheels. Approximate retail value of each prize
is $13,000.00. Local delivery, federal and provincial taxes as applicable, are included as part of the prize at no cost to the winner. Vehicle insurance,
registration, license, and any applicable income tax, will be the responsibility of each winner. Each vehicle will be delivered to the GM Pontiac dealer
nearest the winner's residence in Canada. The prize will be awarded to the person whose name appears on the entry, limit of one prize per person. All
prizes must be accepted as awarded, with no cash substitutions. Prizes will be awarded to each winner by Telecom Canada. Prizes awarded may not
be exactly as illustrated.
4. Random selections will be made from all eligible entries submitted, at approximately 2:00 PM E.S.T November 27,1985 and March 12,1986 in
Toronto, Ontario, by the independent contest organization. Prizes will be awarded as follows: Two (2) Fiero Sport Coupes will be awarded from all
entries postmarked no later than midnight, November 13,1985, and two (2) Fiero Sport Coupes will be awarded from all entries postmarked no later
than midnight, February 26,1986. Eligible entries other than the two winners of the November 27 draw will automatically be entered in the final draw
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win, must qualify according to the rules and will be required to correctly answer unaided, a time-limited, arithmetic, skill-testing question during a
pre-arranged telephone interview. All decisions of the contest organization are final. By accepting a prize, winners agree to the use of their name,
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compliance with the contest rules. To receive a list of winners, send a postage-paid, self-addressed envelope within three (3) months of the final
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5. This contest is open only to students who have reached the age of majority in the province in which they reside and who are registered full-time at
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6. Quebec Residents. Any dispute or claim by Quebec residents relating to the conduct of this contest and the awarding of prizes may be submitted to
the Regie des loteries et courses du Quebec. This contest is subject to all Federal. Provincial and Municipal laws
B.C.TEL^)
A member of
Telecom Canada Tuesday, October 8, 1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Universities to toot own horns
OTTAWA (CUP)— Faced with the
threat of federal funding cuts,
Canada's 58 universities are taking
their plight to the public.
From Oct. 19 through 27, they're
lauching a nationwide public relations binge, with ads in all the big
daily papers and on television,
chamber of commerce speeches,
open houses and special lectures.
The universities want to make
Canadians sensitive to their pro
blems to avoid losing money when
the federal Conservative government submits its next budget.
"I'm left with a terrible fear that
the government is going to try to
dramatically reduce the universities'
budget for education as well as
research," said Myer Horowitz,
president of the 30,000 student
University of Alberta and co-chair
of National Universities Week.
"If we ever needed a reason to
have a public relations campaign
(and I don't use that in a negative
sense) then there's a good one,"
Horowitz said in a breakfast interview at Ottawa's Four Seasons
hotel recently.
He said many university administrators worry the recently appointed study team on education
and research will recommend cutting universities. "Six years ago,
how   many   of   us   could   have
predicted it (massive university funding cuts) would have occurred?
And it is occurring this year in
B.C." Horowitz said.
The Association of Universities
and Community Colleges of
Canada, along with four provincial
and regional funding associations,
have sunk $65,000 into the project.
Testimonial advertisements in
newspapers as well as Maclean's,
the Report on Business, the Financial Post and Time are sponsored by
various corporations. A Montreal
advertising firm donated the NUW
artwork.
The week is organized by ad
ministrators with no input from
faculty or students. Canadian
Federation of Students chair Barbara Donaldson and Don Savage,
executive secretary of the Canadian
Association of University Teachers
attended a recent organising
meeting in Ottawa, but have not
been invited to help plan the week.
Horowitz said the public is not
thinking enough about what it
wants from universities, and neglect
is huring the schools' quality.
"We want people to think about
universities," Horowitz said. "If
(people) end up being more critical,
fine: that's OK too."
Group for politics
-  steve engler photo
ARCHEOLOGY STUDENTS BRUSH up on their technique by restoring an ancient monolithic obelisk. Despite
its nauseating appearance, discovery is of the utmost significance, not to be lightly whitewashed over. Professional consultation revealed object, in keeping with Expo's man in motion theme, to be part of geer system of ancient perpetual motion machine.
Kyle calls for more nuclear war protest
By DEBBIE LO
Chinese Canadians are the second most educated ethnic group in
Canada but rank eighteenth in
wealth and a Chinese-Canadian
National Council representative last
weekend.
Dora Nip told over 100 people at
a three day Chinese-Canadian
youth conference at Vancouver
Community College entitled
Challenging the Future, Chinese-
Canadians have come a long way
since being forced to pay head taxes
to immigrate earlier this century,
but not far enough.
"Chinese-Canadians still haven't
made it and have a long way to go,"
she said. For example, she added,
they are faced with "sympathetic
discrimination" in the work force
when trying to rise to the top.
But she pointed to the Chinese
By DOUG SCHMIDT
Despite the growing threat of
nuclear war, there is not much drive
on the part of many to do anything
about it, a UBC psychology professor said Friday.
"Why is there such a large group
of those who are uninvolved (in the
peace movement)?" Dr. Neil Kyle
asked 40 people in SUB 205 during
his lecture, "Apathy, activist or
survivalist — the psychology of
adult reactions to the threat of
nuclear war."
"Our perception of an inability
to control our lives gives a sense of
helplessness which can lead ~ to
apathy," he said.
Kyle used statistical data obtained from US survey polls to show
there are large sections of the public
who believe the next war will be
nuclear, but despite this they do not
take part in the public debate on ending the arms race.
Psychological defenses allow
them to ignore, and thus cope with
the nuclear arms issue, he said.
Such defenses include:
• repression: person is aware of
the threat but tries not to think
about it;
• rationalization: person says
"it won't happen to me" or "I'll be
able to get away in time";
• denial: person tries to
minimize or deny that a threat exists;
• psychic numbing: an extreme
form of denial, characterized by
dulled senses, thinking and
behaviour.
Kyle cited as an example of
denial, an American professor who
wrote a pamphlet on "How to have
fun in a fallout shelter in World
War III."
"I don't know where these guys
are at," Kyle said, slapping the side
of his head in amazement.
Despite our attempts to avoid
thinking about nuclear war there is
now a relatively higher percentage
of involvement than in the 1960s or
'70s, Kyle said.
But Kyle sees the 1963 signing of
the Limited Test Ban treaty on
nuclear weapons as one of the
reasons for the demise of the anti-
nuclear movement.
"People's perception of the risk
went down even though missile
numbers continued to rise rapidly,"
he said.
But there were other reasons, including a changed sense of
priorities, most notably when ac-
tivisits redirected their energy into
the anti-Vietnam War movement
and talk on nuclear issues focused
on the "peaceful atom" and
nuclear energy.
SMZ4
There are two types of people active in the anti-nuclear peace movement, Kyle said.
"The activists are those who
believe nuclear war is not sur-
vivable, but that it is preventable.
The survivalists believe in the exact opposite, the nuclear war is not
preventable, but that it is sur-
vivable," he said.
"The latter are interested in
minimizing the effects of the inevitable."
Kyle accuses activists of not promoting the peace movement
enough.
"(Local)  activists  have  to  ask
themselves: how many people have
heard of EAR (End The Arms Race
— a Vancouver umbrella organization of peace groups)?"
The problem of visability became
most apparent to Kyle last year,
when he taught a UBC continuing
Education course on the
psychological effects of nuclear
war.
"Interested people in my class
came to me asking where to go to
get active — they didn't know how
to get active even though Vancouver is one of the most activist
places with the largest (peace)
groups," he said.
monopoly on B.C. place cleaning
crews as an example of the corporate power Chinese-Canadians
currently hold.
Nip and Vancouver city councillor Bill Yee both called for more
Chinese-Canadian community involvement in politics.
Yee said there has been a lack of
"conscious community effort"
to gain Chinese-Canadian political
power.
' 'There is no organized approach
by various communities in Canada
to train people to be interested in
politics," he said. "We need to encourage citizens to learn more
about the system."
Yee encouraged "young people"
to join political parties and said
there has been a lack of "family encouragement" among Chinese-
Canadian families to get their
children interested in politics.
"To be successful not only do the
younger people have to show interest, the community has the
responsibility to get organized," he
added.
Archivist and author Paul Yee
said Chinese-Canadians have been
lumped into one community "not
by chance but by appearance."
Yee said Chinese-Canadians do
not share one common history like
other ethnic groups in Canada.
"There is a gap between immigrants, the native born and the
older generation," he said.
Yee said there exists a protective
feeling among the older generation
Chinese that the early immigration
of Chinese to Canada is their personal history and has little to do
with the newer generations.
Liberal leader  laments  latest  learning  losses
By KEVIN LOO
National Liberal leader John
Turner spoke for education and
against the B.C. government Friday
in front of a largely partisan crowd
packing the SUB ballroom.
"I am extremely disturbed that
an urgent priority — education — is
being neglected by the government
of the province of British Columbia," he said.
He said Victoria has been "diverting" university funding to the extent that the federal government
pays "not 50 cents of every dollar,
but 106 per cent of the ocst of post
secondary education in the province."
"That is a misuse, that is a
betrayal of trust to the people of
Canada...and I consider it a scandal," he said.
Turner said B.C.'s schools do not
sufficiently train students in the
languages and cultures of the
Pacific Rim.
"In British Columbia we can
reflect a new Canadian psychology
that we are no longer just an Atlantic nation — we are an Arctic nation
and a Pacific nation. And this province,   on   an   educational   level,
ought to reflect that," he said, advocating Pacific Rim trade.
Turner defended Canada's
parliamentary system.
"There is a lot of cynicism about
our public administration, ...but
whatever our problems, we still enjoy the freest, most tolerant country
in the world."
He said "the freedom, spontaneity and directness" in Canadian
parliament is available "nowhere
else in the world."
And he urged the audience to get
involved.
"The system only works if the
brightest and the best among you
are persuaded someday to become
involved in the political life of your
country."
After Turner spoke, he was asked
about such issues as gay rights,
South Moresby, student grants, and
relations with the United States.
Commenting on New Democrat
MP Svend Robinson's gay rights
bill which proposes an amendment
to the Charter of Rights adding sexual orientation to prohibited bases
of discrimination, he said, "I see no
reason why sexual orientation cannot be included in protection of
rights." But, when pressed he said,
"I haven't read Svend's bill. It's
not high on my reading list."
He said South Moresby Island,
which the provincial government
plans to log, is "an environmental
treasure of which the people of
British Columbia ought to be proud, and it ought to be preserved."
"There is other availability on
the Queen Charlottes for selective
logging. Of course, the whole darn
problem arose because neither the
government in this province, nor
the people of Canada, nor the industry in the last thirty or forty
years bothered to promote a decent
reforestation policy for the island,"
he said.
Turner said he believes fundamentally in the Canada Student
Loan Plan.
"I believe the repayment provisions ought to be rendered more
flexible until students are able to get
permanent gainful employment,"
he said. "And there ought to be a
proper balance between a loan
system and a bursary system."
He repeatedly mentioned the firing of Vancouver's school trustees,
and said education could be run
- david mccullum photo
TURNER. . .speaks
better on a day to day basis by an
elected school board than by Victoria.
In an interview with the Ubyssey
he urged UBC to suport the Canadian Federation of Students a national student lobby group. "We
always gave full support (to CFS) in
my day," he said. "Students ought
to have a strong national and provincial voice." Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 8, 1985
M/?. PRIME MINISTER, THERE
15 GREAT CONCERN AMOA/G-
THE PEOPLE OF C A NAPA OVER
THE RECENT TUNA SCANDAL.
YOU CLAIMED THAT YOU
LEARNED OF THE SALE. OF
RANCID CANNED TUNA 0/O
AFTER THE MATTER WAS
BROADCAST ON TV.
\
VET YOUR FISHERIES MINISTER
SAID VOUR OFFICE WAS INFORMED
WEEKS AGO. DO YOU DENY THAT
THERE HAS BEEN A WATERGATE
STYLE CQVERVP, MR. MULRONEY?
NOW LET ME
MAKE MYSELF
PERFECTLY
CLEAR..
Yankee beef
Americans are rather uneducated when it comes to the subject
of Canada. Most people accept this point with little doubt, and
some even consider this American ignorance beneficial. However,
American ignorance of our nation can often be distressing —
especially when the ignorance invades the white house.
Most Canadians remember when Reagan, a few months ago,
called Japan the United States' biggest trading partner. That
honor, of course, belongs to Canada. It may have been a small
mistake, but it revealed a disturbing economic attitude.
Now that attitude towards Canada has resurfaced, and in a
more serious context. The United States recently devalued its
dollar, attempting to heal its deficit.
Before the US undertook this drastic measure, it consulted the
other members of the West's economic "big five": Britain,
France, West Germany, and Japan. Canada's name is noticeably
absent from the list.
Canada may not be as important as these "big five"
economically, but this country is still the States' biggest trading
partner. A dropping US dollar will make our products more expensive to American buyers. The consequences of the Americans' action are serious to Canadians.
Why wasn't our government consulted? Perhaps Mulroney,
Clark, and Co. should make Reagan and his advisors aware of our
existence.
Ignorance in cultural matters is disturbing; but when American
economic ignorance affects Canada, some drastic education is
necessary.
LaQ Xf L6 rs
Arts student miffed at token gesture of A.M.S.
It is disappointing but not surprising that AMS Students' Council
tabled the motion to post notices informing students that certain products sold on campus are produced
by companies controlled by South
African interests. Far from showing
any interest in encouraging students
to boycott such products, Students'
Council has been actively promoting the sale of such products by
having various campus events sponsored by companies with strong
South African links.
an event, "Musical Chairs," sponsored by Craven A cigarettes.
Craven A is owned by Rothmans,
which has strong financial links to
the Rembrant Group, one of the
largest corporations in South
Africa. One must also question the
propriety of having campus events
sponsored by groups whose
business is peddling carcinogens to
the public.
On September 13 the AMS held a
beer garden with Doug and the
Slugs. This event was sponsored by
Carling O'Keefe, which brews
Miller under licence in Canada.
Carling O'Keefe also has strong
financial ties to the Rembrandt
Group.
Why is the AMS actively
cooperating in the promotion of
these companies' products? Such
cooperation can only constitute
tacit endorsement of the sponsors
themselves, and ultimately of the
apartheid system which has provided the basis for their corporate suc
cess in the world market.
Duncan Stewart and Glenna
Chestnutt can talk about "freedom
of choice" all they want. Such talk
is hypocritical nonsense. The
students of UBC were never given
any choice whether they wanted any
campus events sponsored by these
companies. If Students' Council is
so concerned about "freedom of
choice" its members should resign
en masse so that UBC students can
directly    decide    major    issues
themselves in direct democratic
general assemblies, or barring that
through a series of referenda. Of
course they will do no such thing
because they aren't really concerned
with freedom of choice but rather
are trying to disguise with
ideological rhetoric their own
choice to cooperate with these companies and to refuse to make even a
token gesture against apartheid.
John Broughton
arts II
On September 12 the AMS held    Miller Beer, which in reality means      A m^> ^^ ■«■ ^%#% m%     4» L» **.n a a    ^^ I ■ -~-i— J ^^^ — ^ ^M ^
Anonvmous deed Amencan show sl|8hts Canada
X.   M. M * \S t §/Jr- M M M> \S WkJ      Vfr V V %* By KEITH STRINGER When this "Vancouver" law of-     volved the foiling of a holdup. T
I want to thank the person who
returned my wallet to Brock Hall on
Thursday, September 26, 1985. 1
would have like to thank you in person for your kindness in returning
my wallet, I.D., and some 40 odd
dollars.
Since you did not leave a note of
your identity, this is the only way I
could think of thanking you.
Please know that your kind act is
much appreciated. It is wonderful
to know that there are honest people like you on this campus.
Amy Lam
arts 2
Don't obstruct parking
Reserved parking spaces are
often assigned to people with
physical disabilities. Do not park in
a reserved space which has not been
assigned to you. The person to
whom the space has been assigned
needs to park there in order to get
to class, go to the library, and participate in academic life . . . you
don't.
Elizabeth Hill
graduate studies
geological sciences
SUB entrepreneurs annoying
Who gives all those entrepreneurial spirits permission to
turn the halls of our sacred SUB into a haven for money-changers?
Positioning themselves to assault
the senses and the pocketbooks of
the masses, they conspire to present
an impediment to the proper flow
of traffic thru' the hallowed hall.
Someone, please, put the
privateers somewhere so we need
not hurdle their tables to gain access
to our building.
Steve McJannet
science 4
By KEITH STRINGER
I fortunately only saw the last
half of CBS's Stir Crazy last week.
Besides being badly written, acted
and filmed, the American made TV
show insulted Vancouver and
Canada.
The first scene I caught portrayed
Stanley Park as an Indian reserve
harboring two fugitives of the law.
When an Indian chief questioned
one of the two American renegades
about the victim of an alleged
murder, the man replied "He was
only a Canadian." What a rib
tickler.
Viewers also suffered through
scenes of the RCMP rampaging
through Vancouver in Monty
Python-style red ceremonial
costumes. The two city police officers involved in the manhunt drive
a chrome plated (we're talking the
whole body, now) police car,
recognizable as such only by the
cherry lights mounted on the roof.
One of these officers, a woman topped by an outlandishly long
Californian afro, spoke with the
most irritating of southern accents.
When this "Vancouver" law officer made a fool of herself
downtown, she cautioned her partner never to laugh at her in any of
America's states or possessed territories. I'm glad the show cleared
up Canada's identity as being the
51st state. I'd had some funny notion we were an independent
sovereign country.
Two pieces of film footage
deserve special mention, the first involving a chase sequence in a Burnaby park. While I lost count of
how many Canadians shown were
wearing plaid lumberjack shirts, I
still vividly remember hordes of
people tackling the grassy slopes of
the park with grass skis and sleds.
In California, maybe. In Vancouver? Definintely not. One of the
lawn skiiers wipes out and somehow
lands on the Grouse Mountain
Gondola. Quite a wipe-out.
The second brilliant sequence in
volved the foiling of a holdup. Two
armed men held two unarmed men
at gunpoint on a grass field the size
of a football stadium. Suddenly, an
unarmed native senior citizen appears on horseback and by surprise
disarms the man with his bare
hands. Approaching horses at full
gallop can be so difficult to hear in
open fields.
The show's final sequence has the
two fugitives trapped on the Lynn
Valley suspension bridge with the
police on the side captioned
"Welcome to America" and the
RCMP on the side captioned
"Welcome to Canada." What, you
didn't know a bridge in North Van
crosses the 49th parallel?
I dread to think that American
viewers may be led to believe that
Canada took part in the writing of
this insulting piece of garbage.
The time has come for a review
board to screen films depicting
Vancouver as Vancouver to ensure
that such inane American-made
trash is never again associated with
our good name.
Recent Ubyssey article makes insulting comparison
This letter is in response to an incredibly outrageous article in last
Friday's edition of the Ubyssey.
The article, It is Time for Action, is
not only slanderous to Bill Bennett
but it is also completely out of
touch with reality.
The article implies that there is a
direct relationship between the
Marcos dictatorship now present in
the Philippines and the Social
Credit Government under Bill Bennett.
To draw such a parallel is an insult   to   the   Philippino   students
whose very lives are threatened by
Marcos' repressive tactics. The article suggests that the students of
B.C. are in a similar situation. This
is absolutely absurb. We in B.C. do
not face the possibility of persecution by means of imprisonment and
sometimes even death for merely
voicing our own opinions.
I would imagine that a student in
the Philippines would gladly
welcome an environment such as
ours over the one now existing in
his/her country.
Also the article states that we
must fight the Marcos' and Bill
Bennetts of the world. While it is
true the Marcos regime is an oppressive government that works
against the people; we must keep in
mind the Bill Bennett and the
Socreds were elected and given a
mandate to rule by a large majority
of the province.
If we are to fight against our
elected government then we are truly divided and if we are not united
then we will most surely fall.
Greg Buchanan
arts 2
THE UBYSSEY
October 8, 1985
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Friday throughout
the academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff
and are not necessarily those of the administrataion or the
AMS. Member Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey's
editorial office is SUB 241k. Editorial department,
228-2301/2305. Advertising 228-3977/3978.
Mr. Ginther are you ready?? I; I; I'm ready Johnny. Okay, here it is — the billion dollar 60 cent question. Name (hehehe) all the Ubyssey staffersl You have thirty seconds, GO! What, thats sick, noone
knows that. Tic-tic-ttc-Twenty seven seconds! Okay. Okay. Letssee, mmmm, Debbie Lo-tic-Stephen
Wisenthal-tic-Ronald-tic-Stewart and, and, and, and, and-ti-Doug Schmidt and Steve
whatsisname... Engler, and, who is that, Mike Goder...Boober...Dobber...Grober...GoberGrober,
GROBERMAN. Yeah, thats it. Okay-tic-tic-tic-only ten miserable seconds left Mac-yeah, yeah, right
lets see David Macallum! Gordana Rasic, John Edgar, Sarah Millin, Steve Nuefeild Kevin Loo, Erika
Simpson, and Ed, and Ed, Ed...Ed..Ed.Ed.Ed. whats his damn last nam-BLAAT beep! Shit. Sorry,
Mac, times up, you loose! Haw! Haw! Screw off, Johnny. Tuesday, October 8, 1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Israeli bombing highlights American meddling
By MOHAMMED EZROURA
I was shocked to read in The
Ubyssey (Oct. 4, 1985) Ms.
Tessler's defense of the Israeli bombing of PLO Headquarters in Tunis
on October 1 a raid which resulted
in the death of at least 70 civilians
and was subsequently internationally condemned as a terrorist act of
prime nature.
perspectives
Even though Ms. Tessler tells us
(perhaps indirect response to Mr. J.
Clark's disagreement with President R. Reagan and the former's
condemnation of the raid) that we
should abstain from any judgement
(or condemnation?) of Israel
because "both PLO and Israel are
playing a game with rules ... we
can neither comprehend nor
justify," she tactfully ends up giving her own verdict in the case. She
boldly and in contradiction with her
laid premise goes on to explain how
an objective judgement can be
made in full support of the Israeli
bombing of civilians, in defiance of
international law and in violation of
the territorial integrity of a
sovereign country (Tunisia).
Her 'unbiased' view is based on
the fact that, since Israel is faced —
according to her — with a "faceless
opponent who is everywhere and
nowhere," manifesting itself in the
rise of Muslim Fundamentalism in
the       region       as "a
chameleon-enemy" whose intention
is "to conquer the world and convert it to Islam," Israel did the right
thing. In fact, this is what the
'Purveyor' of Democratic values in
North America and some of his
honourable Senators blatantly voiced when hearing of the attack.
It is opinions of Ms. Tessler's
kind, coming from the heart of the
U.S. Congress or from amongst
simple North American citizens,
and converted into sophisticated
weapons, satellite equipment, or
pro-Israel vetoes at the United Nations that have been fuelling Israel's
aggressive acts in the Middle East
and elsewhere (viz. Iraq, Kenya,
Lebanon, Tunisia . . .) Unless this
type of blind support of violence
stops, there is no hope that terrorism in the region will end.
One would ask, in answer to Ms.
Tessler's fear of Muslim Fundamentalism:  who are the people
Litters
True boycott
I feel I must respond to the
Perspectives article in the Oct. 4
Ubyssey. If Horacio's letter had
come from a member of the young
PC's I could believe it, but from a
fellow anarchist his comments are
quite surprising.
I am a member of Student's
Council who voted against the
amendment to ban the sale of South
African products. My reason for
this was simple. I did not fee that it
was right to make moral decisions
for the students of UBC.
I have too much respect for the
individuals who go to this university
to tell them, "It's immoral for you
to buy Carling's O'Keefe, so I
won't let you." Horacio seems to
have forgotten that a true boycott
should be 25,000 students all
deciding that they are not going to
buy these products, not 40 deciding
that 25,000 shouldn't be allowed to.
I think the majority of students
will stop using these products, but
I'm not going to put myself in the
god-like position of deciding people's morals for them.
Dave Kary
4th year astronomy/geophysics
member of student's council
who dogmatically apply an interpretation of the teachings of their
religion to oust other people from
their land and then follow them all
around the world massacring them?
Certainly not Muslims.
And contrary to what Ms. Tessler
claims, Islamic Fundamentalism
does not stem from a desire to colonize the world or convert it to
Islam. It has risen as a strong reaction against the West's continual
defiance of those peoples' rights to
exist, think, and rule themselves
differently and independent of any
foreign hegemony that had subdued
them for years on end. It is also a
radical attack on those national
liberal, secular and pseudo-
Westernized modes of political
reforms which had failed to get rid
of   a   state   of   post-colonial
dependency.
Although Ms. Tessler is right in
saying that Middle-Eastern politics
is a thorny issue, I don't think that
anybody — with a sound mind —
should under the banner of any
creed, support an act of violence on
anybody or any nation whatever the
reasons may be. It is ironical to see
that when Greenpeace Warrior was
bombed by the French Secret Service and a journalist died, North
American opinion was infuriated by
such an act of terrorism; whereas
when more than seventy people
were blasted to death by Israeli
planes under the eyes of U.S.
vigilant satellites, this same opinion
looked unquestioningly at the innocent victims as enemies and the aggressor as a 'legitimate defense'. Is
there any logical reasoning in such
opinion, unless it is goaded by a
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PROFESSOR
SHLOMO HASSON
"Jerusalem: A
Unity of Opposites"
Thursday
Oct. 10, 12:30 p.m.
Hillel House
Behind Brock Hall, UBC
Info: 224-2512
prejudiced view against Muslims
and Arabs alike, or by a naive
understanding of international
politics.
Once again, the U.S. support for
the raid on Tunis has shown to the
world to what extent the full intimacy between Israel's existence
and U.S. foreign policy is strong in
the region. And in no way should
the TWA and the Iranian crises
obscure the issue.
If Ms. Tessler is interested in
origins, she should revise her
history books to see how a nascent
U.S. superpower replaced a dying
British colonialism in that part of
the world early this century. The
Middle East and the Arab World in
general have been since the 18th
century, the centre of international
politics and the object of a desire
for appropriation by the West. And
Zionism as a pro-American expansionist philosophy is part of that
scheme. To stop the tragic events of
the Middle East, the North
American peoples must reconsider
what their governments have been
doing abroad and try to understand
that other nations also would love
to live in peace. No Muslim or Arab
has any desire to die for the fun of
it.
Everybody now is becoming
aware of the fact that the Palestinians have paid dearly, unfortunately, for the Auschwitz horrors; something they had nothing to
do with. The Sabra and Chat ilia
tragedy, the Beirut demolition by
Israeli planes, and the confiscation
of Arab lands to leave room for
new Zionist settlements are all still
fresh in our memory (See Mc Bride
et al., Report of the International
Commission . . ., London, Ithaca
Press, 1983).
Let us all hope that sometime in
the near future, democratic ideals
which are highly cherished by Canadian, American, erstwhile colonized
peoples and others alike, will bring
us to abandon the law of the jungle
and open up a peaceful dialogue in
order to come up with a better idea
to stop the current Palestinian
holocaust instead of flagrantly supporting of state terrorism.
Mohammed Ls a graduate student
who is interested in issues of the
middle east.
"THERE'S NEVER BEEN A COMEDY
QUITE LIKE AFTER HOURS/ A RACY,
RAUCOUS RIDE THROUGH THE NIGHT
BOUND TO LEAVE AUDIENCES
REELING WITH LAUGHTER."
-■PEOPLE MAGA/INE  Pelef ifavers
"What a pleasure it is to watch Scorsese cook. He is masterful. His
images sparkle; his love of moviemaking reveals itself in every
dazzling cut and close-up. The cast is a cream."
NEWSWFE*   Dav.d Anse^
After Hours' is the year's best shaggy dog story. 3 delirious and
challenging comedy. Highly enjoyable!"
I^E MA(\A.'iN!   :;
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The film is definitely an original, unlike any of Scorsese's films,
or for that matter, unlike any film."
^ANNt1' Nt^     t .
THE GEFFEN COMPANY PRESENTS A DOUBLE PLAY PRODUCTION
AFTER HOURS • ROSANNA ARQUETTE • VERNA BLOOM • THOMAS CH0NG
GRIFFIN DUNNE • LINDA FI0RENTIN0 • TERI GARR • JOHN HEARD
RICHARD CHEECH MARIN • CATHERINE 0'HARA
PRODUCTION DESIGNER JEFFREY TOWNSEND
MUSIC BY HOWARD SHORE • EDITED BY THELMA SCH00NMAKER
DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY MICHAEL BALLHAUS
WRITTEN BY JOSEPH MINION • PRODUCED BY AMY ROBINSON,
GRIFFIN DUNNE AND ROBERT F C0LESBERRY
DIRECTED BY MARTIN SCORSESE Q)'
AGEFFEM COMFWSJY RELEASE
Opens Friday, October 11th
At A Theatre Near You Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 8, 1985
W4&ti
TODAY
UBYSSEY SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM
CUP 48 committee meeting, 7 p.m., 106—1169
Pacific St.
ANARCHIST CLUB
Meeting, bring your ideas, noon, SUB 224.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Sign-up for tap workshops on weekend, free to
members,  $5 for non-members,  all day,  SUB
206.
EAST INDIAN STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Executive meeting, noon, E.I.S.A. office.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Co-op supper, 6 p.m., Lutheran Campus centre.
UNDERWATER HOCKEY
Practice,   everyone   welcome,   7   p.m.,   UBC
Aquatic Centre.
"IL CAFFE" ITALIAN STUDENTS CLUB
Lunchtime conversation and chance to meet
people, noon, BUCH D121.
SCIENCE FICTION SOCIETY
Election  nomination for treasurer and general
meeting for new members, noon, SUB 249A.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Practice time, noon, SUB party room.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION
Weekly testimony meeting, noon, SUB 215.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Discussion, noon. Brock 304.
UBC MEN'S SOCCER
Diachem Bowl, UBC vs SFU, 7 p.m., Thunderbird Stadium.
GRADUATE STUDENT SOCIETY
Self-defence lessons,  5:45 p.m.,   Grad  centre
cafeteria.
WEDNESDAY
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Gallery night and nominations are now open for
services   committee   chair,   4:30   p.m,   Gallery
Lounge.
UBYSSEY SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM
Staff meeting, noon SUB 241k.
WOMEN STUDENTS' OFFICE
"Preparation for Mid-terms: Time Saving Tips"
— discussion for women, noon, Brock 223.
HILLEL
Dinner,  5:30 p.m.,   Hillel  House behind Brock
Hall.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Sign-up for workshop on door, all day, SUB 208.
POLITICAL SCIENCE STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
General meeting, noon, BUCH B323.
FOURTH YEAR ZOOLOGY STUDENTS
Bake sale,  10:30 a.m. to 1  p.m., Woodward main
concourse.
PHILOSOPHY STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Discussion evening, "what is social justice?" 7
p.m., upstairs lounge, International House.
UBC RUGBY
Match   vs    Capilanos,    7   p.m.,   Thunderbird
Stadium.
THURSDAY
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Emma Kivisltd speaks on lesbians at the Nairobi
conference, noon, SUB 215.
LATIN AMERICAN SOLIDARITY COMMITTEE
General meeting, noon, SUB 212A.
HILLEL
Torah study, 11:30 a.m., Hillel House.
MARXIST LENINIST STUDY GROUP
Defence of natural/social sciences vs religious
mystification, noon, BUCH B223.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Thursday nooners, noon, Lutheran campus centre.
MAIN LIBRARY
Tour, noon, meet at Main Library entrance hall.
TEACHING ASSISTANTS UNION
Professor Steve Foster speaks on how to get the
most out of lectures and discussion groups.
1-2:15 p.m.. Graduate Centre, 2nd floor lounge.
CHINESE STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Chinese painting class, 4:30 p.m., Asian centre
room 604.
The First Year Students Committee is an AMS Service Organization
composed of all students attending
UBC in their first year. This twelve
member committee (elected by first
year students) organizes events
specifically for first-year students,
such as dances and the New
Students Retreat.
Anyone interested in joining is
asked to come to an informational
meeting on Tuesday, October 15,
1985, at 12:30 p.m. in SUB Room
206 (Council Chambers). If you like
being involved, meeting a variety of
people, and having a good time,
this is the committee to join.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Sign up for tap workshop, aJI day, SUB 208.
PRE-DENTAL SOCIETY
Chalk carving, noon, IRC 5.
NETWORK
"Jerusalem, a unity of opposites," noon, Hillel
House.
EAST INDIAN STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
General meeting, noon, SUB 125.
ISMAILI STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Badminton night, 4:30 p.m., Osbourne Gym.
STAMNTISCH
German language meeting, 7:30 p.m.. International House upper lounge.
ENTREPRENEURS CLUB
Wine and cheese party, 3 p.m., SUB 207/209.
CHRISTIANS ON CAMPUS
Jubilee meeting, noon, Henry Angus 328.
CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR CHRIST
Meeting,   topic:   dynamic   Christianity,   noon.
Brock 302.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Bible study, 7 p.m., 1868 Knox Road.
ENTREPRENEURS CLU8
Guest speaker: George Meon from Sandwich
Tree, noon, Henry Angus 226.
INTERVARSITY CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Miniseries on the book of the Romans, noon,
CHEM 250.
FRIDAY
UBC STUDENTS FOR A FREE
SOUTHERN AFRICA
Vigil at north end of SUB to protest apartheid, all
welcome, noon, outside the Bank of Montreal.
LATIN AMERICAN SOLIDARITY COMMITTEE
AND THE LAW STUDENTS UNION
Talk by Carmen Camet (Guatemalan specialist on
human rights and international law) on Human
Rights, Upcoming elections in Guatemala,
noon, SUB 215.
STUDENTS FOR PEACE AND MUTUAL
DISARMAMENT
Owen Wilkes and Roman Beder: What Is Going
On in the Pacific?, noon, SUB 205.
CHINESE STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Squash racquetball night, free for members only,
7:45 p.m., Thunderbird winter sports centre.
UBC MEN'S SOCCER
UBC vs Alberta, 2 p.m., O. J. Todd field.
CHINESE STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Ball hockey night, 8 p.m., Osborne Gym F.
Sura I know atomic war'* wrong/. But something attract* rrw to th* nuclear bomb. / I tova
th* power and the artcrgy/ That man«t«r cur* could nrt m« f ra*. / Cam* t wanna ride on an
ICBM/ I wanna tirJa on an ICBM/ Bringing joy from 0» to them/ I wanna ride on an tCBM.
Twruiib
♦
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CLASSIFIEDS Tuesday, October 8, 1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
Intramural Sports Report
3-on-3 BASKETBALL
Intense round robin schedules
Friday night saw twenty-two Div. I
and II teams vie for seededspots in
Saturday's playoff round of the annual 3-on-3 UBC basketball tournament.
A single elimination playoff draw
produced two championship games:
Div. 1 Psi upsilon came up against
the Dekes, and Div. II play resulted
in the Gage Terminators playing the
Betas. The stage was set for two
highly competitive championship
games, even though the guys were
feeling tinges of Basketball burnout
from the previous series of games.
The Div. I game had the Psi Upsilon team on top in convincing
style. Composed of Mike
Maselechko, Steve Pawlett and
Mike Potkins, Psi Upsilon defeated
the Dekes 5-3 and 8-6 in the best of
3 final. Mike Potkins, the decisive
shooter for Psi U, dominated the
key area, and Ian Covey shot well
from the outside for the Dekes.
The Gage Terminators — Doug
Whit ford,  Chris  Vandevelde  and
Ian Petterson proved too much for
the  Beta  team,  and  claimed  the
championship title in Div. II.
SOFTBALL
The   Super   Sports   softb.all
tournament, for a major success.
The Kappa Sigma team triumph—.
ed in the Men's division and
Team Moss captured the Co-Rec
crown.
In the Men's final, the Betas were
no match for the powerful Kappa
Sigs, losing the game 14-2. In the
battle for third, EUS 1 emerged victorious over their fellow geers Civil
3, 8-2, and EUS 2 squeaked by the
Arts-Bluejays 6-5 for fifth overall.
The Co-Rec division wnt down to
the wire with Team Moss, made up
of Totem Park grads, needing a
double play in the final inning to
clinch a 6-5 win over the Misfits.
The consolation final was even
closer with EUS Civils edging out
the Aggies 12-11 in an extra inning.
A total of 34 teams took part in
the two day tournament.
LOGAN CYCLE
On Thursday, September 26 at
the Harry Logan track, Mech II —
EUS cycled to victory by beating
the UBC Fire Department by a mere
2 seconds after 200 laps (50 miles)
around the track. Although windy,
the weather was on the cyclists' side
with excellent sunny conditions.
The top three teams: Mech II-
EUS, UBC Fire Department, and
UBC Cycling Club all struggled for
the lead in the final gruelling 5 laps.
Each team gained the front position
— and lost it again — realizing the
ATA GLANCE
GREEK TOGA TROT
Brian Kirkhope, VST
173.50
Women — 3 km.
Matthew Stern, Science
174.70
Carolyn Daubeny, P.E.
12:37
Greg Hank, Betas
175.40
Mae Jong, Education
13:45
Dave Robinson, Betas
175.40
Chris Bjornaal, Arts
13:47
Ryan Darby, Fiji
176.10
Sherry Wright, P.E.
14:00
David Little, Mech IV
182.00
Cathy Bryan, Science
14:35
Joanne Linburg, Alpha Delta Phi
14:45
Men — advanced
Kris Cholyk, Nursing
14:49
Seconds
Liza Grinder
14:54
Bruce Marshall, Science
157.50
C. Horner, Med
14:55
Alec Black, P.E.
158.20
Patti Friesen, Nursing
14:56
Kerry Scott, Kappa Sigma
162.30
Tom Gomez, Rehab. Med.
162.70
Men — 3 km.
Marshall Wilkinson, Science
165.50
Paul Rapp, Georox III
10:27
Anders Ourom, Staff
165.80
Paul von Donkelaar, Rowing
1Q:36
Stephen Chu, EUS
177.10
Jim Richardson, Georox IV
10:38
Paul Quinn, Betas
177.30
Chris Brown, Betas
10:47
John Suk, AMS Cycling Club
177.X
Stewart Bell, Rowing
10:56
John Dawson, St. Andrews
177.80
Steve Gustavson, Betas
11:31
Erik Madson, Deke
11:32
Women
DanleyChan, EUS
11:36
Whitney Steber, Arts
193.40
Geoff Huenemann, Sigma Chi
11:39
Lindsay Hall, P.E.
194.70
Kevin Rutherford, Comp. Sci.
11:45
Liz Robertson, EUS
196.70
Carolyn Daubeny, P.E.
199.80
Women — 5 km.
Sherry Wright, P.E.
200.40
Vanessa Adrian, Educ
17:57
Pamela Kerrin, Educ
18:09
CYCLE CRITERIUM
Sandi Herring, Educ
18:38
Men — 25 km.
W. von Dankelaar, Ski Team
18:40
Jan Palaty, Science
35:15
Marianne Morgan, Science
19:04
Brian Kirkhope, VST
35:19
Karen Warner, Nursing
19:05
Andrew McClelland, Science
35.20
Liz Robertson, EUS
19:16
John Dawson, St. Andrews
35:21
Winona Bishop, EUS
19:21
John Suk, AMS Cycling Club
35.22
Wendy Helliwell, Geography
20:22
Mark Hobday, Betas
35.23
Pat Good, Rowing
20:31
Erik Madsen, Dekes
35.24
Paul Quinn, Betas
35.25
Men — 5 km.
Dag Field, VST
35:26
J. Jackson, Pharmacy
14:27
Larry Nightingale, P.E.
14:31
Women — 25 km.
Seamus Parker, Mech II
14:44
Lindsay Hall, P.E.
40:06
Paul Quinn, Betas
14:49
Sherry Wright, P.E.
N/A
Paul Heintman, Regent College
15:00
Liz Robertson, EUS
N/A
Reidar Zapf-Gilje, EUS
15:16
Andy Zalkow, ZBT
15:18
Men — 40 km.
Andrew McClelland, Science
15:28
Alec Black, P.E.
58:27
Bob Perkins, Faculty
15:30
Tom Gomez, Rehab Med
58:28
Rob Hasegawa, Science
15:48
Marshall Wilkinson, Science
58:29
Brian Hammond, Phi Delt
58:30
EDGE OF THE RAINFOREST RUN
Ian Thordarson, Fiji
58:31
Men
John Lew, Biochem
58:32
Lindsay Eltis, Biochem
43:47
Anders Ourom, Staff
58:34
Paul Quinn, Betas
48:01
Peter Thrift, Dekes
58:35
C. Brown, Betas
48:55
Jamie Catheart, EUS
58:36
Paul Rapp, Georox III
49:35
John Crowley, Fiji
58:37
Nick Smith, Forestry
49:37
Bob Perkins, Faculty
49:51
Women — 40 km.
Andy Zalkow, ZBT
50:41
Alexi Jenkins, Arts
1:32:00
Reidar Zapf-Gilje, EUS
50:53
Rob Hasegawa, Science
51:32
SOFTBALL TOURNAMENT
Rauol Wiart, Forestry
51:58
Men
1. Kappa Sig (14-2 over Betas)
Women
2. Betas
Carolyn Daubeny, P.E.
59:04
3. EUS 1 (8-2 over Civil 3)
Karen Warner, Nursing
99:06
4. Civil 3
SueCauen, P.E.
65:24
5. EUS 2 (6-5 over Bluejays)
Sherry Wright, P.E.
66:47
6. Arts Bluejays
Jennifer Daubeny
67:56
7. Phi Delts/Fiji (tie)
Charlotte Rasmussen, Science
74:25
8. ZBT/EUS 'EEVForestry/    .
1. Spadinger
74:25
Met. Eng Grads (tie)
J.Wrinch, VST
81:38
Co-rec
CYCLE SPRINT
1. Moss (6-5 over Misfits)
Men — novice
2. Misfits
Seconds
3. Medicine/Rehab Med (tie)
Ralph Buchal, Mech
171.60
4. EUS EE/Commerce (tie)
Mark Hobday, Betas
171.70
5. EUS Civil (12-11 over Aggies)
Matthew Murnaghan, Mech
173.10
6. Aggies
Tom Szaver, Forestry
173.10
7.  Forestry/EUS EE 1 (tie)
high calibre race expected from the
results of the semi-final heats on
Saturday, September 21. The UBC
Fire Department led the race going
into the final lap, when Mech II
caught up and passed the Fire
Department with only half a lap to'
go. Mech II cycled hard to maintain
their lead and crossed the finish line
at 2:11:02, narrowly defeating the
Fire Department with a time of
2:11:04. UBC Cycling Club was
right behind them with a time of
2:11:06.
The Mech II members — Mike
Bigio, Errol Hula, Marcel Bittel,
Tony Wakelin and Doug Richardson — led the EUS to its second victory in the Logan Cycle "200".
Last year the EUS I team rode to
victory with a time of 2:07:06.
CYCLE CRITERIUM
47 cyclists warmed up for the Cycle Criterium on September 28, at
the roadways around Thunderbird
stadium. The still and sunny day
helped the cyclist to beat last year's
rain soaked times.
In the women's 25 km course,
Lindsay Hall (P.E.) crossed the line
at 40:06 shattering Janis Pursell's
(E.U.S.) time of 46:09 in 1984.
Alexis Jenkins completed the 40km
in 1:32:00.
In the 40 km men's race, the top
three finishers slashed more than
2.5 minutes from last year's winning time (1:00:59) posted by Tim
Rode. This high calibre race
brought the top ten cyclists in at one
second intervals with Tom Gomez
(Rehab) leading the pack with a
time of 58:27.
The competition was no less intense in the men's 25 km race as the
top nine cyclists all finished within
an exciting 10 seconds. Jan Palaty
(Science) took the top spot as he
crossed the finished line at 35:18, a
full 7 minutes faster than last year's
time of 42:21 set by Steve McMurdo.
TIRED of hamburgers and
hot dogs?
Why not try SAMOSAS!
A  tasty  new snack food,
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IN SUB LOWER LEVEL
Open daily 7:30 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
+VAffc. T>E£kaM
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Shampoo, Cut, Blowdry
10.95
('til Oct. 22/85)
3621 West Fourth Ave. 733-3831
FRANCIS FORD COPPOLA AND GEORGE LI CAS
A FILM BY PAUL SCHRADER
On November 25,1970, Japan's most celebrated
writer, Yukio Mishima, shocked the world.
a life in four chapters
A ZOETROPE STUDIOS/FILMLINK INTERNATIONAL/LUCASFILM LTD.
PRODUCTION "MISHIMA: A LIFE IN FOUR CHAPTERS'
K^.wF»d GEORGE LUCAS ™. FRANCIS COPPOLA s,.mn,KEN (KiATA • KENJI SAWADA
YASOSUKE BANDO-TOSHIYUKI NAGASHIMA p™*,*. .**,.„. EIKO ISHIOKA ^„. PHILIP GLASS
,M„.rw^, JOHN BAILEY »H„,„b, PAUL SCHRADER & LEONARD SCHRADER
p™w„. MATA YAMAMOTO .„■ TOM LUDDY i^b. PAUL SCHRADER
,|« jmiu IIH M* • USO IMS.
iW Jffit'it «l :.i«»
DISTRlBlTtDBl WARNER BROS. <*&
Opens Friday, October 11th at the Denman Place Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 8, 1985
Thunderbirds unbeaten streak continues
By STEVE NEUFELD
The streak continues. The UBC
soccer T-Birds remain unbeaten in
this season's Canada West league
play and goaltender Brian Kennedy
has stretched his consecutive
shutout string to four games. After
a weekend victory over the Saskatchewan Huskies and a tie against
the Alberta Golden Bears, UBC
currently finds itself in second place
in Canada West standings.
Inspired by four first half goals
coach Joe Johnson's crew
decimated the struggling Saskat-
chwan Huskies by a 5-0 margin in
Saskatoon. Two of the goals came
off penalty kicks awarded to UBC
after Kevin Riley and Mike Malana
were fouled in the penalty box.
Terry Klim and Alec Piercy scored
from the penalty marker while Sean
McLaughlin,   John   Gasparic  and
Riley added singles.
Saturday's match against the
league leading Alberta Golden
fiears was more evenly contested
with UBC failing to connect on
some golden opportunities.
During the first half Jonathan
Pirie blasted a shot past the goalie
only to hit the post while in the second half Kevin Riley had a clean
break on net but missed the scoring
Field hockey takes first
By BERYL TSANG
The UBC Thunderbird field
hockey team has done it again.
This past weekend in Calgary
they won their second consecutive
Canada West tournament against
some very tough competition in
Calgary and Victoria.
UBC won its first game Saturday
against the University of Alberta by
a 4-0 score, but the team did not
fare as well later when they dropped
a 1-0 decision to Victoria on a goal
in the last minute of play. Thunderbird coach Gail Wilson said the
game was indicative of the closely
matched competition that has
marked the Canada West this
season.
"The teams were fairly even with
each being quite good. The game
against Victoria could have gone
either way," she said.
The Thunderbirds rebounded the
next day with a 2-1 victory over the
Calgary Dinnies, a team which surged into contention this year in the
Canada West with the result that
one of the traditional leaders in the
league, either Victoria or UBC, may
not make the CIAU championships
at Toronto Nov. 1-3.
"This win was very important to
us," said Wilson. "It put us in first
place. If we had tied we would be in
second right now while a loss would
have put Calgary out of reach in
first place."
The win means that the Thunderbirds can rest up for the next week
and a half in first place in the
Canada West standings. But with
Calgary and Victoria nipping at
their heels, the third and final
Canada West tournament at UVIC
on October 18, 19 will be crucial for
the T-Birds playoff hopes. Only the
top two teams in the Canada West
make the playoffs so the race isn't
over yet.
Team     GP W L   T F    A Pts
U.B.C.     6 4 1    1 12   4    14
Calgary    6 3 12 8   6    12
Victoria    6 3 2    1 7   5    11
Alberta     6 0 6   0 4 16     0
opportunity when he unleashed a
kick directly into the waiting arms
of the goaltender. The game ended
a 0-0 tie with goalie Kennedy recording the shutout.
Unfortunately, Jonathan Pirie
and Gregor Young both sustained
injuries which may sideline them
for upcoming crucial games. Pirie
has a dislocated shoulder while
Young suffered a sprained ankle in
a collision with the Alberta net-
minder. The loss of both players
leaves Coach Johnson very concerned about the team's prospects
in this weekend's games.
Tonight, however, the Thunderbirds will meet the SFU Clansmen
in a soccer version of the Shrum
Bowl. Game time is 7 p.m. at
Thunderbird Stadium and should
feature some excellent soccer plus a
chance for UBC students to cheer
on the Thunderbirds and win some
cash as well. A $100 cash prize will
go to the student group cheering the
hardest for the T-Birds while a $150
prize will go to the Undergraduate
Society supporting UBC against the
Clansmen. No one group of people
can win both prizes.
Canada West soccer action continues this weekend as UBC hosts
Alberta on Friday, October 11th at
2 p.m. and Saskatchewan on Saturday, at 2 p.m. Both games will be
played on O. J. Todd field out by
the traffic and security office.
Team GP G W   L   F A Pts
Victoria 5    3    0   2 12   6   8
Alberta 5    3   0    18   3   8
U.B.C. 5    2   2    1  12   8    5
Calgary 5   2   2    1 12   8   5
Lethbridge 5 1 4 0 6 19 2
Saskatchewan 5    0   5    0   2 15    0
Golden  bears tarnished
By RICHARD BROWER
Saturday evening at Thunderbird
Stadium the UBC Thunderbirds
came up with a solid football performance to down the nationally
ranked Alberta Golden Bears 24-2.
The victory puts the T-Birds
WIFL season record at an even two
wins and two losses and moves
them into a three way tie for second
with the Golden Bears and the
Manitoba Bisons who won over
Saskatchewan 37-24.
Early in the-game, Alberta was
moving the ball well but had their
drives stalled in UBC territory and
could only come away with two
singles on wide field goals. That was
all they would score as the Thunderbird   defence   retained   control
thereafter.
Late in the second quarter UBC
also missed two field goals for
singles and the half ended with a
dreary 2-2 score.
The second half had more action
and it was all the Thunderbirds
who came up with three
touchdowns and a punted single.
Offensive star of the game, Terry
Cochrane, ran in the first
touchdown from the 1 yard line at
12:13 of the third quarter.
The other two touchdowns provided exciting plays with defensive
star Mark Norman intercepting a
sideline pass and returning it 36
yards, and Matt Pearce returning a
punt untouched from his own 44
yard line with just 44 seconds left.
ADJUSTABLE
TRIPOD
LAMP
The Thunderbirds now have a
good chance at making the playoffs
with the WIFL showing parity this
year. Next Saturday the team plays
in Saskatchewan against the
Huskies whom they defeated 20-3 in
the season opener.
Team     GP W L T   F A Pts
Calgary  4 3 1 0 125 99   6
U.B.C.   4 2 2 0    81 55    4
Man.      4 2 2 0 109 97   4.
Alberta   4 2 2 0   63 92   4
Sask.       4 1 3 0   77 112    2
STUDYING LATE?
CANT SLEEP?
—Swim in 3 million litres of KUO
— Relax in the whirlpool
— Enjoy a co-ed steam £r sauna
Low Lights —Good Tunes —Adult Only (18 &■ Up)
TUESDAY-THURSDAY
10 p.m.-12:25 a.m.
SATURDAY
10:15 p.m.-12:25 a.m.
ONLY $1.25 WITH YOUR AMS CARD
A GREAT WAY TO BEGIN OR
END YOUR DAY
UBC   AQUATIC CENTRE
2075 WESBROOK MALL
228-4521-24 Hr. Pool Info.
228-4522—Lesson & Admin. Info.
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EVERYTHING YOU NEED FOR:
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Located in War Memorial Gym, Cage, Downstairs
Phone 228-3515 or 228-3996
Open Mon., Wed., Fri. 1:00-2:00 p.m.

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