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The Ubyssey Mar 3, 1966

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Array Vol. XLVIII, No. 55
THE UBYSSEY
VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, MARCH 3,   1966
Guten
morgen
CA 4-3916
Chancellorship a race!
Students sign
for legal aid
in courtroom
By BERT HILL
Three hundred law students
have signed a petition, sent to
B.C. attorney-general Robert
Bonner Wednesday, demanding
greater support for legal aid.
The petition is in support of
a bill, presented last year by
MLA Tony Gargrave, to provide increased legal aid for
persons unable to afford it.
"The present system provides
only funds |for court room action and not for the minor advice that many people require
but cannot afford — for example landlord-tenant relationships." said Gary Lauk, law II.
"Even more important, one
out of every three criminal
cases goes through the courts
every day undefended.
He said the law students feel
if the profession does not act
to direct legal aid policy, more
radical groups might try to
socialize it.
"The new bill would give
the Law Society of B.C. virtual
control of the operation of legal aid."
The bill was shelved last
year by the provincial government because the present grant
was not sufficient to cover a
new system.
—  betts foto
spring's sunshine on  Fort
EMPTY GUNTOWER stands  in
Camp beach, a  silent reminder to  beachcombing, class
cutting students of days less peaceful.
DISCREPANCIES
IN FACTS
Roger won't remember'
By STUART GRAY
Ubyssey SUB Reporter
Student Union Building Chairman Roger McAfee Wednesday
declined comment on a dis-
crepency between his version
of the Bank of Montreal's rental offer for future campus
banking space, and that of UBC
bursar William White.
McAfee said Friday the Bank
of Montreal made two separate
offers.
White said however, that the
bank made only a single offer
of $1,130,000 for the entire
9,000 sq. feet of banking space,
and that its tender left the division of money and space for
the university and the AMS to
settle.
The Ubyssey asked' McAfee
if had been misinformed.
"I don't know," he said.
Had he contacted White to
verify the facts?
"I choose not to comment,"
said McAfee.
What had been the terms of
the tender submitted toy the
bank, which McAfee told The
Ubyssey Friday he had seen?
"I WON'T remember," grinned McAfee.
Asked if McAfee was aware
of the banking bid, White said:
"To the best of my knowledge,
McAfee and Kyle Mitchell
(AMS treasurer 1964-65) had
the opportunity of acquainting
themselves with the particulars
of the agreement."
Commenting on the discrep-
ency between his and McAfee's
version   of   the   bank's   terms,
(Continued on  Page 3)
SEE:   McAFEE
Enomoto bid sets
student  first'
By   CAROL   WILSON
A 21-year-old Japanese Canadian student has made an
unprecedented bid for the position of chancellor of UBC.
Randy Enomoto, graduate
studies I, is the first student to
run for the position, which is
usually awarded by acclamation.
The other candidate for chancellor is John M. Buchanan,
69, a former member of the
senate and board of governors
and a past president of the
alumni asociation.
'NOT A STUNT'
"This is an unorthodox thing
to do, but it's not a stunt,"
Enomoto said Wednesday.
"I want to attempt to make
that area of the university democratic, and reveal the status
quo that exists.
"There is no reason why
sudents should not participate
in the decisions affecting the
students of this university. The
chancellor has this decisionmaking potential."
The nominees have five days
to decide whether they will
stand for election.
If neither candidate withdraws, election ballots will be
sent ou convocation — approximately 30,000 persons on
March 7, and must be returned
by May 26.
Ninety per cent of the members of convocation are in
Canada, the other ten per cent
are scattered around the world.
'CAMPAIGN    FULLY'
A candidate must be nominated by seven members of convocation.
Enomoto handed in his nomination form Wednesday with
eight signatures.
"I will campaign fully," said
Enomoto. "I will focus on the
undergraduate population on
the campus itself.
RANDY ENOMOTO
. . . chancellor?
"Although they are non-voting    students,    I    think    they
should be made aware of the
nature of the institution.
'NOT DEMOCRATIC
"It is not a democratic one.
"I want to show that a democratic procedure like an elec-
ion is out of place in an undemocratic institution," Enomoto said.
"The administration and
board of governors could not
allow me to be elected — it
would undermine the traditional nature of the office.
"The position is based on
prestige, the amount of influence one has in social circles.
I don't qualify under either
criteria,"  he said.
(Continued on  Page 2)
SEE:  ENOMOTO
FORT CAMPERS
BACKING MAC
Mac to Europe drive started
By CAROL WILSON
Another "Back Mac" campaign has hit campus.
Residents of Fort Camp
have organized a campaign
to send A. P. MacDowell,
known to Fort Campers as
Mac, and his wife to Europe.
Mac has been residence
clerk at Fort since Jan. 14,
1946.
Fort residents are trying
to raise between $1,500 and
$2,000 collected over two
years.
Residents are asked to
donate whatever they wish.
The students are making
a list of previous Fort Camp
residents, and will send letters to them advising them
ARTHUR MacDOWELL
... to Europe
of the campaign.
Anyone who would like to
contribute should get in
touch with Ralston Alexander, Fort Camp men's council president, or Sheanne
McCullough, women's council president, or put their
donation in the collection
box in the Fort Camp canteen.
Mac was supposed to retire this year, but asked for
a year's  extension.
"I hope I get it," he said.
"Fort Camp has been home
to me. I have enjoyed every
minute of it.
"I have always found all
the students to be wonderful," Mac said. Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday,   March   3,   1966
— kurt hilger photos
A DEEPLY PENSIVE moderator, Sir Ouvry Roberts contemplates the pros and cons of campus parking at Wednesday's engineering-frosh debate. No winner was declared.
EDUCATION  WEEK
First in
achieve
finals
awards
Thirty-six students who topped their classes in last
year's final examinations will receive academic achievement
awards March 10 in Frederic Wood theatre.
Two students from each faculty will receive the award
during provincial education
week March 7 to  12.
UBC chancellor Phyllis Ross
will present the awards in a
3 p.m. ceremony chaired by
AMS president Byron Hender.
Arts Dean Dennis Healy will
speak at the ceremony.
Recipients are: education,
Diane Rogers and Susan Gayle
Biden; home economics, Gloria
Davidson and Kay Watson;
forestry, Gary McDermid and
Robin Quenet; applied science,
Peter Madderton and Denton
Coates.
Commerce, William Stan-
bury and Robert Friesen; arts
William Wadge and Shirley
Darcus; architecture, Thomas
Bowen   and   Anthony   Watty;
ENOMOTO
UBC President John Macdonald said Wednesday, "The
University Act specifies that as
a graduate of this university,
he (Enomoto) is qualified for
the office."
The chancellor is elected for
a three-year term by convocation, which includes all alumni
of the university, members of
the senate, the president of the
university, and faculty members named by the president.
He acts as an ex-officio member of the board of governors.
Buchanan, 69, graduated
from UBC in 1917. He retired
as president and chairman of
the board of B.C. Packers Ltd.
in 1964.
agriculture, Ralph McQueen
and James Tingle; social work,
Marilyn Callahan and Max
Beck; science, Mary Somerville
and Keith Mason.
Rehabilitation Medicine,
Maureen Thiel and Linda
Keen; pharmacy, Wendy Woo
and David Lynes; physical education, Monique Lindeman and
William Boyd; nursing, Susan
Haywood-Farmer and Jennifer
Cornish; music, Barbara Allen
and Ann Craig.
Medicine, Robert Jack and
Igor Grant; librarianship, Geoffrey Chapman and Heather
Harbord; and law, Barry Slut-
sky and Edward Ryan.
LIQUOR PERMITS
Ban on student
licences stays
Vancouver's police department isn't yet convinced UBC
students don't need chaperones.
Deputy chief John Fisk has|groupof students have
re-affirmed   the   department's | re(j ^j
new policy of refusing liquor
permits to student groups unless a faculty member assumes
responsibility.
UBC president John Macdonald and AMS president Byron Hender have formally protested the new policy.
The police ruling followed a
raid on a science undergraduate society stag in January.
In reply to Hender's protest Fisk wrote:
"On the basis of recent experiences with student groups,
we are not convinced students
are prepared to accept responsibility for the proper supervision of functions covered by
special liquor permits."
Liquor Control Board vendors issue permits.
"But the views of local police
are always secured before such
permits are granted," Fisk said
Monday.
"Liquor permits will be issued when we are convinced
that students will comply to
all the regulations as stated in
the liquor act."
Hender said he had protested
the ruling because he felt the
whole student community
should not suffer "because one
or two unfortunate incidents
involving   a   relatively   small
Assistant bagmen
needed for AMS
AMS treasurer-elect Lome
Hudson said Wednesday
he needs three assistant
treasurers and one member
at large to sit on his finance
committee for next year.
"The p o s i tions involve
making all the major AMS
expenditure decisions for
the year," said Hudson.
CORSAGES  FOR  SPRING  FORMALS
REASONABLY PRICED.
STRATHCONA FLORAL CO.
5555 West Blvd.
Phone AM 1-7271
Summer Employment
Opportunities
A limited number of general office summer employment
opportunities will be available for second or third year
male students for the period from the end of the term to
mid-Septem!ber. The positions will be in the pulp and
paper, woods, converting and, building materials divisions
of Crown Zellerbach Canada Limited in British Columbia.
On-campus interviews will be scheduled for March 8th.
Students in Commerce or Arts — majoring in Economics,
Maths or Geography — who are interested should leave
their names at the Student Services Office.
^£r
CROWN ZELLERBACH CANADA LIMITED   y*
LUMBER/PLYWOOD/NEWSPRINT/PAPER/PULP/PACKAGING      ^£^
occur-
year.
"To date there have been
only allegations made, and no
actual charges," wrote Hender.
"Students do not expect to
receive special treatment before the law," said Hender.
"They do expect equal treatment."
Hender is planning to write
a letter to the bi-weekly police
commission to be held March
10.
WE'VE DIDDLED IT AGAINI
Another Air Shipment of
WIDE WALE CORDS
in new summer colours . . . 9.95
Also Arriving By Low Flying Plane
(as well as the Red Baron)
BAD BOY Mini
BLUNDERBUSSES
in the latest "Flak" colors at   the
same ridiculous price 9.95
BAD BOYS
RAGGE SHOPPE
315  SEYMOUR
(jettiny framed?
Yours for the Asking . . . Our FREE
"Take Home" Invitation Album — mailed
to you or call at our store
Careful advice expertly given to all brides.
Plan  early to  ask about  our very  LOW
COST, HIGH QUALITY Wedding Needs.
™b CARD SHOP
Comer Robson and Burrard
MU 4-4011
Jilnv Soasty, (pMMntA,
Great
Expectations
TODAY
12:30, 3:30, 6:00 and 8:30
AUDITORIUM
50c
Russian Roulette and
Contact Lenses-
With Hale the fitting of corneal contact lenses was
introduced and developed in Vancouver in the late
40's. Over the ensuing years our leadership has been
maintained with a research and development program that allows no worthwhile advance anywhere
in the world to go unnoticed. Experience of this
calibre eliminates the risk inherent in the uniqueness
of this form of eye protection. Inexperienced and
unskilled promoters present no bargains at any
price, if permanently damaged eyes are the end
result.   For  your  safety  and   comfort  remember  —
t^Qpbmt,
seven
locations
In Greater
Vancouver
Student discounts
identification.
upon  presentation  of  acceptable Thursday,   March   3,   1966
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
OPEN LATE
FOR EXAMS
Library gets new hours
By CAROL WILSON
Both the Main Library and
the Sedgewick library will re
main open later before and
during final exams, providing
student assistants will work
late.
The Sedgewick Library will
remain open until 2 a.m. Monday to Friday, and the main
stacks will stay open to midnight Monday to Friday from
March 21 to April 22.
No reference assistance can
be given, but the circulation
division will be open so books
can be borrowed.
'This is only a minimal arrangement" said Basil Stuart-
Stubbs, library head.
"There will be no one but
students assistants in the library during these times."
"We are doing it to provide
study space and some access
to books prior to exams. We
could not work on this basis
throughout the year."
It will be necessary to hire
nine student assistants every
day.
"If students cannot be found
for this work the plan must
be abandoned," Stuart-Stubbs
said.
"We have to hire students
for the job because no one else
wants to come all the way out
here for two hours work."
Students who can work are
urged to get in touch with Mrs.
Keith Murray in the Personnel Office,  West Mall.
"I have recommended that
we extend library hours
throughout the year providing
use of the library indicates we
should,"   Stuart-Stubbs   said.
"To maintain these late
hours throughout the academic
year,- it would be necessary to
hire additional permanent staff,
j in addition to student assis-
I tants. Annual cost would be in
I the range of $30,000."
— dermis  gans photos
PRACTISING HARD for Friday nigth's Song Fest are (right
to left seated) Linda Wray, Bev Clarridge, (standing)
Norma Scott and Merle McCrackeno of Alpha Phi Sorority.
TOO MANY BOOKS'
AMS axes Totem
in economy move
By DOUG HALVERSON
Ubyssey Council Reporter
AMS council chopped down a lot of Totems Monday
night.
Council passed a motion by
engineering president Art
Stevenson to stop production
of the 49-year-old UBC year
book.
He said it ran at a loss every
year.
"In 1962 half the people
given complimentary issues did
not even bother to pick them
up," he said.
Totem editor John Tyrell
tried in vain to defend his
publications.
"We've been here 49 years
and should be here another
149," he said.
He said the reason Totem
failed was there were too
many small groups publishing
yearbooks on campus.
He cited engineering, law
and forestry as examples.
Tyrell said Campus Life was
a substitute for those without
a faculty yearbook.
"The success of the faculty
yearbooks is the power of
coercion  they have,"  he  said.
Council voted 7-9 in favor
of suspending the publication
of Totem.
As soon as the motion was
passed however AMS president-elect Peter Braund said
next year's council would reconsider the motion.
Democracy loses dollar race
in poor athletic election
There's no money in physical  education elections.
The faculty, holding its first election in several years,
is broke. It receives only a small grant from the AMS.
Candidates in the elections are Ed Youngberg and
Byron Thorne, for president; Brent McComib and Ernie
Yocub for vice-president; Merle Oliver and Melanie Kamm,
for secretary-treasurer.
A meeting of candidates will be held noon today in the
War Memorial gym.
It has no money for advertising the elections; ballots
are being printed by the athletic department.
Claude Marsden, Phys Ed: IV, said the AMS usually
under underwrites phys ed functions.
Study space
for new SUB
investigated
By BERT HILL
There may yet be study
space in the Student Union
Building.
AMS president Byron Hender has asked SUB chairman
Roger McAfee to assess the
cost of changing the floor
plans of the new building to
include:
e Temporary study space in
the SUB basement now slated
to be used for future expansion;
• A Squash court in the
space now reserved for a bowling alley extension.
The additions, suggested at
Monday's council meeting,
would cost the students nothing.
Hender said the money
would come from "outside
sources.
Part of the space is reserved
for a senior students lounge
which he thinks will take up
3,000 of the 10,000 square feet
in the basement.
Present plans for SUB do not
include study space.
McAfee said he had not yet
had a chance to investigate the
suggestions.
McAfee
(Coninued from Page 1)
White said: "I would suppose
he's probably got too many
things going on at one time —
although I don't mean to insinuate that his work load is
too great."
"But it's quite clear that
there are only one set of facts."
(The Bank of Montreal is to
continue as the sole banking
agent for the university, and
if the proposed plans are finalized, will occupy 3,000 sq. feet
in the new administration
building, and 6,000 sq. feet in
SUB, on a 35 year prepaid
lease basis.)
If the bank spaces had been
rented on proportional basis,
the SUB space would get approximately another $500,000
rent, for a total of $754,000, as
opposed to the administration's
$376,000.
Roger told council in January that he regarded this half
million difference as a "student
contribution to the administration", and that he had sent a
letter to White stating this.
Asked Wednesday for a copy
of this letter to White, McAfee
produced a letter from AMS
files, and obscured all tout one
paragraph from your Ubyssey
reporter.
That one paragraph did describe the $500,000 as a student
contribution to the administration.
White said Monday he couldn't remember receiving the
letter, but said Wednesday if
he had received' it, it must have
been misfiled.
JOIN
KITSILANO
CREDIT UNION
Low Cost Loans
to Members - Insured
Phone or Call:
2821 W. Bdwy.    RE 1-4531
GSM NEWS
SKI TRIP: Students interested in the Ski Trip to Whistler
Mountain this Saturday, March 5, should pick up
tickets at the G.S.C. Office. Note: The bus will now
leave the centre at 7:00 a.m.
MUSIC EVENING: The Music Evening in the Faculty
Club Main Lounge, Tonight at 9:00 p.m., is free, but
tickets are required. Pick them up at the G.S.C.
office.
BEER GARDEN: The Beer Giarden will not be open this
Friday due to a previous booking of the Lower
Lounge.
John Stark Presents—
Eugene O'Neill's
The Iceman Cometh
Nightly at 8 p.m. for Limited Engagement
KITSN-AN0 THEATRE   -   2114 W 4th Ave.
Tickets from Vancouver Ticket Centre or at the Box Office
"Exciting, absorbing, a theatrical event for Vancouver."
—Jack Richards.
"A good production of a good play."—James Barber.
"Finest  direction  in  recent  years."—Ben  Metcalf.
U.B.C. CHARTER FLIGHT
TO LONDON
3 Weeks—August 24th-September 14th
$34000
Eligibility — Faculty and Students (and/or their parents,
spouses and children).
Please   leave   names   and   phone   number   at   A.M.S.
office or Phone WA 2-7931  or RE 8-6996.
DEADLINE: MARCH 10th meumstr
Published Tuesday, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C. Editorial opinions
expressed are those of the editor and not necessarily those of the AMS
or the University. Editorial office, CA 4-3916. Advertising office, CA 4-3242,
Loc. 26. Member Canadian University Press. Pounding member, Pacific
Student Press. Authorized as second-class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence and editorial writing.
THURSDAY,  MARCH  3,  1966
"The responsibility of the press
is to report the Truth."
—Batman, Feb. 3,  1966
&&&," &ftX
,^'.
Lord Randall
Chalk up another one for direct action.
While student council has been piously passing resolutions about the need for more student representation
on the governing bodies of the university, those direct
action types whose pressure brought the October march
to frutition have come through again.
They've come through in the person of one Randall
Enomoto, grad studies, duly certified a member of convocation and eligible, eager, and willing to run for
chancellor of these exalted halls.
Which, if he succeeds in collecting more of the
votes of the enfranchised alumni than his worthy opponent, will result in this university having the ultimate
in student participation in its administration.
Of course, chancellor is mostly a figurehead position
in the university hierarchy. The chancellor is chairman
of Convocation, and confers degrees.
But, and this is the but which might yet be heard
'round the Canadian university world, the chancellor
is also a member of senate, and the board of governors.
The advance in student-administration relations
which would result from Mr. Enomoto's election is thus
almost beyond comprehension:
The activities of the board of governors are suddenly
open to the consideration of the student body and the
faculty — through Mr. Enomoto's availability to the
student and other news medias.
Students and faculty, informed of the facts involved
in individual issues, can then make their opinions clear
to the board through the good offices of Mr. Enomoto.
And on the old chestnuts, like bookstore-residence-
food services profits, Mr. Enomoto's access to the facts
allows more effective action by students if irregularities
— from the student point of view — are discovered.
So we wish the best of luck to Mr. Enomoto in his
upcoming campaign  to  enlist  the  support  of   voting
alumni.
His election would virtually ensure a new era of
student-administration relations, and not least by breaking down the barriers of ignorance which the board of
governors — unlike the aldermen of other cities — have
chosen to erect around their dealings and doings.
Expressed support for Mr. Enomoto's campaign by
the AMS executive thus far runs on the "if we like the
student running for chancellor we'll support him" line.
Which, in view of Mr. Enomoto's politics and Mr.
Enomoto's view of the AMS executive, will probably
mean no boost from the student government.
Which we think is a real shame, for Mr. Enomoto's
election to the chancellorship of UBC can only mean a
bright new day ahead for the university, as fogs of misunderstandings are cleared away from the institutions'
governing bodies.
A better day for students especially, as a graduate
student steps forward to take a part in university administration, just as has been much mooted by those who
wish reform in this area.
We feel confident the progressive alumni will see
the situation this way.
So here's to UBC Chancellor Randall Enomoto, the
students' own.
mmm ■ " -        	
EDITOR: Tom Wayman Carol Wilson, vlooked for Randy.
u n      ■• looked for Buchanan, couldn't fihd
Newt   Ron Riter        them,   got   frustrated   and   smoked
Associate    George Reamsbottom clsy^Uf^- Hallucination HiRh-rnan
visited  the  bureau.   Stu Gray  dis-
City Al Donald appeared,     and    Jim     Good,     Sue
DhM_                                     ■___— b_j»_ Gransby,     Joan     Pogarty,    Kathy
rnoto Norm Bern Hyde, Ann Bishop wrote deathless
Sports Ed Clark prose.  Bert Hill complained about
a._»_ ___.                                   r>      _. ■■ not   setting   by-lines   so   we   gave
Asst News       Dan Mullen him   two.   Other   members   of   the
Richard Blair, Robbi West masses   who    contributed    to    the
a../. _■•_.                      r>          _. ___ journalistic   gem   were  Val  Zuker,
Asst City Danny Storrman Bill    Graf     Derick    Blackie,    Red
Page Friday John Kelsey Baron.   Kit  Milne,  and  Mucusman
Managing Ian Cameron Halverson. Benton was copyrunner
Fauitum                                 Mib. B.U.- and Marilyn Hill was Miss Tween
Matures Mike Bolton -laSses of March  2.  Howie White
CUP.. Don Hull wTote   literature.
v v v i- V v r * v v v r v i- .- \  .  v v \- v i v v v .. . ..>.-.....       \   . .....
— ron  riter photo
"Mein herr, I beg to report I have landed at something called the Abbotsford Air Show.
I realize I'm a little off course, and I realize a German officer shouldn't hide in his
cockpit, but if you had seen that doghouse flying by over France . . ."
LETTERS  TO  THE   EDITOR
Library  policy   exasperating'
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
I am astounded at the lack
of logical thinking as regards
our present library policy.
Sufficient funds can be
found to support an elaborate
gardening crew and university traffic patrol yet the administration balks when the
question arises of extra staffing for the library.
If we expect to see this
university as a future graduate centre we must provide a
library which is available for
continuous study and research.
It is exasperating to be
shuttled from the library at
10 p.m. in the midst of research on a term paper.
Keeping the Sedgewick Library open until 2 a.m. will
not solve the problem.
This library should, and
obviously does, cater to first
and  second  year  students.
There is no reason for it to
remain open beyond 12 p.m.
But the main library must
THE  IN-SCENE
remain open until 2 a.m.
through the week in order to
provide upper year and graduate students access to research materials. In view of
the approaching examinations
this postion should be adopted   immediately.
RJL
Arts   IV
'VIOLENT   EXCEPTION'
Editor, The Ubyssey. Sir:
I take violent exception to
the letter of "Ex-sqdrn.-ldr.
Featherstone-Smith". If he
cannot distinguish a Spitfire
from a BF-109 or a P-51 Mustang, I can only express sympathy for those he flew with.
Had he taken pains to see
the enlarged photograph, the
fact that the aircraft is a Spitfire is all too obvious.
Finally, the person who supplied the photograph (which is
actually a frame of gun-
camera film) stated unequi-
vocably his uncle informed
him the aircraft was a Mark
IX Spitfire  as  flown by his
uncle's wingman!
I hope this puts S/L Smith
right.
Per ardua ad asbestos, Jack.
R. THOMAS
Ed. Ill
'OLD SWEAT'
Editor. The Ubyssey, Sir.
Richtofen's squadron was
certainly daring.
Their tri-planes were painted a brilliant crimson which
showed up so well that we
called them the "Flamingos".
They flew up and down our
front line just south of Ypres,
straffing from 300 feet.
They were so low in fact
that we fired 18 pounder field
guns at them in an attempt
to chase them off.
I even fired my revolver at
one of them as he chased me
from only 50 feet up — the
pilot's face being clearly seen
from my half trench on the
ground!
L. S. HUMPHREYS
Medicine Dep't.
BY GEORGE  REAMSBOTTOM
Its a good news week!
An Art's president-elect ex-
itedly pushing athletic scholarships and a rodeo.
A fella named Randy Eno-
moto trying
t o convince
us he's serious about
running four
chancellor.
An AMS official busily
collecting stu-
reamsbottom dent signatures for petition to bring
NHL-hockey to Vancouver.
A report that Vancouver's
police department still isn't
convinced UBC students don't
need chaperones.
Editor trying to find subject
for  editorial.
Photographers looking for
dolls to take pictures of and
dolls trying to get in the way
of the photogs.
Reporters  trying  to  make
sense out of the rumors, press
releases and various axe-
grinding story tellers.
Editors trying to make
sense out of sense reporters
made out of same rumors,
press releases and axe grinders.
Other editors editing same
copy for final time, writing
heads and deciding play of
stories.
Proofreaders at printers cutting parts from stories when
they're too long.
More editors harrassing
printers by changing page
makeup and play of stories
when they don't fit being
either too short or uncuttable.
Or perhaps picture of doll
isn't right shape.
Late breaking story doesn't
break and hole open on page
one. Move story up from page
three and remake page three
again. Printers mumbling
louder, casting eyes at clock
as deadline coming closer.
Editor rewriting editorial:
Late breaking story finally
breaks. Lots of excitement,
good stuff. Shift story from
page one back to page three.
Remake page three again.
Printers not mumbling any
longer. Too busy figuring out
overtime pay.
Editor thinking about starting new editorial based on
late,  late  breaking story.
Page proofs finally up.
Could look better but no energy left and already an hour
.into  overtime.
Phones ringing but no-one
answers. Might be someone
taking back that late, late
breaking story.
The presses will roll in a
few hours and another Ubyssey will entertain, offend and
puzzle. It might even inform. THE WAYFARER
commitment
Thursday, March 3, 1966
Page  1
Sixty-five per cent of Canada's drug addicts are in Vancouver.
Choose your way of life
and pay the bills later
By LYNN
A Spanish proverb runs:
"Take what you want, says
God, and pay for it."
If you want the pearl of
great price, Christ says, then
sell all you have and ibuy it.
If, on the other hand you
choose lawlessness, the judge,
says Christ, will deliver you
to the officer and you will
be thrust into prison, and
what's more you'll stay there
until you pay the last farthing.
You make your choice and
you pay for it — one way or
the other.
LOOSE LIVING
Select a libidinous, loose,
irreverent life and you'll pay
for it. We commonly call this,
self-indulgence. But think on
it. Self-indulgence to live a
wasted, under par, Godless,
lower-plane, dissipating, frivolous existence? Self-indulgence? No. Surely this is the
costliest self-sacrifice a man
could make . . . turning his
back on everything that most
renders life worthwhile.
Think on it. Stop being
fooled by the idea that you
can choose beteween self-
indulgence and' self-sacrifice.
This is a mere trick of words.
All we can choose between is
two kinds of self-sacrifice.
The good or the evil. Take
whichever you want and pay
for it.
Christ calls for self-denial
in order to be His disciple.
Will we give up the high
for the low or the low for
the high?
CHEAP—NOT FREE
Should we choose to ignore
Christ, to snub God, to indulge in an idle, lazy, sensual life, we can have it at
once. With all the wild thrill
and mad sense of liberation
that one might seek.
Seize the passionate desire
at once . . . but the reckoning comes later. Take it, the
devil says, be cheap, lie,
cheat, indulge yourself at
my table of sin . . . never
mind about the bills for the
moment. They'll come in
later.
On   the   other   hand,   the
great choices, unconquerable
faith in God, undefeated
courage to stand by Christ,
loving thy neighbor, humility, high character, high intelligence, great service . . .
these bills come in at once.
They must be paid in advance, in devotion, dedication,   humility,   compassion,
(Continued on Page 4)
SEE:   CHOICE
AID FOR ALL
Chapel revives
lost conscience
By JOHN  RATHJEN
and TRUDY WHIPPERMAN
To see Teen Challenge in
Wayfarer visited Vancouver's
Inside the vacated Skid Road
store, the atmosphere was more
like that of a coffee shop than
a mission. Most of the dozen
tables were occupied, some
with knots of young people
talking earnestly with a "worker", others with one or two
beats listening obliquely to the
background music of a bass
fiddle and a piano.
A blonde in a bulky-knit
sweater and jeans sauntered
unsteadily towards us.
"Pardon me, I'm high right
now," she slurred when she
had been introduced. Her eyes
had a glassy" blankness about
them, and she was too inebriated to converse coherently.
Another drug addict in his
early thirties proved more communicative. He had been fixed
action, two reporters from The
Chapel on the Street.
two hours earlier and claimed
that the junk loosened him
up so that he didn't mind discussing his habit. Extending
two badly seared fingers, he
said, "You see, I'm coasting
away, and here's the cigarette
burning through ir    fingers."
This addict, with many other
addicts, prostitutes, homosexuals, alcoholics and teenagers
looking |for kicks, has experienced a peculiar fascination
for the Chapel.
The workers call it "bugging".
One   self-confessed   criminal
found    himself    incapable    of
knifing  a  man  after  he had
left   the  Chapel.   Others   com-
(Continued on  Page 3)
SEE: REVIVES
Home cures
80 per cent
of addicts
"Eighty per cent of those drug addicts who go to a Teen
Challenge Centre and stay the first two weeks are cured,"
says David Wilkerson, founder of Teen Challenge, a church-
related program designed to reach and rehabilitate members
of teen gangs and drug addicts.
Wilkerson  admits his pro-
Coming talks
by addicts
and ministers
admits his programme for a cure, and his
80% claim, are related to one
type of addict only — "the
one who is sick of junk, fed
up with the needle and wants
to start a new life."
He claims the cure is for
life, and the promise of help
is to all addicts regardless of
how long a "run" they have
had. When Wilkerson talks to
addicts he outlines the steps
to freedom as follows:
ADMIT YOU ARE HOOKED! It doesn't matter whether
you take off once a day or
ten times a day — you are
hooked — so why not admit
it?
QUIT LOOKING FOR AN
EASY WAY OUT! Cold turkey is the best and quickest
way to start a cure. It never
killed anybody. Don't expect
to be trusted or babied. If you
can run around making connections, you can work for
a cure.
•      •      •
GIVE YOURSELF OVER
TO GOD! Wilkerson's claimed
80% started the programme
on their knees.
START PLANNING LIFE
ALL OVER AGAIN! Think
back to the time before you
started on drugs. What was
your ambition? You must
learn to love the things you
once hated and to hate what
you loved. You can do the
right things now because G.od
gives you power to do them.
Wilkerson and his asociates
who have used this method
since 1959, are producing an
increasingly impressive list of
case histories to back their
statements.
John Gimenez and the
"singing ex-addicts" from the
Bronx will be at UBC Tuesday noon, March 9. They say
God helped them.
Nicky Cruz, another ex-addict, will have opportunity to
give his story in Bu. 106,
April  4.
A record on each former
addict has been kept, and
Wilkerson claims that most of
his former addicts are now
"productively  employed."
MARCH 9
John Gimenez's group, five
former drug addicts, speak of
their experience as "junkies",
and of the cure. Bu. 106, Wednesday noon.
MARCH 17
"What is a Christian?" Rev.
P. A. Gaglardi speaks in Bu.
106, Thursday noon.
MARCH 22
An Anglican priest, Rev. J.
Pitt of New Westminster,
speaks on "God Lives." Bu.
202, Wednesday noon.
April 4
Nicky Cruz, a former drug
addict (of The Cross & Switch
blade) speaks on his experiences in New York's gangland
and describes his cure. Bu. 106,
Monday noon.
B.C. HIGHWAYS Minister,
Rev. P. A. Gaglardi, speaks
Thursday, March 17 on
What is a Christian, in Buchanan 106. See story page
four.
LOVE IS THE
GREATEST
(SEE PAGE 2) Page 2
THE      WAYFARER
Thursday,   March   3,   1966
THE WAYFARER
The Wayfarer is published by the Associated Full Gospel Students for
the purpose of Christian witness. We believe that the claims of Jesus Christ
have been too summarily dismissed by too many students, letters to the editor
should  be  sent to   Box  46,   Brock  Hall.
EDITOR: KEN GAGLARDI
ASSOC. EDITOR: JOHN  RATHJEN
ASSISTANTS:
David Morris
Sharon Morrison
Bernice Gerard
Gary Anderson
Rick Bowering
Ron Costley
Cathy Eversfield
Russel Griggs
Ernie Hamm
Grace Howsam
Dennis Morgan
Trudy Wipperman
Roger Stronstad
Irene Stronstad
Herbert Tisher
Bob Wagar
Dorothy Watts
David Anonby
Malcolm Ruthven
Charmaine West
Gordon Wood
'*
Holy Spirit—God?
Are some Christians being mislead about the Holy
Spirit?
We suggest that an honest study of this subject will
lead the examiner to some interesting conclusions. Consider, for example, the eye witness report of a missionary
to Africa as reported in Outlook. The Rev. Maud Ellis
claims that "I heard illiterate women praising the Lord in
perfect English, others in Swahili, Pedi and other languages
not spoken in that area, which I recognized."
Next we ask the reader to consider an account of this
phenomenon as recorded in the second chapter of Acts in
the Bible.
"How hear we every man in our own tongue, wherein
we were born?
"Parthians and Medes . . .
"Cretes and Arabians, we do hear them speak in our
own tongues the wonderful works of God."
(Acts 2: 8-11 King James Version)
The similarity is striking.
Naturally we would not conclude at this point that we
have settled the question, but may we suggest that this may
be grounds to warrant further study — by all?
Christianity edible
Church bulidings were never so attractive, well ventilated, and lighted. Then, why do most of them have fewer
customers on Sunday night, and every other night in the
week, than the piazza palace? Judging from the crowds one
sees at the local drive-in there is more hunger for hamburgers than for God.
The Bible records that, "He that hath the Son hath
life." Isn't that what everyone wants — more life? If the
the hockey rink operated like a church, it would be empty
too. People don't go to the Forum or the Maple Leaf Gardens to hear a lecture on sports or a dissertation on the
way to play winning hockey. They go there to see life in
the form of a hockey headliner racing down the rink with
two or three of the opposition in hot pursuit. They want to
see their favorite star in action.
The church has a headline attraction. If it would only
turn Him loose with the crowd that comes out, there would
toe excitement. He could hold His own with all comers.
When the Apostle Paul came to town he didn't give a long
treatise on theology, a wearisome harangue on sin, tout he
told about a Christ who is the same yesterady, today, and
forever. People were excited about what they heard.
No one critizes a Vancouver audience that lines the
streets of the city to catch a glimpse of the queen; and no
one is upset when ten thousand voices are raised to cheer
a favorite hockey or football star. Why may every other
form of activity be served red hot, while religion must be
kept refrigerated and unpalatable? Must we talk only of a
Christ of history when the Christ of reality wants to make
Himself known and felt?
"He that hath the Son hath life." The important thing
is to receive Him, make Him our very own. I waste time
trying to honor a God of my own creation. I can neither
make nor destroy Him. He stand today as He has stood for
centuries — the Man of the Ages. I may have Him when I
open every avenue of my soul to His reception. "As many
as received Him, to them gave He power to become the
Sons of God ..."
To press, no less
I can just see the headline in The Ubyssey, "Religious
Rag Rocks Campus" ... or maybe, "Religious Rag Racks
Up". Anways, The Wayfarer is in the press — literally.
Now we wait.
In the interim, there are a few bouquets to hand out.
The first goes to the editor, Ken Gaglardi, who collapsed into bed, exhausted, minutes after he handed in the
copy.
The second, to the faithful assistants (now all home in
beds) who will throw up their hands in "holy" horror when
they see their now-mutilated brain children.
Last, to The Ubyssey staff for their aid and comfort to
our green-horn staff.
You realize this may force us to change our idea of God as being up there.
COMMENT
SAINT PAUL
Love is the greatest
By DOROTHY WATTS
"If I can speak with the
tongues of men and of angels,
but have not love, I am a blaring trumpet or a clanging cymbal. Of if I can prophesy and
am versed in all mysteries and
all knowledge, and have such
absolute faith that I can remove mountains, but have not
love, I am nothing. And if I use
all I have to feed the poor, and
give up my body to be burned,
but have not love, it profits
me nothing.
• •      •
"Love is forebearing and
kind. Love knows no jealousy.
Love does not brag; is not conceited. She is not unmannerly,
nor selfish, nor irritable, not
mindful of wrongs. She does
not rejoice in injustice, but joyfully sides with the truth. She
can overlook faults. She is full
of trust, full of hope, full of
endurance.
"Love never fails, But if
there are prophecies, they will
come to an end; if there are
tongues, they will cease; if there
is knowledge, it will come to an
end. For our knowledge is
partial, and so is our prophesying; but when that which is
perfect is come, all that is partial will come to an endl.
• •      *
When I was child, I talked
like a child: now that I have
become a man, I have put an
end to childish ways. For at
present we see things as in a
mirror, obscurely; but then we
shall see face to face. At present I gain but partial knowledge, but then I shall know
fully, even as I am fully
known. And so there remain
faith, hope, love — these three;
but of these the greatest is
love.
—I Corinthians: Chapter 13
Weymouth Translation.
• •      •
This passage, penned by the
Apostle Paul, may appear to
some to be a rather fanciful,
sentimental dicourse by an im
practical person, in this chapter
he describes a love which
seems humanly unattainable.
Even the most devout human
love would fail to mesaure up
to Saint Paul's description.
• •      •
Is this love of which he
speaks like the pot of gold at
the rainbow's send? Like out
of grasp? Humanly, yes. When
neglected or abused, it disintegrates. When faced with
hatred, it becomes hate.
On the other hand, divine
love encompasses the whole
world, regardless of man's responses to it. The person who
possesses this love gives to
everyone as he reflects the love
which God has placed in his
heart.
• •      •
Human   love   may   inspire
many admirable actions. It may
incite a person to give to the
poor; sometimes it may even
demand death. Yet Paul states
that human love is not sufficient. Without this Christ-inspired love, our self-sacrificing
actions fall short. Nothing on
earth can take the place of a
genuine divine love.
However, God does not expect anything from us without
first giving us an example to
follow. In his epistle to the
Romans, Paul writes, "For
scarcely for a righteous man
will one die; yet per adventure
for a good man some would
even dare to die. But God com-
mendeth his love toward us in
that while we were yet sinners,
Christ died for us."
•      •      •
Perhaps some would die for
those with whom they shared
mutual admiration and respect-
But Christ died for everyone.
His love did not stop antipathy
or hatred, but continued to
flow despite obstacles.
Moreover, God His Father
showed infinite love in allowing His Son to be sent to earth,
mistreated by his countrymen,
and eventually murdered. In
short, God is Love, Absolute
Love.
Man.s images false'
says UBC seminarian
By DENNIS MORGAN
"God is Spirit" and therefore all man-made images are
false.
Certainly such images of God
are dead whether they are
physical or mental, and must
not be confused with the true
God, the spirit of holy love.
He is anything but dead!
Patient, yes; humble, yes; beyond comprehension, but not
dead! It is those who have preferred darkness and death
rather than light and life more
abundant who are dead.
Christians don't oppose scientific truth; they seek it. But
they don't seek God in the
name of science, they seek
science  in the name  of God.
They realize that "spiritual
things are spiritually discerned."
Therefore they can only ask
their non-Christian friends and
those who accept the "God is
dead" theory to listen to the
spiritual or "existential" demands of their hearts and be
open to God's revelation of
Himself.
Admit that you might be
wrong in limiting your search
for knowledge of God to the
category of sensory knowledge.
Jesus said, "Blessed are they
that have not seen, and yet
have believed."
DENNIS MORGAN
Seminarian A.T.C. Thursday,   March   3,   1966
THE      WAYFARER
Page 3
SCIENTISTS DO
BELIEVE IN CHRIST
Religion isn't mythical
REVIVES
(Continued from Page 1)
plain that their long-dormant
conscience is revived. Whatever the fascination, it draws
some individuals back over and
over again.
Chapel on the street is staffed by five full-time workers.
One is a young minister; another a judo expert and theological college graduate; a third
man serves as pianist. Two
girls, both graduates of Bible
colleges, also assist. All have
been specially trained in Da
vid Wilkerson's New York
Center.
During our visit, a fellow in
his late teens spoke briefly to
the group about the transformation in his life.
"I was a rebel from the beginning," he said.
At the age of thirteen,
disillusioned by the separation of his middle-class
parents, and cynical about
people in general, he left home.
For three years he roamed
about, carousing, serving jail
terms, and hating everything.
During a drinking bout on
Vancouver Island last year, he
decided to reform. He returned
to school, but soon quit and
came to Vancouver where he
sold himself as a male prostitute.
It was in Vancouver that
God began to "bug" him. For
weeks he wandered aimlessly,
never shaking the conviction
that he must give religion a
serious try. Finally, through
a minister, he contacted Teen
Challenge.
'Christ completely transform-
formed my life!" he exclaimed.
"Now I have a definite peace
of mind, a joy of heart. Once
there was turmoil inside; but
now there is peace. I have no
guilty conscience any more. My
hate became love.
"When I was fifteen, I wrote
my mother telling her that I
never wanted to hear from her
again. But when I met Christ,
I got in touch with her right
away. It's fantastic! I'm just
like a new man!"
By G. H. WOOD
•What about the widely
trumpeted conflict between
science and religion, and the
claim by naturalists and
athiests that belief in the
supernatural is akin to faith
in the pagan myths ?
• •      •
This is not only an exaggeration and oversimplification—
it is also a patent falsehood,
and some scientists are saying
so today with a directness that
contrasts with the timidity
even of some theologians.
Professor Donald S. Kerlee,
Chairman of the Physics Department at Seattle Pacific College, says the difficulty arises
when "it is assumed that all
knowledge is ess'e n t i a 11 y
scientific in nature.
• •      •
A Christian view of science
recognizes the excellence of
science in its description of the
physical world. Beyond the
scope of science, however, the
Christian recognizes parameters of experience not
measured by units of length,
mass, or time, nor easily expressed in units derived therefrom. There are many of these
parameters!; tlhey cannot he
ordered in the mathematical
sense, nor can a quantized
scale be assigned as in physics.
Yet they describe many of
the experiences of life,  going
Relationships with Him
are on personal basis
By LYNN
Basically there are three
relationships available with
the man, Jesus Christ.
Firstly: utter ignorance,
because one has never heard.
Secondly: purposeful with
drawal from Him.
Thirdly: personal possession of Him.
Relationship with Jesus
Christ in any of these three
categories, has nothing whatsoever to do with a Church.
It is purely on a personal
basis that one can ever have
any contact with Him.
ONE DOWN
The Bible states in Matthew 24:14, 'And this Gospel of the Kingdom shall be
preached in all the world
for a witness unto all nations
and then shall the end
come." We cannot deny but
that the missionairies of the
Gospel are straddling the
globe right now. There will
be few to truthfully plead
ignorance.
Secondly: In the wretched
millions men have thumbed
at God, yawned in His face,
and continued to worship at
other shrines. Wood and
stone, paper and flesh. For
- man must worship something
or someone! Christ ignored
because Christ faced meant
certain change. And mankind
wallowing in its self-pride
would not change.
Thirdly: The group who
having looked beyond the vacant tomb of Christ into the
amazing heavens, know for
a certainty that 'tao' has been
reached, that the spirit has
been freed, and that life
eternal in the company of
Christ, The Son of God, is
assured. This group had first
to watch uncommitted, as
three days before, three crosses were silhouetted against
the evening sky — a grim
reminder of death. They
wondered vaguely as those
who loved the crucified Man
stood stunned beside a closed tomb. Wondered if another idealist had not been removed and with Him. all His
grand but unfulfilled promises.
IDEALIST  REMOVED?
But now the tomb is
empty, and in the background someone whispers:
"Destroy this temple and in
three days I will raise it up
again."
The reports filter through.
Men make claims that they
have seen the crucified Christ
.... talked with Him!
"Why seek ye the living
among the dead? He is not
here, but is Risen."
"Ye men of Galilee; why
stand ye gazing up into the
Heavens? This same Jesus,
which is taken up from you
(Continued on  Page 4)
SEE: RELATIONSHIPS
far beyond the mere description of the scientific variables.
A Christian view of science
admits the revelation of God
in nature through his creation,
as well as through special revelation, the Holy Scriptures."
An Indian scientist, Professor H. Enock, retired head of
the department of zoology at
the University of Madras,
South India, emphasizes that
science has "no explanation
for the origin of matter and
only speculations for the origin of life.
The theories established in
one generation are often contradicted in  another.
After more than thirty years
of teaching I have had no
occasion to change my view of
the spiritual realm or of the
mission of Jesus Christ. I have
come to the settled conviction
ithat no established fact of
science contradicts the Bible."
Dr. Claude Rimington, professor of chemical pathology
in the University of London,
issues a sober reminder regarding the alternative between faith and unbelief. "It
is the duty of a scientist to
question and investigate, to
draw deductions, and in his
search for truth to set up hypotheses which he then
attempts to refute by further
investigation.
A hypothesis can only be
assumed to have a high probability of correctness in so far
as attempts to refute it have
failed. The so-called laws of
nature are of this character.
Within a given set of circumstances, these laws may appear
always to be obeyed, as in
Newtonian mechanics, but
they may be found inadequate
or fallacious if the reference
system is altered. Science
must beware of dogma! It
must be clearly aware of its
own limitations imposed by
the procedure -which it uses,
namely, to exclude as many
variables as possible, save
that under scrutiny.
The process is one of exclusion and is highly selective; it
follows that the picture of
existence which science provides must be limited and incomplete. Bearing this in
mind, I see no incompatibility
in outlook between the scien--,
tist and the Christian.
A Christian can be a scientist
in the strictest sense of the
word and believe in God the
Creator and in the divinity of
Christ, in whose person God
projected himself into the
existence of our ■world in
space and time."
Summing up the relation of
science and faith, Dr. William
G. Pollard, of the Oak Ridge
Institute of Nuclear Studies in
Tennessee, states: "... science
is by definition the study of
nature, and more particularly
of those aspects of the natural
order that are regular, repeat-
able, and predictable.
The Bible by contrast is
chiefly concerned with man's
relationship to that aspect of
external reality which transcends the natural order—God,
heaven, and eternity.
It bears witness to a sequence of cosmic events in
which the supernatural broke
through into the natural with
great revelatory power. These
events are not regular, repeat-
able, or predictable.
Modern man is imprisoned
in space, time and matter. He
has largely lost the capacity to
respond to any supernatural
mode of external reality, to
any aspect of his world, that
iB, tnansdendent to three-dimensional space and time.
Incapable of i m a gi n ing
either heaven or eternity —
to say nothing of the Word by
Whom all things, both visible
and invisible, were made, being made flesh and dwelling
among us — he again sits in
darkness and in the shadow
of death. But the reality of
the living Christ and the power
of his resurrection, the love of
the Father, and the light of
the Holy Spirit continue unabated through such an age.
They and they alone will in
time again liberate man from
his imprisonment in space and
time, illuminate his darkness,
and dispel the shadow in
which he sits."—Excerpted by
permission from the August
27, 1965 issue of Christianity
Today. Copyright 1965 by
Christianity Today, Inc.
(G. H. Wood, Graduate
Student-Physics).
DAFT DEFINITION:
"AFTER ALL,
V\)E   BOTH
WORSHIP THE
SAME CjfoD...
..you worship
in your wav...
... AND X
WORSHIP
\\\  H/SJ Page 4
THE      WAYFARER
Thursday,   March   3,   1966
RELATIONSHIPS
(Continued
into Heaven, shall so come
in like manner as ye have
seen Him go into Heaven."
The air is charged with
excitement. And the disciples, cowed and miserable
during the past 72 hours
when they had deserted their
Lord and hidden behind the
safety of locked doors, now
suddenly, decisively, bouy-
antly with unrestrainable
passion carry the challenge
of their Risen Lord into the
enemies' territory. "We cannot but speak of the things
which we have seen and
heard." They were all thrilled beyond fear in the stupendous knowledge that
Christ was ALIVE!
Were they deluded? Are
we deluded who likewise
believe in This Man, This
Jesus Christ, The Risen Son
of God? No, they were not
deluded, nor are we. No fact
in history is better established than this one concerning
the resurrection of Jesus
Christ of Nazareth.
IDLE TALES
It came to the disciples as
a complete shock, unexpected, bewildering. They repeatedly told the women who
came to them concerning the
empty tomb .... that their
words were 'idle tales, and
they believed them not.'
If one man says he has
seen a dead person alive,
we may believe him or not,
according to our opinion of
his trustworthiness. If ten
men tell us that they collectively have seen this dead
man alive, then one takes
notice. But if five hundred
come with the same story,
and we disbelieve .... then?
We don't want to believe,
and we shut our ears, and
we turn our feet in another
direction so that the disturbing news does not win us.
If one denies the reality of
the Resurrection appearances, one does so with a
lack of integrity, and a real
sense of doom.
No ... . this third group
.... has rationally conceded
that this Jesus Christ in rising from the dead, fulfilled
the more than 300 prophecies
related of Him in the Old
Testament.
INVALIDITY MEANS . . .
If Christ had not lived,
died and risen again from
the dead, then is faith in
Christianity vain, then is the
martydom of the saints a
wicked |farce, then is the
world desolate, the grave
dark, the rule of chaos eternal and heaven non-existent.
Critics might proffer that
He arranged to fulfill these
300 prophecies. They are
right, of course, but in the
fulfilling some 'Superna-
t u r a 1' arrangement was
necessary.
The   great   conviction   of
Christ's resurrection blows
trumpets within us.
It is from this that no
man can escape. There is no
hit and miss here. This Man,
Jesus Christ, ROSE from the
dead.
And if He rose from the
dead, He is then indeed all
from Page 3)
He ever claimed to be. He is
The Son of God. He is The
Saviour of the world. Not
just a philosopher, a prophet
who went around doing good
and saying clever things. No,
He is immeasurably more
than that.
The resurrection stares
man in the face. It tugs at
the innermost privacy of a
man's being. The third group
has responded humbly and
willingly to the truth of the
empty tomb, and have triumphantly met The Son of
God and been transformed
in their innermost recesses,
so that no longer does the
vanity of the world appeal.
The first group, UTTER
IGNORANCE of Christ, will
no longer be with us.
The second, purposeful
WITHDRAWAL, multitudes
who finding themselves in
this mess of a world, respond by being a mess themselves. The small-scale individuals, who in an era
terrific in its chaos, ominous
in its perils, immense in its
opportunities, get no vision
of Christ .... because they
are small-scale. Rovers of
self. Not courageous to take
that step into faith that will
enlarge their vision, their
mentality and heart. And the
PERSONAL POSSESSION
group to whom Christ is the
thrilling centre arf a rescue
story.
REV. BERNICE GERARD
... no hours
No room for
Pentecostal
chaplain here
The Pentecostal chaplain,
Rev. Bernice Gerard keeps no
regular office hours; in fact
she has no office at all. But
she can be reached by phone at
her home in Oakridge, or
through Box 46, Brock Hall.
By way of self description
Miss Gerard said, "I suppose
you could call me a neo-classical type chaplain in that the
strength of my conviction concerning the power of primitive
Christianity in its golden age
provides the where-with-all for
my service to God.
I believe in prayer and in
taking the Bible seriously. You
can pass it on that anytime anyone wants to talk about the
God of the New Testament and
how He works today, this chaplain is available and warm for
the subject."
Ministers book valuable
source on drug information
The Cross and the Switchblade, by Reverend David
Wilkerson with John and Elizabeth Sherrill, is available
at the campus bookstore. It is the story of David Wilkerson's
adventure in the asphalt jungle of New York's gangland as
he started a lonely — and seemingly doomed — crusade to
help teenagers of the city's gangs.
The book is a valuable source of information on what
Time (Aug. 14, 1964) described as "Preaching the Monkey
off their Backs." Those with even a little interest in the
drug problem should read the Wilkerson story; the man
with first-hand experience in helping addicts deserves to be
heard.
CHOICE
(Continued from Page 1)
charity,     self-discipline,
loyalty.
Our choice — always.
CHOICE IS YOURS
We can 'be defeated, embittered, crushed, afraid,
faithless, egotistical, with
cynicism withering the soul
... if that's what we want,
God says, take it and pay for
it. But the choice can be
different.
"For whosoever," says
Christ, "will save his life
shall lose it; but whosoever
Shall lose his life for my sake
and the Gospel's, the same
shall save it.
"For," continues Christ,
"what shall it profit a man,
if he shall gain the whole
world and lose his own soul?
Or what shall a man give in
exchange for his soul?"
DARKNESS OR LIGHT
Christ was aware of the
consequences. Indeed he was,
and He left us in no uncertainty concerning the
choice. His cross represents
a collosal fact that should
make every decent man and
woman pause. He looked
across the centuries of time
and decided it was worth the
agony of pain and shame. He
was aware that millions
across the centuries would
make the 'right' choice because He took the "rap." The
sinless Son of God paid the
price to set men free and
move them from darkness
into light, from death into
exuberant, thrilling, pulsating LIFE.
PART OF PROBLEM?
"I have come," He said,
"that they might have life,
and that they might have it
more abundantly."
Part of the problem? Part
of the answer?
Part of the disease? Part
of the cure?
Part of the debit side of
life or the credit?
Baal or God?
"Take what you want, says
God, take it and pay for it."
But whenever one soul accepts the challenge of Christ,
accepts in humility, with repentance the purpose of The
Cross, it makes a difference
to the entire world . . . and
everything depends on
enough people who are part
of the answer . . . people who
make  the  'right'  choice.
Editor probes
tongues
for new book
They Speak With Other
Tongues is John Sherrill's
account of the adventure
which was his when he set
out to write a documentary
on the subject of speaking
with other tongues. As a senior editor of Guidepost, his
search for facts led him to
libraries, to numerous hand-
clapping churches, and finally, to a confrontation with
his own miracle.
For the person who wants
the gist of what the "tongues
movement" is» Sherrill's book
is made-to-order. Within the
framework of his search for
the facts and under the influence of his personal questioning, he moves steadily to
a climax, all the while giving
the historical and Bibical
background.
The author's apparently
candid report of his own experience and of the extent
of the "charismatic renewal"
in the old-line churches and
elsewhere will be of interest
to many.
The book is informative
but does not, of course, prove
anything to the reader; like
Sherrill, each one must seek
his own answers.
Views  on  life
two  thinkers
by
Aristotelian Logic:
When Aristotle was asked
what a man gains by lying, he
replied "Not to be believed
when he tells the truth".
Ministers come to talk religion
JACK PITT
. . to speak
THE HONOURABLE P. A.
GAGLARDI, British Columbia's Minister of Highways, is
scheduled to speak on campus
Thursday noon, March 17.
He has been invited to speak
as a minister of the gospel but
it is not expected that his presentation will be "stuffy" (even
if it is religious) because there
is nothing stale about Mr.
Gaglardi.
In addition to his responsibilities in the government he
preaches regularly in Calvary
Temple, Kamloops, on several
daily radio broadcasts, and on
television weekly; and, he also
keeps up with scores of invitations to service clubs, church
groups and business gatherings.
THE REV. JOHN PITT of St.
Barnabas  Anglican Church in
New Westminster is scheduled
to speak on campus Wednesday, March 23 at noon.
Rev. Pitt recently addressed
the Full Gospel Business Men's
Fellowship International which
convened in London, England
after 450 American businessmen and their wives flew in
to participate in an "intensive
layman's witness" throughout
Britain and other European
countries.
In London Mr. Pitt addressed the inter-denominational
convention audience, and later
served in a team that participated in a massive "visit-the-
churches" program. The
FGBMI group received invitations to 2400 British churches
of all denominations. The Rev.
Pitt will speak on the topic,
"God Lives".
P. A. GAGLARDI
.  . .  not stuffy Thursday,   March   3,   1966
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
FOREGROUND
Here come co-op  houses'!
More for
your money
Co-operative residences are
increasingly under discussion in UBC student government circles, as a possible
alternative to the still-a-plan-
ning student union building
and/or a necessary cure for
UBC's tangled housing setup.
Here Ubyssey reporter Pat
Hrushowy scans the current
UBC and Canadian student
co-op residence  scene.
In the current "boom town"
era of university expansion in
Canada, the problem of student housing is becoming an
almost insoluble dilemma.
At UBC, there just isn't
enough room for out of town
students to live on campus.
Many students are forced
to travel further from campus than ever before to obtain room and board in private homes and have found
reasonably priced apartments
at a premium.
Only at the Universities of
Toronto and Waterloo can
one see any positive action
being taken to correct the
ever worsening situation.
The Toronto students have
the first and largest co-operative residence plan.
"We can benefit from the
experience of the students in
Toronto in providing reasonably priced accommodation
for our own students," said
Jim Slater, chairman of the
AMS married students' housing committee.
Although co-op residences
are out of the scope of the
housing committee, Slater has
been increasingly active in
this  field.
Out of the Toronto co-op
has sprung Co-operative College Residences Incorporated
(CCRI).
CCRI arranges financing,
engages specialized architectural and legal services and
negotiates to obtain the necessary co-operation of the universities and various levels of
government.
Students need a place where
they can eat and sleep and
carry out the other necessary
functions of life. In addition,
they have to study.
It becomes a complicated
problem when it is recognized
that this place cannot be passive.
Student residences play an
important role in the educational process.
Therefore, it isn't just a
problem of providing a place
for students to live, but one
of providing containers for a
diverse mixture of students
that will be stimulating.
At the University of Toronto, Rochdale College, planned to be open in 1967, will
include eighteen "houses" of
18 students each, accommodation for 16 students on each
of 19 floors in private and
semi-private facilities and 10
apartments per floor on each
of 20 floors.
SHEW*
5S5S Sib
"m*
1*
5
ll*^_P«i.
OPENING IN 1967, this is Toronto's Rochdale College, with
628 single students and 200 married couples without
children living in 20 floors of building. Cost runs about
$5 million. UBC student planners see similar high-rise
structures going up on the Fort Camp site.
SMALLER SCALE co-op residence is off the drawing boards
for the University of Waterloo. This one houses 105 male
students in double and single rooms, at a total project
cost of $428,000.
The Way To Spend
FRIDAY EVENING, March 4th
SONG FEST 66
Q.E. Theatre - 8:00 p.m.
Tickets: A.M.S. and Q.E.
HONEYMOON AT THE HARRISON
Spend lazy days golfing, riding, strolling by the lake, swimming in the hot pools and the sparkling outdoor pool. Q?
Enjoy fun-filled evenings in the gay Copper Room with dancing
and entertainment nightly. <^P Memorable food, a relaxing
resort atmosphere, and The Harrison's magnificent mountain
scenery. C^p For that most special holiday, plan to stay at
The Harrison. ^ Just 2 hours drive from Vancouver, B.C.;
3Vi from Seattle.
June honeymooners receive a special wedding present - 50% off room rates
THE HARRISON Hotel
a distinguished resort at
Harrison Hot Springs, British Columbia
In Vancouver:
Call   toll-free   521-8888,
see your travel agent
U.B.C. THUNDERBIRD
WINTER SPORTS CENTRE
SKATING SCHEDULE — 1966
Effective September 24th, 1965, to April 15th, 1966
TUESDAYS
WEDNESDAYS
FRIDAYS
SATURDAYS
SUNDAYS
(Beginners & Preschool Children)
12:45—2:45 p.m.*
2:00—3:30 p.m.
7:30—9:30 p.m.
3:00—5:00 p.m.
7:30—9:30 p.m:**
3:00—5:00 p.m.
7:30—9:30 p.m>*
12:45—2:45 p.m.
7:30—9:30 p.m,
*    Special student admission: 15 cents.
** Except when hockey games scheduled — No. 19 & 20.
Jan. 28 & 29, Feb. 11 & 12 and two more dates not scheduled.
ADMISSION:  Afternoons    —    Students 25c    Adults 60c
Evenings    —    Students 50c    Adults 75c
Skate Rental 35c per pair — Skate Sharpening 35c pair
For further information: Call 224-3205 or 228-3197
The building will provide
accommodation for 628 single
students and 200 married
couples without children, but
the accommodation is structured into small self-governing units with various types
of separated but not segregated facilities.
This is the type of residence envisioned for the campus here. It could possibly be
built on the Fort Camp site
and be completely autonomous.
By allowing the co-op plan,
the university administration
would be able to use freed
capital for academic purposes.
And student residence plans
would not have to wait their
turn while the administration
considers what it thinks are
more important projects.
Will the
KEY    CLUB
be  ruled   by  the  establishment? It will be THE establishment.
SPECIAL
EVENTS    PRESENTS
THE
PAUL WINTER
JAZZ ENSEMBLE
Sat. Night - 8.30 - UBC Auditorium
Advance tickets at A.M.S., Vancouver Ticket Centre or at the door.
Students $1.50 • $1.75.        Adults $2.50 - $2.75
Credits: Winners Intercollegiate Jazz Festival 1961, Playboy, Jazz Poll Leaders,
First Jazz Group to play in the Whitehouse, Six ablums released on Columbia,
State Department tour of South America. Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday,  March  3,   1966
McGILL MAD
Province's grant
prompts inquiry
MONTREAL (CUP) — A committee of civil servants
and university representatives will look into the amount
of Quebec's grant to McGill University to determine
whether the school can operate properly with the funds at
its disposal.
Quebec's Premier Jean Lesage announced the formation
of the committee after a meeting with a five-man delegation
from McGill.
The university was to receive a total of $7.6 million in
provincial grants for 1966-67,
an increase of only $100,000
over last year. McGill protested this was insufficient and
"an error in judgment."
The Union Generale des
Etudiants du Quebec has welcomed the low McGill grant,
however. In a telegram to Lesage, UGEQ said the ratio now
established for grants to French
and English universities should
be maintained to allow French-
language schools to catch up
with their English-language
counterparts.
The UGEQ statement goes on
to deplore the "feebleness of
the governments argument"
about McGill's extra funds
from   the   National   Research
New chemical
idea hailed as
'far reaching7
By BILL GRAF
A UBC chemist has upset a
widely-held belief that chemical reactions are retarded by
low temperatures.
Associate professor Richard
Pincock concluded after more
than two years of research that
reactions can be speeded up at
low temperatures.
Pincock's studies, described
as "outstandingly original in
conception" by Professor C. A.
McDowell, head of UBC's
chemistry department, may
have far-reaching consequences.
The preservation of human
tissues, food storage, and the
possible existence of life at low
temperatures on other plants
are among the main areas relevant to Pincock's work.
Pincock, a graduate of the
University of Utah and Harvard, joined the UBC faculty
in 1&60.
He began studies on frozen
compounds in 1963, and has
ibeen assisted toy grants from
the National Research Council,
American Chemical Society
and recently from the U.S. Air
Force.
Pincock has recently begun
studies on why decomposition
is speeded up when solutions
are frozen. He has a tentative
answer.
"Under these conditions,
which are analagous to the
agents being in an unfrozen
solution, the chances of a collision and a reaction are reduced,'' he said.
"If, however, the agents are
brought together in a much
smaller volume, which is analagous to freezing the solution,
the reaction takes place in a
shorter time because of concentration," he said.
Council and private sources.
In reality, UGEQ says, the
redistribution of grants takes
account for the first time of
a fundamental reality: that the
university sysem of the French
majority is still radically inferior to that of the English
minority.
Mission week
at St. Marks
The Newman Campus mission is being held every day
this week at noon in St.
Mark's College lounge.
Father Maloney is speaking
on the relation of doctrine to
morality.
He feels that in order to
judge today's problems people
should return to the original
source — the scriptures — and
not rely on — doctrines established by previous generations.
The mision is a yearly event
sponsored by UBC's Newman
club to provide both inspiration
and information for students.
The mission is open to all
denominations.
Newman club president
Harry Ray, commerce III, said
one of the purposes of the mission is to give students an idea
of the club's activities and to
encourage  new members.
Will the
KEY    CLUB
be dominated by engineers?
Never.
Rent
A Gown
Lovely   Selection
Brides
Attendants
Formal Wear,
Fur   Stoles,
Tux.  & Din.
Jackets,  Costumes.
MARIE BRUCKER SALON
Designers and Dressmakers
Sales and Rentals
2608   Granville 733-6727
4691   Kingsway 435-1160
INDOOR
FOREIGN STOCK CAR
AUTO RACES
Saturday, March 5
I A cross between a demolition derby and a stock
car race —
I FINAL race of the season.
See a race car built in 15
minutes and then raced.
AGR0D0ME
I Time trials 7:30 Races 8:30
Adult $2.00 Student $1.25
I Child  under  12   FREE  with  Adult
DONALD    D.    STEVENSON,
BA# M. F., noted forest management expert, will give
the annual H. R. MacMillan
lecture in forestry in Bu. 106
noon, March 8 on Economic
aspects of intensive forest
management in the southeastern United  States.
HELD OVER
BIG MILLER
SHAKEY'S PIZZA PARLOR
Shows at 9:30, 11:30, 1:30 "Hoot" Sunday
1026 Granville Res. 681-2822
P.E.U.S. To Vote Friday
B.P.E. students are actually having an election to determine next year's council. For the first time since  1958
council members will not go in by acclamation.
Candidates for office:
President: Ed Youngberg, P.E. Ill; Byron Thome,
Rec. III.
Vice-President: Brent McComb, P.E. Ill, Ernie Yaculb,
P.E. III.
Secretary-Treasurer: Meryl Oliver, P.E. II, Melanie
Kamm, Rec. III.
Students are invited to hear these people speak .  .  .
Thursday,  12:30 in Room 213, War Memorial Gym
Vote Friday, March 4, at War Memorial Gym.
What's the
lowest-priced
sports car
you can own?
You're looking at it!
It's the Austin-Healey Sprite. And it's got everything that makes it a true sports car. Twin-carb,
1100 cc. engine with four-speed gear box. Disc
brakes and rack-and-pinion steering, too. Bucket
seats, of course. And a tremendous world-wide
competition record. A true sports car.
And here's the best part. You just can't pay
less, and still get a true sports car. So get the
new Austin-Healey Sprite, and you'll agree . . .
nobody puts more into car-making than BMC.
The British Motor Corporation of Canada Ltd.
AUSTIN   •   MG   •   AUSTIN-HEALEY
AUSTIN IS NOW AT
PUMLEY  FOURTH  AVENUE
2211  W. 4th AVE.
AUSTIN - MORRIS - MGB
RE 1-3141
10th AND
ALMA
RE 3-8105
1585 MARINE
GORDON BROS.NO™ vr?.£_7
AUSTIN, MG DEALERS
FRED  DEELEY  LTD.
CANADA'S OLDEST AND LARGEST AUSTIN DEALER
FRED  DEELEY  LTD.
Serving British Columbia for Over Half a Century
907 W. BROADWAY RE 8-2171 Thursday,  March   3,   1966
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
— powell hargrave photo
MOST PEOPLE KEEP their heads up but Frank Gnup's new boys keep theirs down
during spring training. This field of grounded cycfiers represents next year's crop of
football  Thunderbirds   and   that's   Gnup   hoping miracles really do happen.
ONE  DAY
TO  SPLASHDOWN
Swimmers meet at UBC
UBC's swimming Thunderbirds host the second annual
Canadian Intercollegiate Swimming and Diving Championships this weekend at Percy
Norman Pool.
The championships will
bring together the top male
swimmers and divers from 42
colleges and universities across
Canada.
Each of the five athletic conferences affiliated with the
Canadian Intercollegiate Athletic Union has qualified 20
swimers who will compete in
15 events, including two relay
and diving competitions.
Last year the UBC team set
six Canadian records and won
the Nelson C. Hart Championship trophy.
Bob Walker set records in
the 100 and 200 yard butterfly
and in the 200 yard individual
medley competition while Bill
Gillespie swam to record times
in the 100 and 200 yard backstroke events. UBC's relay
team splashed to a record in
the   400   yard   medley.
Records are expected to fall
in most events in the meet
which begins at 1:30 p.m. Friday with heats in seven swimming - events and one diving
event.
Finals are set for 8 p.m.
Saturday with the finals sche
duled for 2:30 p.m.
Nine Thunderbirds qualified
for the national championships
last weekend at Saskatoon by
placing either first or second
in an event in the Western
Canadian Intercollegiate Championships   where   the   hosting
University of Saskatchewan upset UBC 132-122.
The nine are swimmers Walker, Gillespie, John Conroy,
Eric Marks, Bert van de Berg,
Dave Smith, Bill Campbell,
Gary Baker and diver George
Fudge.
Saskatoon foursome slide
to victory over TBirds
Mike Lukowich's strong curling foursome from University
of Saskatchewan won the Western Canadian Championships
Saturday in Calgary.
The 1-ukowich rink from Saskatoon won the competition
with a 5-1 record including a 10-1 trouncing of UBC Thunder-
bird's rink skipped by Howard Tyner.
The UBC rink tied for third place with a 3-3 record.
A week earlier, Lukowich lost in the Saskatoon provincial
playdown finals to Bob Pickering of Milestone, 9 to 6 by missing
a difficult double takeout with his final stone in the twelfth
end.
Will the
KEY
CLUB
replace
consensus?
It's
LIBEL' to
El Circulo Presents
"Tres Sombreros
de Copa"
MARCH 4th and 5th
Frederic Wood Studio
For tickets call 255-2463
or at A.M.S. Office
FORMAL AND
SEMI-FORMAL
Rental  and Sales
TUXEDOS - WHITE DINNER
JACKETS - TAILS - MORNING
COATS        -        ACCESSORIES
Complete Size Range
STUDENT  RATES
McCUISH
FORMAL WEAR
LTD.
MON.-SAT.-9:30 to 5:30
2046 W. 41 s»
PH. 263-3610
"The home of friendly people and happy teachers."
SCHOOL DISTRICT
No.  35  (LANGLEY)
Within  easy  commuting   distance  of   U.B.C,   S.F.U.   and
U. of W.W.
Elementary and  Secondary Vacancies Effective
September, 1966
For salary schedule and detailed information phone
594-4515 (Toll free Vancouver Area)
Harold  D. Stafford:  District Superintendent of Schools
SPECIAL
EVENTS
&
FROSH US
Presents
TOAAASI
Fijian Folk Singer
B
R
O
C
K
25c
F
R
I
D
A
Y
Y
N
O
O
N
Tomasi has appeared at Shakey's, The Bunkhouse and
the Shanghai Junk. He formerly was a performer at
the Polynesian Cultural Center in Hawaii.
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
Finance Committee:
Applications are now being accepted for positions in
the Finance Committee.
1. Three Assistant Treasurers
2. One Member At Large
Those possessing a wide knowledge of student activities and capable of assuming an interesting and
responsible office are especially urged to apply. Please
submit applications in writing to Box 53 by March 7,
1966.
Chairmen Needed:
Applications are now being received for chairmanship of the following committees:
ACADEMIC ACTIVITIES COMMITTEE.
FROSH ORIENTATION COMMITTEE.
INTRAMURALS COMMITTEE.
LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE COMMITTEE.
COLLEGE SHOP MANAGER.
All applications shall be in writing and shall be addressed to the secretary (Box 54).
Eligibility forms must be submitted with applications.
Eligibility forms are available at the Secretary's office
(upstairs south Brock).
Applications must be submitted by 4:00 p.m. Thursday, March 3rd, 1966.
W.A.A. Elections:
Nominations are now open for the positions of President, Vice-president, Treasurer and Secretary of the
Women's Athletic Association. Nominations will close
at 4:00 p.m. on March 7th, and elections will be held
on March 10th, in Bu. 100, at a general meeting
to which all women on campus are invited. Nominations may be submitted at the Women's Athletic
Directorate office in the Women's Gymnasium.
Students Court: Constitutional Hearing
The court will hold a hearing on Tuesday, March 8th,
12:30 p.m. in the Student's Council Chambers, Brock
Hall, to enquire into the validity of the Law Students
Association, election held Feb. 25, 1966.
All those interested in making representation to the
court must notify the Clerk of the Court of their intention to do so by 4:00 p.m. Monday, March 7. The
hearing is open and all students are invited to attend.
Apply Box 126, Brock Hall. Page  8
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday,  March   3,   1966
'TWEEN CLASSES
Company comes calling
Campbell Mackie, program
consultant and Geoff Cue, B.C.
CYC Regional Program Developer will talk to all students
interested in volunteering for
CYC projects. IH today from
2:30 p.m.
SPECIAL   SEMINAR
Why Be Hung Up — Possibilities for Social Action —
Dr. W. G. Hardwick — Urban
Geography — Bu. 2233 noon.
PHYSICS SOC
CAP western tours lecture
— Laser demonstations of the
interaction of intense optical
radiation with matter. Noon
in Hebb.
SPORTS   CAR  CLUB
General    meeting    noon    in
Chem 250. Elections RACING
FILMS  GALORE!
VCF
Dr.  Phil Ney speaks tomorrow noon in Ang. 110 on Faith,
Reality and Miracles.
IH
Exhibit of Chinese paintings
by I-Hsiung Ju Monday-Friday,
8 to 10 p.m.
UBC SOCREDS
Howard Johnson — MP for
Okanagan - Revelstoke speaks
Friday noon Bu. 104.
POETRY READING
Reading   of   African  Poetry
in   English  presented  noon   in
Bu. 219.
FROS
Come to tea at IH 3-5 p.m.
FILM SOd
GREAT EXPECTATIONS in
Aud.  at  12:30,  3:30,  6:00  and
8:30. 50 cents.
CHEERLEADING
CHEERLEAD!    Tryouts    for
'66-'67 teams. Bu. 218 Monday
noon March 7.
WUS
Dr.  Kassis  speaks  on  study
abroad Bu. 203 noon.
SQUIRES SOC
First annual Pacific Northwestern Invitational Squires
Tournament to be held noon
March 10th in Brock Lounge.
NEWMAN CLUB
Campus     mission     in     St.
Mark's Lounge at noon all this
week.
ED. US
Dr. Fiedler speaks Ed.  1006
noon.
EAST ASIA SOC
Two Chinese movies noon
Bu. 104. China-India Border
Dispute and Bountiful Harvest.
SPECIAL  EVENTS
FUS and Special Events present Tomasi, Fijian folksinger,
noon in Brock. Part of Frosh
week celebrations. 25 cents.
CHORAL SOC
A festival otf Song — Friday
8 p.m. in Aud. Tickets at door.
BAY
Starts Tomorrow
THE  HIGH BRIGHT SUN
Dick Bogarde - Susan Strasberg
Plus
CAT BALLOU
Lee  Marvin  -  Jane  Fonda
STUDENTS 75c
DILTA
Plus
Plus
Starts Tomorrow
THE CURSE OF
FRANKENSTEIN
Hazel Court
DR. CRIPPEN
BLACK  TORMENT
CSA
Hugh Hunt gives noon-hour
talk in Bu. 214 on Transcendental Deep Meditation. Public
invited. Hunt is an initiate of
Makeah Makarish yogi.
VOC   PARKS
Mr. Eadie of Alpine Outdoor
Recreational Resources Ltd.
speaks on Cypress Bowl Development and the new recreational demands of the Lower
Mainland   noon   in   Ang.   415.
All welcome.
FUS
Soc-Hop   in  Brock  noon  —
two  hours  of  dancing  to  the
Shantelles. Admission 50 cents.
SPECIAL EVENTS
Last minute tickets available
for Romeo and Juliet and the
Vancouver Symphony. See Rm.
255 Br.  Ext.
CLASSIFIED
Rales: 3 lines. 1 day. $.75—3 days. $2.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Please bring or send lo Publications Office, Brock Hall.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost 8c Found
11
FOUND ADS inserted free. Publications office, Brock Hall. Local 26,
224-3242.
LOST — LONDON FOG RAINCOAT
at Totem Park Dance. Reward offered.   Phone   224-9774,   Room   302
Scandals
39-A
TOTEM TRIUMPH GYMK ANA.
Middlegate Shopping Centre, 7155
Kingsway, Bby. March 6. Registration  9:00  a.m.
FOUND WOOL, SCARF IN ANGUS
312 last Firday. Phone Marliyn,
431-7957.	
LOST: GREY UMBRELLA IN BU.
2233 two weeks ago. Please call
Marilyn, 922-6893, deep sentimental
value.
LOST. A BLACK AND GOLD FIN
either in Brock or Main Library.
Stacks,   phone  266-7500.
FOUND. — UMBRELLA ON BUS
carrying Education students to
Cariboo. Claim at A.M.S. Business
Office
LOST—LADIES' AMBER FRAMED
glasses near Buchanan. One week
ago.   Please   phone   224-5332.	
Greetings 12
DEAREST YVONNE, HAPPY 21st
birthday on March 5. Only the best
of everything always. All my love
Bob.
DINO, YOU VILLAN! GERRY, IG-
nore those crude churls with the
practical jokes. They only ridicule
my love. To prove my love, only
phone   Pino,   922-6908.	
Special Notices
13
THE "BANDITS". (LITTLE SAL-
ly Walker) are coming. Don't tell.
It's   a   big   secret'
STUDY FOR FINALS ! BUT HAVE
a ball first, the Pre-med Ball.
This Saturday at the Coach
House.   Only   $3.50   cpl.   at   A.M.S.
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance rates? If you are over 20 and
have a "good driving history you
qualify for our good driving rates.
Motorbike & Scooter Insurance,
also from $17.00 up. Ted Elliott,
224-6707.
DANCE TO KENTISH STEELE
and The Shantelles. Noon today In
Brock,   25c
DON AND THE GOODTIMES WILL
be in the Armouries with Kentish
Steele and the Shantelles, Saturday, March 5. Don't miss the biggest dance yet. Just $1.50 per person.   9-1.
THE NOCTURNALS CRASH IN TO
Totem Park Friday night from 9
p.m. to 1 a.m. It's a mixer! AMS
cards,   please.	
STUDENT MEDICALLY UNABLE
to attend classes needs notes for
month of March in English 100,
History 202, Psychology 100, So-
ciology  200.   Phone  228-8593.
WINTER KEPT US WARM. A
student film from U. of T. Presented by Film Society.
Travel Opportunities
16
3 WEEK CHARTER FLIGHT TO
London Aug. 24th to Sept. 14th,
$340. Faculty and students (and/
or parents, spouses, children, eligible). Phone WA 2-7931 or RE 8-
6996. Deadline for applications
Mar.    10th.
POST EXAM TOUR TO MEXICO,
X295_ via CPA. For inform, phone
Steve Hunter, AM. 1-8656 after 6
p.m. Reservations. Deadline March
11th.
Automobiles For Sale
21
MUST SELL 1958 MGA CONVERT-
ible in good shape with excelfent
transistor radio. What offers?
Phone   224-9957.   Ask   for   Randy.
SACRIFICE ! 1962 VOLKSWAGEN
de luxe. Radio, low mileage, excellent condition. Phone CA 4-5979
after 7.
'52 8-CYL. FORD, ONE OWNER.
Onl 52,000 miles, excellent condition. Cheap. Ph. AL 5-7843. Be-
tween  6 p.m. and 9 p.m.
1955   PLYMOUTH   HARDTOP.   ORI-
ginal  owner.  266-6206.
Motorcycles
27
HONDA 90 IN GOOD CONDITION,
1966 plates, and new front tire.
Phil,   224-6381.
Orchestras
35
BUSINESS SERVICES
Typing
43
PROFESSIONAL TYPING, ARDALE
Griffiths Limited, 70th and Granville,  263-4530.
FAST, ACCURATE TYPING
thesis, essays, etc., on new IBM
Executive typewriter, phone 263-
4023.	
EXPERIENCED TYPIST, WEST
End, would like typing to do at
home. Phone MUtual 3-5071 morning   or   evening.	
TYPING 25c page or J1.95 hour West
End. 685-5539 eves. Campus pickup and delivery, $1.00.
EXPERT TYPIST, SPECIALIZING
in thesis term papers and reports.
AM 1-4655.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
TWO STUDENTS WANTED FOR
part time work now, and full time
during summer. Duties include
maintenance work on apartments
& revenue houses and occasional
chauffering. Applicants must be
reliable and of neat appearance. All
applications in writing. Send name,
address & phone number and recent photo to Mr. Alexander, 1320
Comox,  Vancouver 5.	
A  GO-GO   GIRLS
For the "SURF". Opening this week
end Located in Richmond, on the
way to the ariport. Above the
Richmond  Marina.  Phone  278-2624.
HEAD LIFE GUARD to supervise,
direct and train a staff of five life
guards and assist with the summer aauatic program. Qualifications expected. Instructor's award
in swimming & life saving. Salary $400 month, plus car allowance
and extra instructional income
opportunity. Send applications' to
Director of Recreations, Municipal
Hall, 610 Duncan St., Powell River
B.C.	
SUMMER TRAINEE DIRECTOR OF
Recreations — Applicant must be
in the Faculty of Physical Education & Recreation. To organize
and direct the summer recreation
program of swimming, playgrounds
and activity centre, commencing
May 1, 1966. Starting salary J400
month plus car alee.
Send applications to Director of
Recreations, Municipal Hall, 610
Duncan   St.,   Powell   River,   B.Q.
Work Wanted
52
EXPERIENCED R. & B. BAND
wants dance jobs. Phone Brjan,
AM    6-4260.
Miscellanous For Sale
71
ONE SCIENCE, SWEATER AND
crest. Size 42. Phone Del, CA 4-
9494.
Rooms
81
QUIET, COMFORTABLE ROOM
for rent. Private entrance. Bathroom  & phone.  Phone AM  3-6123.
Room & Board
82
ROOM AND BOARD — D.U. FRA-
ternity House. Excellent food. Call
Al Dahlo CA 4-5852  or CA  4-9841.
MOVE ON CAMPUS FOR EXAMS!
Room and board available in Fraternity House. Phone 224-9986 between  5:00  p.m.-6:30  p.m.
Houses and Apts.—Other
Cities 87
FREE WEEK END SKI LIFT
tickets and meals for 2 or 3 piece
Comibo for dancing, cafeteria,
Whistler Mt. 2-3 hours each Sat.
and Sun. aft. Mrs. Beattie, phone
MU 4-9913.
ROSEDALE .ONTARIO — FAMILY
of 4 with furnished coach house
(3 air cond. BR's, 2% baths, LR,
DR, garage), wishes to trade for
similar accommodation July-Aug.
with responsible individual in Van.
For further information call Van.
682-6331.
LASSO
ATM
RODEO
LOOK
It's the way to round yourself up for Spring's active
days! So, head West, cowgirl! Climb into hipsters,
pop into Western look shirts, and prairie flower
prints ... all corralled for you at the Bay in Cres-
tique separates by Rosectest.
A. Rib-rider poor boy turtle-neck shell knit in pure wool, the liveliest
sweater you'll see around these parts for Spring. Lasso yours in olive
green  to  wear  with  your  other  Crestique  separates.  8-14.   Each 6.95
B. Western slims with the hipster look in slub weave cotton. Styled
with simulated leather tie belt, stitch detail on pockets, and fly front.
In olive green. 6-14. Each 11.95
C. Flap pockets on this cotton voile shirt give it a cowgirl look when
tucked into a hipster skirt. Styled in aqua to mix beautifully with
Rosecrest's olive green skirt separates. 6-14. Each 10.95
D. A-line hipster skirt with no waistband, Western-look stitching. Styled
in slub weave olive green cotton to mix and match with your other
Crestique duds. 6-14. Each 9.95
THE BAY COLLEGIENNE SHOP, THIRD FLOOR
the
S£ay
OIOROIA at ORANVIUI

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