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The Ubyssey Oct 8, 1993

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Array Vol. 75, No.9
UBC NEWSBREAK ON THE CO
INSIDE
UBC's
man of millions
Page 3
POLICE BEAT
Melee
draws
crowd
BY CHARLES NHO~
A SHOELESS male in his
early 40s weighing about 200
lbs and dressed in only a tank-
top and shorts roamed the SUB
halls, threatening to kill people
during Wednesday's chilling
noon hour. He then walked into
the Art Gallery and sat down on
a couch.
After several minutes he
suddenly picked up a binder
labelled "Artists' comment
book" and ripped out four pages
while shrieking.
The lunch crowd outside the
Student Union Building
suddenly swelled from about 60
to 300 as UBC RCMP arrived to
subdue the man who was earlier
violent and threatening.
He ran outside in the
direction of Main Mall where
RCMP took up the chase and
finally caught him on the busy
pavement just below the steps to
the SUB.
"A mentally ill person is 10
times as strong as a normal
person," said Cpl. Nancy
McKerry.
Though no blows were
dealt, students levelled criticism
ar. the RCMP, comparing it to
the Rodney King beating. Four
officers wrestled the man to the
ground.
Police secured the man onto
a stretcher to keep him still while
he was sent to University
Hospital.
McKerry said this person
was known to the RCMP and
had a history of mental illness.
UBYSSEY SPECIAL
Vancouver, British Columbia, October 8,1993
THIS AIN'T NO DISCO: Yokojima, Ikemoto and Ito bring heavy metal from Japan to UBC's
Ritsumeikan House. See back page. steve chan photo
QUOTE
"Many boys like pop music,
it's a problem."
Back Page
FIRE TRAIL
Fridges
on fire
BY CHARLES NHO
FRIDGES were aflame but the
motive has left UBC firefighters in
the cold.
It all began on Nursery Road
last Friday when a suspicious fire
justpast midnight levelled the South
Campus Annex which had stood
there since 1940. The building had
stored old refrigerators.
"When we gotthere, the flames
were coming out the windows," said
fire chief Steve Nordin.
UBC RCMP found no
accelerants but arson has not been
ruled out. One suspect was
questioned and then released.
"We always start with a
question mark. We view it as arson
until we determine otherwise," said
Staff Sgt. Bern Jansen.
The fire caused an estimated
$10,000 in damages.
The annex, built originally for
a classroom, has been mainly used
as a storage. In the past it has stored
graduation paraphernalia, stages,
and banners.
Secret success
Dozens of students found their
way to SUB 24IK after Pow
notified the campus on September
21,1993, thatacopy of theDenver
Post editorial regarding prominent
Vancouver stock promoter Robert
Friedland's link to an
environmental mining disaster
would be available for public
viewing in the newsroom. Details
of the case were banned from
publication in Canada until later
on that day.
ON THE CAMPAIGN TRAIL
Door to door in West Point Grey
BY BRENDA WONG
VANCOUVER Centre Liberal candidate Dr. Hedy
Fry stands atop a hill in West Point Grey surveying
the territory. She wrinkles her nose, and flatly states that we
are in Tory country.
In fact the Vancouver Centre riding has traditionally sent
more Liberals than Conservatives to the House of Commons.
But in the past three elections it has gone Conservative.
This does not deter Fry who is canvassing for votes on this
cool Indian summer evening. Dressed casually in a sweater
reflecting the autumn colours and leather pants, Fry tackles
the tradition of door knocking for support.
As her chief competitor Prime Minister Kim Campbell
travels across the nation, Fry is walking door to door in the
constituency. In 2.5 hours she will cover up to 50 houses.
At times Fry appears to be uncomfortable with the
traditional in-your-face tactic: "This whole door-knocking
thing is a pain for people who are having dinner."
With its manicured lawns and stately churches, the
West Point Grey neighbourhood is solidly upper-middle
class, according to the 1991 census.
The typical resident is married, often with no children,
and lives in a house they own. Many residents are university-
educated and the average family income is $49,000.
Vancouver Centre has a high rate of people moving
into the neighbourhood from other parts of the city. Also,
many move into the area from other provinces or cities.
After campaign coordinator John Fraser chats up an
opera enthusiast, preparing the way for the candidate, an
anticlimax arrives when Fry realizes the Australian man is
ineligible to vote.
SEE PAGE 7
Hedy Fry tiptoes into Tory turf.      KIM chbmg photo Friday, October, 1993
POW
\fol. 75, No. 9
^5 7^f
TUTORS
WANTED
The AMS Tutoring Services is looking for well-qualified individuals to work
part time, tutoring UBC students in a variety of subjects throughout the entire
academic year (1993/1994 ).
The AMS Tutoring Service is an education project which provides drop-in
tutoring service primarily for first year students. The Service is partially
funded by the University of British Columbia's Teaching and Learning
Enhancement Fund.
REQUIREMENTS:
• Some experience teaching adults or university students.
• Knowledge of 1 st. year university subjects such as: Physics, Math,
Economics, Statistics and/or English (grammar and essay writing).
• Good communication and interpersonal skills.
• Responsibility and commitment.
The wage is $9.00 per hour. The successful applicants must be UBC students.
Please send resumes to Room 248 of S.U.B. (the Student Union Building).
CLASSIFIED • 822-3978
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING	
RATES: AMS cardholders - 3 lines, $3.15, additional lines, 63 cents, commercial
- 3 lines, $5.25, additional lines, 80 cents. (10% discount on 25 issues or more).
Classified ads payable in advance. Deadline 3:30pm, 2 days before publication.
Room 266, SUB, UBC, Vancouver, BC, V6T 2A7, 822-3977.
5, COMING EVENTS
THE VANCOUVER INSTITUTE
Free Public Lecture
Saturday, Oct. 9
Professor Karl J. Astrom
Department of Automatic Control
Lund Institute of Technology, Sweden
on
BLACK BOXES AND WHITE NOISE
Lecture Hall 2, Woodward IRC
at 8:15 p.m.
11 - FOR SALE - Private
SUB BALLROOM
U.B.C.
DOORS 7:OD PM
SHOW PROMPTLY S:OOJ=>M
* ^ dlMm^KSSSSMammw^ammM
U.B.C. STUDENTS S7.00
TIX AT A.M.S. BOX OFFICE ONLY
GENERAL ADMISSION $9.00
TIX AT TRACK RECORDS OR
A.M.S^OJ^FFIC^^jBjC.
MORE INFO BE2-6273
ARE YOU PLANNING A HOLIDAY?
Visit TRAVEL CUTS
The only Student Travel Experts!
We are ON CAMPUS
SUB, Lower Level 822-6890
♦Student Travel at Student Prices*
75 - WANTED
1985 HYUNDAI PONY; very few miles
<35KAT; am/fm stereo with amp; 4 dr
hatchback, veiy dependable, 443-1314 pgr-
322-6323.
JUGGLING FLOWER STICKS is a fun &
easy way to relieve stress. To order a set of
24" x 1/2" suede flower sticks send cheque or
money order for $29 + $4 postage & handling
to Peter GUI, Box 602 Black Diamond Alta.
T0L OHO, For small or child's set, 20"x 3/8"
send $20 + $4 pstge & hndlg. Please allow up
to 4 weeks for delivery.
GYM MEMBERSHIP - Ron Zalko, 1 yr.
Unlimited use in two locations.
$200. 221-1737 after 4 pm.
90 NISSAN CENTRA, under warranty,
perfect cond. 70,000 km, $8000 obo. 737-
8575. Leaving Canada, must sell.
FRYE BOOTS, new 2prs. size 10B
Western/Motorcycle slim toe style. Value
$290 US. I want $170 obo over $125. 224-
6326.
- 1982 MERCURY-LYNX. Good running
condition. AirCared. $950 obo. Phone Paul
at 222-4734.
12 • GARAGE SALE
FURNTTURE,MATTRESSES,elec-W)i-*ics
& much more. Sat from 10am - 3pm. 4041
West 41st Ave., Van.
20 • HOUSING
ROOM AVAILABLE on campus. Prof,
chef.,parking, laundry facilities, games room,
sauna, well kept house. Available immediately
at a great rate. Call Martin at 222-2489, leave
message.
30-JOBS
UNIV. STUDENT to work 4-5 hrs/week,
light cleaning, laundry, ironing, in house near
10th & Bianca. $9/hr. negot Bryan 224-
4486.
FOREIGN EMPLOYMENT SERVICES
Japan: Temp, and full timejobs in Japan as
Conversational English Instructors. Up to
4,000/month, no experience necessary. Free
details; send self-addressed stamped envelop
to: MGM Support Services, Dept. 317, 106-
3120 8th Street East, Saskatoon,
Saskatchewan, S7H 0W2.
PART-TIME D J. forthe Pit wanted. Must
be a UBC student, 19+ years of age. Please
apply to Bill or Jeff at Pit, Oct. 12,13 & 14th.
35 - LOST
LOST - 2 SILVER rings; left in washroom
of the SUB (2nd floor). Sentimental value.
Please call Sue 738-2030.
70 - SERVICES
BEST-BUY CAR & TRUCK rentals. We
gladlyacceptcashdeposits. Wemakerenting
hassle free. Ph. 261-2277 —261-CARS.
LSAT PREPARATION COURSE:
Comprehensive 20-hour weekend courses;
experienced instructors; simulated exam; free
repeat option; full money-back guarantee.
Cal MEDLAW SEMINARS at 739-4922.
NRG HEALTH & FITNESS
Personal training for all
fitness levels
excellent!
ph. 420-1496 (Jahan)
NEED TUTOR for computer, MS works
spreadsheet & data base. Your computer,
your place, prefer statistics/economics
student. Please call Almasir 987-4574 &
leave msg.
VOLUNTEER opportunity. Girl Guide
company needs 1-2 leaders. Thursdays 6-8
pm, Westside. 736-5535 for info.
85 - TYPING/WORD PROCESSING
PROFESSIONAL typist, 30 years exp.,
wd process/typing, APA/MLA, thesis.
Student rates. Dorothy, 228-8346.
Miracles Performed Upon Request
AMS WORD PROCESS-ZING
Room 60, Lower Level SUB
Mon-Thurs: 9-6 * Fri: 9-5
Full-serve & self-serve computers
Give us a call — 822-5640
PAPER PERFECT word processing for
all your student needs. Laserprinting /spell
& grammar check. 736-1517.
99 - PERSONAL
WOULD THE PERSON who removed 3
books by "Northrop Frye" from the Main
Library sometime in Feb. please return. No
questions asked.
BETWEEN CLASSES FOLKS!
Friday, October 8th
Nursing Undergrad. Soc.
Speaker: Carys McDougall and
April Bishop, clinicians, UBC Site,
Herpes Clinic. "Directions in
Nursing." Presentation series.
Forum for undergrads with B.SN.
practising nurses. Noon-1:20, Univ.
Hosp. - UBC Site, Acute Care
Pavilion T-188 (third floor).
UBC Entrepreneurs' Club.
"Tribute to Vancouver Business."
Speaker: Jim Pattison, SUB
Auditorium, Noon-1:30.
UBC Entrepreneurs' Club.
"Tribute to Vancouver Business."
Boat Cruise on Pride of Vancouver,
7:30-1 lpm, Call Leah 822-1123 for
info/tickets.
Thursday, October 14th
UBC Women's Centre. Coffee
and herbal tea house: all women
and their children welcome. 4:30-
7:30pm, UBC Women's Centre,
SUB 130.
October 1993
SUB 241K 75th b'day
Many happy returns Ubyssmals.
I
2 for 1 Coin Wash Special!
USE ONE
Washer
GET ONE
I      coupon for next visit
I... say Alejandro and Debora
*  U.B.C.'s nearest neighbourhood
£ Professional Dry Clean • Dropoff • Coin Wash
GOLD COIN
CLEANING CENTRE
I
3496 West Broadway
2 blocks east of Alma on South Side
 -r1 Vfol. 75, No.9
POW
Friday, October 8,1993
NEWS
UBC's man of millions
BY CHUNG WONG
BOB LEE rarely goes home
to eat dinner. Nor does he
stay for breakfast.
As soon as the 60-year-old
multi-millionaire rises, he buzzes
off for an 8am "breakfast meeting"
whether it be for his firm's $400
million real estate portfolio or for
funnelling funds to UBC where he
now spends a quarter of his time.
After a day of meetings,
wheeling, dealing, and sitting on
various community boards, he
usually doesn't return home until
10pm, when he reads the paper and
watches the evening news
concerning the city in which he has
lived all his life.
Even a sore back has not kept
him from working out at the YMCA
twice a week for up to eight hours.
This has been Lee's daily ritual
since his appointment as chancellor
of UBC—a position known to most
students as the person who taps you
on the head on graduation day.
His role, however, is
comparable to that of his good friend,
B.C. Lieutenant Governor David
Lam, who is expected to retire on
federal election day. As chancellor,
Lee will act as an ambassador and a
beacon for economic interest for
UBC.
The pioneer kingpin of Asian
investment is seen as the university's
revenue messiah during a time when
campus coffers have been strapped
for cash.
As chair of UBC Real Estate
Coip, Lee will help the university
rake in at least $3 million in profits
a year from future highrises to be
built at Hampton Place on 16th
Avenue and Wesbrook Mall, the
site of long forgotten clearcut and
slashbuining protests in 1989.
As a UBC fundraising
campaign chair, he has already
convinced his long-time partner
Peter Wall to donate $15 million
and has helped David Lam ask high
profile developers Tom and Caleb
Chan, who own several major hotel
and golf course projects at Whistler
and Blackcomb, to donate $10
million.
In the next five years, UBC's
campus terrain, barring
environmental protests, will
experience development more
rapidly than ever before as it gears
up for construction totalling $15
million. The upgrades are expected
to revive sagging university purses
but may also draw the ire of those
who want to preserve the campus
landscape.
Real Estate investment kingpin Robert Lee will step into chancellor's role of funneling
more funds into campus coffers.  Lee, a 1956 UBC commerce graduate, was on the Board
of Governors from 1984-11990. He also heads the Prospero Realty group which manages a
portfolio worth more than $400 million. CHUNG WONG photo
Lee says he would like to meet
as many campus people as possible
and solicit their involvement.
Known for an approachable,
laid-back personality that he has
maintained since childhood, Lee
often makes people forget how large
his pockets are. It is estimated that
he has brokered more than a billion
dollars of real estate in the past three
decades riding on offshore
investment from Asia.
"Financially, I've done better
than I have ever dreamt of," says
Lee, with his trademark boyish
enthusiasm.
Lee pinpoints his durability to
his long-term vision which left him
relatively unscathed during the real
estate market collapse in the 80s that
claimed many of his peers.
"I really thought of a long-term
relationship with the community.
Because of that it took a bit longer.
To make a quick dollar and a
mistake—I didn't want to do that.
Whatever advice I gave had to be
solid."
He adds, "I was very fortunate
in business. I was probably one of
the first ones to deal with Southeast
Asia."
Lee, a UBC commerce graduate
in 1956, heads his successful
Prospero International Realty Inc.,
founded in 1979. His daughters
Leslie and Carol and, sons Derek
and Graham are also UBC commerce
graduates. Only Leslie has yet to
join the family business.
Tough family expectations gave
the Lees a need to succeed.
Bob's father Ron BickLee, still
alive and well at 101 years old,
arrived in Vancouver from Canton
of the century. Lee Sr. emerged as
one to be trusted by Chinese
immigrants who would pool their
money to help him start a food import
business called Foo Hung. Lee Sr. 's
success came during World War II
when he stocked up on food items
which were later strictly rationed.
When Bob was born in 1933,
Lee Sr. bought 50 acres of land on
East Broadway with a railway
running through it Decades later,
Bob could not understand why his
dad bought the land and even more
so why he kept it—that is, until the
price kept on doubling. It was sold
in 1958 and the real estate agents
made a killing.
Lee found his calling, if not his
long-term vision.
"I was never a good student, but
I was forward looking," says Lee.
And there was almost no other
choice.
Despite his father's success, Lee
was only given a $2 weekly
allowance throughout university on
top of working for his father for
almost nothing.
Before university, while he
attended King Edward secondary
school and the now defunct Model
elementary school where City
Square now stands, Lee, who speaks
fluent Cantonese, was forced to
attend two hours of Chinese classes
every day. He was being groomed
for his future.
WTien Lee graduated in 1956
from UBC with nursing student and
future wife Lily, he worked for his
dad for two years but was frustrated
by the slow return on high volume
sales. He turned to H.A. Roberts in
1961, propelled by a desperation to
succeed. But he would only earn
$225 in the first half year.
"I wanted to be the best in my
field. I wanted to establish a
reputation in the field."
His first break, however, did
not come until 1965 when Lee was
travelling in a car with a member of
the Tiampo family based in the
Philippines and Hong Kong. By
chance he drove by the 31-storey
Imperial Towers owned by former
Vancouver mayor Tom Campbell
which appealed to his passenger but
was not for sale. After two months
of negotiating, the towers were sold
for $2.5 million and Lee collected a
healthy $48,000 commission. He has
since handled more than $30 million
worth of real estate for the Tiampos.
That sale would steer Bob's career
toward Asian investment.
By 1967, he met Peter Wall and
SEE PAGE 6
$50,000
offshore
donation
The largest and arguably the
wealthiest organization in Taiwan
handed UBC president David
Strangway a cheque for $50,000.
The money will become a bursary
for students who are unable to attend
university for financial reasons.
The cheque was delivered on
Sunday at John Oliver Secondary
School during the Tzu Chi group's
first anniversary in Canada by group
leader Gary Ho.
The 3.2 million members of the
Buddhist Compassion Relief Tzu
Chi Foundation recendy eclipsed the
Kuomingtang government   which
has 2.5 million members to become
the largest organization in Taiwan.
With only 30 followers and five
disciples, the group was founded in
1966 by Dharma Master Cheng Yen
who has been called Taiwan's
Mother Teresa.   She is currendy
nominated for the Nobel Peace
Prize.
Jokingly its members have said
that Cheng Yen could easily
become Taiwan's president
The Canadian group based in
Richmond has already attracted
600 members in one year. I --al
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Rage Against The Machine Vfol. 75, No.4
POW
Tuesday, September 21,1993
NEWS
News expose: Project Censor
BY BIANCA ZEE
A reporter considered to be
the city ' s 1 e a d i n g
investigative journalist on urban
development is engaging in a
national project to unearth the 25
most censored stories in Canada by
the media.
SFU instructor and free lance
journalist Donald Gutstein, known
for exposing Mayor Gordon
Campbell's business links to
Marathon Realty, a company whose
development applications the city
reviews, is spearheading Project
Censor in Vancouver.
The project is funded by the
Canadian Association of Journalists
which was founded in 1978 to
"advance understanding of the
concealed, obscure or complex
aspects of matters that significantly
affect the public."
The project aims "to make the
public more aware that the media is
not giving it the quality of coverage
it deserves and through that, to put
more pressure on the media to clean
up its act," Gutstein says.
An American project
counterpart was started 17 years ago
in Sonoma State University in
California to annual.
Under the guise of a contest,
the public is invited to submit buried
news stories, 25 of which will be
nominated and ranked this spring.
Gutstein believes news in
Canada and theU.S. has deteriorated
in recent years.
He says that advertisers are
SFU instructor and reporter
Donald Gutstein
placing a chokehold on the media,
pressuring i t to be more promotional
and less critical.
The media "does not want to
rock any boats and have stuff that is
too controversial because it will
upset the advertisers," he says.
"Have happy journalism because
that will make the readers feel better
and more likely to go out and support
the advertisers."
Gutstein also points out that
newspapers are trying to align their
readership with the target market of
its advertisers.
When there is reason to please,
there is censorship, he seems to say.
"Even with reporters, there is
self-censorship, because they want
to make reporting their carijer."
Primary to the economic link,
Gutstein explains that there is a
recent concentration of ow nership.
In Canada, the newspaper
empire is a virtual monopoly carved
up among a few privileged families.
Canada's media superpowers
consists of the Thomson Corp. of
Toronto which owns 40 daily
newspapers includlig The Globe and
Mail, Conrad Black of Hollinger
Inc. hoarding a phenomenal 207
newspapers and Southam Inc. with
its fifteen city newspapers
accounting for 38 percent of total
daily circulation in Canada.
More often than not, Gutstein
claims, the publishers who own the
newspapers or TV stations hire
people who they feel reflect their
same values and they, as managing
editors, just promote and hire people
who are dependable and are a good
fit for company values.
"That means you are going to
have to get good stories, get good
recommendations and in order to do
that you are going to have to make
sure you write stories that your paper
is going to run," says Gutstein.
Censorship is not only exclusive
to the written word. Television
embraces a sense: of reality that
transcends print in its visual impact
"Because you see something
on television, the image creates a
reality and that is an incredibly
powerful device but what we look at
is completely recontextualized. Its
impossible to film reality because
reality is ongoing and there are so
many aspects. You always have to
select from the ongoing stream and
it's the way the selection is done,
why it's done, who's there to do it,
and how it's all packaged together."
"It is tremendously powerful
and dangerous," says Gutstein.
Sent»<x\
Free
Tutoring
for UBC Students
Drop-in and get help with 1st year subjects in Math, Physics, Statistics.
Economics, and English.
WHEN:   Room 212 in the SUB (Student Union Building) 6138 SUB Boulevard
Saturdays 1:00-4:00 pm Sundays 6:03- 9:00 pm
Magda's (in the Common's Block of Totem Park Residence) 2525 West Mall
Tuesdays 7:00-9:00 pm Thursdays 7:00-9:00 pm
Starting: TUESDAY, OCTOBER 19, 1993
FOR INFORMATION CALL: 822-3092 between 12:00 and 2:00 pm, Monday to Friday.
PLEASE PRENT
Student's Name: l
Tutoring Request Form
■ UBC Faculty: ■
PLEASE PRINT
Times available tor Tutoring: l_
_   Telephone *: ' '
I   Please list, in detail, subjects you would like help with:
Course: l_
Level:
_l
Course:
J    Level: L.
Course:
Course:
Level: l_
_J    Level: L.
DR. MANDY KARIM, MD
is pleased to announce the relocation
of her Family Practice to
#303 - 2083 Alma Street
(on 4th & Alma over the Muffin Break)
with a special interest in Paediatrics
Telephone: 222-2256
No appointment is necessary.
Office Hours: Monday - Friday 10:00 am - 6:00 pm
Saturday 9:00 am - 12:00 noon
HUB
University Copy Centre
Alma at Broadway
#2, 3701 W. Broadway, Van., B.C.
Tel: 222-4142 • Fax: 222-9855
COPIES
(STUDENT SPECIAL - NO MINMUM)
Limited Time Offer
•AUTO FEED or
SELF-SERVE
COLOUR COPIES • RESUMES • REPORTS • LABELS • FAX SERVICE
.....».««..»»»»>»•■>
-t ? t t *
The University of British Columbia
Department of Theatre and Film
LOVE AND ANGER
by George F. Walker
Directed by Alison Aylward
OCT5-9&13-16
2 for 1 Preview - Tues. Oct 5
Curtain: 8:00 pm
DOROTHY SOMERSET STUDIO
RESERVATIONS
822-2678
a
INFORMATION SEMINAR
GMAT
October 14
5:00 pm
Angus 225
GRE
October 14
6:15 pm
Angus 225
FREE
FREE
734-8378
Please drop off this form in Room 248 of the Student Union Building or call: 822-3092 (12-2 pm)
KAPLAN
The answer to the test question. Friday, October, 1993
POW
Vol. 75, No. 9
Pow
Editor
Effie Pow
'Managing 'Editor
Michelle Wong
'Photo Editor
Lisa Kwan
tyitts Editor
Sara Martin
Steve Chow
WorCdCNszos Editor
Hao Li
front Cover Editor
Rosa Tseng
'Hg.urpaper 'Design
SJ.Ahn
822-6681
InstructionalEditor
Chung Wong
Copy Editors
Brenda Wong
Doug Ferris
Tessa Moon
Omar Kassis
^porters/Photographers
Karen Go
Ellen Yeung
Bianca Zee
Charles Nho
Kim Cheng
Bruce Wolff
Steve Chan
Advertising
Lyanne Evans
822-3977
A Ubymy Special Nhtai,
Next hue November *
Tel: 822-2301    Fax: S23-n7.
Reform Intolerance
With only a couple weeks left in the elections race, the
Reform Party has been dominating British Columbia without
significant critical analysis by the press.
Reform economic policies greased by Manning's
confidence appear like miraculous great leap forwards to win
the populist vote.
But can British Columbians overlook scrutiny of the
side effects. A party which rides on the gripes of the nation
may not be a balanced one into which Canadians can place
their trust.
The party's greatest weakness rests in its immigration
policy which has been strategically and neatly overshadowed
by Preston Manning's overzealous deficit reduction plan. It
is, however, the party's social attitudes that turn the stomachs
of a big chunk of Canada.
The Reform Party portends to have a "commitment to
the concept of equality." It embraces democracy yet levels
the largest degree of intolerance toward immigration and
multiculturalism among all existing parties. Perhaps Manning
believes some are more equal than others.
True multiculturalism has burdened the nation—but no
more so than the democratic process from which it is derived.
Does that mean a party should do away with democracy just
as Reformers want to rid multiculturalism?
Multiculturalism has disillusioned the nation—as has
democracy—but one cannot overlook its fundamental
meaning: To accept and respect other cultures.
The Reform Party's intended reduction of yearly
immigration from 250,000 to 150,000 is almost as ridiculous
as their swift three-year deficit reduction plan. In fact, such
a policy has been unprecedented in Canadian history with the
exception of discriminatory laws barring Chinese immigrants.
If Reformers truly believe in equality then let them
demonstrate it in their policies without contradictions.
After a one-run miss last year, the POW co-ed softball team swept the intramurals fall softball
tournament on Sept. 26, beating the Law Faculty's Cases Loaded 12-10 in a five inning playoff final.
In the three round-robin games Pow blasted their way to 11-0, 8-3 and 4-2 victories. The team won
free admission to B.C. Place Stadium all-nighter softball tournament on Nov. 15 or 17 starting at
11:30 p.m. This year's Pow sluggers featured Harold Park, Marita Luk, Charles Nho, Bianca Zee, Don
Mah, Deanna Ho, Chung Wong, Carrie Wilson, Kim Rieb and Gold Glover Dale.
Ubyssey reaches 75 years
BY KAREN GO AND MICHELLE WONG
TOM Hawthorn claims he met the best inquiring
minds of campus during his six years at The Ubyssey,
Joe Schlesinger still has friends from his good 'ol days, and
Charles Campbell, current Georgia Straight manager, blames
the paper for everything that has happened in his life.
A place of initiation for many Canadian journalists, The
Ubyssey hasn't changed much in 75 years.
Hawthorn, a Province reporter, was at the student paper
from 1977 to 1983. New to Vancouver in 1977, he walked up
to the office and volunteered his services. There, in the heyday
of media technology, he learned to use a typewriter with blank
keys.
"The best thing about The Ubyssey was all you had to do
was show up and you'd get involved," Hawthorn said. "There
wasn't anything more fun than that
"I learned all the basics of newspaper reporting at The
Ubyssey," he said. 'The best questioning minds on the campus
were working at the paper or I met them during the interviews."
Vancouver Sun columnist Vaughn Palmer said the
practical experience was great.
"It certainly was a real life experience—deadlines, a
government to deal with, people phoning to complain about
the paper."
Budding bureaucrats are still theatening to shut The
Ubyssey down. The only difference is during Palmer's stint at
The Ubyssey (1971-74), it was the UBC administration against
The Ubyssey, not the AMS.
"Now the students are after the paper," said Palmer. "God
knows we've made enough mistakes but we were free."
Schlesinger, CBC international news corespondent, said
his year as editor-in-chief in 1952 was one of the happiest
times of his life.
"The AMS is so bloody self-righteous," he said.
Schlesinger ironically took a leave of absence to run for
AMS presidency and finished a close second. This was a time
when The Ubyssey was published three times a week and the
editor was also a member ot student council.
Reportedly he also stuffed The Ubyssey ballot box to get
Allan Fotheringham elected as editor-in-chief in 1953.
Charles Campbell, areporter in the early 1980s and current
managing editor of the Georgia Straight, said his position at
The Ubyssey was the "general dog's body."
"I hppe that the Ubyssey remains the vilest rag west of
Bianca Street for another 75 years," he said.
The Miracle: Find theatre, see show
BY SIMON MATUASEVIC
Well, well, well. William Gibson's play The Miracle
Worker, starts off slowly, but give it a chance and you'll be
standing by the end.
It is about Helen Keller's teacher, Annie Sullivan, who
comes from the Perkins Institution for the Blind in Boston to
help Helen, if she can. Her biggest obstacle is the young
woman herself who has been spoiled by her family's pity.
They indulge her every whim and as a result, Helen is a selfish,
disagreeable brat
The highlight of the play comes in act two. Annie teaches
Helen how to use a spoon and eat off her plate. The result is a
huge brawl between the two, including kicking, punching,
biting, dragging, clawing, scratching, spitting, screaming.
Finally, amidst the wreckage, Helen learns.
All the performances are fairly good, but the two leads are
outstanding. Aloka McLean as Helen does a fantastic job (she
also plays Zoe in the The Lotus Eaters at the Vancouver Film
Festival). This kid has a lot of talent and tons of potential.
Jennifer Clement as Annie Sullivan deliverd another
notable performance. Dauntless and unrelenting, her spirit is
contagious, catching the whole audience in the struggle to help
Helen out of her world of awesome isolation.
The plays ends October 9 at Richmond Gateway Theatre.
LEE FROM PAGE 3 *.^^^^-^—^^^——
Peter Redekop who formed Wall and Redekop Realty Ltd.
where Lee would eventually work with David Lam. Lee
became a partner buying nine per cent of the company.
"I was more into real estate and they were more into
brokerage and investment It was a very good fit," he says.
For the first five months at Wall & Redekop, Lee's sales
figures appeared like enlarged donuts, but the Star Ferry riots
in Hong Kong would strike fear into the British colony's
residents triggering a wave of offshore investment for which
Lee was well-positioned to receive. Canadian investments
brought mediocre returns but offered security as an irresistible
benefit—and for the local economy, they created jobs. Lee
would become a local pioneer for Asian investment.
His future partners would include the powerful likes of
Nelson Skalbania, Jack Poole, Geoffrey Lau and former
UBC Board of Governors chair Peter Brown.
His next career launch came timely—when the real
estate market was about to boom. In 1979, Lee left Wall &
Redekop to form the Prospero group whose portfolio has now
surpassed $400 million. Unlike fast buck flippers like
Skalbania and Poole, Lee passed through the real estate
slump of the 80s relatively untouched by avoiding high
profile buildings and focusing on low key developments like
Metrotown.
His next area of concern will be at the tip of Point Grey
where Lee says he can apply his private sector finesse. Vbl. 75, No.9
POW
Friday, October 8,1993
NEWS
TORY LAND FROM PAGE 1
But Fry's attention switches quickly at
another house where she pumps ex-Montrealer
Serge's hand enthusiastically as a distraction
from his lawn mowing in the growing
darkness.
Most folks politely take pamphlets from
volunteers or Fry. But there are times they
aren't welcoming: "I'll put him down as U-
negative (undecided and most likely not),"
says Fraser, as he bounds away from a Reform
supporter's house.
Ruth Chernin is on her way inside when
Hedy Fry detains her for a few moments to
chat. Dressed in a green jacket Chernin looks
stern, like she is lecturing Fry about requiring
MPs to be 55 before they collect their pension
plan. But her last words are encouraging, as
she smiles benignly from behind her hornrimmed glasses: "We'll expect good things
from you."
As the evening progresses, Fry shows her
sociable side. When people want to chat with
her, she is welcomed into their homes heartily.
They even want her to stay for coffee.
But Fry invites them along to her coffee
parties she organizes periodically in the riding
so policy can be discussed at length with the
community.
An enthusiastic, middle-aged Mr.
Richardson, with a. touch of a British accent,
eagerly wants more Liberal pamphlets. And
he wants to discuss definite ideas about policy
directions at a coffee party. However, he is
misinformed on how to register as a voter,
believing it is done by door-to-cloor
enumeration. This year, enumeration is by
mail, by phone or by dropping into Elections
Canada. Voters were enumerated dooir-to-
door before lastyear'sreferendum made ittoo
costly for a second run. Fraser informs him
that only the city election has door-to-door
enumeration.
And some houses are totally
unapproachable: a dark, brown comer house
has two blue Kim! signs posted high on a
fence—blooming out of a backyard full of
flowers. Fry and her entourage walk by, not
wasting time or energy on a lost cause.
And sometimes there are unexpected
sightings. Fraser runs past theominous barking
dog guarding a decrepit house. He returns to
report the residents support the Christian
Heritage Party. The: group falls silent in awe
at the rare occurrence."
■fc   •- "**■
Hedy Fry (I) with Sophia Leung (r) trailed by Pow reporter Brenda Wong
and Vancouver Sun reporter Robert Mason Lee ki/v! CHENG PHOTO
BE   A   RARX   OR    IX.
We look for it in the bright ideas,
specialized knowledge and leading-edge
skills of today's graduates.
It is the kind of energy that fuels
PanCanadian's ongoing activities as
a Canadian leader in the exploration,
development and marketing of crude oil,
natural gas and natural gas liquids.
It is the kind of energy we are proud to put
to work - to meet today's needs, and those
of tomorrow. To find out more,
please visit our booth at the upcoming
Career Fair.
PanCanadian
Petroleum Limited
Human Resources
150-9th Avenue S.W.
Calgary, Alberta T2P 2S5
Telephone: (403) 290-3119
—>-__j_k
x.M *.
■:VP^~.pdd'^   **Xf*:X      jpt
RESOURCE LIBRARY rttOIViDUAt. ADVOCACY S80UPS WORKSHOPS FEMINIST COUNSELLING
Brock Hall
Room 203
m
Open:
9:00 am - 4:30 pm.
;©*■
ucr*:
WOMEN STUDENTS' OFFICE
WINTER TERM GROUPS
Come join us for support, discussion and information.
Meditation and Stress Reduction Oct. 5 - Nov. 16
 to Nov. (drop-in support)
Mature Women Students
Bicultural Women	
Assertiveness Training ..
Career Planning	
Self-Esteem	
Dating Relationships	
Oct.
  Oct. 18 - Nov. 22
  Oct. 13, 20 & 27
14, 21, 28 and Nov. 4
.... Oct. 26, Nov. 2 & 9
 Oct. 20
■sm
Mi
He-
SEK
iff"
'ex*.
SOS
■:m-.
■m'
1*%
fm-
5**0:i
m
S*****'
m
For further information and registration for groups, call       ;R
822-2415
|     FILM SERIES FOR WOMEN, IN BROCK 204D:
f( Chilly Climate Friday, Oct. 22 (12:30 - 2:00 pm)
| Still Killing Us Softly Friday, Nov. 26 (12:30 - 2:00 pm)
§       	
|       FILM FOR OCTOBER, WOMENS HISTORY
I MONTH IN BROCK 203:
m A Time to Reap Friday, Oct. 15 (12:30 - 1:30 pm)
§  Burning Times  Wednesday, Oct. 20 (12:30 - 1:30 pm) j§j|
§>   No Time to Stop Friday. Oct. 22 (2:00 - 3:00 pm)   M
*E -tr
RESOURCE LIBRARY INDIVIDUAL ADVOCACY 6R0UPS WORKSHOPS FEMINIST COUNSELLING
sO"*!.
o
.--*;.■
Student University
Affairs Office
SUB Room 100B • 822-4846
Objectives:
The Student University Affairs Office (formerly the AMS Ombudsoffice) helps
students resolve concerns they may have with the policies and procedures of UBC
and the conduct of the university's faculty, staff and administration. They Student
University Affairs Office helps students deal with obscure procedures that thay
often have to follow to resolve problems ranging from an appeal of a grade to a
complaint about parking.
Volunteers Needed:
The Student University Affairs Office is staffed by trained student caseworkers. If
you think that you could contribute to the office, please drop off a resume or a
completed application (available at the office) by October 22. Volunteers from all
faculties and backgrounds are welcome.
Co-ordinator Needed:
The Student University Affairs Office also needs a Co-ordinator to help the organization attain its objectives. This position requires a commitment of at least 10-
15 hours per week. A successful candidate will have knowledge ofthe structure of
the university, leadership ability and communication skills. Applications from all
faculties and backgrounds are welcome until October 15.
For more information about the Student University Afffairs Office or to drop off
an application, please visit us on the SUB concourse, or call us at 822-4846. Also
available to discuss the position of Co-ordinator is Janice Boyle (AMS VP), SUB
Room 248, or 822-3092. 8
Friday, October, 1993
POW
Yfol. 75, No. 9
■:.**:-!-!^>M«J4W8l
ARTS
Heavy metal from Ritsumeikan
BY EFFIE POW
THEY'RE famous already
and don't even know it.
On the way to the photo shoot,
along West Mall, a guy on a bike,
wearing his raincoat inside out, stops
the trio with guitars slung on their
backs.
"Hey, I've heard about you," he
says, stopping on his bike.
"You're famous aren't you?" he
asks.
Well, not quite.
Bon Jovi-mania brought
together three women metal lovers,
currently at UBC's Ritsumeikan
House on the exchange program.
They aren't some girl band like
Japan' s Princess Princess or S honen
Knife.
Kaori Ikemoto, 20, looks like
an ordinary Japanese exchange
student, if not a tourist, with her
"It's a little dark and moody."
—Kaori Ikemoto
shoulder length permed hair and her
sensible shoes. But when she pulls
out her shiny white Charvel, the
stereotype is suddenly thrashed.
"Sometimes I feel sad that I
don't look like I play heavy metal,"
says Ikemoto, a Guns 'n Roses fan.
Political science student and
bassist Chie Ito, 19, jokingly
interjects: "You don't look like a
heavy metal fan. You look like you
play the flute."
She and Ikemoto have jammed
together for a year at Ritsumeikan
University. She may look like a
bookworm, but don't be fooled. Her
long-necked Fender is almost a big
as she is.
"Many boys told me heavy metal
is not girlish enough—it's not girl
Smashing metal barriers: Ito (I),
Yokojima (c), and Ikemoto (r).
STEVE CHAN PHOTO
■
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PRINTED IN CANADA ABP 01/93
music," she says.
Ito rebuts, "Many boys like pop
music. It'saproblem. I feel there are
walls between us."
Katsura Yokojima, 21, a
beginner guitarist and 13-year
classical pianist, who loves Van
Halen and Bon Jovi, says young
people are more willing to accept
them.
"Adults look down on it. They
think only bad girls like it," says the
sociology student. 'They call it hebi
meta to mean it is bad music."
Ikemoto, Ito and Yokojima are
three of 100 Ritsumeikan students
at UBC for this year's exchange
program. The teenage metal fans
became friends at the university . It
wasn't hard, they say, because few
young Japanese women like hard
rock or heavy metal.
The three friends play classical
heavy metal, which is a hybrid of
heavy metal arrangements for
classical music.
Yokojima says: "Japanese people
tend to like that kind of melody in
minor chord."
Says Ikemoto: "It's a little dark
and moody."
When Ikemoto was 15 years old,
she heard Bon Jovi on the radio and
her musical tastes were changed
forever.
"I got the shivers and
goosebumps," says the American
and English literature student
Yokojima says that one has to
know English in order to sing heavy
metal.
"Japanese words do not fit heavy
metal toowell,"says Yokojima, who
tops her plaid shirt and soccer shoes
with a Bon Jo vi cap worn backwards.
Ito, who likes European bands
like Rage and Europe, says her
parents initially worried about her
new musical passion.
"I was so moved. I realized
heavy metal was my kind of favourite
music," says Ito, who wears a black
"no fuckin' frills" Skid Row t-shirt.
She made her parents watch hard
rock videos to help them understand
her favourite music. Now, they still
don't appreciate it, but they leave
her alone.
Ito and Ikemoto became friends
after finding out they listened to the
same midnight radio program called
Pure Rock 802. The show was on
Saturday nights until 5am when most
people were asleep.
Ikemoto and Ito joined the New
Music Club at Ritsumeikan, which
turned into a hard rock club when its
new members took over. Bands
there play once a month for the
school. Only five ofthe 30 members
are women.
"Because women are a minority,
we are conspicuous, but the guy s are
easy to get along with," Ikemoto
says.
In just a year Ikemoto and Ito
have backed male singers in bands
called Hellion, Blue Marshall,
Joousama Band (Queen's Band).

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