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The Ubyssey Sep 15, 1964

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Array SPECIAL FROSH  EDITION
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER  15,  1964
CA 4-3916
French universities quit
RESIDENCE BEDROOM awaits paint . . . while students just wait
Bursar lays delay blame
on housing administration
University bursar William
White has blamed the housing
administration for failing to
somplete the new Totem residences. The delay forced 400
students into makeshift housing.
"Any prudent administration
would have allowed a reasonable margin for delay," White
said in an interview.
He said the housing administration estimated completion of the project too closely.
Two of the four residence
units, scheduled for completion
Sept. 1 are still under construction.
•   •   •
"This project was too tight
in terms of timing from the
first," he said. "This is proved
by the inclusion of a penalty
clause in the contract."
(The builders, Bennett and
White Construction Co., must
pay $1,500 for each day's delay.)
White said the construction
of student residences should
not be considered just another
building project.
"The students' welfare is at
stake," he said. "We are most
concerned about this."
John Haar, head of housing
administration, said yesterday
the residences would be ready
some time in October.
"We will be meeting with
the contractors Tuesday to dis
cuss the completion date," he
said.
Haar said delay was caused
by poor weather and lack of
skilled tradesmen.
•    •    •
Most of the students who
had been assigned accommodation in the unfinished Totem
residences were provided for,
Haar said.
Some are staying with relatives. Others have been given
accommodation   in   the   other
residences where the original
students have cancelled.
Most of the 200 male students involved -will be housed
in the Youth Training Centre
huts and the majority of the
200 women will be accomodated in private homes.
• • •
These students will receive
an adjustment in their housing
fees, Haar said. The amount of
the adjustment has not yet
been set.
Trench-English
interests differ
By MIKE HORSEY
Ubyssey Editor-in-chief
TORONTO—Two Quebec universities have pulled out of
the Canadian Union of Students and a third is threatening
to quit.
The universities of Montreal
and Sherbrooke pulled out on
the second day of the 28th
Congress meeting here at York
University.
Laval University will present a motion later today calling for the dissolution of CUS.
It also will withdraw if the
Congress does not pass the motion, and observers feel the
Congress will not. The 36-year-
old national student organization could be left with 41 members.
The Laval motion will ask
that the other universities in
Canada recognize formation of
a proposed Quebec Union of
students, (UGEQ) and that
other similar unions be formed
In the rest of Canada. A bureau of Canadian affairs is suggested as a body to coordinate
action between the unions.
Spokesmen for the Universities of Montreal and Sherbrooke told the Congress the
present form of CUS does not
meet the needs of French Canada.
Montreal's Robert Panet-
Raymond said his university's
decision was final and unchangeable. Both Panet-Ray-
mond and his counterpart from
Sherbrooke, Pierre Hogue,
stressed the decision to leave
was not motivated by separatism.
Panet-Raymond said the
withdrawals would allow both
English , and Trench-speaking
students to pursue their separate interests' without he formality of rigid structuration.
(Continued  on   Page   5)
SEE:  FRENCH
MALCOLM   SCOTT
. . . former president
Fat Scott
acclaimed
CUS vice
TORONTO — Former UBC
student president, Malcolm
Scott, was acclaimed vice-president of the Canadian Union of
Students Monday night.
The 26-year-old Scott takes
office following the conclusion
of the 28th congress here at
York University and will serve
under president Jean Bazin.
Scott, president of UBC's
council last year, and treasurer
for two previous years, will sit
an the board of directors and be
concerned with CUS finances.
Jump from one
to  the  other
Fall rains bring two pool types
By AL DONALD
Sometimes it rains at UBC.
And a good way to avoid
standing in a pool of water
waiting for the bus is to jump
into another pool, namely a
car pool.
There are two types of car
pools.
•    •    •
The first is the type organized by a car driver who
undertakes to transport students out to campus in his
car for a set price per trip.
The prices depend on the
car owner, the car, and the
number of people in the car.
If you are a comely young
freshette and you are riding in
a Volkswagen with five engineers, don't expect to be
asked to pay anything. Heh-
heh.
But for the average Joe
Student riding out in a beat-
up Morris Minor, the prices
run about twenty cents for a
return trip.
The cost if you go on the
bus is forty cents, so it's best
to avoid Shrum's Shuttle
Service.
More appealing to the Trot-
skyite element is the sharing
system of car pooling.
Here all the riders own a
car and they take turns driving their own.
So   let's   assume  you  have
chosen your car pool and met
your travelling companions
for the rest of the year.
Every car pool has at least
one lousy driver. After three
or four days of observing the
wild life in the ditches along
Marine Drive and driving
into the back bumpers of the
cars in front of him, the
driver will announce, "I
think I found a quick way in
—a New Route."
•   •    •
And despite protests from
the others he will lead you all
the way around Vancouver
making you half an hour late
for your morning lecture.
A successful carpool should
also include a Goldwater supporter and the secretary of
the campus Communist club.
They will provide hours of
stimulating conversation
while you wait in the traffic
jams.
•    •    •
To get into — or out of — a
carpool, you can either put a
sign around your neck, or
you can advertise in the
Ubyssey's  classified   section:
Rates are three lines for
one day, 75 cents; three days,
$2; ten days, $6.
See the friendly cashier in
the Alma Mater Society office
in Brock.
Everybody into the pool. *age 2
tHE .    UB.YSSEY
Tuesdoy, September  15,. 1964
Campus squeeze
Where will all the cars go?
By MIKE VAUX
Now read  this .  . .
If you don't three things can
happtn to you.
You can have your car towed
away by the nasty men in the
white suits from the towing
company.
You can get a traffic ticket
from the nasty man in the
brown suit of Sir Ouvry's
army.
Or, if you're lucky, you'll
:;ct away with parking your
car   illegally.
But, as any upper classman
can tell you, the chances of
ihe latter happening are
pretty damned remote.
The reason is that hordes of
Sir Ouvry's brown shirts are
swarming all over campus
looking  for   unwary  Frosh   to
ticket.
"We want to stress the fact
that cars which are parked in
such a way as to obstruct traffic will have to be ticketed and
towed away," said Sir Ouvry
Roberts, UBC's traffic czar.
But, he said, unregistered
cars parked in student lots will
not be  ticketed this week.
"We won't do anything to
these cars until registration is
over," he said.
"By then all cars had better
have stickers," he added ominously.
For the benefit of the un-
baptized you can get a sticker
by filling out a card in the
traffic booth in the Armory,
then taking it to A-lot with
your car.
This, plus $5, will give you
the privilege of stumbling
about a mile to class through
parking lots that are alterna-
ttively mud-holes and rockpits.
The other alternative is to
forget about the sticker, and
pay huge sums of money every
time an eagle-eyed brown shirt
spots your car on campus.
If you do that, not even a
government loan will bail you
out.
Parking poses a real problem at UBC.
"When you have 15,000 students, all trying to get on
campus at peak periods you
are bound to have traffic
jams," said Sir Ouv.
"If we had no regulations.
UBC would be just a big traffic tangle with no rhyme or
reason."
Hazing fades
Lucky little drips!
No more dunking
You escaped, finks.
Frosh hazing was to return
to camus this fall after a four-
year absence.
"We're hoping for an official
return of  hazing,"  last year's
Frosh   president   Jason   Leask
said late in August.
DUNKING
(Hazing Frosh consisted of
dunking them in the lily pond,
ind other such indignities. Hazing was banned from the campus after a series of injuries
to participants.)
But last Saturday, Leask announced this year's Frosh
would also forego the pleasure.
He said the hazing program
didn't get organized due to lack
of interest.
"People have other things to
do in the summertime," he
said.
In August, Leask said Engineering undergraduate society president Steve Whitelaw
supported the idea of holding
hazing in the first week of
registration.
EAGER
"There were a lot of our fellows eager to take part in such
an event," Leask said, "and I
know Engineers enjoy that
sort of thing."
Leask looked back on a year
spent in perhaps the most
thankless position in student
government.
The Frosh year began badly
when the now-defunct Undergraduate Societies Committee
disclaimed responsibility for
the Frosh elections, resulting
in a half-organized, little publicized campaign.
Four hundred of the 3,000
Frosh voted.
Later in the year, a conflict
of dates with the Engineers resulted in the cancellation of
the Frosh dance.
And a conflict with the editor   of   the   Frosh   newsletter
earlier almost led to the cancellation of that.
ALL HIS TRIALS
Despite the trials Leask said
he enjoyed his year as Frosh
President.
"There's a lot of personal
satisfaction in the job," he said.
"You meet a lot of people and
learn a great deal about student government."
Leask told The Ubyssey how
he obtained the position, for
the guidance for any other
would-be Frosh leader:
"I decided to attend Frosh
retreat," he said.
"Frosh Retreat is for people
who want to become active in
student government," he said.
"Student government officials
are there, and they encourage
people to run.
"Speak at the big lectures
for best results," Leask said.
Candidates must make a
speech at the infamous all-
candidates meeting, where
more Engineers than Frosh
usually attend.
All Former
English 100
Students
Read This!
If you obtained a first
class in English 100 last year
and ifVour notes are legible
and reasonably well organized, you should get in touch
with us immediately by
phoning 738-6375 or 733-
3614 (evenings).
Several sets of notes are
wanted. Your prompt action upon reading this ad
may very well result in
hard cash in your pocket.
THE COLLEGE SHOP
A Bargain
That You Can't Afford
To Miss
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Raglan Long Sleeved Sweat Shirts        3.25 Faculty Sweaters	
U.B.C. Orion Sweaters   - -  11.50
Plus Many, Many Items Chosen To Appeal To Your Taste And Your Pocket Book.
also
* Introducing The Entirely New U.B.C. All-Occasion Sweater... only $19.95
THE COLLEGE SHOP GET ACQUAINTED CONTEST
—Merely fill in the Entry Blank and    Deposit it in the Entry Box
in the College Shop.
* First Prize  510 Script
Second Prize   $ 5 Script
^f Prizes Doubled if you have Purchased
a U.B.C. All-Occasion Sweater
CONTEST CLOSES SEPTEMBER 30TH
r
NAME
ADDRESS
PHONE NO    REGISTRATION NO.
THE COLLEGE SHOP, BROCK EXTENSION'-
Open All Day Throughout The Week Of Registration
Faculty and  Year 'Tuesday, September 15;'T964
THE      UBYSSfcY
Page 3
REPORTER DANNY STOFFMAN works on typical Ubyssey
assignment. Danny insisted we mention that interviewee
is Ricki Covette, world's tallest stripper, and that she is
six feet eight inches tall.
Stop by as you
stumble through
That $3 million rainbow
ends in the deans office
Borrowed rooms house
new dentistry faculty
With eight students working in borrowed classrooms,
UBC's long-awaited school of dentistry has begun.
By 1966 there will be 40 students in a new $4 million
building, and the school will be well on the way toward
easing the delays which now accompany the sheer weight
of patients' numbers compared to dentists' in B.C.
Under UBC's President John B. Macdonald, a dentist
himself, and the new dean of dentistry Dr. S. Wah Leung,
the school promises to correct the present status quo in a
vital and long neglected field.
Gay  socialites  yield
to sober social workers
Gay balls and teas will give
way to balding professors and
books when the school of social
work moves into a former Vancouver society centre in September.
The $500,000 F. Ronald Graham mansion at 6101 Marine
Drive was willed to UBC by
Graham, who died April 1963
at 78. President John Macdonald announced in June the
school of social work will occupy the home until their permanent building is finished in
the 1968-69 term.
The mansion contains huge
entertaining rooms and a large
swimming pool.
Many benefit parties were
held there. It was said guests
arriving for one party would
sometimes meet guests departing from a previous affair.
"There were some great
times there over the years,"
reminisced Professor William
Dixon, head of social work.
"But a lot of money was
raised for very worthy causes,"
he said.
"It is our wish members of
the Graham family will regard
the occupancy of their former
home by the school of social
work as an extension of their
(the Graham's) long-standing
interest in serving the community."
The building will foe used
with little interior alterations,
but the bars and pool will be
kept dry.
By TOM WAYMAN
Ubyssey  Friendly   City   Editor
Welcome, tourists.
For the next few years
you're a transient in a town
of learning—here for eight
months, absent for four.
And what you do in these
years will mould your mind
and shape your destiny.
Wow.
That's pretty high-power
stuff.
But it's all a sneaky way to
get you to consider, seriously,
the rag you're now reading.
This thing you're reading is
The Ubyssey, the student
newspaper at the University
of British  Columbia.
And it's put out entirely by
students who are just like
you'll soon be, people who are
spending these few years
moulding their mind and
shaping  their   destiny.
Only our mind-mould and
misshapen destiny has warped
our brain and bent our paths
a certain way.
Toward journalism.
But not just any old journalism. The Ubyssey is Canada's
best college paper—winner of
Southam Trophy for three
years (general excellence), the
Bracken Trophy for two years
(editorials), plus news photography awards.
This product of North Brock
Grads answer
call of wild
Five UBC graduates left
Vancouver Saturday for two
years of volunteer service in
India  and   Sarawak.
Veronica Hatch, Ronald
Hatch, Peter Whaites, Barbara Geddes and Jim Ward
are part of the group of 29
Canadian university graduate volunteers bound for
Canadian University Service
Overseas assignments as
teachers, agriculturalists
and nurses.
Three million dollars is
available to B.C. students this
year in the form of Federal
interest free loans.
The loans, which may be obtained in amounts up to $1,000,
may be borrowed by full time
students resident in B.C.
Students may borrow up to
$5,000 over a period of five
years under the loan plan, and
they do not have to begin to
pay back until six months after
graduation.
At that time the loans cease
to be interest free and begin
to accumulate five and three-
quarter percent interest per
annum.
Dean Walter Gage, the
chairman of UBC's Student
Aid Loan Fund, said before
last Saturday he had approved
more than 1,000 loans.
He said the loans ranged in
value from $100 to $1,000, but
he had not had time to add up
the total amount loaned.
"I haven't any idea what the
average amount would be," he
said.
The $3 million must be
shared between UBC, the University of Victoria, Notre
Dame University, the B.C.
the School of Art at the Vancouver Vocational Institute.
Dean Gage said he did not
know how many students
would apply for loans.
"This is the first year, and
we don't know what to expect," he said.
Application forms and information about the loans can be
obtained from Dean Gage's
Office in the Buchanan Building.
Quake fund
BREMERTON, Wash. (CUP)
The Olympic College activities council has voted to start
a campaign to raise $300 to aid
schools in Alaska damaged by
last   year's  earthquake.
basement has hatched such
news greats as Pierre Burton,
Eric Nicol, Himie Koshevoy
and Jack Wasserman . . . the
list is endless.
But so  is the  work.
Down here we sweat three
times a week, on Mondays,
Wednesdays and Thursdays In
order to publish a paper on
Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays.
In addition to news reporters, we are photographers,
sports reporters, senior editors, proofreaders, party-goers,
and so on.
Each year we need new
people to help fill the ranks
depleted by over-exertion,
graduation, or (gasp) rank
dropouts into The Big Time.
So if you have a yen to
learn to chew copy pencils,
and perpetuate the weekly
fraud, come down to North
Brock  basement and meet  us.
But don't put it off.
We can use you anytime, but
we have more time to train
you now, in September, before
our own respective little minds
boggle at the task of trying to
make news, report it, and pass.
Come  down,   come down to
(Continued on Page 7)
see:   UBYSSEY
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THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  September  15,  1964
THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C. Editorial opinions
expressed are those of the editor and not necessarily those of the AMS
or the University. Editorial office, CA 4-3916. Advertising office, CA 4-3242,
I.oc. 26. Member Canadian University Tress. Authorized as second-class
mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa, and for payment of postage
in cash.
Winner 1963-64 Canadian University Press trophies for
general excellence and editorial writing.
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER  15,  1964
Finding a spot
The Freshman at UBC must remember that every
facet of life here has been designed with him in mind.
His first encounter with the careful planning comes
when he attempts to get into a parking lot with about
7,000 other students at the same time.
The educational process is continued, with a handy-
dandy course on survival thrown in, as the student walks
from the back of the parking lot to a classroom more
than a mile away. In Vancouver, it rains, so the students
can take advantage of the careful non-placements of
sidewalks and covered walkways.
And, if you start feeling the careful planning is
not working to your advantage, you may just have a
chance to survive. For nearly half the first year class
traditionally flunks and there is no reason for you to
spoil the record.
You are starting the so-called "easy BA" program.
This snap course will eliminate you — or one out of
every two persons in your class—within two years.
No one really worries about you. The professors
cover ground which is elementary to them and subsequently boring.
The Administration finds your numbers so large
that it must pump you into huge classes.
The older students are not intellectually at ease
with you.
Your friendly professor won't re-read a chapter in
your text like Miss Tiddlycomb at old Hamstring High.
It all calls for a little independence — maturity if
you wish.
As the years go by, you learn to beat the parking
problem by suddenly becoming lame and getting a special medical permit to park closer to classes.
Or, you become a philosophy major and work out
a brilliant rationale which says your schedule would be
lacking without a daily walk from the parking lot. And
the professors start taking an interest in you, even
listening to your arguments.
The process, we believe, is called becoming an adult.
Good luck.
Now is the time
To Freshmen, just trying to learn about the vagaries that are UBC should be enough.
But on the front page of this edition, we talked
about 43 other universities in the Canadian Union of
Students.
■ , The French-Canadian students have withdrawn from
i the Association. Last year, at the 27th Congress in
i Edmonton, English Canada made sweeping concessions
1 in an effort to keep French Canadians in.
I Three  areas—'Education, Religion  and  Language—
\ had to be approved by majority votes of both English
and French, i.e., making seven French-Canadian universities equal to 35 English-Canadian universities.
Considering   education   is   an   important   national
; issue, it is not difficult to see why CUS was ineffective.
j The   English   Canadians   consider   financial   aid   to
• education both a federal and provincial responsibility.
: The French Canadians consider it solely a Provincial
: matter.
The former structure of CUS stymied positive action.
Now is the time for CUS to prove itself. It is clearly
free to put pressure on the federal government for
increased aid to education.
Now is the time for CUS to show that it can be
an effective force.
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Why put up with temporary accommodation? Follow easy directions and
set up do-it-yourself residence from your copy of The Ubyssey.
""^■'"^
ron quixote rides again
cherish those nice words
To all first year students at
UBC, we says Welcome.
Whoever you are, where-
ever  you're from:   Welcome.
Read those words again,
Friends, all four thousand and
umpteen of you. Read them.
Take them home with you.
Save them. Treasure them.
Those are likely the only
kind words you'll get for free
here.
From this point on, it's all
blood and money.
The blood will mix generously with sweat and tears
as you battle stiffer courses
and higher standards.
The money will disappear
in great gobs — fees are up,
food costs more, housing is
exorbitant and books are murder.
You see, friends, this voyage of higher education you
have for some reason embarked upon will not carry
you to the land of milk and
honey.
The ship leaks financially.
The crew manning it is
underpaid and overworked.
If you do make it to port,
you'll be dumped in an automated, overcrowded unhappy
Outside World in which your
education will entitle you to
little more than a fighting
chance.
Dismal as it sounds, that's
the story, Friends. But it's
not a Dante-type "Abandon
hope all ye who enter" story.
A forthcoming Look magazine article quotes a U.S. college director as saying,
"They (freshmen) are more
and more realistic. They
translate life into what's possible and see themselves as
fairly important in the
world."
We hope he's right and we
hope it applies to you,
Friends.
If you don't know now what
you're  up  against,  you  soon
will.
In the meantime. Welcome.
Editor: MIKE HORSEY
Editors
News Tim Padmore
City   Tom Wayman
Art Director    Don Hume
Managing     _  Janet Matheson
CUP Lorraine Shore
Sports     George Reamsbotlom
Magazine        Dave Ablett
Associate      Ron  Riler
Associate   Mike Hunter
Those who toiled while others oiled
were Carol Anne "Sure I'll go"
Baker; Al "I'm depressed" Birnie;
Al "I'm going to Europe" Donald;
Danny "I'm going, too" Stoffman;
Joan "Registration" Godsell; Janet
"I LIKE Talking" Currie; Norm "I'm
a photog too" Betts; George "I can't
keep away" Railton; Robbie "Way
Out" West; and Al "Charles Schultz"
Hunter. Extra appendages were Lady,
Lorraine's dog; Jeanne, Padmore's—
forget it, fiance; Lome "SFA" Mallin
how aggie vendors
corrupt your morals
If you are not old
enough to drink, you are
not old enough to look at
liquor ads either.
But you are allowed to
look at the cigarette machines on campus.
A policy statement
from the Board of Governors regarding liquor ads
in The Ubyssey states:
"Since a large percentage
of the student readers are
under twenty-one years
of age, there should be no
liquor advertising in The
Ubyssey."
But the cigarette machines on campus are
seen — and used — by
many students every day.
"Minors are forbidden
by law to operate this
vendor," says the machine. Tuesday,  September  15,  1964
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
Didn't need letters
Former newsman
new info head
A man who never attended
university has the job of selling
this one to the people of B.C.
But Ralph Daly, a 25-year
veteran newspaperman and
radio commentator, didn't need
letters after his name to convince the Board of Governors
he Was best man for the newly
created post of director of information services, a job he
started June 1.
• •    •
, "Anyway, maybe it gives me
a fresher eye to look at the
university," he said in an interview.
Daly, who will work out of
President John Macdonald's
office, started his journalism
career as a reporter with the
now-defunct News-Herald i n
1940. He went to the Vancouver Sun in 1950 as an editorial
writer.
He was one of Time magazine's first Canadian correspondents, and also worked
with a Vancouver radio station
on a news commentary program.
• •    •
Daly sees his Job as a news
bureau for the campus feeding
information about the university to television, radio stations, and newspapers.
"The best way to sell the
needs of the university is to
tell the public what UBC is
doing," he said.
While Daly's work will not
directly involve  fund  raising,
RALPH DALY
he will provide information on
finances.
Daly said he is happy with
the troika arrangement of the
joint building fund for UBC,
Simon Fraser Academy and
Victoria College.
"The average businessman is
convinced of the needs of the
universities, but he wouldn't
be impressed with a horse race
competition for funds," he said.
"We have to show the people
of B.C. that their prosperity
is affected by the university,
that there is a need for trained
people."
Daly stressed that his posi-
tionis not a policy-making post
and will not replace the present information service.
Profits from Bird Calls
more than chicken feed
Sales of Bird Calls, the student telephone directory,
will net the Alma Mater Society a $1,500 profit this year.
A. S. Vince, manager of publications for the AMS,
said the directory will increase its advertising space by
50 per cent and will increase its revenue from advertising
from $2,800 to $4,000 when it is published in October.
In addition to this, Bird Calls will be compiled by a
university computor.
In the past, the compilation of the directory was done
by hand, so this year Bird Calls will be out earlier than
ever—by the middle of October, Vince said.
Students will be able to buy a copy in advance during
registration week for 75 cents. Vince said only 5,000 copies
will be published and advised students to  order early.
". . . . I suppose that I first came to St. Anselm's because I was
looking for securiryl In one's first year, U.B.C. can be a strange and
lonely place. It wasn't security that I found though. I suppose you
could say that I was challenged. Naturally, one 'questions one's faith'
when one comes to University. But, in restrospect, most of the agnosticism and atheism that was paraded in "bull sessions" — and in
classes themselves — was based on sheer ignorance of what Christianity is  really saying  today ....
I can't say that my time at St. Anselm's made me a more convinced
or committed Christian, in the traditional sense. I still have lots of
doubts and questions about the relevance of Christianity today. But
you weren't afraid to admit that you had doubts and questions, too.
I liked that. I liked especially the atmosphere at St. Anselm's — the
impression that we weren't there to have all the answers given to us,
but that we had to work these  things through  for ourselves > . . .
It was, I guess, that honesty of approach that meant most to me.
My time in Vancouver would have been infinitely the poorer without
it ....  I will  always  be grateful  to St.  Anselm's .  . .  ."
ST. ANSELM'S ANGLICAN CHURCH
3A  mile  inside  gates on   University Boulevard
Sunday Services at 8 a.m., 11:00 a.m. and 7:30 p.m.
FRENCH
(Continued from Page 1)
He said the Quebec belief
that monetary aid to education is purely provincial as
opposed to English Canada's
"take-it-where-you-can-get-it attitude" was an example where
English and French' cannot
work together.
He also said the French are
opposed to the new federal
loan plan which sees students
get interest-free loans on up to
$1,000 a year for five years.
Panet-Raymond said it is
unconstitutional and an invasion of Quebec's affairs.
• *    •
"If we remain in CUS, our
position will be that of a suppressed minority that hinders
the majority wishes," he said.
At the 27th Congress in Edmonton last year, sweeping
concessions were made to the
French Canadians in an effort
to keep them in.
Roger McAfee, president of
the UBC student council, said
the new structure of the union
will give it greater powers
when trying to lobby for federal aid to education.
• •    •
"It is unfortunate," he added,
"we could not work together,
but the French found this impossible."
Other members of the UBC
delegation here include Gordon
Gaibraith, CUS chairman on
campus; Byron Hender and
Bob Cruise, AMS vice presidents; and Tim Legough.
The Congress will conclude
later today with the election
of a new president.
Students may share
shifty SFA professors
By  CAROL  ANNE  BAKER
Professors here may work shifts in 1965 if buildings at
Simon Fraser Academy are completed with the lack of
dispatch of UBC's new Totem residences.
should drop to around five per
If buildings at Simon Fraser
Academy aren't finished by
next fall, and many suspect
they won't be, SFA professors
and students will have to come
here, says UBC registrar John
Parnall.
"And things will be on a
shift basis," he said in an interview.
Parnall said that if the buildings are up and if SFA takes
the proposed 2,000 students
then UBC's enrolment will dip.
This fall will see about 3,000
new students on campus at
UBC, Parnall said. He expects
a total of 15,500 in all.
Uncertainty on the part of
the public about stiffer admission requirements may be responsible for a drop in the
number of new applications
this year, Parnall said.
"But maybe that isn't such
a bad thing,"  he said.
Parnall said the new admission requirements have also
caused a drop in the student
wastage or drop-out rate. He
said the UBC wastage rate has
dropped from 33 per cent to
25 per cent. Only 20 per cent
are lost through failures, he
said. The rest just drop out.
"When UBC reaches its
quota of 22,000 students in
about 10 years the failure rate
cent because of selected enrolment," Parnall said.
By then the undergraduate
enrolment will be held at about
17,000 and the graduate enrolment at about 5,000. UBC has
a grad studies enrolment of
more than 1,000 now.
"During the next ten years
some of UBC's work load wil'
be picked up by SFA, the Van
eouver technical institute. King
Edward and other universities
around the province," Parnall
said. This will mean more
diversification in education,
which is good, he said.
BREMMERTON, Wash.
(CUP) — Student apathy runs
high at Olympic College,
claims Ranger, the campus
newspaper.
ST. JAMES' CHURCH
Gore Ave. and Cordova St.
ANGLICAN EPISCOPAL
SUNDAYS
8:00 a.m. — Matin*
8:30 a.m. — Low  Man
9:30 g.m. — Family   Man
11:15 a.m. — High   Mau
7:30 p.m. — Solemn  Evensong
Daily  Mass — 7:15  a.m.
Confessions  —  Saturday 7-8  p.m. i
WELCOME
FROSH
From Your
UNIVERSITY BOOKSTORE
See Us For All Your Supplies
FOR MONTH OF  SEPTEMBER
Textbooks Located in the
FIELD HOUSE-Next to Brock Hall
Stationery and other Supplies
AT THE BOOK STORE Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September  15,   1964
News service
Our CUP
runneth
over
By LORRAINE  SHORE
Ubyssey   CUP   Editor
College newspap?r reporters
don't have tea parties despite
all those cups you see at the
beginning of stories.
That CUP really stands for
Canadian University Press, the
news service for English-speaking Canadian university papers.
But CUP isn't always everyone's cup of tea.
The press service, oldest student news service in the world,
was set up to provide news of
goings-on at university campuses all over the country.
However, the service is regularly victim to petty squabbles between the large and
small papers and East and
West. Each has a different
idea of what CUP should be.
Larger universities
For example, the larger universities, Toronto, McGill and
UBC, use the service to inform
students of major events on
other campuses and trends prevalent in the country.
Smaller colleges, with a lack
of happenings at their own
university, depend on CUP to
fill their newspapers — with
news,  features — anything.
Both French and English
newspapers were in CUP until
two years ago.
Then    the    French    college
papers broke away from CUP
to form the Presse   Etudiante
Nationale, or PEN.
Unique style
The French editors charged
they had a unique style that
could not be serviced by CUP.
Membership in CUP now
numbers 32, with the admission
of two new papers at the 1963
conference.
CUP is headed by a national
president, a college editor
elected to the national position
at the annual conference.
He works from the national
headquarters in Ottawa, receiving copies of all college papers
and compiling news releases to
send to member papers.
Each year at Christmas CUP
holds its annual conference,
discusses things and presents
awards, which The Ubyssey
wins.
Green and blue
to get together
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DAVID AXEN ... big grant
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pays off to grad
Graduate student, David
Axen, is one of ten Canadian
students to receive an $1,800
Shell Canada Fellowship this
year.
The fellowship is accompanied by an unrestricted grant-
in-aid to the university and
will be used to assist Axen's
research in nuclear physics.
Axen was born in Bracken-
dale and graduated from UBC
in Engineering Physics in 1960.
Rival forestry and agriculture students are going to have
to learn to live with one another by 1966.
That's the opening date of a
$3.4 million forestry-agriculture complex to be built at a
new main entrance to the university on an extension of Sixteenth.
The new buildings will relieve overcrowding in the present agriculture and forestry
buildings, said agriculture
dean, Blythe Eagles.
•    •    •
Equipped to serve 700 stu-
J dents, the complex will include
lecture rooms, laboratories,
and common rooms.
Dean of Agriculture, Blythe
Eagles, said that bringing the
two faculties together will be
a unique accomplishment.
"Collaborative work in the
future will bring results which
cannot now even be envisaged," he said.
The design of the complex is
based on 10 years of discussion
and planning by the faculties
of agriculture and forestry.
•    •    •
Neil Perry, university vice-
president, said that the overlapping of the two faculties
would bring about savings in
operating costs.
"The complex will serve
B.C.'s two great renewable resources whose combined production may surpass $1 billion
a year by the time the new
building opens," he said.
The old Agriculture building
will go to the Mathematics department, the present Forestry-
Geology building will be used
for geography, and 14 former
army huts will be demolished.
Papers gorged
SANTA BARBARA, Calif.
(CUP)—Nearly 4,000 copies of
the University of California
at Santa Barbara student newspaper, El Gaucho, were found
at the bottom of a 400-foot
gorge.
9 profs account
for Malaysians
Five UBC commerce professors went to Malaya last
April in the final part of a
five-year $500,000 aid program to two Malaysian universities.
Led by Prof. Leslie Wong,
director of the project since
it began in 1961, the team
established nine courses in
accounting and business administration at the University of Malaya, at Kuala
Lumpur, and University of
Singapore.
When the UBC team returns in August, 1965, it will
be replaced by nine Malaysians who will have completed post graduate work at
UBC under the Colom.. .
plan.
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TRAINING PLAN (ROTP)
The ROTP is a tri-service plan offering young Canadians the chance to
attain a university degree and a permanent commission in one of the
three services.
HERE ARE THE HIGHLIGHTS OF ROTP:
• available to male students in engineering, arts, science, and other
courses. • twenty evenings of training with the University Squadron
during the academic year with formal
or contact training at RCAF Units
during the summer. • tuition paid
plus $138 per month pay and allowances throughout the year. • a permanent commission in the RCAF
on graduation. • openings in aircrew and technical branches in the
RCAF.
UNIVERSITY RESERVE
TRAINING PLAN (URTP)
The purpose of URTP is to introduce
university undergraduates to service
life and provide branch training to
qualify them for commissioned rank
in the Regular Force or Reserves on
graduation.
HERE ARE THE HIGHLIGHTS OF URTPi
• combines military training with
academic studies. • available to first
or second year students in engineering, arts, science, medicine and other
courses. • some positions open to
women. • $235 per month plus food
and accommodation during the summer. • up to 16 days' pay during
the academic year. • valuable summer experience at Air Force establishments across Canada and in
Europe.
Get full details at once about these plans so that you can take advantage of this
opportunity now, while you are still attending University. For full information
on requirements, pay arid other benefits, SEE YOUR UNIVERSITY RESIDENT STAFF OFFICER (RCAF) LOCATED ON YOUR CAMPUS.
New Opportunities to Train and Serve in the RCAF
Contact Flight Lieutenant R. B. Robinson, University Armoury,
CA 4-1910
- £5 Sp  —
* __  _ Tuesday, September  15,  1964
TH_      UBYSSEY
Page 7
—don hume photo
SNAKING INTO ARMORY are first of  15,500 students to
register this week. The line-ups won't get any shorter.
Class came first
for dying prof
Law professor Malcolm Maclntyre promised he would
not let down his students, and he was true to his word.
Maclntyre, professor of torts
at UBC, had known he was
dying from cancer for several
months.
But he refused to give up
teaching: "The students are
depending on me," he said, "I
will not let them down."
Toward the end of his life he
found it very difficult to carry
on, but he was never known to
complain though he was often
in great pain.
Doctors had told him he
should give up his work but
he refused. They said if he
stopped it would extend his
life, but again he refused.
James Maclntyre, a lecturer
in law at UBC, said his father
had loved his classes too much
to give them up.
"His whole life revolved
around his work," Maclntyre
said.
"He could not have given up
even if he had wanted to. He
knew he was going to die, and
he wouldn't stop teaching just
to put it off."
James Maclntyre says he
will continue in his father's
footsteps.
"It's a good school here, and
there are memories," he said.
He said his father started
teaching at UBC in 1948 and
stayed there until he died this
April. He was 59.
Members of the law faculty
acquainted with Maclntyre expressed unqualified admiration
for him.
Typical comments were:
'A wonderful man, one of
the foremost authorities on
torts in the country."
"His courage was an inspiration to all he came in contact
with."
His students said:
"He did it, but it was really
pathetic to see him work his
life away for us, but somehow
he managed to finish the job
he started.
"Those of us that passed this
year owe a lot to Professor
Maclntyre."
But perhaps the tribute that
Professor Maclntyre would
have appreciated most came
from a fellow member of
UBC's law faculty, assistant
professor J. C. Smith: "He died
doing what he wanted to do,
but how he found the strength
I don't know—it was the most
absolute devotion I think I will
ever see."
UBYSSEY
(Continued from Page 3)
our ivory tower. Enter Brock's
north entrance, walk straight
ahead till you hit a notice
board, shuffle right till you
face another wall, fall left
down the stairs and roll
straight ahead at the bottom
through our door.
Stand up, stagger to the
counter, and ask to speak to
an editor.
And you're in.
Oh, one more thing.
Don't worry about spending
too much time on the paper.
Every body — proofreaders,
photographers, and reporters
—spends exactly the time they
feel they can. Even a couple
of hours in the long Thursday
lunch break is useful to you
and helpful to us.
PRESCRIPTION
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Shiny siren, too
Wheel a new
shambulance
The old traffic wagon changeth, yielding place to a new
one.
A nice shiny new one, designed to carry out the duties
of an ambulance, as well as a
patrol wagon.
It has a stretcher, red light
and siren, first aid kit, and
radio-telephone.
"It  has  everything  the   old
one    didn't    have    and    then
some," said traffic patrol head,
Cece Paul.
PLENTY  OF ROOM
"We have plenty of room in
the back for the stretcher, a
doctor and nurse in case anyone is injured, and a telephone
so the patrolmen can call for
help in an emergency."
He said the old shambulance
(a 1957 Chevrolet station wagon) did not have enough room
for a stretcher in the back, and
so was useless as an emergency
vehicle.
The university bought the
old ■wagon almost two years
ago after a series of accidents
where injured students had to
wait up to half an hour for a
city ambulance.
It was dubbed the shambulance because of its inadequate
size    and    limited    first    aid
equipment.
BROKE DOWN
The new one was purchased
in June after the shambulance
broke down.
For the first part of the sum
mer the new wagon also proudly displayed the UBC crest on
its doors, with the motto Tumm
Est painted on.
Only trouble is, UBC's motto
isn't Tumm Est, it's Tuum Est.
"The sign painter must have
goofed," said Paul, who had it
fixed after the mangled motto
appeared on the front page of
a summer edition of The Ubyssey.
Doctors getting
refresher course
UBC's Department of continuing Medical Education is
planning a refresher course
for 40 per cent of B.C.'s
2,200 doctors.
The course, entering its
fourth year of operation, is
province-wide.
Teams of two or three instructors will travel to hospitals and give 15 hours of
classes designed to bring the
doctors up to date on new
medical knowledge and techniques.
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HEALTH PLAN BENEFITS
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Until September 30, 1964, all students eligible for
care at the University Health Service may obtain the special
M-S-l plan which covers most kinds of medical and surgical care
not available on campus.'
This is the fifth year of this popular plan — and dues
for single students are $8.00.
A Family Plan is also available for $21.00 a year, to
provide a plan of medical care for spouses and children under
21 years.
THIS WILL COVER YOU FROM OCTOBER  1,   1964,
TO SEPTEMBER 30, 1965
Closing Date is September 30,1964
Apply at the Armouries during
Registration Week
Sponsored by the Board of Governors
and Your Student Council Page  8
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  September  15,   1964
Orientation kick-off
Balloon fullback
becomes a Frosh
A 25-foot rubber figure of Freddy Frosh will lead a procession through downtown Vancouver today to open the 1964
Frosh Orientation Program.
Cafeteria
beefs up
ham prices
By  LORNE  MALLIN
The UBC Food Services has
dune the university a disservice:  They've   hiked   the prices.
Ham sandwiches have
zoomed from 25c to 30c; egg
sandwiches, 15c to 20c; juice,
Re  to 10c.
And it seems that the cost
of living lias hit the price of
dishwasher for soup now costs
15c  1'rom  10c.
• •     •
At 2 p.m. Monday, this reporter had a sandwich in
Brock cafeteria consisting of a
slice of cheese as thick as blot-
paper: the sandwich was definitely of good English Bond.
Buying the sandwich at the
new price was painful, but not
as painful as eating it.
• *    *
A waitress must have noticed something odd when I
left the cafeteria doubled over
for when I returned an hour
later, the sandwiches in question were gone.
Nowhere in sight were the
dog's delight I had sampler1
before.
A few students near the
empty sandwich rack were
complaining.
Little did they know.
Ballot blues
SANTA BARBARA, Calif
(CUP)—Five Associated Women Student elections were
cancelled recently when returning officers at the University of California here
couldn't  find  enough   ballots.
The huge balloon, formerly
a B.C. Lions football player in
last year's Grey Cup parade,
will kick-off six weeks of frosh
events.
The actual orientation activities begin with four registration mixers to be held Sept. 16
to 19 in Brock Hall, International House, Buchanan Quad
and Lower Mall residences respectively.
CASUAL  DANCES
These casual dances give
Freshmen a chance to meet
upperclassmen in a social atmosphere.
Admission is 50 cents for
registered Frosh and 75 cents
for upperclassman.
One highlight of frosh orientation, as in years past, is the
Frosh Retreat held at the YMCA is Camp Elphinstone Sept.
25 to 27. Applications for the
Retreat are contained in the
big brown envelopes given to
Frosh at registration.
FROSH RETREAT
Interested Frosh should hand
in completed forms to the Alma
Mater Society office in Brock
Hall. The applications will
then be screened by the Retreat committee.
The main goal of the retreat
is to familiarize freshmen with
the AMS and other aspects of
student life. It also hopes to
encourage participation in student affairs.
The retreat is divided into
five topics of discussion organized under a central theme.
Student Government, Athletics, Clubs, Frosh Government
and Publication and Communications.
MAC THE MOUTH
Each subject will be discussed separately under the guidance of a keynote speaker who
will be drawn from that field.
At press time, only one
speaker Roger MacAfee, AMS
President, had definitely accepted an invitation to be a
keynote speaker at the Retreat.
For the first time in its history, the Retreat is this year
irganized under a central
theme:  The Value    of    Extra-
Married housing
problems probed
A questionnaire on accommodation problems of UBC's
married students will be distributed to all couples concerned
next week.
i The questionnaire is part of
a needs survey conducted by
the married students' housing
committee.
Compiled by an outside
agency, the questionnaire will
attempt to establish the demand for married student housing at UBC, what married students can afford to pay for
accommodation, and what they
require in housing.
FACTUAL
Committee chairman Clifford Millward said the results
would put needs of married
students on a completely factual, unbiased basis.
At   present,   some    married
students are occupying housing in Acadia meant for faculty. There is no provision made
in campus residences for married students.
Millward said results would
be tabulated by a computer.
An overall picture of the situation would be obtained by
mid-October.
14 PER CENT
Approximately 14 per cent
of UBC  students are married.
Millward said the housing
committee was not concerned
with couples who were not
married.
'"Finding accommodation is
their problem," he said.
Curricular Activities In a Scholastic World.
The Retreat will be climaxed
by a panel discussion on this
theme by several students and
Walter Young of the Economics
department and Dr. J. H. Divinsky of Mathematics.
About 150 frosh, professors
and upperclassmen attended
last year's Retreat.
Cost for the three-day event
is $6 per student.
Committee Chairman Gavin
Hume said the main problem
with the Retreat is that Frosh
is unaware this activity exists.
DAVID BROCK
"Many others are scared off
by the idea that only students
who have been high school
leaders are eligible. These
people are encouragd to come,
but applicants are not restricted to them."
Historic aspect of Frosh Orientation will be emphasized by
the Cairn Ceremony Sept. 30
at 8.30 p.m. The ceremony
will be preceded by a banquet
in Brock Hall at 6.30; guest
speaker will be David Brock.
Agriculture Dean B. A.
Eagles will be guest speaker at
the cairn ceremony which commemorates the founding of the
university at its present location.
CAIRN CEREMONY
After the ceremony, a procession headed by the color
party will lead the audience to
a reception in Brock.
Yet another high point of the
Frosh orientation program will
be the Queen's reception on
the afternoon of Oct. 3, to be
followed by the Frosh Reception Dance at 8.30 p.m. The
dance will feature top popular
entertainment and the crowning of the Frosh Queen.
On Oct. 31, the Orientation
Events will end with the Frosh
Symposium at Hycroft, open to
both upperclassmen and Freshmen.
Sexy czechs
perplex men
PRAGUE (CUP) — Czech
male college students charged
that co-eds are concerned
mostly with clothes and boyfriends.
The men said: "The girls just
memorize and reproduce the
lectures — they don't think
about its problems."
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9:30 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.    -    Saturday till noon
csa NEWS
The Graduate Student Association welcomes you to
U.B.C. 1964-65. This column will appear regularly in
the Ubyssey in order to keep all graduate students informed of the activities being planned by the G.S.A.
Committees. You are invited to spend a part of your
leisure time at the Thea Koerner House where you may
eat, drink, dance, read, watch TV, socialize, etc. (not
necessarily in that order).
Membership
All graduate students are automatically full active
members of the G.S.A. and of the Thea Koerner House.
Membership cards must be obtained at the House Office
after fees have been paid.
Social Evening
In conjunction with th International House Reception
Programme the G.S.A. has organized a social evening
for Overseas students and all graduate students on Friday, September 18, from 8 - 11:00 p.m. in the Lower
Lounge of the Thea Koerner House. There is no admission charge—just bring yourself.
Faculty-Student Cocktail  Party
Get to know your supervisor on a social basis. Invite
him out for cocktails on Friday, September 25 from
3:30 to 5:30. The event promises once again to be a
smashing success. Pick up your tickets at the House
Office beginning Wednesday, September 16. Tickets
will sell for $1.50 and admit one. Please note that in
the past this party has been oversubscribed. You are
urged to purchase your tickets early.
G.S.A. News Bulletin Boards
Information on parking areas for graduate students,
minutes of G.S.A. Executive meetings and special functions will be posted on the G.S.A. News bulletin boards
located in your department.
MAX DEXALL
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Here you will find a completely new stock of all
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well as hosiery, handbags, slippers, rubbers and umbrellas.
Whatever your need in footwear for Fall, you'll find
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Ckajckmk (ZctivitwA—
You are gazing, admiringly of course, at the
ORIGINAL "Academic Activities" column. We'll explain its purposes and functions in a moment. But
first, a word from our sponsor . . .
Any "university" worthy of the name must maintain meaningful student-faculty relationships. But UBC's
"population explosion" constitutes a factor which militates against such relationships.
The Academic Activities   Committee   was  formed
with the express purpose of combatting this problem. We
develop campus programmes of an intellectual nature in
order to initiate and sustain such "meetings of minds."
The AAC projects for the coming year include
several week-end  symposia,   seminars,   poetry   readings,   special   lectures,   discussions   on   international
affairs, and evening academic sessions.
The function of this column? Why, publicity, of
course!
All the above events will be publicized in this new
weekly column. Further, it will be available to any and
all organizations planning programmes of a similar stimulating nature. We hope to have this space become a
"bulletin board" of the week's academic projects, thus
serving both the publicity needs of worthwhile programmes and the information needs of the potential participants.
All this meaty fare will, we hope, be sprinkled
with occasional flashes of that rare commodity, editorial wit.
Any pertinent (and some impertinent) questions
can be answered by Mike Coleman, Academic Activities
Chairman and temporary editor, c/o AMS or Ubyssey
offices. Tuesday, September   15,   1964
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 9
FOR THE BIRDS
By GEORGE REAMSBOTTOM
Ubyssey Sport.-, Editor
UBC sports have a wide program of activities which
should satisfy every student's interests. Especially those
belonging to the superior male sex.
Now that I have lost the interest of the more prominent
sex, it is time to let you poor freshmen in on the sad facts
of campus life, meaning those about the number one participation sport on campus.
From co-eds (this is the name given to female students
who would have you believe they really are here to study)
who somehow made it to the second year and beyond, you
lowly freshmen will be ignored in the manner you deserve
(having invested so much time out here, such small game
has little appeal to them).
As for freshettes (easily recognized by nervous twitch
of cheek muscles which have suddenly been cut-off from
heavy wads of chewing gum) these easily impressed creatures will be so taken with the sophisticated techniques of
upperclassmen that they won't even see you forlorn first
year types.
SOMEBODY CARES
But don't give up fellas, the Men's Athletic office provides you with excellent time-killing entertainment from the
many Thunderbird teams, and the Physical Education department has numerous courses in which you can release your
frustrations in physical activities. For those who wish an
opportunity to play on teams, but don't have the time to
practice with varsity clubs (if you can make them), there is
also a fine intra-mural program.
Men's Athletic Director Bus Phillips (in charge of
administrating all Thunderbird and Jayvee teams) offers
you an inexpensive but highly competitive schedule of sports
events, which gives you an opportunity to spend a few enjoyable hours a week away from the worries of studies.
CAMIPUS SPORTS LOOKING  UP
All four teams will face their toughest competition in
years, if not ever. Last year the Men's Athletic Committee
decided to pull out of the weak Western Canadian Intercollegiate Conference in favor of a two year exhibition
schedule mostly against stronger American teams.
UBC athletic fans benefit more than anyone from this
move, but don't expect championships in the first year.
The footballers who began their season with a close
29-24 loss to highly rated Montana last Saturday were the
first team to open their season, but are still looking for
more players.
Joe Johnson's soccer eleven, finally admitted to the
Pacific Coast Soccer League, will open its season Sept. 26th
against North Shore United.
Peter Mullin's basketball squad, holders of the Western
Canada   intercollegiate   championship,   figure   to   do   well
against American  competition but don't open their   season
till late fall.
Hockey Coach Dennis Selder had hoped to pick up
several members of the UBC based Olympic team, but those
returning to college have flown to Manitoba, where they
will be able to work out with the Winnipeg Maroons, the
next national team. He has also lost his two top scorers
from last year, Bob Parker and Peter Kelly.
SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE
There are, of course, many other fields of sports played
by varsity teams. We have a championship cricket team
whjch will make up the bulk of the Olympic cricket team,
baseball teams, and so many others it would take almost a
column to list them all.
Undoubtedly the most famous UBC athletes have been
those of the rowing crews. This fall the UBC crews have
joined with the Vancouver Rowing Club crews (made up pf
ex-UBC rowers who have graduated) to represent Canada in
the Olympic games.
Woman's sports also play an important role in the
varsity athletic program and have expended considerably
in their program and popularity in the last few years.
And it's all for you to take advantage of, you lucky
freshmen: the publicity hounds will brainwash you, the
band will attempt to break their spell, and the Engineers
will provile half time entertainment by drowning half of
you in the nearest pool.
THE   FREDERIC   WOOD   THEATRE
Final Auditions
for
"THE VISIT"
Internationally acclaimed sinister comedy
BY   FRIEDRICH   DURR'ENMATT
DIRECTED   BY   KLAUS   STRASSMANN
OPEN TO ALL STUDENTS
Men Needed In Particular
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 7:00 - 9:30 P.M.
FREDERIC   WOOD   THEATRE
COPIES OF THE PLAY -
Information  Available  in  Room  207,
Frederic Wood Theatre
Football birds
almost pull upset
BOB SWEET
. . 134 yards
Soccer tryouts
all this week
UBC's Thunderbird soccer
team, a member of the Pacific
Coast Soccer League, is holding practice sessions and tryouts all this week on McGinnis
field (behind the Gymn).
All those interested in trying out for the T'Birds or the
varsity entry in the Junior
Coast League are invited to attend the workouts.
The Birds open their season
Sept. 26th at Kinsmen Park
in North Van. against North
Shore United.
"Suck in your guts and go
get those guys." These were
head coach Frank Gnup's final
words as he sent his underdog
football birds out to face Montana's  powerful  Grizzlies.
And that's just what they
did in almost pulling off the
upset of the year. The final
score became 29-24 when Montana scored a touchdown with
three and a half minutes left
in the game.
Until that moment the UBC
squad had led since their first
play from scrimmage when
they scored a TD on a 36 yd.
pass and run play from quarterback Roger Hardy to halfback Norm  Thomas.
During the game Montana
had 85 plays from scrimmage
compared to 38 for the T'Birds.
This was indicative of the general trend of the game as the
Grizzlies were successful in
controlling the ball most of
the game but had trouble stopping the Birds whenever they
had the ball.
On the ground Gunp's crew
carried for 218 yards on only
24 rushes, a remarkable average of almost 9 yards every
time they ran the ball.
Top Bird rushers  were Bob
Sweet with 134 yards for ten
carries. Following him was Vic
Iwata with 58 yards on only
three rushes.
Ron Smelko scored three
touchdowns and picked up 60
yards rushing to lead his Montana mates to their hard
earned victory.
UBC had jumped to a 14-0
lead in the first five minutes
of the game when Hardy
scored on a quarterback
sneak from the two yard line,
only four minutes after
Thomas had picked up his six
points.
Sweet scored the Bird's final
TD in the third quarter on a
32 yard run.
Commenting on the game
Gnup gave his whole team
credit for an outstanding
effort, especially the defense
which was on the field for over
two-thirds of the game.
Next game for the UBC foot
ball team is this coming Sat
urday in Bellingham against
Western  Washington.
Both the Jayvees and Thunderbirds arc holding open
workouts all this week at 3:30
p.m. in varsity stadium and
aspiring football players are
invited to try out.
Best Campus Buy
Athletic   Date   Cord
ONLY    $5.00
Admits purchaser and member of opposite sex
to all M.A.C. Sponsored Athletic Events
Your Date Card admits You and Your Date
to over 50 athletic events:
Football
Sept. 26 — Linfield
Oct.     3 — McMaster
Oct.    10 — Portland State
Oct.   24 — South. Oregon
Nov.    7 — Oregon College
Basketball
Oct. 23 -
Nov. 27-28
Jan. 2-4 -
Jan. 9 —
Jan. 23 -
Jan. 29-30
Fob. 4-5 -
Feb. 12-13
Feb. 19-20
Grads
— Totem
Tourney
Gonzaga
Seattle   Pac.
W. Washington
— Alaska
Carroll
College
— Cascade
— Calgary
Ice Hockey
Rugby
Jan.    8-9    — Edmonton
Jan.  21   — U.   of  Oregon
Jan.  15-16 — Gonzaga
Jan.  23  - U.  of  Wcsh.
Jan. 29-30 — Alaska
Mar.   18-20  — California
Feb. 26-27 — Calgary
plus U.C.LA
Soccer
Pacific   Coast
All  Gymnastic,
League  Home
Swimming   &
Games.
Wrestling   Events.
Also available - SEASON TICKETS - $3.00
Single Admission for
FOOTBALL BASKETBALL HOCKEY
NOTE:  Student Admission  Prices for  1964-65  will  be  $1.00 Single  Admission.
The new Date Card  is a tremendous bargain at $5.00.
Date Cards on Sale during Registration
at the Armouries, Field House and Memorial Gym.
Quantities are Limited, so get Yours Early. Page 10
T HE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  September'15,   1964
B IS FOR BLACKTOP, the first blacktop to grace a student
parking lot in the University's history. While C-lot students
tramp   through   customary   sludge   and   puddles,   the   lucky
Paves gravel wilderness
Sir Ouv gets
low slung lot
By NORM BETTS
Sir Ouvry Roberts is sporting a shiny new black hardtop.
A  shiny  new   black  hardtop
parking  lot.
B-lot, the most southerly student lot. has been extended
and paved to take 500 more
cars   during   the   summer.
Still uncompleted is a 250-
rar lot for the new Totem Residences.
The work, done by Scotland
and Adamson paving contractors, cost the University about
$40 per parking space, according to a buildings and grounds
spokesman, assistant superintendent Len Bayly.
"It7s only a glamorized paved
gravel  lot  really,"  Bayly said.
The traffic office didn't
know how many B-lot stickers
it had to issue, however.
"They've extended it and
they haven't given us a figure
yet," said a traffic office
spokesman.
"They just haven't got
around to it," he said.
The lot is located at the extreme south end of main mall.
The area is planned as a permanent parking area, and will
likely remain intact for several
years.
Perhap it was
a wishing walrus
LENINGRAD (UNS)—
Malyshke, a walrus in the
Leningrad Zoo, was X-
rayed recently and his
stomach was found to contain more than two and a
quarter pounds of coins.
A Manchurian crane, also
in the same zoo, died of
copper poisoning after swallowing   twenty-seven coins.
The   Frederic  Wood   Theatre
announces
AUDITIONS
for  its autumn  productions
"Man and Superman"
(including "Don Juan  in  Hell" scene)
George Bernard Shaw's Comic Masterpiece
and
"The Visit"
Internationally acclaimed   sinister  comedy
By  Friedrich   Durrenmatt
Open to All Students
COME AND  TRY  OUT !
IN THE FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
TIMES
Thursday, September  17, 3:30 - 5:30 p.m.
Friday, September 18, 3:30 - 5:30 p.m.
Monday, September 21, 7:00 - 9:30 p.m.
COPIES OF "THE VISIT"-
Information  Available in   Room  207,
Frederic Wood  Theatre
—norm betts photo
few   who   snaffled   B-lot   stickers   will   glide   across   nearly
three  acres  of  luxurious  asphalt.   Lot  holds   500  cars,  cost
$40 per car space.
Survey wont be mean
to penniless students
The Alma Mater Society's Student Means Survey might
mean more money for Joe Student.
The result of the survey may
indicate changes are necessary
in the present method of student aid, said AMS president
Roger McAfee.
The Student Means Survey
was undertaken after a $50 fee
hike was announced last January.
Six-page questionaires were
distributed to 1,400 students
last March. These questionaires asked the students how
they now financed their university   expenses.
"Results     of    the     survey
should be ready for presentation to the Student Council at
their first meeting Sept. 21,"
McAfee  said.
"And we hope to be able to
present the results of the survey to the provincial government by Oct. 15," he added.
Copies of the survey will
also go to the commission on
university finances set up last
spring by the Canadian Universities Foundation u n d e *
Dean Vincent Bladen, of University of Toronto.
Patronize UBC advertisers
_?>*i
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Pullover 31-12, $17.98, slims 8-20,
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Without this label
it is not a genuine KITTEN
HAVE  YOU
BEEN
THINKING
OF
TOTEM
IT'S       /
THE
TWO-PIECE
YEARBOOK
• A   Grads   and   Faculties
book. 144 pages with individual pictures of all
grads and a photoessay on
every faculty. $4.00; pre-
sale now, in the Armories.
• For all undergrads and
particularly frosh, ib<e
Campus Life magazine. . .
112 pages (including 16
pages of colour) of nothing but campus life.
Everything you did, or
wished you'd done, or told
parents you'd done {and a
lot you didn't tell) all displayed with a method of
photojournalism new to
Totem. Sports, queens,
dances, riots, registration,
and studying. This and
more for $1.75 pre-sale,
wherever good yearbooks
are sold.
Packaged not in plain
brown paper but a brilliant 4-colour cover. Ask
for it by name; even forget to ask for it by name,
but buy it. In the Armouries. Tuesday/ September,- 15,  196/t
T.H B
vDkbLy S 9 iff
AMS everywhere
You can't escape
the bureaucrats
By  AL  BIRNIE
Ubyssey  Council Reporter
The Alma Mater Society is the student government of
U.B.C.
rage ,n
It is an organization well
worth knowing about, not least
for the reason that it takes $29
out of your pocket each year,
to finance its activities.
As an autonomous student
organization it has few, if any,
rivals across Canada, and on
this campus there are few activities you can take part in that
are not in some way connected
with it.
On top is the 26-man Student
Council.
Six councillors are elected
in campus-wide elections in the
Spring: the president, two vice-
presidents, secretary, treasurer
and co-ordinator.
• •    •
The other 20 councillors are
the presidents of undergraduate societies, groups students
are lumped into depending
upon their courses of studies.
Examples: Arts, Science, Social Work, Architecture, and
soon, Frosh.
Each member of the council
has one vote, but the main rep-
by-pop beef comes when the
Librarianship and Architecture
presidents, representing 46 and
78 students respectively, combine to out-vote the Arts president, representing 4,399 students.
But, you can't fight city hall.
From the first registration-
week mixer you attend as a
Frosh, to the graduation booze
cruise, the AMS invades your
life.
If you join a club, play on a
sports team, get rushed by a
fraternity, hate French-Canadians, fail and break a leg, or
take part in an intellectual discussion on sex at International
House you will be in some way
helped or dictated to by it.
• •    *
The AMS is an $800,000 a
year business — a business organized and controlled by students — and as a student it is
for your own good that you
know something abut it, at
least to be able to vote intelligently.
The Ubyssey, which you now
clutch in your hands, and will
be able to clutch 67 times more
this year, will supply gobs of
Student Council information.
AMS has committees on
everything, and does everything; you couldn't avoid it if
you tried.
The guiding light behind this
year's activities is (fat) Roger
MacAfee, the people's choice
for President.
He, on an average publication day, is good for 47 % of the
copy for any given edition.
Other notables worth knowing are Bob Cruise, first vice-
president; Byron Hender, second vice-president, for the
second year in a row; treasu-
Bearing   cure
CAPETOWN (CUP) — Two
South African surgeons have
discovered that ball bearings
inserted between the discs of
the spine below the base of
the neck will relieve chronic
headaches.
rer, Kyle Mitchell; secretary,
Marilyn McMeans; and co-ordinator,  Graeme Vance.
AMS representatives are sent
to places including Ottawa,
New York, Pakistan, Mississippi, and the Library to watch,
talk, exterminate or overhaul
subjects touching racial discrimination, the aims of French-
Canadians, or free love.
The AMS is like any other
government — if you know it,
may be you can do something
about it.
Get your nose out of your
textbook and into the Ubyssey
Student Council news.
If you're really keen, (horrors), you could even do some
honest - to - god bureaucrattic
council work, if not as Frosh
president, (it's best to have the
devil behind you there), at
least on say, the Brock Hall art
committee.
To paraphrase Davy Crokett,
"Remember the AMS".
No education is complete
without one.
SCOTT MclNTYRE
.  .  .  wild  color
Amateurs share
stage with  pros
Student actors at UBC this
year will have a chance to appear with professionals.
For the first time the Department of Theatre is combining
student productions with Frederic Wood Theatre productions.
Auditions open to all students, for Man and Superman,
The Visit, and a Studio Workshop production will be held
Sept. 17 and 18, 3.30 - 5.30 p.m.
and Sept. 21, 7.00 - 9.30 p.m.
in the new Frederic Wood
Theatre.
Blanks on exams lead to
pair of holes on council
Student Council will meet this fall — two members
short.
Science Undergraduate president, Bob Elsdon, and Forestry Undergraduate president, Dave Parker, both failed
last year and as a result are not permitted to sit on student
council.
The two undergrad societies must now either promote
their   vice-president   to   president or elect a new president.
"What they do depends on their individual constitution,"  said  council secretary,  Marilyn McMeans.
tl
U.B.C.'s MOST USEFUL BOOK
BIRD CALLS
Student Telephone Directory
ic COMPLETE STUDENT LISTINGS . . . name,
faculty,   year,   Vancouver   and   home
addresses   and   local   telephone   numbers.
if YELLOW PAGES, including all campus
telephones, clubs, fraternities, sororities,
U.B.C.   listings,  and   useful   Buying  Guide.
OVER 200 PAGES
LIMITED NUMBER PRINTED
Order Now
75c
From Phrateres Club Members
In the Armouries During Registration.
To Be Distributed Mid-October
n
Two-piece  yearbook
colorless no longer
Totem is about to join Walt
Disney in the technicolor field.
This year, UBC's yearbook
will contain a wild color section, according to editor Scott
Mclntyre.
Mclntyre said Totem will
again be published in two
parts.
The Grad edition will have a
four-color hard cover and contain 144 pages of individual
grad photographs. It will cost
$4.
For those who are not graduating, there is the Campus Life
edition which will cost $1.75.
This soft covered miracle
will have 112 pages of campus
activities like clubs, sports, registration, engineers stunts,
riots and general bloodshed.
Mclntyre also hopes to use a
new method of presentation in
this year's Totem. The activities  will  be  covered chronolo
gically instead of according to
subject matter as in previous
years.
And there will be more pictures than last year, so Frosh
can read it more easily.
Students will be able to order their copies of Totem during registration week.
Losses mount
for magazine
Alma Mater Society losses
on the national student magazine Campus Canada arc enough to pay for a copy of the
magazine for each student at
UBC.
Latest financial statement of
the magazine, printed by the
AMS, shows a net loss of
$4,203.01. or almost 35c per
UBC student, for the two editions of the magazine published
by the AMS so far.
TRADSVILLE
IS WHERE TRADS ARE
On the campus, in the classroom, at the
hop, down where the malts ar< frosty
in fact anywhere where there's one oi
more smart-style young men, you'l! tine;
TRADS, now available in stretch materials for a full measure of superb comfort.
It your young man's  shop  does  not  stock  DON
PARKER SLACKS write to:
PARKER
SPORTSWEAR
CO. LTD.
10355 - 105 Street,
EDMONTON, Alberta ■Pagel2'
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September  15,   1964
Reiect fee boost
PRESIDENT JOHN MACDONALD
. . . fingers crossed
Five years
mapped out,
optimistically
Do you have a five-year plan
for spending money you don't
even have yet?
UBC does.
And it wants to spend $29.8
million in those five years.
UBC has allotted $11.5 million for teaching and research
buildings, $14.5 million for
professional schools' buildings,
$972,000 for the library, and
$2.8 million for site development and services.
Victoria College and Simon
Fraser Academy have similar
five-year plans of $9.2 million
and $29.8 million respectively.
The money to finance these
plans will be raised, hopefully,
by the combined universities
appeal and matching grants
from the provincial government.
Summer students
sit on wallets
The Summer Session Association has rejected a fee increase that would help pay for the new Student Union building.
The Association, made up of
students attending summer
school at UBC, decided not to
pay an increase of $3 per student this summer.
But AMS executive members
are confident that the fee increase will go through next
summer.
• •    •
"We'll really go at it next
summer," said AMS vice-president, Bob Cruise, "I'm very
optimistic about it."
The fee increase for the six
thousand summer students
would have meant a total of
$50,000 before SUB was completed.
Winter session students gave
approval to a $5 increase in
AMS fees last March by an 80
percent majority.
The increase in fees meant
that SUB would be paid for in
15 years.
• *    •
Had the fee increase not been
okayed, the financing of the
building would have stretched
over 30 years.
The architectural competition is now in progress and will
be completed in the fall. Actual
construction is expected to begin next spring.
SUB is being constructed at
a cost of $3.8 million of which
students will pay $2.9 million.
The rest of the cost will be absorbed by the administration,
alumni, government, and busi
ness firms.
The building will serve students as a social centre, as well
as providing space for club
meetings, and executive offices.
The list of facilities includes
everything from an executive
kitchen, designed to help student councillors make coffee,
to bowling alley (five and ten
pins).
New heads
appointed
The president of the Association of Professional Engineers
of B.C. has been named one
of three new UBC departmental heads.
Prof. W. M. Armstrong was
appointed head of department
of Metallurgy in Applied
Science.
Armstrong has been at UBC
since 1946. He succeeds Prof.
Frank Forward who gave up
the post to become director of
the federal government's new
science secretariat.
Also appointed were Prof.
William Nicholls, head of department of Religious Studies
in the faculty of Arts; and Dr.
Alfred Elliot, head of Ophthalmology in the faculty of Medicine.
CLASSIFIED
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost & Found
11
POUND ADS Inserted free. Publications office, Brock Hall., Local 26,
224-3242.
Meetings
12
Special Notices
13
14
Transportation
DRIVERS WANTED for Richmond
car pool, 8.30 lectures, Monday
through Friday.  Phone  277-759^	
IF YOU NEED a" ride or riders to
and from campus, use Ubyssey
Want Ads. Publications office,
Brock Hall,  tel.  224-3242,  Ext.  26.
Wanted
15
AUTOMOTIVE   &   MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
PROBATION    OFFICER,    returning
to  UBC,   must  sell  1963   Belair  6,
automatic, radio, P.S. elec. heater,
seat  covers,  perfect  cond.,   $2,250.
Call   William.   321--3181.
Accessories & Repairs
22
Body Work: Glass
23
Automobiles For Hire
24
Automobiles Wanted
25
Boats & Supplies
26
BUSINESS   SERVICES
Beauty Salons
31
Copying 8c Duplicating
32
Laundry—Dry Cleaning
33
Moving—Storage
34
Orchestras
35
Photography
36
Printing—Engraving
37
Repairing—All Kinds
38
Rentals
39
Sewing—Alterations
40
Tailoring
41
Typewriters &  Repairs           42
"STUDENT       TYPEWRITERS]     all
makes,   all  prices.   Free  delivery.
Modern   Business   Machine    Corp.
Ltd.    461 E. Hastings. Phone 682-
4016.
Typing
43
Writing—Editing
44
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted                            51
SEVERAL 2nd or 3rd year students
to sell Ubyssey advertising. Commission  paid  for  part-time  work.
Send note of application to Manager of Publications, Brock Hall.
Work Wanted
52
INSTRUCTION  —   SCHOOLS
Auditions
61
Dance
62
Music
63
Tutoring
64
Special Classes
65
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
BIRD CALLS—the most useful book
on the campus. Student telephone
directory available latter part of
October. Limited number. Order
during Registration from members
_ of  the   Phrateres J21ub.   Only  75c.
ATHLETIC DATE CARDS admit
you and your date to over, 50
M.A.C. athletic events. Buy now.
Don't miss out on this bargain.
SCUBA GEAR for sale, near new7
complete outfit, 199. Tel. MU
1-0602. 	
MICROSCOPE (Leilz)7 used by
medical student, just like new,
U80.00. AM 1-3647. 7037 Montgomery.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
PICTURE BOOK ROOM, share kitchen and home privileges with
other UBC girls. Deep freeze, electric dish washer, TV, stereo. 10
mins. to UBC gates. S30 month.
Evenings 733-6617.. _
TWO MEN, share double~Wom7~priv7
entrance, bathroom, $30.00 each
Three blocks from Campus. 1911
Knox Road.  CA 4-6197.
Room & Board
82
Furn. Houses  &
Apis.
83
Unfurn. Houses
& Apis.
84
Halls For Rent
85
Real Estate
86
A-OK dictionary
MOSCOW (UNS)—The An-
glcHRussian dictionary of astronautics was published in
Russia recently.
It contains 7,000 words and
is designed to standardize
terminology in rocketery,
space medicine and radio-
electronics.
WORSHIP ON CAMPUS-
THIS SUNDAY at
ST TIMOTHY
LUTHERAN   CHURCH
Pastor: H. Fox — CA 8-8166
10 a.m.—Bible Study
11 a.m.—Worship
HUT L-4 -  EAST MALL
FROSH ORIENTATION
CALENDAR OF EVENTS
Sept. 16
Sept. 17
Sept. 18
Sept. 19
Sept. 25-
Sept. 29
Sept. 30
Sept. 30
Sept. 30
Oct. 3
Oct.   31
Registration Mixer
Registration Mixer
Registration Mixer
Registration Mixer
27 Frosh Retreat
Queen's Fashion Show
Cairn  Banquet
Cairn Ceremony
Cairn  Reception
Frosh  Reception
Frosh Symposium
Brock Hall
50c
Frosh, 75c
uc
International House
50c
Frosh, 75c
uc
Buchanan Quad
50c
Frosh, 75c
uc
Common  Block
50c
Frosh, 75c
uc
Elphinstone
Brock Hall
Free
6:30
p.m.
Brock Hall
$1.00
8:30
p.m.
Cairn
Free
9:30
p.m.
Brock Hall
Free
8:30
p.m.
Armouries
7
•
All
Day
Hycroft
?
Join  In
Have  Fun    —    Get Acquainted

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