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The Ubyssey Mar 2, 1973

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Array Vol. LIV, No. 39
VANCOUVER, B.C.,
FRIDAY, MARCH 2, 1973
Poof OfC sought, site unset
228-2301
Circus
This edition of The Ubyssey is
extra big because of the Open
House supplement. It's
produced by a different
editorial staff and represents
their opinions and not those of
the regular staffers.
For what we think of the
whole circus (and we have
quite a bit to say — none of it
complimentary) see the
editorial on page four.
Meanwhile, have a look at
the whole issue.
You'll notice things aren't as
hunky-dorey out here as the
administration would like it to
seem.
By DAVID SCHMIDT
The Alma Mater Society will ask the
board of governors Tuesday to approve
the $5 covered pool fee for next year
even though a site for the new pool has
not yet been selected.
The AMS still does not have a
commitment on the site of the pool nor
has the administration given out any
dates for the beginning of construction.
According to the referendum students
passed Oct. 5, the new pool must be
situated within 300 yards of SUB, a
criteria the administration has not yet
firmly accepted.
The president's siting committee,
which will decide the location of the new
pool, has received several submissions.
Neville Smith, acting physical plant
head, presented that department's
master plan for the university, drawn up
in 1966, which makes provision for a
covered Olympic-size pool in the
Thunderbird sports complex at the south
end of campus.
"The plan shows the pool as being one
component of the sports centre," Smith
said.
He said the standing plan could,
however, be reviewed.
"We don't follow the plan blindly," he
said.
"Students have always preferred the
parking lot on the south side of SUB as
the site for the new pool, but we have
been told the site is not big epough,"
AMS co-ordinator Bob Angus said
Thursday.
The site now being suggested is the
open area parallel to Empire pool.
"The soccer field immediately behind
SUB, possibly the best location, cannot
be used because it was donated to us and
See page 2: SUB
THE NEW POOL? No, it's just a rather large puddle guarding side
door of old Sedgewick library. The Curious Onlooker told Ubyssey
photographer Mark Hamilton he saw alumni senator E. Davie Fulton
disappear beneath the puddle folds, ;udged to be at least 10 inches
deep. "That's funny," the Curious Onlooker opined. "I thought he
disappeared at least 20 years ago."
AMS bites burger baron
By GARY COULL
Democratic Students'
Caucus members of the Alma
Mater Society executive-elect
say they will help picket
Denny's restaurants to aid
striking employees fight bad
working conditions, despite
two court injunctions
prohibiting strike lines.
More student support came
Wednesday night when the
AMS council gave $50 to the
employees strike fund and
urged all students to boycott
Denny's restaurants. They will
also send a telegram to labor
minister Bill King urging
repeal of Bill 43 which denies
non-unionized Denny's
employees the right to strike.
AMS president-elect Brian
Loomes said Thursday
students can have a
tremendous effect on the
outcome of the strike by
boycotting Denny's and forcing
reductions in their profits.
Graduate studies president
Stan Persky, AMS secretary-
elect, also urged students to
directly participate in
picketing and join the boycott.
Worker's began picketing
Denny's Feb. 12 after several
unsuccessful    attempts    to
discuss their grievances with
management.
Among their complaints are:
compulsory eviction after 20
minutes of customers who only
ordered coffee, management
banning of all friends and
relatives   of   staff   from   the
restaurant, no pay for three
hour compulsory staff
meetings which occur on
employees' own time and no
job security.
Management responded to
the strike by firing all
picketing-     employees.
Res finances
stay secret
ByJOSIE BANNERMAN
Derrick Booth, Acadia Park tenants' society chairman said
Thursday financial details about UBC residences should be
available in the near future but no date for the release of the
information has been specified.
The Ubyssey reported erroneously Tuesday rehabilitation
minister Norm Levi had announced in a Feb. 22 meeting with
Booth the details would be released immediately.
Booth met with Levi and education minister Eileen Dailly in
Victoria to discuss UBC housing director Les Rohringer's
proposed 9.75 per cent rent increase for all student residences.
But Levi did not indicate a date for the release, Booth said.
Residence representatives requested in a Feb. 16 letter to
administration president Walter Gage "that the administration
release ... a detailed financial statement ... of all revenue
and expenditure of housing over the past three years and
See page 13: NO
Protesting staff remained
outside Denny's around the
clock until Feb. 15 when
management successfully
obtained an injunction, under
Bill 43, prohibiting the pickets.
A former Denny's waitress,
who asked to remain
anonymous, said Thursday the
Feb. 15 picket line resulted in
substantial money loss to the
restaurant. She said the
management receives an
average of $376 on a Tuesday
night, but during the picketing
took in only $84.75. At the same
time the company paid out $120
in labor and material costs.
Last weekend citizen pickets
continued the protest but were
served with another
management injunction, this
time stopping anyone from
picketing. This injunction now
applies to anyone picketing
Denny's.
About 40 people were
picketing when the
management served the
injunction.
The Working Women's
Association organized more
citizen pickets at Denny's
starting Thursday and
continuing daily. Supporters
will also give out pamphlets at
See page 8:  SUPPORT Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, March 2,  1973
Community chest
By ELAINE BLESI and ART ARON
This column is the first of a weekly series on
community organizations and where, how and
when people can get involved.
There are some of us who feel the planet is
passing through a decisive time and a moment
of crisis for mankind. This column is addressed
to you. But what can we do? Can one person
make any difference? We all know that if
people with our awareness fail to act, there is
little hope that the rest of the population,
lacking our opportunities, skills and
awareness, will act for us. Yet it is sometimes
very discouraging to take action, to even plan
action, knowing the ignorance, apathy, and
suffering we are attempting to overcome.
This column is a tool for you. It is meant to
offer support, encouragement, information,
inspiration. What is our message? That there is
great hope we will succeed — many people
right now are making important changes in the
flow of man's evolution. These people are not
especially talented or strong. They simply
decided to have their lives make a difference
for others.
Lisa and Jim were enrolled in university in
Toronto — she in psychology, he in English.
They were dissatisfied with what they were
doing. They contacted Children's Aid and
learned about the need for married couples to
operate "group homes". The private
organization in Toronto, operating homes for
boys aged 10 to 17, had the goal of keeping boys
that had turned up in court from going to
reformatories. There were about five homes
and they were run by elderly, puritanical
persons with inflexible and inhuman attitudes
toward their "wards". But they were failing to
reach the boys or to help them.
In a desperate effort to bring in some young
people who might be able to understand the
boys, especially their drug scene, Children's
Aid hired Jim and Lisa. They started out cold,
just doing the best they could, and they had a lot
of hard times. But they made a difference.
One year later Lisa and Jim are directing
the organization, in essence controlling the
board of directors, because of their
effectiveness. They have expanded the number
of homes 300 per cent, hired other young
couples to be group parents, and have
convinced the judges to let them take many
more boys than would have been placed in
institutions. They have seen most of the boys
become happier and more effective in their
lives. Lisa and Jim made a big difference to
hundreds of mixed up boys in Toronto.
What can you do in Vancouver? The
Scientific Pollution Environmental Control
Society needs our aid in their guardianship of
our environment. If you are a student, you can
talk with them about a topic for a paper you
could write for a class that would also research
an area in which they need information.
Protect two birds with one paper! They also
need people to speak in the schools (all you
prospective teachers, take note), showing
slides and turning kids on to their planet. And
they need people to work in the office and on
their newspaper, to make signs, come to
demonstrations, and show films. Call 736-8404.
For those who are people-oriented, the
Mental Patients' Association is fighting the
desperation institutionalized by mental
hospitals. They have a drop-in centre and phone
service and need people who like to talk to
people — just socializing, or sometimes
handling crises, if that is your skill. They also
opened a new house Thursday and need help
cleaning and painting. Call Patty, Karen, or
Don at 738-5177.
For those of you who see the mess from a
social viewpoint — there is now a Federation of
Anti-Poverty Groups — a brand new
organization trying to bring together the
multitude of grass roots action groups so they
can exert more power and learn from one
another's experiences.
This group is so new that they need people
interested in being leaders and planners and
organizers. There is an office to set up, citizens'
groups to talk to, publicity work and newspaper
clippings to be done. One FAPG project is a
directory of all the organizations trying to help
the people — a crucial tool, and a job that can
only bring optimism to those involved! Phone
Mel at 873-3131 or 733-2375.
Finally, for those of you eager to run your
own show, here is our Idea of the Week: all
parents with a new baby inevitably consider
what kind of world their child will inherit. Why
not send a letter to each of these families
describing the ecological crisis our high level of
consumption has created — a rational, well-
documented letter, with' suggestions on action
they might take (perhaps just a donation in
their child's name to SPEC). If the diaper
services and baby food companies can get the
names of new parents, so can we. Once the
letter was printed and a means of getting the
addresses established, the job would only take
a few minutes a week. Simple help for old Mom
Earth. She has nobody but us to help her.
SUB front, Gage lot seen
From page 1
and must be kept a soccer field
in perpetuity,'' Angus said.
He said other possible
locations which would conform
to the specifications of the AMS
pool referendum are the open
area in front of SUB and the
parking lot adjacent to Gage
Towers residence.
"I don't think students would
favor these locations because
the parking lot is used heavily
by students in the evening and
because a pool in front of SUB
would be quite unsightly,"
Angus said.
He said the AMS must now
try to work out compromises
with the siting committee,
physical plant, and the
physical education
department.
"We will be looking at the
suggested site to see how the
building would fit and we will
also be looking at possible
ways of rerouting University
Boulevard to make the parking
lot site large enough to
accommodate the pool,"
Angus said.
He said he hopes the site
could be established very
quickly so construction can be
started by next January.
"We have a certain
momentum going and we don't
want to let it go," he said.
"The site is not an
insurmountable problem,"
said Angus.
He said the main problem
would be the financing of the
pool.
"The university doesn't have
its share of the money. The
current capital budget, not as
big as was hoped for, has
already been earmarked.
"UBC does have the ability
to appeal to the provincial
government for the extra
funds," Angus said.
If the administration does
not have its share of the
money, the pool may be
delayed until funds can be
raised.
If this occurs, the $5 fee will
probably not be affected, as
there is no time limit on
construction.
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40 BONUS COUPONS WORTH $75 Friday, March  2,  1973
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 3
Committees ignore WAG request
—mark hamilton photo
LARGEST SCRABBLE GAME ever, will take place at UBC today as part of Open House festivities. In
practice Thursday, competitor Horace Rooster-Maybe wheels a giant "C" in place on a triple word square
in front of Buchanan building, thus spelling cytoplasmicreticulum and scoring 2,348 points. If
Rooster-Maybe scores 1.3 million points he wins his weight in residence rent increases.
By SANDI SHREVE
A women's action group request for student and clerical
staff representation on administration president Walter Gage's
committee investigating the status of women at UBC has yet to
be considered.
And although Gage Thursday claimed it will be, he refused
to release the finer details of when and on which committees.
Earlier this year Gage formed two committees to study
findings in the group's report, released in January, that women
at UBC are discriminated against in appointments, salaries,
promotions and educational opportunities.
When group member Sue Waechlter discovered these
committees were composed only of faculty and administrative
staff, she wrote Gage requesting student and clerical
representation.
"The letter was sent a couple of weeks ago," said Jane
Rule, group member and creative writing department lecturer.
"But the president refused to consider this kind of
representation.
"The women's action group is composed of all campus
women and our report dealt with discrimination against all of
them.
"But Gage's committees stop with their present makeup of
only faculty and administrative staff," she said.
Of course, Gage said Thursday, the group's request will be
considered.
"Other committees will be set up and the letter will be
considered then," he said.
However, he refused to reveal just what function these new
committees would have, when they would be established or how
seriously he intended to consider expanding the representation.
Waechlter was unavailable for comment Thursday but
group-member Val Embree said there has been no reply.
"A group of women were willing to see Gage about the
matter but he told us he wanted a letter.
"We were also told these committees were only preliminary
ones and not to jump to conclusions — students and clerical staff
would be represented on later committees," said Embree.
"It seems a little absurd that they wouldn't be on the
preliminary committee but we'll just have to wait and see."
The existing committees were established to study
discrimination among faculty members and staff employed
through the personnel department, after examining the group's
report.
Knute Buttedahl, continuing education department
assistant director, heads the group studying employed staff.
"Our group was only set up 10 days ago so we've just
started," he said, adding they hoped to complete the work
quickly.
This committee is composed of administrative staff
members A. G. Fowler, computing centre associate director,
library assistant Joyce Harries, assistant education dean
Eileen Nesbitt, Joseph Sallos, chemistry department
electronics engineer, assistant dean of women Joyce Searcy
and Marjorie Smith, continuing education program director.
Faculty members of the committee formed in January are
Robert Clark, academic planning and head of the committee,
Alice Baumgart, school of nursing, Lois Bewley, school of
librarianship, James Kennedy, computing centre, Julia Levy,
microbiology, Peter Suedfeld, psychology, Peter Lusztig,
commerce, Jessie McCarthy, health care and epidemiology,
Ruth White, French; and James Zidek, math.
Muck
By JUDY ZAICHKOWSKY
Buying a car is probably the biggest plunge
into consumerism by UBC students.
And they spend the hundreds — perhaps
thousands — of dollars involved with a
recklessness that has to be seen to be believed.
Confusion reigns in certain areas — and one of
these is over warranties and guarantees.
Both mean essentially the same thing and
both are likely to be big selling points when you're
buying a car, but very few students understand
the warranty or guarantee they receive.
Most will cover defective parts, but labor
costs may be borne by the car buyer, especially in
the case of a used car.
Remember that labor charges are costly and
may exceed the price of the parts concerned.
The Consumer Protection Act ensures that any
warranty or guarantee must be stated in the
contract or displayed in such a way that it clearly
relates to the goods being sold. In this case you
should receive written details.
If there is no warranty or guarantee the
contract must say so.
Contracts too, cause complaints.
Say the salesman tells you the car has a
reconditioned engine and a new transmission, or
the brakes have just been relined but when you
check the contract there's nothing there about any
of these improvements.
You complain: it is an incomplete contract,
you say.
But it is more likely to be a little stretch of the
truth by the salesman. Contracts legally have to
be correct. Trust them, not the salesman and
make sure they list the improvements before you
.buy.
BUY A CAR ... buy a problem
But you don't have to sign a contract, you say;
never have. It was called an order form, retail
buyers agreement or conditional sales contract.
Don't be misled by the term "order form" for
it too is a binding document.
The value of used cars can and does fluctuate
according to their condition. The classified
columns of a newspaper sometimes give a
reasonable guide to the price of a particular year
and model.
If you intend to use your present car in trade
for a new or used vehicle, it becomes extremely
important to establish a realistic value for the car
you are buying.
What may seem a generous allowance for the
vehicle you're buying may be more than offset by
the prevailing selling price of the car.
You would be most unwise to surrender your
own vehicle until you have completely settled the
terms of your purchase, Signed a binding contract
and taken possession of the car you're buying.
Most consumers are not mechanically minded
and haven't got the trained ear which will pick up
the noises associated with engine wear or an ailing
differential.
You can either check with your own
mechanical expert or contact one of the growing
number of diagnostic stations specializing in this
series.
This examination should point to any repairs
which may be necessary and bring to light any
accident damage not always obvious to the casual
observer.
When you buy a car you will expect the seller
to have authority to sell it and give you "good
title".
But if a mechanic's lien or other encumbrance
is filed, someone else may still have a claim.
Car dealers normally make a search of the
central registry at the motor vehicle branch in
Victoria, and pass along the fee as part of the
selling price.
If a car is to run well, both in the interests of
your safety and the other person's on the road,
regular service and maintenance are required.
When repairs are necessary, particularly if
the car is nearing the end of its useful life, the cost
of repairs should be weighed against its current
value.
You should determine the cost of repairs
before giving your approval and if necessary
request a written estimate. However you may be
asked to pay a fee for the estimate inspection if
you don't agree to the work being done there.
If you run into a problem, the provincial
government consumer affairs officer deals with
complaints, and correspondence should be
addressed to the consumer affairs officer,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria. Page 4
UBYSSEY
Friday, March  2,   1973
Ivory tower
complex
The real UBC is not a cross between the PNE home
show and Coney Island.
At the real UBC students don't have an Oxford Union
debate to resolve that a formal university education is
obsolete. They sit in overcrowded classrooms wondering if
they are going to get a job when they leave.
While they study in the new Sedgewick library they
wonder where 50,000 books in the main library are going
for lack of space to put them.
They don't need a housing tour to tell them that the
proposed 10 per cent rent increase, the third in that many
years, is unwarranted.
They realize increases like these and food quality
might be seriously questioned if food services and the
housing administration had to account to the public by
opening their books.
They know handing out French pastries and coffee
won't change the fact that most of them don't learn to
speak French when they study it here.
They wonder about a tenure system which gives
permanent jobs to profs who don't give a damn about
teaching while firing those who do.
They wonder why a select group of downtown
businessmen and those sympathetic to them sit on the
board of governors while a majority of taxpayers — workers,
students and teachers — are excluded.
They wonder why daycare, part-time status and money
is not available to encourage women students to get a
university education.
They wonder why women receive less money for the
same work at UBC and why fewer of them are in the top
administrative positions.
Yeah, we really wish everyone would get a chance to
see UBC. Open House should not be relegated to two days
in March every three years.
The policy of especially inviting people out to campus
seems to indicate they are not wanted at any other time.
In fact the administration seems to have a definite
policy of discouraging community interaction on campus.
Instead of spending money for a two-day extravaganza
the administration should be holding Open House every day
by sponsoring community oriented programs.
It's also rather odd that Open House seems to be
concentrating on pointing out the new buildings on campus
rather than discussing the type of education students are
receiving.
It appears that the administration is trying to make
you believe the only thing you pay for are buildings.
Yet it is you, the taxpayers, invited out here to see the
nice shiny buildings, who are paying for the middle and
upper class kids' education.
If the administration was sincere in its desire to have
the community interested in the campus then it would
provide more extension and night courses devoted to
promoting that goal.
Part of our regrettable ivory tower complex comes
from being situated out on the end of this peninsula,
shielded from the real world by the endowment lands, but
opening the gates to the world every three years will hardly
solve the problem.
At any rate, there is more to UBC than meets the eye.
Come up and see us sometime.
V.
THE UBYSSEY
MARCH 2, 1973
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university year by
the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial
opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS or the
university administration. Member, Canadian University Press. The
Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review.
The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located in room 241K of the
Student Union Building.
Editorial departments, 228-2307; Sports, 228-2305; advertising,
228-3977.
Co-editors: Jan O'Brien, John Andersen
Freedom, they cried, so Sandy Kass complied. Mark Hamilton said no,
Len Johnson said so. Bev Sicherman agreed, so Mike Sasges was freed. But
Lesley Krueger cried when John Andersen lied. You make me bereaved,
breathed Sandi Shreve. John makes me frown, Gary Coull told Steve
Brown. I didn't know he was lyin', David Mars told Jan O'Brien. It all
makes me sick, said Kent Spencer to Dave Schmidt. This is all such a sham,
added Josie Bannerman. But Simon Truelove decreed it was quite a deed,
to which Kini McDonald said, the issue is dead. We couldn't spell our new
photog's name, but we hope he will come back again.
"\
Letters
Rent
Your most recent article on the
proposed residence rent hikes
contains a number of errors which
should be corrected.
First of all, welfare and
rehabilitation minister Norman
Levi did not state that detailed
financial reports would be
released Tuesday. He did state,
however, that he would look into
the problem and that he
sympathized with our request that
the full financial books be
released.
Furthermore, the article
neglects to mention that Levi and
education minister Eileen Dailly
met with representatives of all
residences, both single and
married, and not just with Derek
Booth, Brian Loomes and myself.
The article also states that the
board agreed to release all
pertinent financial statements to
tenants by Feb. 21. While this-
would have been very nice, it is
totally untrue.
Consequently, Loomes' claim
that this is why we went to
Victoria is obviously unfounded.
Finally, we have no guarantee that
the data on residence finances will
be taken from the
controller-general's department
and made public.
We hope that this will be done,
but the decision rests at this point
in the minister of finance's hands.
1 hope that in future your articles
on the housing situation will be
more accurate, and that you will
take the time to consult not only
the Alma Mater Society
executive-elect, but also the
representatives of the tenants,
when you are writing your stories.
Svend Robinson
student senator
Lochs
Re: Morality, K. A. Town
Your letter in Tuesday's
Ubyssey has no justification
whatsoever. I have lived in Totem
Park for three years. Granted the
front doors are locked by
midnight but guys and girls carry
front door keys and are able to
enter respective buildings at
anytime.
As far as morality, it is known
that  guys stay overnight  in the
girl's houses and girls in the guy's.
The only restrictions are made by
the students themselves on the
particular floors.
As for the Gage low-rise, the
married couples have a gorgeous
queen size bed to share. And for
$150 a month, a furnished room
at such close proximity is a
bargain.
I'm not saying any one of the
residences are perfect but that it is
the students who make any place
a place to live. Just look at some
of the ads in the local papers and
see the restrictions, outrageous
prices and then take at the hovel
they are trying to rent!
MA.K.
microbiology 3
Friends living in the low-rise
tell us -they don't have a
"gorgeous queen-size" but in fact
have twin beds.
Concern
I am also concerned about
Tuesday's residence story
particularly the fact that all
statements came from myself,
making it appear as if I am the
organizer for residence students,
which is not the case. They
themselves have organized
opposition to the rent-hikes. The
Alma Mater Society
executive-elect supports this
opposition.  It  is important that
The Ubyssey ensure that residence
students are heard rather than
simply getting statements from
AMS executive members like
myself.
As Svend Robinson points out
in his letter, the board of
governors did not agree to release
the financial information by Feb.
21. This was a demand the
residence action committee made.
We went to Victoria to discuss
subsidies, the lack of student
representation on housing
administration and also to get the
complete financial information
the board did not release.
Secondly, welfare and
rehabilitation minister Norman
Levi did not tell me that he would
release the information by
Tuesday. He spoke to Derrick
Booth and said that he would try
to have the information by
Tuesday' and   if we  didn't  hear
from  him  by  then,  we   should
contact him.
Both of these are reporting
errors that should be clarified.
At this point, however, having
been assured by Levi and
education minister Eileen Dailly,
as we were last Friday, that they
are sympathetic to residence
students and they see no reason
why the financial reports
shouldn't be made public, the
question is, when will the
information be made public?
Levi and Dailly are in a
position to turn their sympathy
into action. They should do so by
immediately asking the minister
of finance Dave Barrett to provide
residence students with the
detailed financial statements as
soon as possible. Action on their
part is necessary because the
board has been unresponsive to
the residence students' demands
for full financial details.
I would like to emphasize the
necessity of a change in the
Universities Act that would put
students on the board.
That body has to become
responsible to students and to the
public.
Lastly, I wish again to urge The
Ubyssey, as Svend has, to consult
the representatives of residence
students, married and single, in
order that the people directly
concerned be heard.
Brian Loomes
AMS president-elect
Vietnam
While agreeing with the
concept that the people of
Indochina should and must decide
their own fate without outside
interference there are some
considerations that Stuart Russell
overlooked in his recent letter.
We have an opportunity to aid
the Vietnamese people because of
the statements of Mitchell Sharpe
that Canadian troops are there for
60 days and then Canadian
involvement has to be rethought.
At this moment there are
between 200,000 to 300,000
political prisoners in South
Vietnamese jails. Canada has an
opportunity to do something
about these civilian prisoners. We
can demand access to the jails. We
can say.that we will leave at the Friday, March  2,  1973
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 5
Letters
end of the 60 days if the prisoners
are not released.
Because of government
statements we can demand of our
government this type of a role as a
member of truce supervision.
Each of us can ask this
committment of our government.
It is foolish to demand
withdrawal without this rider of
the release of the prisoners. We
can ask that Canada has access to
the jails or after the 60 days we
leave.
It is interesting that people
who have been to Paris and talked
to the representatives of North
and the exiled South Vietnamese,
have all reported that this is the
role Canada can play from the
Vietnamese perspective.
On March 6, Don Luce, a 14
year resident of Vietnam, will be
on campus to talk about these
political prisoners.
PEACE.
George Hermanson
UBC campus ministry
IIPS
I am writing to comment on
Ken Dodd's article of Feb. 16
about IIPS.
The article brought up some
valid questions concerning the
project. I would first like to
discuss those points with which I
disagree or which I consider to be
erroneous, and then those points
which deserve careful
consideration.
First, I think it should be
pointed out that IIPS' goal is not
to provide any absolute answers
to questions or problems. The
intention is not to write
simulation models that will spew
out solutions to all the problems
of the city, but rather models that
will indicate what the possible
results of following a certain
course of action might be, and
thus to stimulate people to
explore the consequences of
actions more fully. If, for
example, a city is thinking about
extending a freeway ststem and a
simulation indicates that this
would probably only result in
further congestion, people will
want to know why this result
might come about, and if it a valid
consideration. The valuable part
of this process is that it makes
people ask questions about the
city as a system rather than as a
collection of aspects. I see the
main value of this project as
educational. It is not meant in any
way to take the place of citizens'
groups, planners or other decision
makers.
Second, we have very
definitely not abandoned
community involvement with the
project. The trouble is that
before you can involve the
community in something, it has to
exist. We are barely completing
the framework for the proposed
system right now: if we fail in this
effort, the question of community
involvement will disappear. We're
hoping to succeed, so we've had a
couple of presentations at places
like Vancouver City College.
Some model-building workshops
where a group of people got
together and designed a
simulation of a park and a course
in the centre for continuing
education (which I think is
running until May). I don't believe
there was any way in which the
people could have been involved
any sooner — it would have been a
waste of their time.
Third, as far as I can
determine, no one who really is
'still closely tied' to the project
was interviewed during the
preparation of the article. I have a
lot of respect for Dave Baxter and
Mike Goldberg, and I'm sorry
they are no longer working with
us, but I don't think that their
reasons for leaving the IIPS
project were as simple as you
imply (for one thing, work on this
project seems to take up a lot of
time), nor do I think that they are
necessarily able to give a totally
unbiased view of the project. Buzz
Holling, as far as I know, still
supports IIPS' goals.
Fourth, the main responsibility
has not been delegated mostly to
mathematicians and programmers.
The models are being built and
designed by planners, geographers
and ecologists. Programmers are
responsible for translating models
to the computer, but not for the
design of the models.
Finally, IIPS is not only
involved with simulations. This is
certainly the aspect of the project
which has received the most
publicity. However we are also
involved in creating a geographic
information system which will
allow one to manipulate maps (e.g.
zoning maps, road maps, etc.)
easily and quickly on a tv-type
computer terminal, with this
system one is able to select
geographic elements that have a
particular attribute: for example,
roads more than two lanes wide,
available park land, etc. the data
involved is thus always real and
not simulated. Also we are
working on an information
retrieval system generalized for
any type of data, which is not yet
complete.
I think that no problems will
be solved by stopping the IIPS
project in particular. Simulations
have been written (by big
companies as well as academics
and governments) for the last 10
years, and will continue to be
written regardless of what
happens at UBC. The real
problems lie in how people will
develop and use simulations, and
what kinds of safeguards have to
be provided to prevent abuses.
So we come to the points
which require consideration. I
think it's very important that
simulation models be transparent
to users, and that every attempt
be made to present all the
weaknesses and flaws present in
any model. The problem of having
people unconditionally accept a
result because 'the computer says
so' would be mitigated this way. I
suspect that this aspect is
somewhat overrated though: how
many times have computers
fouled up in dealing with you?
How much faith do you have in
computers? Possibly a worse
problem might be to have an
action justified on the basis that a
simulation indicated it was the
best action: people may feel that
it's impossible to argue with that.
As long as the project stays at the
university this problefn can be
dealt with, because people will be
available for community and
citizens' groups to consult with. I
don't know what the best solution
is when this happens in other
environments, and I'm sure a lot
more of it happens than what we
are aware of. In both cases, the
real problem is in people being
too ready to believe in the
infallibility of the computer. Now
if everyone (or a majority)
believes something will happen,
then that event probably will
happen: you have a self-fulfilling
prophecy. Again, the only
solution I can see is to try and
educate people to the drawbacks
and weaknesses of simulation
modelling in general.
The dangers inherent in large
companies having access to these
techniques are over-rated: if the
models were capable of producing
clear-cut answers (as the article
suggests), then this would be more
serious. As it is, the big companies
are writing simulation models
anyway. This is nothing new. Will
their results do them any good?
Are they hurting us? Should we
stop them?
Because I think that a lot of
the problems of our cities are
technical ones (for example, how
to provide fast, clean, pleasant
transportation), I think that
simulations can help people solve
them. I am aware of the fact that
there are problems in how the
models are to be used, but I don't
think that those problems will go
away if the IIPS project does. My
experience in discussing this with
many people has been that very
few are willing to make any
suggestions about how to deal
with these problems, though they
are quick to point out that they
exist and that they're afraid of
them. We'll have to face up to
them sometime. Suggestions are
welcome.
Lynn Hueftlein
computer services
IIPS
Comment
Dear David S. Dick:
Not wanting to leave you
"disappointed and" angered"
regarding the women's tribunal on
abortion,    contraception    and
sterilization, I'd like to comment
on the letter which appeared in
Tuesday's Ubyssey. It was indeed
heart-warming to know you
would take the trouble to get
your name in the paper the day
before elections for arts rep, but
not attempt to otherwise contact
the organizers.
But, nevertheless, it seems fit
to clarify a few points, both those
mentioned in your letter and
those missing.
You point out that, despite
your personal beliefs, you feel
that this issue is of sufficient
.importance that it should be
"discussed and debated as fully as
possible." A debate has specific
functions and attributes, serving a
useful but different purpose than
a tribunal. If we had planned a
debate such as the one held in the
fall of 1971, it would have been
represented as such.
You further state that 1 assured
council that, "all points of view
would be given the opportunity to
present  their  case." I believe I
pointed out that, although we
were not attempting to solicit any
presentations from anti-abortion
forces, we would certainly have to
deal with them if they came
forward. This eventuality did not
arise as offers of testimony were
received and a program planned.
Undoubtedly this was because the
tribunal took place during
women's week; therefore, it
consisted of testimonies which
brought out the effects of the
laws on women. The issue under
discussion in the part of the
tribunal which dealt specifically
with abortion was the effects of
the laws on women. It is hard to
imagine a case being made for the
benefits reaped by women
because of the restrictive abortion
laws.
Perhaps the most irritating
element of your letter was the
manner in which you implied that
we switched horses at the last
minute, leading people on with a
promise of a debate then
See page 6
TUESDAY MARCH 6 at 12:30 p.m.
in room 207-209
Student Union Building
DON LUCE       — FREE!
Volunteer worker in South Vietnam since
1958 and member of the International
Committee to Free South Vietnamese
Political Prisoners
will speak on
"Political Prisoners in
South Vietnam"
Sponsored by Speakers & Education Committee,
LCWl, AUCM Campus Ministries
UNIVERSITY FOOD
SERVICES
Welcomes You To
OPEN HOUSE
STUDENT UNION CAFETERIA - "NORTH SIDE-
FISH and CHIPS    or    FRIED CHICKEN
AUDITORIUM CAFETERIA - "SOUTH OF THE ARMORY"
AUTHENTIC CHINESE FOOD
PONDEROSA - "WEST MALL"
ITALIAN SPAGHETTI
RESIDENCE DINING ROOMS AT PLACE VANIER OR TOTEM
-REGULAR MEALS -
BUS STOP - (Main Mall at Bookstore). BUCHANAN LOUNGE - North End of Building
- WAR MEMORIAL GYM - (Downstairs) - STUDENT UNION BLDG. (South Side) -
BARN - (Main Mall near Forestry and Agriculture) - W. GAGE RESIDENCE. Page  6
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, March  2,  1973
Letters
GUERILLA
From page 5
presenting one-sided testimony. If
I gave the impression to council
that the tribunal would consist of
impromptu speeches by whoever
turned up, then indeed there was
a misunderstanding. Because of
the strong response to our call for
personal experiences with
abortion contraception and
sterilization we drew up a
program which alloted time to
each speaker who had asked to
speak.
Our main purpose in having the
chairwomen emphasize that
anti-abortion forces did not have a
place in the tribunal was to insure
that the lengthy program of
testimony would not be
interrupted by persons not
addressing themselves to the issue.
No educative purposes would have
been served at that point if the
tribunal had degenerated into a
cross fire of ill-prepared
arguments.
This cautious attitude was
justified by past experience
because, as you well remember,
during the referendum on
abortion law repeal held last year
the anti-abortion forces made no
response to our campaign until
the actual voting day. We felt that
this type of last-ditch action was
not constructive to over-all
understanding of either group's
position or merit; we could not
condone such actions at a
function we supported.
As well, you stated that I came
to you as "respresentative of
women's week", thus attempting
to slur the whole of women's
week in your criticism. If you had
cared to read your agenda or
listen to my introduction you
would have realized 1 represented
only the abortion action
committee on campus.
In closing I'd like to question
what conceivable advantage might
have been ours in misrepresenting
the nature of the tribunal. Our
request for endorsement was
merely a gesture to call the
attention of student council and
members of the student body to
an  activjty  which  related  to an
PLAY . . . women demonstrate for legal abortion
important issue. Your accusation
of "deplorable deception" on our
part suggests a conscious
manipulative act of which I feel
we were in no way guilty.
Misunderstandings need not be
construed as devious
misrepresentation.
I sincerely hope any
misunderstanding which occurred
has been cleared up and any
personal anguish caused to council
members atoned for.
Gayle McGee
co-chairwoman abortion
action committee
opportunity to present their
case." Because this person was not
a member of this collective.
I am surprised to read that the
tribunal or any other event
planned for women's week could
have been cancelled at the whim
of student council, without even
as much as a word to us, the
organizing body.
Jeanette A. Auger
on behalf of the
women's studies collective
development
demands
justice
During the next two weeks the following "third world"
events will be held on campus. We invite you to attend.
Tues.,   March   6   -   12:30   Sub   207-207   Don   Luce
"Political Prisoners in South Vietnam."
Wed.,  March   7  -   12:30 Clubs Lounge in Sub. Ash
Wednesday Service. "Third World Invites
us to Repent."
Thursday, March 8 - 12:30 Room 106 Buchanan Dr.
Andrea   Papandreou    York    University
"Ideology of Development"
March 8 Lounge International House 12:30 Mr. Pearson
"Canadian    Diplomacy   Yesterday   and
Today."
March 9 — Room 106 Buchanan 8:00 Dr. Papandreou
"Underdevelopment   and   Dependency."
March  11   — International  House 7:30 Five Canadian
Church Leaders "The Third World Speaks"
March     13    -    sub    207-207    12:30   John    Dillon
"International       Corporations       and
Development."
March 14 - Art Gallery In Sub. Development as Seen
by the Agencies — a Display.
March 15 - International House Chester Ronning "Far
East Situation."
You can Help our publicity by cutting out this
ad and placing it on bulletin boards.
Poem
More poetry . . .
Winter Rain
Crackling on the windowpane
The rain enjoys a little game
It twists the lights from far away
And streaks the. glass with
patterned spray
While overhead the evening sky
Writhes with grey-dark clouds
awry
Depressing scene so some might
think
No weather for a skating rink
But winter rains will come and go
Just don your day-dream
portmanteau
Ron Adams
apse 4
Whim
Regarding David Dick's letter
entitled "Tribunal" in Tuesday's
issue of The Ubyssey.
The women's studies collective
who sponsored women's week was
never invited to speak to the
student council regarding the
tribunal, or in fact any program
featured during women's week.
We were not aware of the.fact
that council would be voting on
the issue of whether or not the
tribunal could be held.
Perhaps you could identify the
"representative of women's week
who assured council that, while
most of the organizers were
opposed to the present laws, all
points of view would be given the
jjjj|;J5)   TWO PUBLIC MEETINGS
"MAN and RESOURCES" YEAR - T973
WHAT? -   TWO "Man and Resources" Public Meetings
WHERE? -
Tuesday, March 6,
8:00 p.m.
Wednesday, March 7,
8:00 p.m.
Oakridge Auditorium
342 Oakridge
VANCOUVER
S.H.A.R.E. Centre
1300 Hammond St.
COQUITLAM
WHO ? — Y0U- the public of Burnaby, Coquitlam, Delta, Langley, New
Westminster, North Vancouver, Port Coquitlam, Port Moody,
Richmond, Surrey, Vancouver, West Vancouver, and White Rock.
• • • • COMf TO THE MEETING OF YOUR CHOICE * * * *
The purpose of this meeting is to inform everyone about Man and Resources Year and ask for your
involvement in Community Interest Groups. These groups in addition to Provincial Task Forces
will be established throughout B.C. and all over Canada to work on the alternative solutions and
the implications of these solutions to local problems. Provincial and National Issues. Twelve such
issues were identified by citizens from across Canada at the Montebello National Workshop —
CITIZEN PARTICIPATION - POPULATION - GROWTH ETHIC & SOCIAL VALUES -
QUALITATIVE & QUANTITATIVE DATA - NORTHERN DEVELOPMENT - INTEGRAL
PLANNING & COORDINATION - FOREIGN OWNERSHIP - OWNERSHIP - ENERGY.
EVERYONE   IS   WELCOME   TO  ATTEND+++NO
WORK OUT THE SOLUTIONS.
10RE   TALK   ON   PROBLEMS+++LET'S
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PHONE NANCY RATCLIFFE AT 387-6411 IN VICTORIA,
OR LESLEY MAIA AT 683-6711 LOCAL 671. Friday, March  2,  1973
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 7
By UP readers
'Books' prepared for blind
UBC's blind students are prospering under
government grants and technological advances.
UBC's Crane Library for the blind has received a
federal Local Initiatives Program grant of $31,700 to
hire 11 unemployed persons experienced in the
performing arts for recording books on tapes.
Under the terms of the LIP grant no more than 17
per cent of the money may be used for capital costs.
Crane head librarian Paul Thiele said that only
about $650 of this money is being used for recording
tape while the rest of the 17 per cent is used to rent
and repair the equipment needed.
Thiele said at least 600 people use the library's
services and about 12 tapes have been sent to Sweden
for students there who needed materials in English
and French.
' Story by DAVID MARS
Photos by MARK HAMILTON
Most of the materials sent to the blind are mailed
postage-free under an international agreement,
while other costs are paid by Inter-library Loans, an
organization which co-ordinates this type of
exchange, Thiele said.
Of the 600 people served by Crane library, about
65 are UBC students and another 200 are B.C.
residents.
LIP worker Michael Gale said most of the other
library users are east of Ottawa, with a lot of books
being sent to the University of Saskatchewan at
Regina.
The Crane library has its own recording studios,
but Thiele is not happy with the quality or number.
"We really only have two studios although we
use two other rooms as studios. The sound-proofing is
poor and we really need six or eight good recording
areas."
There are no new recording studios in sight for
the library but Thiele is looking forward to an
expansion of the study space for blind students.
Upstairs from the library is a recently-opened study
room with carrells, popular magazines in braille and
tape recorders.
In about one month Thiele expects to take over
the room next to the library which is now being used
for teaching assistants' offices, Gale said. The
library offices may be moved into this area and the
present office converted into study space.
This would expand the total study space and
make the area surrounding the recording somewhat
quieter, Gale said.
The Crane library is not concerned solely with
. blind students. Thiele said that the library is now
helping any students it can with learning disorders,
particularly those with dyslexia.
"Students with dyslexia have comprehension
problems with written material and as more people
find out that their reading problems are due to
dyslexia we expect to be serving quite a few
students."
Thiele said that while the library is only serving
a few students now with dyslexia, more keep coming
to Crane as they hear that the library will record
materials for them.
The library is using IBM electric braille
typewriters, tape recorders and a lot of volunteer
help, financed during the last year with grants from
the Alma Mater Society ($4,000), the UBC alumni
association ($1,000) and various individuals ($2,500).
In addition to these grants, the federal
government and large private foundations have
funded some research to develop machines for the
blind.
One of these machines has been developed by
Michael Beddoes of UBC's electrical engineering
department. Called the Spellex, this machine is
essentially a Telex connected to a computer. When
the blind or partially-sighted person types a letter the
machine's computerized voice emits the-sounds.
When the letter or essay is finished the student
can have the entire piece read back to him to check
for spelling mistakes.
Beddoes has been working on this machine and
related ones for the last five years with grants from
the Woodward Foundation, the National Research
Council, the Medical Research Council and the
Vancouver Foundation. These grants average about
$10,000 each year although in earlier years the grants
were considerably smaller.
Much of this money is used to hire graduate
students who work the machine and another
designed by Beddoes to scan typed books and "read"
them aloud.
A new $10,000 computer is expected this month
and this will be used only for Spellex. Only 18 hours
per week are available for Spellex now on the
AUDIO EQUIPMENT . .. Crane Library machines to help blind "read."
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1:,-i"l-.i;.iii|..4.;.i.i;.44i -I1,:.;-**«-,*:- -.-;.: i--*;'-mm
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UBYSSEY REPORTER . . . David Mars at
Crane Library entrance
computer now in operation. Of this, the Jericho Hill
School for the blind has 12 hours and Crane has six.
With the new computer these two centres and a
third at the Canadian National Institute for the Blind
will operate on a time-sharing system and will have
access to the computer 40 hours a week.
Beddoes sees three uses for his Spellex machine.
An obvious use is for students who want to type their
essays and homework but want to be able to do their
own proofreading. A second use is to help the blind
learn how to spell better.
"The blind are poor spellers because most of
them use Braille and it makes extensive use of
contractions. With the Spellex they should be able to
learn to associate the correct spelling with the
word," he said.
Beddoes is most enthusiastic about the third
possible use of Spellex -   jobs for the blind.
With this machine, and variations upon it, the
blind should be able to find jobs in typing pools and
related areas where until now they have been unable
to find employment.
One of the variations is aimed at having the
Telex computer hook-up use both upper and lower
case letters. The hook-up now in operation at Crane
is only suitable for upper case letters. All that is
required to convert it to upper and lower case letters,
however, is a different Telex.
There is no modification required for the
computer itself and Jericho Hill now has one of these
new Telex machines, Beddoes said.
Another new Telex is on loan in the electrical
engineering department but Beddoes said it will
have to be returned if Crane cannot come up with the
money for it.
For partially-sighted students the Crane library
is contemplating purchasing a camera-television
setup which is used for reading books. The camera is
equipped with a near-zoom close-up lens which can
magnify the book's printing up to 42 times on the 18-
inch screen.
This $1,600 machine is on loan from Visualtek,
California while the library decides whether to buy
it.
At the flip of a switch the picture can be changed
from white on black to black on white and when the
close-up lens is removed the camera can be used for
reading maps at a distance.
The purchase of this machine, like everything
else at Crane, is dependent upon funds and priorities.
And like most other departments at the
university, the funds are always short and the
priorities difficult to set.
Under Thiele's direction, however, the Crane
library for the blind has become the leading resource
centre for blind and partially-sighted students in
Canada. Blind students and workers alike are
benefitting from the activities of this library. Pa g« 8
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday,  March  2,   1973
Students de-registered
OTTAWA (CUP) — Carleton
University students who failed
to pay their academic fees, due
Wednesday, have been de-
registered.
Carleton registrar J. I.
Jackson this week sent letters
announcing de-registration to
863 students, who owe the
university a total of $128,700 in
tuition fees.
But according to student
council president Bruce
Cameron, most of these
students will be glad to hear
the news.
Unlike other universities,
Carleton   does   not   assess
charges for late fee payment or
withhold students' marks until
they pay.
Carleton students who have
not paid are simply de-
registered — as if they never
registered in the first place.
Students suffer no academic or
financial loss for failing to pay
and can re-register the
following year.
De-registered students can
appeal to a board of one
student, one faculty member,
and the university registrar.
Cameron said the policy is
"a good deal for students". If
they are doing poorly in the
UEL meet discusses
regional park
By SANDY KASS
A presidential committee studying the university endowment
lands is scheduled to meet Thursday to discuss a proposal which
would preserve the lands as a regional park.
The proposal, contained in a report by the Scientific Pollution
and Environmental Control Society, would bring the lands
under the jurisdiction of the Greater Vancouver Regional
District, which co-ordinates planning for Lower Mainland
municipalities.
A spokesman for commerce dean Phillip White, who chairs
the committee, said Thursday the group will discuss the report
at its next meeting. The crown-owned lands are currently held
for expansion of UBC.
In its report, SPEC said an emphasis should be placed on
preserving natural areas that can support a variety of
activities.
"We foresee a region that gives a walker relative seclusion in
quiet, green areas while allowing cyclists and horsemen
freedom for their movements.
"As well, we suggest increasing access through several
wooded ravines, to the stretches of natural shoreline
surrounding Point Grey.
"We stress the distinct advantages of a trail system which
provides a wide range of walking opportunities for all types of
hikers and which samples the varying geographical features in
the area — ravines, beaches, ridges, bogs and others," the six-
page report says.
Uses proposed for the area include strolling, picnicking,
hiking, nature study, riding trails, golfing and group camping..
A salmon stream is also suggested.
hair is
Man's Hair Design Studio
SPECIALISTS IN BODY PERMS
AND COLORING
lehnAme 870-5435
540 WEST BROADWAY, VANCOUVER, B.C.
Winners of over 20 International Prize Awards
MEN'S GRAND MASTER
CHAMPION 1970, 1971.
MODERN, DISTINCTIVE
HAIRCUTTING & HAIR STYLING.
Free Parking At Rear
(Closed on Monday)
Dr. Bundolo and his Pandemonium
Medicine Show has been RUN OFF
campus in order to give an air of
respectability to
OPEN HOUSE
But never fear he will return I
Live Radio Comedy
FREE
SUB Movie Theatre
Thurs. Mar. 8 at Noon—Show at 12:30
spring, they can simply not pay
the final fee instalment without
academic consequences.
About the same number of
students were faced with de-
registration at this time last
year. Cameron said students
who are de-registered are
people who are failing, have
dropped out,  or who cannot
pay-
Support
sought
THEA KOERNER HOUSE
GRADUATE STUDENT
CENTRE ELECTION
for Student Members of the
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
• Nominations are invited for three positions on the Board.
s Nomination forms are available at the Centre Office.
a  Nominations close Tuesday, March 13, 1973 at 5:00 p.m.
From page 1
other Denny's locations in the
city explaining the strike and
asking citizens to observe the
boycott.
Loomes said the DSC
members of the AMS
executive-elect and newly
elected arts council reps will
walk the picket lines.
The        WWA, United
Fisherman and Allied Workers
Union and UBC Women's
Studies have also joined picket
lines during the past week.
Donations to the strike fund
should be sent to the WWA's
office at #3 - 45 Kingsway.
INTERNATIONAL
HOUSE
presents the
DANCE OF THE YEAR
2 BANDS
Serenaders Steelband
&
Continental Cavaliers
Facilities
Sat. - March 3, 1973
9 p.m.- 1 a.m.
$1.75
In your own way.
In your own time.
On your own terms.
You'll take to ihe
taste ofmPlayetmS Filter.
/l^iT
&».
cnHtf*
6ufl*s
Warning: The Department of National Health and Welfare advises that danger to health increases with amount smoked. Sensuality from Polish Mime see page 2
Page Friday Dance
Polished Poles
First on the program was The Kimono, a
mime drama which captured the Haiku-
like essense of the Japanese legend it
portrayed. The highly controlled, staccatolike movements expressed the theme
without any embellishment. Facial
expressions were utilized to a maximum
and were often so effective as to be
grotesquely mask-like.
Next was The Labyrinthe, which was
described on the program as "a geometric
composition of spatial relationships, built
up from the associations which the feeling
of eternity, existent in all closed forms that
are defined and finished, calls up." Though
it had its good moments, I liked this work
least and found it as lacking in sense and
meaning as the description quoted above.
Later, talking to Henryk Tomaszewski, I
came to understand it better as "a visual
presentation meant to stimulate the
sensations of various experiences
throughout life such as being open, being
closed, fear, elation, running, searching,
hiding,  etc."   I  also  see   now  that  my
negative feelings toward this work were
influenced by the absence of any female
members of the company in both it and The
Kimono, in which the only female part was
played by a man.
Last on the program was Faust in which
the few female members of the company
finally made a much awaited appearance. I
liked this work best of the three and I
thoroughly enjoyed Tomaszewski's light
refreshing way of treating the war between
good and evil as a fair and fun battle. Once
again no moral judgements were made and
the symbolism was left open to be
interpreted by each person. Much comedy
was interspersed throughout and Janusz
Pieczuro got a lot of laughs as a zany
Mephistopheles.
All in all, I would say that Dayid Y. H. Lui
once again sueceeded in bringing to
Vancouver audiences an evening of
extremely high calibre entertainment
which will be long remembered by those
fortunate enough to have seen it.
Jolanda Forsythe
In town
Beef heart here
Captain Beefheart is
arriving in town this week
with a whole new message.
There has always
been a small band of
Beefheart freaks who dug
his first three albums Trout
Mask Replica, Lick My
Decals Off, Baby, and The
Spotlight Kid, but to the vast
majority they were
incomprehensible. His new
album Clear Spot has
changed all that.
"We're the only people
doing anything significant in
modern music," Beefheart
says. He angers if you
suggest he copped out with
his new album, which is less
obscure, "I can do
anything," he insists. "I'm
not compromising one damn
bit on this new album. I
enjoy playing this stuff
more than Trout Mask
Replica."
Along with the new album
comes the message:
"Trying to save this planet
is what's happening man,
not somebody who takes
drugs and goes crazy to
listen to something as sane
as my music. Anyway, with
Clear Spot, the message
about drags will be so up
front nobody will have
trouble divining it."
So Beefheart may have
tamed his music somewhat,
but he has done it for a
reason. "Above all, I'm
trying to tell people that
they don't have to use
narcotics to feel. Drugs are
like a carnival, and when
you go home you have to
start living again.
Unfortunately, people don't
have the bodies or brains
left to function. I want my
mind the way it is — the way
I was born with it.
"I would just as soon play
the music on the new album
because when I see all those
people out there taking acid
to get into my music, then I
don't want to play that kind
of music. I don't want to
make people think they've
got to use some sort of
elevation to get into what I
do. If I did that, what kind of
artist would I be? Just
another   phoney   asshole."
The two Commodore
Ballroom shows will be the
perfect stage for Captain
Beefheart.The small (1500)
audience will be just the
right size to be overpowered
by his wild on-stage
presence — which he has not
tamed. And they won't have
to depend on evil drugs,
because good old alcohol
will   be   available   on   the
premises.
David MacKinlay
If you cant beat 'em...drive'em crazy!
JANE FONDA • DONALD SUTHERLAND • PETER BOYLE
"STEELYARD BLUES"   A BILL/PHILLIPS Production Co-Starring
GARRY GOODROW • HOWARD HESSEMAN • JOHN SAVAGE • Written by DAVID S. WARD
Executive producer DONALD SUTHERLAND • Produced by TONY BILL and MICHAEL & JULIA PHILLIPS
Now Showing
STRAND   681-2362
600 W. GEORGIA ST.
12:30. 2:15,4:05,
5:50, 7:40, 9:20
HALF PRICE
OPENING SPECIAL
Mar. 1, 2, 3&4
on all
PIZZAS picked up
at the new
LINO'S PIZZERIA
3621 W. Broadway    (jUstE,stofAima)    736-3401
OPEN 4 P.M. TO 2 A.M.  FREE DELIVERY TO CAMPUS
First in Taste & Service - Try Us and See
GENERAL GRAD CLASS
MEETING
THURSDAY, MARCH 8, 1973
Rooms 207-209 SUB
PURPOSE - To hear presentations of groups desiring grad class
funds and to VOTE on the projects YOU think
should receive grad class funds.
VOTING -       Thursday March 8, 2:00-5:00 p.m.
Friday March 9, 10:00-5:00 p.m.
in the main foyer of SUB
//•7-v/ mm'/.
MARY COSTA   "unreasonably beautiful with a voice
like sunlight made audible"
star of the new film, "The Great Waltz" sings the world's
loveliest arias
"One Fine  Day" from  Madame  Butterfly, "Musetta's Waltz
Song" from La Boheme, "Song to the Moon" from Rusalka
and other beautiful songs.
SIMON STREATFEILD conducts the VANCOUVER
SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
Friday, Sunday and Monday
march9,ll&12
at 8:30 in the Queen Elizabeth Theatre
Tickets from the Vancouver Ticket Centre or call 683-3255 to
charge to your Eaton's account.
$3-50 $450 $5.50
Page Friday, 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, March  2,   1973  Page OH 2
THE UBYSSEY: OPEN  HOUSE  EDITION
Friday, March 2,  1973
CONCRETE ART
across campus. It's
—roger kozma photo
can produce sound just like concrete poetry. This work sends sounds of bells echoing
a different, internal view of Ladner Clock Tower, outside main library.
Dinosaur finds
smart new home
By MARISE SAVARIA
The Geological Sciences Centre, one of the first largely
prefabricated buildings on campus, provides highly flexible
facilities for students in geology and geophysics.
The building, opened in April, 1972, houses undergraduate
laboratories, a museum, machine shops, seminar rooms, a
students' lounge and a reading room. Faculty and graduate
research facilities are provided on the third floor.
The 3 1/2 storey steel frame building is a change from the
usual brick and concrete construction of other campus
buildings.
Size and shape of interior rooms can be altered to meet
changing needs by moving modular walls.
To provide maximum wall space for laboratory tables and
to hold down heating and cooling changes, windows in most
laboratories are limited to occasional two-foot wide, floor-to-
ceiling vision panels.
There are no dividing walls, or wall or floor electrical and
plumbing outlets in the laboratories. Distilled, hot and cold
water, sewer outlets, electrical, gas and communications
services are provided by eight floor-to-ceiling service columns.
Services are distributed through built-in conduits in module
laboratory tables, which can be connected together in desired
shapes.
Two glassed-in exterior staircases, located at the south and
east ends of the building provide main access to the building.
An elevator in the centre of the building is used for moving
supplies and equipment, and for those unable to use the stairs.
The museum section is the home of the university's 110-
million-year-old dinosaur. The 25-foot-long skelton is
permanently imbedded in plaster on a wall in the museum.
The bones of the duck billed reptile, officially called a
Lambrosaurus, were found in 1913 in Alberta's Red Deer
Valley, and moved to the old UBC geological museum 23 years
ago.
Before the centre was built the geology department
occupied an assortment of Second World War army huts and a
two-storey frame building.
The new centre brings together and provides a core for the
complex of the earth sciences at UBC.
Arts has ancient plays, sidewalk cafes
By JOSIE BANNERMAN
A smorgasbord of
intellectual delights and other
similar delicacies awaits you
at Open House displays
planned by departments in the
arts faculty.
Outstanding examples of
19th century illustration,
binding and printing
techniques and original
Victorian manuscripts from
UBC's famous Colbeck
collection form the basis of the
English department's exhibit.
The department is also
sponsoring a special lecture by
eminent Canadian novelist
Hugh MacLennan on "Writing
in Canada over 30 Years".
MacLennan speaks at 12:30
p.m. Friday in Bu. 106.
"French for Western
Canadians" is the theme of the
French department's Open
House happening which
centres around a sidewalk
cafe. Coffee and French pastry
will be served.
The department of
linguistics is putting on a
variety of displays designed to
disprove the myth that a
linguist is just a person who
knows several languages.
You can see on an
oscilloscope, a device which
measures and records sound
waves — see what you sound
like when you speak.
The Foreign Students'
English Project demonstrates
modern techniques of teaching
English as a second language,
and visitors will have a chance
to operate the Language
Master.
The psychology department
has several display areas in
the basement of the Henry
Angus building. '
The testing of emotional
reactions by physiological
means is being demonstrated
in the clinical psychology
display area where students
are   also   giving   lessons   in
relaxation training.
Highlight of the music
department's display is a
series of 16th century masques
being performed in the recital
hall of the music building.
A display in the music
library features the work of
Canadian composer Jean
Coulthard presented through a
variety of pictures, recordings,
manuscripts and printed
scores.
. Robinson Crusoe at Spanish
Banks, an adventure movie
produced by students in the
economics department, proves
that specialization comes
naturally and economic
problems aren't restricted to
advanced societies.
Visitors to the Archeology
Lab in the basement of the
math building have an
opportunity to discover what it
is that archaeologists do,
besides dig holes in the ground.
Exhibits in the lab feature
displays of sites excavated in
the past as well as sites
currently being worked on by
students.
The anthropology-sociology
department is presenting an
exhibition of photographs of
fieldwork showing the peoples
UBC anthropologists have
studied.
Aspiring politicians,
diplomats, bureaucrats,
executives and others are
invited to participate in the
political science department's
man-computer simulation of a
future world ecocrisis.
This simulation, on display
Friday and Saturday in the
foyer of the new Sedgewick
Undergraduate Library, is a
working model of important
aspects of international
relations.
The computer part of the
simulation consists of a
number of computerized
models   of   aspects   of   the
international system. These
models provide an
environment for human
decision makers to respond to
and manipulate.
The scenario for Open House
involves a possible" world
future between nations
resembling Canada, USA,
USSR, China, a United States
of Europe and the
underdeveloped countries.
The results may be realistic,
as when a previous, similar
simulation predicted the
Russian invasion of
Czechoslovakia; or they may
be (hopefully) wrong, as when
this model led to a Third World
War in a UBC class simulation
earlier this year.
Question: Did        the
Phoenicians know how to
write?
Answer: Prof. Hanna Kassis
of the Religious Studies
department will try to
persuade you they did by
writing your name in this
earliest alphabet known to
man.
Over in geography, even
junk piles have meaning.
Geography covers more
ground than you may have
realized. Don't miss the
department's display of
stripped and abandoned cars;
a behavioural geographer
discusses where they were
found on the block, and why.
It's in room 223 of the
geography building.
Visitors are also invited to
participate in a game, Design
Your Ideal Neighborhood.
The department of Hispanic
and Italian studies is giving
lessons in Spanish and Italian
in the language lab Buchanan
111 between 10:30 a.m. and 3:30
p.m. Saturday.
The department is also
presenting a short play by
Cervantes, El juez de los
divorcios performed by
students, in Spanish. Don't be
deterred by the language
barrier; a detailed account of
the play will be read in
English.
Performances are scheduled
for 8 p.m. Friday, and 4 p.m.
Saturday in room 203 of the
Buchanan building.
Students in classical studies
are presenting scenes from
Plautus' famous caomedy
Miles Gloriosus, The Braggart
Soldier.
Performances are scheduled
for Friday at 7 and 8:30 p.m.
and Saturday at 2, 4, and 7:30
p.m. in Buchanan 205.
The Asian studies
department has planned its
display   to   emphasize   the
importance of the culture of
the peoples of East Asia to the
people of Vancouver.
Highlights of the program
include a Chinese costume and
folk dance show, and a
Japanese tea ceremony and
Koto concert.
Open House for Arts One, an
interdisciplinary program
designed to encourage students
to develop their powers of self
expression, will be in the Arts
One building. (It's the dirty
grey stucco building with the
green tile roof just behind the
education building).
An introductory talk is being
given at 1 a.m. and 2 p.m. on
both Friday and Saturday.
An invitation to join...
The Paulist Fathers.. .A contemporary religious community
serving the people of Canada and the United States communicating the Christian message: in the city, in information centers, in the parish, on radio and TV Dispelling
uncertainty and imparting peace, celebrating the hope of
the people of God and speaking on issues that concern the
Church.
As an individual, you can develop and share your talents
with others. As a member of the Community, you will experience the encouragement and support of fellow Paulists.
We're interested, if i
For more   Information write:
Father Donald C. Campbell,
Rooml04CA.
Paulist Fathers.
847 Markham Street
Toronto 174, Ontario Friday, March 2, 1973
THE^UBYSSEY:'"OPEN TfOtfSE' EDITION
'PhgetSH 3
POTTED  PLANTS   are  essential   part  of new Sedgewick  Undergraduate library.
Librarian Basil Stuart-Stubbs made a special effort to save old Red Oaks on Main Mall
—roger kozma photo
above library. Huge concrete caissons was idea developed to protect them. They make
for cozy, hide away bench rests.
'Pride, effort
make OH 73'
By WALTER GAGE
Administration President
The students, faculty members and employed staff of the
university are delighted to welcome you to UBC's triennial
Open House, designed to provide for the general public a
glimpse of the teaching, research and extracurricular activities
that go to make up the varied life of B.C.'s largest university.
First, let me say that Open House is primarily the
responsibility of the students of UBC, who spend many
hundreds of hours preparing exhibits and displays and
arranging lectures in association with the university's teaching
and employed staff.
The students first
manifested their pride in UBC
immediately after the Second
World War by suggesting that
the university open its doors on
a regular basis to allow our
citizens and taxpayers to see
how public funds are spent to
further the goals of higher
education.
The staging of an event like
Open House is, in large
measure, only possible
because of the energies of
students and I am pleased that
they have continued to provide
the main impetus for the event.
During your brief visit to the
campus I hope it will be
possible for you to visit some of
the new buildings and facilities
that have been constructed
since the last Open House in
1970. These include the
Instructional Resources
Centre in the Health Sciences
Centre, the Geological
Sciences Centre, the
Sedgewick Library and our
new residence complex.
UBC has two important functions — teaching and research.
In recent years there has been a continuing debate on the nature
and function of higher education and how much weight should
be assigned to each of these basic functions. I fully expect that
you will have questions concerning each of these areas and I
invite you to speak to our students and faculty members about
these topics and to listen to their opinions.
Finally, I hope it will be evident to you that the University of
British Columbia is an institution which aims to serve the
province and the nation by providing educational opportunities
for all our citizens while at the same time striving to attain the
highest standards of excellence.
I extend a hearty welcome to all who visit us today and I
hope, too, that you will find it a fruitful and rewarding
experience.
OPEN HOUSE
Growing campus
welcomes you
The University of British Columbia just
won't stop growing.
Every year more, and more, and more
buildings are added to make room for. the
vastly-divergent activities of more than 25,000
people who inhabit this campus every day.
Take a look around today and you'll find
dozens of structures that weren't here in 1970 if
you visited Open House that year.
More than $30 million worth of construction
has gone on in the past three years.
There's a fancy new undergraduate library
— buried underground, opposite the Main
Library, and under Main Mall. It's an ingenious
solution to the problem of an ever-compacted
central campus core. No room above ground?
We go subterranean.
In the medical sciences complex there's a
new Instructional Resources Centre which
boasts some of the finest,  most advanced
technical equipment for education that you're
likely to find anywhere.
The IRC's electronic wizardry rates high on
anyone's tour.
There's a new Geological Sciences Centre
which has a friendly old dinosaur (now
inanimate).
You'll find new office blocks like Buchanan
Tower (the one that resembles a fortress), and
other office structures which are clustered
along West Mall — they're the two-storey
wooden ones, which some faculty affectionately
refer to as the Holiday Inns.
For those of you on journeys of nostalgia,
most of the old buildings are still here and you
may still come across some familiar graffiti.
The old army huts are, thank goodness, a
vanishing race.
Whatever you're looking for, chances are
good that you'll find it. Enjoy yourself.
What's happening?
PRESIDENT GAGE
... says welcome
Agriculture    page 8
Alumni Association . page 7
Architecture ..... page 12
Arts faculty   ...  pages 2,17
Campus politics page 4
Clubs page 9
Commerce page 12
Computing centre   .. page 5
Dentistry   page 12
Education    page 12
Engineering   page 11
Food  page 11
Forestry     page 6
Geological Sciences
Centre   page 2
Housing  page 5
Instructional Resources
Centre    page 18
In your hand you hold two
Ubysseys.
One was produced by the
regular staff of Canada's best
university newspaper, the
other is a special section,
produced by the staff of Open
House.
The papers come as a
package, both marking Open
House weekend, but they are
separate in editorial control
and content, and neither staff
is responsible for the other's
section.
International House . page 7
Law page 12
Libraries    page 11
Map   pages 10,11
Medicine    page 13
Physical Education    page 12
Planning    page 5
Science       pages 15,19
Sedgewick Library >.. page 4
Student services page 5
Visitors' services   .. page 11
Westwater    page 5
Women's studies   .. page 14 Page OH 4
THE UBYSSEY: OPEN  HOUSE EDITION
Friday, March 2,  1973
THE WSSIY
SPECIAL OPEN HOUSE EDITION
MARCH 2 and 3,1973
EDITOR: Murray McMillan
This special edition of The Ubyssey was produced by the Open
House Committee, with the assistance of the staff of the regular
Ubyssey.
Our cover incorporates the Open House logo which was
designed by fine arts student John Kula.
Among those who produced mounds of copy were Mike
Sasges, Lorri Rudland, Marise Savaria, Laurie Jones, Geoff Thomas,
Rosemary Cairns, "JB", Ryon Guedes, Dave Schmidt,
Deborah MacNeill and Josie Bannerman, Vaughn Palmer.
Come hack . .
Come in and enjoy. All this has been put on for
your benefit. You're looking at a telescoped version of
UBC.
Scores of displays and events are scheduled to give
you, the visitor, some idea of what goes on at UBC. But
don't go away with the idea that this is campus life.
It's not. We hope you'll come back a few times
between now and the next Open House, to wander
around on a normal day, and see what day-to-day life is
like.
But for the moment you have the opportunity to
see hundreds of things that go on in small rooms and
isolated laboratories which outsiders seldom enter.
For many UBC students and faculty, this weekend
is an education as well — they get a chance to see what
goes on in corners of the university beyond their own
little corner of campus.
But that's what Open House is all about.
Education.
We hope you enjoy yourselves. Come back.
Open House Committee
WILSON RECORDINGS COLLECTION . .. underground music
—roger kozma photo
Come down and read
CHAIRMAN
VICE-CHAIRMAN    Sheila Wong
TREASURER John Wilson
SECRETARY    Lynne Kincaid
FACULTY COORDINATOR    	
 Mike Forhan
CLUBS    Wendy Wilson
SERVICES    Carolyn Miller
TOURS Dick McLellan
BUSES Terry Seibold
. . . . John Keating
GUIDES  .Pemme Muir
TRAFFIC    Ed Foster
SCHOOL TOURS Lynne Kincaid
PUBLIC RELATIONS	
  .Laurie Jones, Geoff Thomas
OPEN HOUSE PAPER    	
 Murray McMillan
PROGRAM COORDINATOR	
 Rosemary Cairns
By DEBORAH MacNEILL
Among the steel encased roots of eight
red oaks, in what was underground, are 130,000
books, 20,000 records and acres of new
"human" library space.
The building is the new Sedgewick
Undergraduate Library built under Main Mall.
It opened on Jan. 3 and was designed as a place
for students to read, gossip and activate, to
listen to Shakespeare or to contemplate the 42
Shakespearean quotes lettered on the plate
glass windows, and of course, to study.
Designers began work six years ago. The
building was to provide desperately-needed
study facilities and an academic centre for
undergraduate students.
To find out the building's needs, students
were polled before plans were completed.
The common voice demanded: more study
areas both formal and informal, public and
private; more room for books and browsing;
expansion of listening room; more and better
facilities — photocopying machines, typing
room, lounges and conversation areas.
The library had to be concealed in the
middle of the Main Mall, it had to be as
economically humble as possible, it had to be
what students would want to use and have a
growing, living atmosphere.
One hundred thousand cubic yards of earth
were removed from the mall in front of the
main library, construction began, concrete was
poured in, and the result is, two storys of
library space that brings the outdoors in.
The interiors of the library have carried on
the living concept. Big windows, green carpets,
big bright spaces and rough cedar dividers
provide a pleasing atmosphere. The colored
furniture carries it on through the entire two-
storey building.
And the staff has made it policy to keep the
library alive and active. A feedback board
posts student suggestions and staff responses at
the main entrance. It provides often
entertaining reactions ranging from
complaints about empty candy bar machines
and physical inconveniences related to any new
building — squeaks, bangs and low ceilings, to
constructive ideas about how to speed up
turnstile lines or rearrange cataloging
procedures.
But almost all the suggestions are
accompanied with compliments and gratitude
for the "world's largest underground planter
filled with books" which, as librarian Basil
Stuart-Stubbs says "will encourage people to
stuck around and read."
UBC politics: what's said, what's done
By MIKE SASGES
Politics at UBC, like politics everywhere, is the
art of the possible.
On this campus it's a matter of finding the
median between what's been said and what's been
done.
At UBC political battles have flared up for the past
three years over tenure disputes and student
representation at all levels of the 12 faculties and 100
departments.
In the fall of 1971, six professors in the
anthropology-sociology department were up for a
tenure review.
The department's promotions and tenure
committee recommended five of the six be granted
permanent appointment in the department.
However, two of the five, Matthew Speier and
Ron Silvers were granted tenure only by a slim
majority.
The committee's recommendations then went to
the arts faculty's tenure and promotion committee.
However, department head Cyril Belshaw, as is his
right, also sent a recommendation on Silvers and
Speier.
And Belshaw recommended against tenure for
two assistant profs.
Graduate students in the department, organizing
around the issue, created a committee to consider
both the tenure recommendation process and the
decisions made that fall.
Some department profs and graduate students
accused Belshaw of unduly influencing committee
proceedings because of an alleged history of
personal animosity and political disagreement
between the two sociology profs and Belshaw.
But the story now shifts to the English
department where another popular prof was refused
tenure.
Brian Mayne was the prof in question. He and
David Powell were the centre of tenure dispute
raging in the department during the last Open House.
Powell decided to fight his case openly while
Mayne decided to have the promotions and tenure
committee reconsider its decision at a later time.
October, 1971 was the time and the committee
recommended against the English prof, described by
a committee of students in the department as
"eminently qualified, both as an extremely
competent teacher and in terms of publishing."
But the scene soon shifted back to the anthrosoc
department where the student committee on tenure
released a report on the current proceeding.
The committee found most of the students in
Speier's and Silver's classes favored the two.
It also found the two profs had a consistently high
publication record, an important criteria for tenure
recommendations on this campus.
The department's promotion and tenure
committee agreed to discuss reconsidering its
decision. Students regard the review as their victory
because they believed they had isolated the head
from his profs.
And the committee decided new assessors must
be appointed to decide on the two profs' cases.
Speier and Silvers, however, refused to go along
with any new addition to the tenure recommendation
to aits dean Doug Kenny and so the department
promotion and tenure committee killed the idea.
But in January, 1972 department profs voted 30-8
in favor of a complete review.
In the Slavonic studies department and in the
psychology department grad students were making
public their disagreement with tenure decisions.
In Slavonics two instructors were fired and one
assistant professor was demoted to instructor.
The students claimed the demoted prof had a
better teaching record than that of a junior prof who
was granted tenure.
In the psychology department acting head Edro
Signori fired junior profs Mike Humphrey and Carol
Marx, although students had petitioned Signori not to
take any action on the two.
What's been said and what's been done? Students
realized they must organize themselves at all levels
of the departments.
And that's what they began to do this year.
Led by the arts undergraduate society executive,
students began last fall to petition arts dean Kenny
and the faculty council, composed of arts profs, to
consider letting students join normally-closed
committees in the faculty and its department.
Kenny refused to allow such a motion to be
presented to the November meeting of the faculty
and the students, led by the AUS executive, invaded
the meeting, bringing about the first confrontation
between students and faculty in some years.
Most of the profs voted to walk out of the
meeting, declared an open meeting by protesters and
sympathetic profs.
The meeting endorsed a resolution by
anthropology professor Bill Willmott which read:
"That the following motion be placed on the
agenda of an emergency faculty of arts meeting as
soon as possible:
"That the faculty of arts accept the principle of
student representation of all levels of the faculty and
that a committee be elected consisting of an equal
number of faculty and student members to work out
details of representation."
Students at a later meeting elected six students
toTepresent them on the committee.
And after the Christmas break the senate voted
to accept in principle voting representation for
students at all faculty levels except committees
concerned with hiring, firing and promotion of profs,
scholarships, business and finance.
For students this was a start even though for
some it meant too much had been said and not
enough had been done.
For student leaders the New Democratic Party's
election has meant better access to the provincial
government than was possible during the Social
Credit's tenure. Friday, March 2,  1973
THE  UBYSSEY:  OPEN   HOUSE  EDITION
Page OH 5
Smorgasbord of sights
COMMUNITY AND
REGIONAL       PLANNING:
Lasserre building, 205, 211,
Corridor of Second Floor, and
alcove area in front of 205A, B
and C.
Display is concerned with
informing the community of
the school's activities and of
the role of the social planner,
as well as learning from
community members what
they feel the school should be
doing. A simulated community
planning meeting, with citizen
participation,    logo    block
modelling, and role-playing by
citizens, as well as specific
application of the school's
activities to Vancouver, will
aid in this dual aim.
COMPUTING CENTRE: Civil
engineering 200.
The computing centre has an
IBM 360 Model 67 Duplex
computer, one of the largest
computers in Canada, run
under one of the most
sophisticated operating
systems in North America.
Display will consist of self-
guided tours in the centre.
FORTUNE WAITS
FOR THE PANNING
Gold for the panning! Head for the mining exploration
camp (complete with helicopter) just outside the Geological
Sciences building.
When you've made your fortune come on inside, there's
more to see.
There's an old mine car filled with ore exhibits with free ore
samples for visitors, and a fluorescent mineral display.
Polarizing microscopes, used for observing rocks in detail,
are also on display.
Check the push-button light-up map and locate ore deposits
throughout the province.
Don't miss the dinosaur and fossil exhibit and the time lapse
film showing the Athabasca Glacier in motion.
This film, narrated by Geological Sciences prof Richard
Kucera, won an award last year for the best science film in
Canada.	
FLASHESFLASHESFLASHE
Michael Ovenden, UBC
astronomy professor, is
speaking on how he
"rediscovered" a lost planet
that once circled the sun and
exploded some 16 million years
ago. He speaks at 8 p.m.
Saturday in Buchanan 106.
*    *   *
Master craftsman John Lees
is demonstrating the craft of
glassblowing at 4:45 p.m.
Friday and at 4 p.m. Saturday
in Hebb theatre. Lees' work
will be on display in the main
entrance of the Henning
building.
Also in Hennings, the centre
of campus physicists,
appropriately - costumed
experimenters will perform
Pascal's experiment to
illustrate the nature of a
vacuum at 3 p.m. Friday.
Galileo's "Leaning Tower of
Pisa" will be performed at 1:30
p.m. from the Ladner Bell
Tower.
HOUSING
ADMINISTRATION:
Conventions office, Sedgewick
Undergraduate   Library.   AH
residences will be open.
Tours of student residences
at UBC, as well as information
on conventions, reveals the
varied activities of the housing
administration.
STUDENT SERVICES:
Ponderosa Cafeteria
Joint informational display
put on by the registrar's office,
student services, health
services, dean of women's
office, and continuing
education. A computer and a
slide show will be featured, and
people will be available to
answer visitors' questions
about the various
departments. Models of the
planned Museum of Man and
the Botanical Garden are also
be on display here.
WESTWATER RESEARCH
CENTRE: Instructional
Resources Centre, Lecture
Hall 1.
One of the centre's public
lectures is given Friday at 3
p.m. The topic "The Role of
Citizen Groups in
Environmental Decision-
Making", and the speaker is
Dr. Donald Chant of the
zoology department at the
University of Toronto.
THANKS
Numerous companies
contributed materials for Open
House displays.
The Open House Committee
gratefully acknowledges the
contributions of the following
organizations:
MacMillan Bloedel
Crown Zellerbach
Bapco Paint
International Paints
C.I.L.
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for that smart look in giants ...
look to
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THE  UBYSSEY:  OPEN   HOUSE  EDITION
Friday, March  2,   1973
Environment stressed
in forestry display
By LORRI RUDLAND
The forestry faculty is
putting more environmental
emphasis in its displays for
Open House says Rod Willis,
forestry's Open House
Chairman.
"We have to admit we've
blown it in the past," he said.
"Classical forestry should put
the regeneration of forests first
and the value of lumber
second, but in B.C. it has
usually been the other way
around."
To emphasize forestry's
greater concern with
environmental issues a balloon
logging model constructed to
about one-fifth of its
operational size will be on view
in the forestry mall. Because it
hoists the whole tree, branches
and all, there is no waste left
where the trees were cut, and
by lifting the trees over the
soil, the amount of soil
disturbance caused by present
logging methods is greatly
decreased.
Changing land management
policies giving more priority to
recreational uses are
illustrated with an eight foot by
twenty foot contour map of the
Chilliwack Provincial Forest
and another map of Mount
Edziza Park in northern B.C.
Multiple-use concepts in
forestry resources are
emphasized in contrast to the
outdated   single-use   concept.
If you are interested in
getting involved, forestry has a
computer programmed to test
your- ability to schedule logging
trucks in loading and dumping
operations. Any person can
type commands into the
computer-. Theoretically there
are about 10 logging trucks
and four landings. The trick is
to schedule the 10 trucks to
pick up the logs from the four-
landings and carry them to the
dump without any time —
wasting delays due to line-ups.
Berkeley professor Dr.
David T. Mason is giving a one-
man multi-media show. He is
presenting two stimulating
films about the way man views
himself in nature.
At least the titles of the films
are stimulating — Procession
of the Megathroph, and When
You Look Deeply Into the
Many-Faceted Golden Eye of
the Green Lace Wing.
Discussion will follow the
films.
Or if you want to see how
dirty your- sewage or ditch
water- really it, just pass a vial
to the forestry water quality
analyzer. It will tell you where
Forestry
happenings
FORESTRY:     MacMillan
building
Trees are the keynote of this
display. 7,200 Douglas fir-
seedlings will be distributed to
visitors, 500 Christmas trees
will provide atmosphere, while
the Silviculture option display
will distribute another 800
Sycamore seedlings. A model
of the Chilliwack Provincial
Forest, as well as models and
slide shows covering the
various options within the
faculty, are on display.
your water fits on the water
quality scale.
Some very interesting aerial
photographs of Vancouver all
on display. These are
composite photos made up
from pictures taken one or two
seconds apart. If viewed under
a special instrument, they give
a stereo view (sort of like 3-D
movies) illustrating
Vancouver three-
dimensionally.
If you are interested in forest
fire control, see the forest fire
simulator used to train
dispatchers for the B.C. forest
service. It will project a
picture from a forestry lookout
with sound recordings of the
stages in forest fire control,
including the use of water
bombers and ordinary chain
saws.
Seven thousand Douglas fir
seedlings which were grown at
UBC will be given away to
eager recipients.
Another 700 Sycamore
seedlings will be given away in
return for a donation. This
money will be given to charity.
Pulp mill and sawmill
models will illustrate wood
utilization.
Wildlife displays will
illustrate various stages of the
forest and the animals related
to each stage.
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Hurry. This is a limited offer.
* At tU Friday, March  2,  1973
THE  UBYSSEY:  OPEN   HOUSE  EDITION
Page OH  7
ALUMNI SET DEBATE,
GAGE RECEPTION
Classics head Malcolm McGregor will chair an Oxford-
Union style debate on the topic: Resolved that formal university
education is obsolete.
The Alumni Association is presenting the debate from 11
a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Saturday in the SUB conversation pit.
People are invited to participate in the debate by listening,
questioning, arguing, heckling and especially by voting yea or
nay on the resolution.
At 2 p.m. a special reception for returning alumni and their
families will be held in Cecil Green Park. Administration
president Walter Gage, the 67-year-old Grand Old Man on
campus, will be around.
AT INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Come to the fair!
By DAVID SCHMIDT
The annual International Fair is being held at
International House to coincide with the Open
House festivities.
The fair features slides and folk music in
booths organized by nine overseas student
associations. Groups presenting booths are II
Caffe (Italian), El Circulo (Spanish), the
Chinese, Pakistani, German, Balkan, Polish,
Turkish, and Canadian - Indian clubs.
Admission is free. It will culminate in a dance
with two live bands Saturday evening. For only
$1.75, campus visitors can cap off a great Open
House weekend to the sounds of the Continental
Cavaliers and the Serenaders Steel Band.
International House dances are renowned as
the best on campus.
IH is located at West Mall and Northwest
Marine Drive.
In addition to displays by individual groups,
International House will have its own
information booth were it will tell visitors the
history of IH and explain some of its programs.
Carl Beach, IH program director, describes
International House as "a university and
community centre for Canadian and foreign
students."
It was built opposite the armory on land
donated by the university and financed by the
Vancouver Rotary Club. It was opened in 1959
by Eleanor Roosevelt.
International House is run by a board of
directors made up of community, student, staff
and Rotarian members. Its operating budget is
financed through the university, and the board
is therefore responsible to the university board
of governors.
IH provides a wide range of services for the
foreign students from more than 70 countries
who annually attend UBC. Before the student
leaves his home country, International House
writes him or her to establish contact and to
determine if any help is needed.
A little Trouble in the morning.
After Shave and Cologne with a
distinctive, disturbing fragrance that can give
a whole campus Trouble up to 8,10, or even 12 hours!
and you've got Trouble all day.
Campus
Banking Service
Derek is manager of the Commerce branch at UBC. He's
a good man to talk to. Come on over and meet him. He
knows that students have special needs — and he'll be glad
to discuss them with you. His aim is to become banker to
everyone  on   the   campus.
<&
DEREK BOTTOMLEY
CANADIAN IMPERIAL
BANK OF COMMERCE
UNIVERSITY BRANCH
5796 UNIVERSITY BOULEVARD - IN THE VILLAGE SHOPPING PLAZA Page OH  8
THE  UBYSSEY:  OPEN   HOUSE  EDITION
Friday, March  2,   1973
PROVOCAT/VE DISPLAYS'
Agriculture: whole hog
By LORRI RUDLAND
The agriculture faculty has gone whole
hog this year.
Some of the more provocative displays
feature a gigantic simulated cow stomach, a
mechanical strawberry harvester, data on
nutritive value of organic foods, a summary of
Agriculture Minister Dave Stupich's policy
statements and their future implications and a
magnetic egg.
The agriculture economics displays are
located in the plant science building,
horticulture in the greenhouses and adjacent
horticulture building. All other displays are in
the MacMillan building.
If you have ever wondered how cows digest
that grass and turn out whole, two per cent and
skim milk, try to see the huge simulated cow
stomach on display at the MacMillan building.
Rumen bacteria are responsible for
breaking down the cellulose cows eat and will
be visible tnrough microscopes contained in
peakholes scattered across Bessie's stomach.
Or if papillae and membranes are your bag, put
your head right into the cow stomach and view
the interior decorating.
A mechanical strawberry harvester is being
researched here and a working model is
displayed. This machine does a once over
picking job, harvesting all the strawberries at
one time. Because of the variance in ripening
times, efforts are being made to develop a
variety of strawberry where all the berries
ripen concurrently.
Another agricultural engineering display is
the precision forestry seeder capable of seeding
one-half million seeds per day. In addition the
process of freeze-drying and freeze
concentrating foods will be demonstrated.
With the projected world protein shortage,
simulated meat or other food products are
being researched much more extensively and
could perhaps become a future economic
necessity.
A look at 'dirf and 'cow'
CENTRAL DISPLAY:
MacMillan building, courtyard
and first floor
This display, a joint
production of students and
faculty, is entitled Food for
Thought: Thought for Food,
and attempts to cover
significant historical
contributions to present-day
world food production.
AGRICULTURAL
ECONOMICS: MacMillan
building
Displays cover Canada's
feed grain and livestock
industries, the Okanagan
Basin horticultural industry,
and rural poverty — all
illustrated through maps,
pictures, slides and diagrams.
AGRICULTURAL
ENGINEERING: MacMillan
building
Exhibits deal with new
developments in agricultural
engineering through new
techniques of environmental
control.
FOOD SCIENCE:   MacMillan
building — 240 and hallway,
room 254
Individual displays  answer
BESSIE
... moo
the theme-question, What is
Food        Science?, and
demonstrate the role of the
food scientist. Displays range
through grading standards,
food additives and organic or
natural foods, and include a
question-and-answer   box   for
pertinent topics.
PLANT      SCIENCE:
Horticulture building
Two films are featured in
this display — Do You Know
These House Plants?, a pre-
made slide film, and Crop
Production in B.C. Displays
illustrate the various
disciplines within plant
science, as well as research
projects currently underway.
POULTRY SCIENCE: Poultry
Products building
A   series    of • relevant
displays.
SOIL   SCIENCE:    MacMillan
building 102, 154 and 158
Theme is The Soil and the
Environmental Quality, to tie
in with increasing public
concern over the soil as a vital
part of man's total
environment and a precious
renewable resource. Displays
illustrate such problems as soil
pollution, erosion, and land
use. A film entitled Down to
Earth illustrates land use
problems in the Fraser Valley.
Free soil sample boxes are
available to visitors.
We are proud
to have again been selected
the OFFICIAL GRADUATION
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ARENAS and CURLING RINK ice time
requests from UBC student groups for
the 1973-1974 season, are required
as soon as possible.
•
THESE REQUESTS ARE TO BE
FORWARDED IN WRITING TO
H.R. NICHOLSON, Manager
•
Requests for
Spring and/or Summer Arenas
ice time are also presently
being received.
For information call 228-3197 Friday, March  2,  1973
THE  UBYSSEY:  OPEN   HOUSE  EDITION
Page OH  9
SUB clubs
feature da
whole woiks
HERE'S WHAT UBC'S CLUBS
ARE SHOWING:
ABORTION ACTION
COMMITTEE: SUB main
concourse
A copy of the law regarding
abortion is centrally displayed,
surrounded by screens
presenting views on the legal,
moral and medical aspects
which arise when repeal of the
abortion laws are discussed.
AGRICULTURAL
UNDERGRADUATE
SOCIETY:       MacMillan
Building
For details of this"
display, see faculty displays —
agricultural sciences. In
addition, the AgUS is holding a
chicken barbecue in the main
foyer of the MacMillan
Building from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.
on Saturday.
AMATEUR RADIO CLUB:
Brock Hall 358
No special display is
Dlanned. but the radio station
is open and attended during
Open House.
AQUA SOC: SUB ballroom and
gym rotunda
To show the public a typical
Pacific Northwest underwater
scene, club members have
built a simulated reef,
complete with typical flora and
fauna. Slides and films
supplement the typical
underwater scene.
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB:
SUB ballroom
Within a typical Chinese
garden, a bringing-together of
the ancient and modern faces
of China is presented. Ancient
Chinese artifacts and a
Chinese character-writer
represent the old, while a
Chinese artist from Hong
Kong, a photographic display
of Chinatown, and other
contemporary displays show
the new. Shows will be
presented onstage by the
Dynasty Dancers, the Chinese
Musical Society, and the Kung
Fu Club.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
ORGANIZATION: SUB main
concourse
A comfortable and
informational booth lets
visitors come and share ideas
with the members staffing the
booth.
CHRISTIAN CLUBS: North
alcove, SUB main  concourse
A four-part. pictorial
presentation conveys the
message of these clubs: world
problems, man's individual
responsibility, man's attempt
at solution of the problems, and
God's solution — Jesus Christ.
CIVIL ENGINEERING
CLUB: Room 203, civil
engineering building
Display shows a model of a
bridge structure, molded from
photelastic plastic which will,
when observed under polarized
light, allow an optical stress
analysis of the structure.
ECKANKAR CLUB: SUB
main course and room 211
Central feature is a half-hour
film, narrated by the present
living Eck Master, Sri Darwin
Gross, which provides an
introduction to Eckankar, the
ancient science of soul travel.
EDUCATION STUDENTS
ASSOCIATION: Education
building
Those first-day-of-practicum
"shakes" are illustrated in a
slide and tape show. The
students invite visitors to come
and see what all future
teachers go through, as well as
activities of the educational
council and students.
FENCING CLUB: War
Memorial Gymnasium
Highlight is a demonstration
of fencing techniques on
Saturday from 2 to 2:30 p.m. in
the War Memorial
Gymnasium. Members of the
club are on hand to provide
information about their sport,
and photographs and fencing
equipment will be on display.
GEOGRAPHY CLUB:
Geography building
Exhibits and displays on the
various areas of geography —
cultural and urban, regional,
physical, and economic
geography are presented.
INTER-FRATERNITY
COUNCIL:        SUB        main
concourse
This display features a booth
explaining fraternities and
their role on campus. Slides
depict inter-fraternity
activities (service projects,
work parties, literary projects,
etc).
INTERNATIONAL       HOUSE
The annual International
Fair is being held to make the
public aware of the richly
diverse cultural backgrounds
of UBC's  overseas  students.
LIBRARY STUDENTS
ASSOCIATION: Main library,
north wing, top floor
Students are exhibiting an
old-west style, full-size handprinting press, and a fairly
complete print show. Visitors
will be able to see work which
the students have done, and
may be able to see
demonstrations of the printing
technique.
MEDICAL
UNDERGRADUATE
SOCIETY:  Health  sciences
building
Medical students are
displaying a variety of
diagnostic aids to the public, as
well as a film on the effects of
surgery on cardiovascular
disease. Diagnostic aids
dealing with heart and
vascular disease are
incorporated in the over-all
health sciences display, but
there is a series of displays of
aids not connected with
cardiovascular disease —
respiratory function
measurements, ophthalmo-
scopes,stethoscopes and reflex
hammers.
MINERAL ENGINEERING
CLUB: Mineral engineering
building
Main feature is a drilling
competition. An experienced
drill operator will demonstrate
drilling techniques; various
others will then be allowed to
try their hands at it. A number
of large drills and other
machines are on display, as
well as a small generator and
an accompanying explanatory
display.
—joe martin photo
FLOATING FREE in thin, thin air, Dave Sandercock takes a dive. Members of UBC Skydiving Club are
staging dives into soccer field behind SUB at 2:30 Saturday. Plane was loaned by Air West Airfines.
MUSSOC       MUSICAL
tTHEATRE SOCIETY: Student
Union Building, auditorium
Mussoc is presenting a revue
entitled Brotherhood of Man, a
show which follows the lifespan
of a person. It includes
songs and skits from famous
Broadway musicals such as
Fiddler on the Roof; You're a
Good Man, Charlie Brown; and
The Boyfriend. Show times are
4 and 10:30 p.m. on Friday, and
1 p.m., 3 p.m., and 5 p.m. on
Saturday.
NISEI VARSITY CLUB: SUB
ballroom
This display reflects the
club's heritage through a
Japanese-Canadian photo
display (courtesy of the Asian
Canadian Coalition). Focus of
the display is a Japanese
house, containing a display of
ikebana, various ornaments
and decorations.
ONTOLOGICAL SOCIETY:
SUB main concourse
An informational display of
the society's purpose — to
assist people to move through a
recreative process into their
true state of consciousness or
being, that of order, harmony
and  creativity.
PANHELLENIC:   SUB   main
concourse
An informational display and
slides reveal the activities of
the sororities such as
Intramurals and Phoenix, and
in off-campus philanthropic
work.
PHOTOGRAPHIC   SOCIETY:
SUB main concourse
Photosoc provides highest
quality photographical
chemicals and equipment to
students at the lowest possible
cost, on a co-operative basis.
PHRATERES   CLUB:   SUB
main concourse
Pictures and posters, as well
as pamphlets, reveal the
varied facets of this social
service club, which is open to
all women on campus, and
which is involved in a variety
of activities around the
campus and the community.
POTTERY CLUB: SUB main
concourse
Visitors are invited to create
small pottery items, mix the
glaze, and label the items with
their names and addresses.
Club members will bisque,
glaze and forward the items to
their creators.
PRE-SOCIAL WORK CLUB:
Outside conversation pit, SUB
Member clubs are cooperating with the school of
social work in providing an
informational booth.
Pamphlets, pictures and a map
illustrate some facets of social
work, while a video reporting
of visitors' comments on issues
of social concern will be an
added feature of the booth.
RIGHT TO LIFE SOCIETY:
SUB main concourse
This presentation traces the
development of a human life
from conception to birth
through color slides, while
another set of slides presents
the reality of abortion.
Literature will be handed out,
and club members will be
available for discussion.
SAILING CLUB: Alcove
across from information booth,
SUB
Display is a slide show with a
taped commentary. A flying
junior sailboat is also on
exhibit.
SKYDIVING CLUB: South
alcove, SUB main  concourse
A demonstration jump is
scheduled for Saturday
afternoon at 2:30 in the soccer
field east of SUB,' depending on
weather conditions. (Planes to
be provided by Air West.) The
club is displaying posters and
brochures, a stretched-out
canopy, jumpers' equipment,
and a continuous movie-slide
show.
STUDENT LIBERALS: SUB
ballroom
Club members will provide
information and discussion of
the role of the student Liberal
on campus, as well as on
politics in general. Booth
features posters and handouts,
and federal and provincial
MPs and MLAs may be present
at various times to talk to
visitors.
STUDENT MOBILIZATION
COMMITTEE: SUB main
concourse
Focus of this display is a
continuous showing of The
Automated War — a slide-show
and sound track which
documents the war in Vietnam.
Photographs showing victims
of the war are on display, and
fact sheets on Vietnam and the
role of Canadian troops, both in
Vietnam and elsewhere, are
being handed out.
STUDENTS
INTERNATIONAL
MEDITATION      SOCIETY:
SUB main concourse
Club members fulfill the
purpose of SIMS — the
expansion of the individual's
mind, development of his
creative intelligence, and use
of his full potential in studies,
careers, and recreation —
through Transcendental Meditation, as taught by Maharishi
Mahesh  Yogi.
THEATRE STUDENTS
ASSOCIATION: Freddy Wood
Theatre
Theatre students will
provide tours of Freddy Wood
Theatre from 3 to 7 p.m. Tours
include facilities and
equipment of the theatre, a set
for environmental theatre, and
a rehearsal in progress?
VARSITY CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP: North alcove,
SUB main concourse
A discussion of Christianity
as a valid part of the academic
scene, with emphasis on the
fact that religious issues are
human issues, and that VCF
can contribute to the search for
a genuine human existence.
VARSITY OUTDOOR CLUB:
SUB rooms 205, 207 and
courtyard
The VOC display describes
the club's various activities —
mountaineering, hiking,
skiing, climbing, cross-country
skiing, and a variety of other
outdoor recreations — as well
as how to do them, where they
can take place, and who takes
part.
WARGAMERS: SUB 216
The        club displays
demonstration games, ranging
from ancient to modern
battles, with particular
attention being paid to
Napoleonic   land   warfare.
WOMEN'S STUDIES: SUB
main concourse
An information and
literature table is planned by
the women's studies group'.
Women are in attendance to
talk, rap, and answer questions
about anything and everything
related   to   women's   studies Page OH   10
THE  UBYSSEY:  OPEN  HOUSE  EDITION
Friday, March  2,   1973
YOUR OPEN HOUSE MAP
THE UNIVERSITY
OF BRITISH
COLUMBIA
CAMPUS
P-parking
M - information booths Friday, March  2,  1973
THE  UBYSSEY:  OPEN   HOUSE  EDITION
Page OH   11
LOTS TO SEE:
Engineering
World off books
UBC's      Engineers      are
displaying the following:
METALLURGY:
Metallugy building, first two
floors.
Ten       to        15        major
demonstrations  and  displays
scanning the spectrum of the
metallurgical field.
CIVIL:
Civil engineering, 201 and 203,
Ponderosa annex B [sanitation
laboratories], structural and
hydraulic labs.
Displays and films are being
shown in the civil engineering
building, while various
displays on show in the
structural, hydraulic and
sanitation laboratories.
CHEMICAL:
Chemical Engineering
Building
Seminars and films illustrate
the role of the chemical
engineer in industry and
society.
ELECTRICAL:
McLeod Building.
MECHANICAL:
Mechanical     engineering
building and annex.
The famous Wally Wagon,
UBC's prize-winning urban
car, is on display.
Hungry? Then let's eat!
When the feet are sore and
the body needs a rest and the
mind needs a break to observe
all that has flashed by, try
stopping at one of the many
refreshment spots on campus.
Gourmet it may not be, but
it's here.
FOOD SERVICES
MEALS
Available at the following
locations; hours are generally
those of Open House:
SUB cafeteria — North Side
— Featuring Fish and Chips or
Fried Chicken.
Auditorium   cafeteria   —
under auditorium and south of.
armory  Authentic   Chinese
Food.
Ponderosa cafeteria — on
West Mall — Italian Spaghetti.
Residence dining rooms —
Place Vanier or Totem Park —
Regular Meals.
SNACKS
Available at the following
locations:
Bus Stop — Main Mall beside
bookstore.
War Memorial Gym —
downstairs.
SUB - South Side.
Barn — on Main Mall near
Forestry and Agriculture —
will close at 6:30 p.m.
Saturday.
Mobile Snack Bar will be in
service.
VENDING    MACHINES—are
in:
Law Library
Civil Engineering
Auditorium cafeteria and
annex
Brock
Buchanan Lower Main
SUB basement
OTHER SPECIAL FOOD
SERVICES
Nisei Varsity Club provides
tea and Japanese crackers at
their display in the SUB
ballroom extension.
Agricultural Undergrad
Society is holding a "Chicken
Bar-B-Q" Saturday at
lunchtime in front of the
MacMillan building.
International House —
International Foods and
Refreshments is available in
individual displays.
Hispanic and Italian studies
are offering a variety of ethnic
food in Buchanan lounge and
foyer.
The French department has
set up a "sidewalk cafe" in
Buchanan 102.
The Pit will be open between
4 p.m. and midnight Friday.
Services to visitors
Any general questions can be
answered by phoning 228-4183
or coming in to SUB 230A.
BABYSITTING
Children over two years are
well looked after by Phrateres
in SUB 209.
WASHROOMS
Indicated in all buildings.
LOST AND FOUND
Lost articles can be turned in
to guides or guide booths and
will be brought to the main lost
and found room — SUB 105A.
TOUR BUSES
Buses will tour the
Thunderbird Sports Centre and
TRIUMF      (Tri-University
Meson Facility). They will run
approximately every 20-30
minutes. Tickets must be
bought in advance at a cost of
25 cents from the ticket booth
facing SUB Loop. The tour will
be approximately one hour and
20 minutes.
HEALTH SERVICES
First-aid stations are at
Information Booths.
First-aiders are at Main
display areas on campus.
St. John's Ambulance are
providing some volunteers.
They are also providing a
direct ambulance service to
Wesbrook      Hospital      or
Vancouver  General   Hospital
(for more serious cases).
UBC students trained in
First-aid are scattered
throughout main display
areas. They are wearing a
white armband with a red
cross.
The emergency number  is
228-6798.
COMMUNICATIONS
Communications centre for
Open House is located in SUB
212A. Telephone exchanges
are:
Emergency: 228-6798
Problem lines: 228-6879, 228-
6958.
Finding your way ...
All the major buildings which have Open
House displays are marked on the map on the
preceding page. Below is a list of buildings and
their corresponding numbers on the map.
Angus Building 22
Armory   5
Arts One Building 24
Auditorium  9
Bio-Sciences Building 36
Bookstore 20
Brock Hall 44
Buchanan Building  .. 13
Cecil Green Park [Alumni Ass'n] 2
Cecil Green Park Coach House    1
Chemical Engineering 34
Civil Engineering 19
Community Health Centre 48
Dairy Barn  31A
Dentistry [MacDonald Building] 41
Education Building 23
Empire Pool 42
Freddy Wood Theatre  6
Gage Towers Residences 46
Geological Sciences Centre 25
Geology-Geography Building 10
Geophysics Building 26
Hebb Building [Physics] 17
Hennings Building [Physics] 16
Home Economics 18
Horticulture Building 27
CURRICULUM LAB:
Education building third floor,
centre block
Low-key display of materials
shows visitors the operations of
the lab without hindering its
daily operation. It includes a
school library display,
explanations of the curriculum
lab's function within the
faculty and of automated
circulation, as well as a display
of past and present textbooks.
MAIN LIBRARY
Thematic display of the
growth of the library since
1915, as well as possibilities for
future expansion, entitled
Where Do We Grow From
Here?, will be seen by visitors
in  the   entrance   hall.
Instructional Media Centre 35
Instructional Resources Centre  40
International House 3A
Ladner Clock Tower 14
Lasserre Building   8
Law Building 45
MacLeod Building 31
MacMillan Building 28
Main Library 15
Math Building 11
Mechanical-Civil Engineering 33
Mechanical Engineering 21
Music Building   7
Nitobe Memorial Garden  3
Pharmacy Building 37
Physical Education Centre 50
Ponderosa Caferte'ria 4A
Poultry Products Building 32
Place Vanier Residences  4
Sedgewick Undergraduate Library 12
Student Union Building  47
Thunderbird Winter Sports Centre 49
Totem Park Residences 29
Totem Pole Park  30
Walter H. Gage Residences  46
War Memorial Gymnasium 43
Wesbrook Hospital 38
Woodward Biomedical Library 39
NEW SEDGEWICK UNDERGRADUATE LIBRARY
All the new facilities are on
display for visitors and a
newsprint handout describing
the facilities and floor plans is
available.
WOODWARD    BIOMEDICAL
LIBRARY
Displays of rare and historic
books and items related to
biological and health sciences,
MUSIC    LIBRARY:    Music
building, fourth floor
Featured in this display is
the work of the Canadian
composer, Jean Coulthard,
shown through pictures,
recordings, manuscripts and
printed scores. Page OH   12
THE  UBYSSEY:  OPEN  HOUSE  EDITION
Friday, March 2,  1973
Faculties
line up
potpourri
Commerce
COMMERCE AND BUSINESS
ADMINISTRATION: Henry
Angus building, main floor,
lobby and lounge area
Audience participation is
emphasized in the varied
displays of the commerce
faculty — among them a
computer demonstration and
an audio-visual educational
display. A model of the Third
Crossing; table models of
Arbutus Village (loaned by
Marathon Realty) and False
Creek (from City of Vancouver
planning department); a
continuous slide show related
to urban land economics; and a
visual display of the proposed
Squamish port facility and
possible alternatives, will be
on view also. A world map
and a directory will be
available for any commerce
graduates wishing to locate
former classmates.
Phys  ed
PHYSICAL EDUCATION:
War Memorial Gymnasium —
foyer, gymnasium,
performance lab,
physiotherapy room.
Thunderbird Winter Sports
Centre — Units I and II, south
complex gymnasia
The main display, on the
gymnasium floor, features
gymnastics and various
games. Stationary displays
surround the central display.
Western Canadian
Intercollegiate Hockey and
Basketball Championships are
being held on Open House
weekend.
Dentistry
DENTAL HYGIENE:
Dentistry building — ground
floor waiting area, rooms 112,
117 and main clinic
Table clinics focus on two
aspects of the dental hygiene
program: clinical services and
community involvement.
Displays complement the table
clinics, and in the main clinic
there is a demonstration of
clinical techniques performed
by the dental hygienist.
ARCHITECTURE:     Lasserre
building, third floor
Displays consist mainly of
student     "work-in-progress".
Education
EDUCATION:       Education
building
A series of 24 departmental
displays covering all areas of
the faculty, to represent the
many aspects of modern
teacher education.
Law
LAW: Law building foyer
Display features a mock
criminal trial involving a
filmed event which simulates a
real-life situation. Witnesses
who have viewed the film
previously will be examined in
the mock court, providing an
intriguing insight into the
functioning of our court
system.
O      0       mm.     ©
<~>   r\   <-*■ m Friday, March  2,  1973
THE  UBYSSEY:  OPEN   HOUSE  EDITION
Page OH   13
Medicine: What's up Doc?
GENERAL DISPLAY: Health
Sciences Centre, Instructional
Resources Centre, Biomedical
Communications 3, 4 and 5
This display, focussing on
arteriosclerosis, shows how the
health team works together to
combat disease within the
community. Resource people
are available to answer
questions about this major
health problem — one which
attacks all age groups in an
endless variety of forms.
Information, slides, models,
equipment and professional
attendants from the
participating health
professions enable the public to
equip themselves with the up-
to-date knowledge which could
save their lives. A heartbeat
provides background "music"
to add emphasis to the display.
AUDIOLOGY AND SPEECH
SCIENCES: Community
Health Centre
Display features computer
talk through vocal tract analog
speech synthesis, and
demonstrations of sound
spectrography, auditory
illusions, and psychoacoustics.
OPTHAMOLOGY: Medical
sciences building
Slides and films illustrate
eye disease and eye surgery.
Demonstrations of examining
techniques and instruments
are being given.
PATHOLOGY: Medical
sciences building, C block, 3rd
floor
Exhibit includes a
photographic display of skin
disease, electron microscopy,
gas liquid chromatography,
and cell electrophoresis,
showing the diagnosis of
disease through the
microscopic examination of
tissue.
PHARMACOLOGY: Medical
sciences building, C block, first
floor, room 114-A
Static display reveals that
veins are more than just tubes,
how nerves transmit messages
to muscle, movement of the
isolated intestine, and shows a
beating heart close up. A series
of lecture-demonstrations will
be given in room 114-A, on two
topics of current interest.
PHYSIOLOGY: Medical
sciences building, A block,
rooms 100 B-C, 102, 104, 106
Electrical activity picked up
from the human body is
displayed through
oscilloscopes, light flashes and
telemetry, as well as a display
of automatic blood pressure,
and an artificial kidney
machine. Exhibits of depart
mental research activity are
also to be shown.
REHABILITATION
MEDICINE:       Rehabilitation
medicine hut
Demonstrations of various
techniques used in
rehabilitation medicine are
being given, including methods
used to teach disabled patients
how to function within their
capabilities in all the activities
of daily living.
NURSING: Instructional Resources Centre, main floor
Display shows the role of the
nurse within the educational
system, the hospital and the
community. The nursing
program, its academic, social
and extracurricular activities;
the nurse within the hospital
and her changing role; and the
nurse's role in public health,
schools, industry, and homes
are covered in a unified slide
show, as well as in the
individual displays.
PHARMACY: George
Cunningham Building
Informational displays show
the consumer all about the
manufacture and dispensing of
drugs, including examinations
of quality control techniques,
the role of the pharmacist, and
the interaction of various
drugs.
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CONGRATULATIONS
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Members of VANCOUVER, CALGARY, TORONTO,
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Compliments and Congratulations
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and it's visitors —
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,m
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5754 University Blvd.— 224-3202
IN THE VILLAGE - V/z Blocks East of the Pool Page OH   14
THE  UBYSSEY:  OPEN   HOUSE  EDITION
Friday, March  2,  1973
Program explores
women in society
On Jan. 24, the UBC senate
voted to grant accreditation- to
a women's studies program,
consisting of four courses, to be
available to second-year
students next year.
The senate decision came
immediately after the release
of the report of the status of
women at UBC compiled by the
women's action group. The
report stressed the need for
equal opportunity and
employment for woman
students and employees of
UBC, and recommended
women's studies programs and
courses be expanded.
Prior to the accreditation,
women's studies had existed
only as a series of non-credit
courses operating through the
centre for continuing
education, serving people in
the Vancouver
area. Organized in 1971, the
extra-curricular program was
expanded last spring by an arts
department committee in
collaboration with the original
planners into a formal
program.
After being accepted by the
arts department Dec. 6, the
program was submitted to the
senate for approval.
The new women's studies
program will consist of four
three-unit courses:
Women's studies 222, an
interdisciplinary course
including lectures by members
of the anthropology, sociology,
psychology and English
departments,     with     panel
discussions and guest lecturers
from other departments.
Women's studies 224,
"Women in Literature", an
analysis of women writers and
their contributions to the
recent appearance of a
feminine self-awareness.
Anthropology - sociology 222,
which concentrates on
comparative analysis, and
explanation of variation and
understanding in contemporary situations in historical
perspective.
Psychology 417, covering the
study of sex role development
and sex role stereotyping.
The program will enable
students to take a six-unit
program, consisting of
women's studies 222 and one of
the other three courses.
Enrolment will be limited to
60 students taking the full
program and 25 taking only
women's studies 222.
A full descriptive brochure
will be available on campus
this month, including a reading
list and registration procedures.
The non-credit women's
studies program continues to
operate through the continuing
education centre, and includes
concentration on all aspects of
women in society, with
presentations from noted
women authors, experts and
academics.
Those     wishing     further
information   can   phone   228-
.2082,   or   write   to   Women's
Studies, Box 85, Student Union
Building, UBC.
ASSOCIATION OF STUDENT COUNCILS
OFFICIAL
STUDENT FLIGHTS
SUMMER, 1973
VANCOUVER/LONDON
FROM     $225.00 Round Trip
132.00 One Way
TORONTO/LONDON
FROM     $155.00 Round Trip
86.00 One Way
Complete Travel Services Available
INCLUDING   RAIL   PASSES,   CAR    RENTALS-PURCHASES,   TOURS,
INTER-EUROPEAN STUDENT FLIGHTS, INTERNATIONAL STUDENT
ID CARDS. TRAVEL BOOKS. ETC.
Write or Phone:
ASSOCIATION OF STUDENT COUNCILS
Room 100B, Student Union Building
Univ. of British Columbia
Vancouver 8, B.C. - 224-0111
AOSC
It's your organization
USE IT
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toget
your money's worth
Bank of Montreal
The First Canadian Bank
At the Bank of Montreal, we wish
to be unique among banks. Unique
in that we wish to serve not only as
a place where you can deposit and
borrow money. But we also want to
show you how to get the most for
your money.
After all, we've become one of
the largest banks in the world, and
who should know more about money?
That's why all our efforts are dedicated to giving you advice that will
help you in your depositing and
borrowing. We want you to get your
money's worth.
STUDENT UNION BUILDING BRANCH — G.E. FREEMAN, MANAGER
ADMINSTRATION BUILDING BRANCH — G.F. PEIRSON, MANAGER Friday, March  2,  1973
THE  UBYSSEY:  OPEN   HOUSE  EDITION
Page OH   15
Science
world
unfolds
BIOCHEMISTRY
Displays cover biochemical
subjects of interest to the
public, such as the functions of
Vitamin C, genetic engineering
and models of DNA, freeze-
drying of consumer products,
and illustrated discussions of
viruses, including the cold
virus and evidence that cancer
is a virus. It also includes
biochemical research tools and
films.
BOTANY: Botany hut
Centred on the theme of
Mushrooms, Moulds and Man,
this display shows some of the
ways in which fungi help or
harass man, from bread-
making to birth control pills,
from heart disease to garbage
disposal.
COMPUTER SCIENCE: Civil
engineering building, 3rd floor
Demonstrations of useful
student and faculty projects —
intelligent game-playing
programs, geographic
information retrieval, urban
simulations, computer typesetting and MTS time-saving
system are examples. Displays
cater both to public interest
and to computer users.
GEOLOGY: Geological
sciences centre
Displays and demonstrations
can be found in this new
building — after visitors get
past the dinosaur in the front
lobby.
GEOPHYSICS AND
ASTRONOMY: Geophysics
and astronomy building
A geophysical field camp is
set up on the front lawn —
inside the building are movie
and slide shows; photographic
displays of geophysical and
astronomical research;
displays and tours of
laboratory equipment, seismic
station and telescope; and a
computer room display and
computer game.
HOME ECONOMICS: Home
economics building
Displays illustrate the theme
of Man and His Environment.
A foods display features
breads from around the world
and a microwave oven
demonstration, while dietetics
will discuss food faddism,
special diets and obesity.
Textiles displays costumes of
various ages and ethnic backgrounds; information on the
new synthetic fabrics; the
fibre-to-fibre process; as well
as an information centre
providing booklets,
information and addresses. In
the Reading Room, a multimedia presentation on the
Socialization of Women in
History is being presented, as
well as static displays of birth
control and VD information,
and a game entitled Create a
Family.
MATHEMATICS:
mathematics building
MICROBIOLOGY: Bio-
sciences building
OCEANOGRAPHY: Bio-
sciences building, west wing,
lower floor
An introduction to the study
of    the    ocean    and    the
atmosphere and its relevance
to local and global situations,
through simple experimental
models, exhibition of
equipment, and illustrations of
some present projects.
PHYSICS:  Hennings  building
Nuclear reactor models and
components, never before seen
in B.C., will inform the public
of Canadian achievement in
the applied physics field. Two
classic experiments will be
performed by appropriately
costumed experimenters —
Pascal's experiment to
illustrate 'the nature of a
vacuum (Friday at 3 p.m.) and
Galileo's Leaning Tower of
Pisa experiments (performed
Saturday at 1:30 p.m. from the
Ladner Clock Tower).
A special lecture by Prof. F.
A. Kaempffer, entitled More
About Gravity, will follow the
latter experiment. Master
craftsman John Lees
demonstrates his craft of
glassblowing — Hebb Theatre
at 4:45 p.m., on Friday and
Saturday at 4 p.m. — and
exhibits of his work are on
display in the main entrance of
the Hennings Building. No
special displays are being put
on at the Tri-Universities
Meson Facility (TRIUMF),
but tours are available.
ZOOLOGY: Biological
sciences building
Visitors can see a physiology
lab in progress, view future
trends in microscopy, examine
living cancer cells, visit
laboratories demonstrating
animal behavior, and travel
the time line of scientific
discovery.
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266-8381 Page  OH   16
THE  UBYSSEY:  OPEN   HOUSE  EDITION
Friday,  March  2,   1973
A Message
from the
Minister of
Education
HON. EILEEN DAILLY
Minister of Education
British Columbia
I would like to congratulate everyone responsible for the
University of British Columbia's ninth 'Open House'. We all
recognize that Education, because of its growth in scope and in
intensity, has become the direct and intimate concern of every
citizen. I hope, therefore, that the public will always have an
opportunity, such as this 'Open House', to examine it at first hand.
Educational methods and goals can become introspective. The
general public can lose touch with the various educational
organizations. By meeting and sharing views as is happening
today, we are helping each other understand the variety of needs
and aspirations within our society.
From the time of their original conception Universities
have inspired, and been inspired by the broader community.
Whatever slow progress civilization has made, has come about
through the unending search, by teachers and students alike, for
new truths and new meaning in old truths. But that search can
never go on in isolation. It must be stimulated, enlivened and
given meaning through close interaction with the world outside.
That is surely true of this University, which, conceived only
a single century ago and in operation less than 60 years, has been
allowed little serenity or intellectual isolation. There has always
been an active public interest in its affairs and philosophies.
Encouraged and stimulated by this attention, the University of
British Columbia has responded by both providing a further
richness to our scientific, humanitarian and cultural affairs and
by its contributions to the growth and prosperity of our Province.
I hope open houses, and open-mindedness too, will continue
to flourish as vigorously as ever at this University.
THE GOVERNMENT OF
THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA Friday, March  2,  1973
THE  UBYSSEY:  OPEN   HOUSE  EDITION
Page  OH   17
Diversity in arts
ANTHROPOLOGY-
SOCIOLOGY:      Buchanan
building
Exhibit consists of
photographs of field work,
music and slide shows, as well
as films. Featured will be an
exhibit entitled Images of
Vancouver. '
ARCHAEOLOGY:
Archaeology lab
A series of displays exhibits
objects found on digs, as well
as slide shows on various digs
and excavations within B.C.
ARTS I: Arts I building
Introductory talks on the
program are being given at 10
a.m. and 2 p.m. both Friday
and Saturday. Students and
faculty are on hand to discuss
the program, and there are
slide shows of Arts I activities
as well as exhibitions of arts
and crafts and various student
proiects.
ASIAN   STUDIES:   Buchanan
3218
An exhibit planned to
emphasize the importance of
the culture of the peoples of
East Asia to the people of
Vancouver. Program includes
a Chinese costume and folk
dance show and a Japanese
Tea Ceremony and Koto
Concert.
CLASSICAL     STUDIES:
Buchanan 205
Display features scenes from
the Miles Glorious, The
Braggart Soldier, Plautus'
famous comedy, performed
Friday at 7 and 8:30 p.m., and
Saturday at 2, 4 and 7:30 p.m.
Slides of Delphi and Pylos, as
well as films on the art of
Pompeii and the Golden Age of
Athens (5th century B.C.), are
being shown frequently.
Visitors will see models of
Greek architecture and art,
performances of Greek
dancing, and can sample
Greek pastry.
ECONOMICS:     Buchanan
building 219, 220, 222.
Display includes films, to be
shown periodically, a series of
static exhibits, and talks on
aspects of economics.
ENGLISH: Buchanan 204.
Approaches to the study of
English include a display of
rare books and manuscripts,
and a study of mechanical aids
to both teaching and research
in the field of literature.
FINE ARTS: Frederic
Lasserre building 7, 104, 107,
foyer and auditorium annex
154.
Ceramics displays and an
exhibition of students' art
work.
FRENCH: Buchanan building
102, 106, 202 and 204
Display is organized around
a French sidewalk cafe where
coffee and French pastry will
be served. Features live
entertainment in the form of a
sing-along, led by a group of
students performing
traditional folksongs. In
keeping with the theme,
French for Western
Canadians, films for both
adults and children, books
dealing with French Canadian
literature-, culture, art and
history, suggestions about
teaching French to children at
home, and an information
program for those interested in
course offerings of the
department, make the display
informative as well as
entertaining. CBUF-FM will be
broadcasting during Open
House from this display.
GERMAN: Buchanan 1210 and
1213
An exhibit of posters entitled
The Young Generation in
Germany, a display of books
from Switzerland, Germany,
Austria and Scandinavia, and a
collection of picture postcards
depicting German scenes and
art works can be seen in one
room of this exhibit. A second
room features continuous
showings of German, Austrian
and Swedish films.
HISPANIC AND ITALIAN
STUDIES: Buchanan foyer
and room 203
Display of books, films and
slides.
HISTORY: Buchanan 217
LINGUISTICS:      Buchanan
202
General displays and movie
presentations, as well as
demonstration of equipment
used in linguistics.
POLITICAL SCIENCE:
Sedgewick Undergraduate
Library
MUSIC: Music building
Highlight here is a series of
16th century masques being
performed in the recital hall of
the building. Also prominent is
a photographic display
explaining the various events
which occur in the music
department during the year.
Performances of student
compositions, concerts, a
library display, and an ethno-
musicology display round out
the presentation.
PSYCHOLOGY: Angus
building basement
RELIGIOUS STUDIES:
Buchanan 214
Photographic and slide
display of sacred scriptures
and scripts, including an
illustrated discussion of the
development of writing
through the ages. Dr. H. E.
Kassis will spend some time
each day writing visitors'
names in Canaanite script of
the ninth century B.C.
SLAVONIC STUDIES:
Buchanan 200
A series of relevant displays.
SOCIAL WORK: Southwest
corner of Student Union
Building
Display involves visitors
through varied use of the
media, depicting social work
issues of concern to the public
as well as social work
education.
THEATRE:   Frederick   Wood
Theatre
A series of relevant displays.
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MARCH 7 - 10 8:00 p.m.
Tickets: $2.00 - Students: $1.00
Tickets:* Room 207 - Frederic Wood Theatre
UBC SOMERSET STUDIO
OPEN HOUSE
UBC MARCH 2 ft 3,1973
The Centre +
"THE SOUNDS OF
PAINT AND THREAD"
used in worship
j. -An exhibit of Liturgical art.
S<» Friday, March 2 - 3 p.m.-1 Op.m.
V%     Saturday, March 3 - 9 a.m.-10 pjn.
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CONGRATULATIONS
To
THE UNIVERSITY OF B.C.
Vco&e/u6ozza.
Established 1918
Member of the Vancouver Real Estate Board
over half a century of Service.
562 Burrard
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FAB CO
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Friday; March 1,  f973
IRC maze of rooms, screens, studios
Flanked by the Woodward
Biomedical Library and
located near the corner of
Wesbrook and University
Boulevard, the P. A.
Woodward Instructional
Resources Centre is a recently
constructed part of the health
sciences complex at UBC.
Inside the $3.75 million
building opened in September
1972 is a combination of
lecture halls and seminar
rooms along with film,
television and photography
studios outfitted with
contemporary furniture and
teaching aids.
It is designed as a portion of
the planned university health
sciences complex, which will
include a 350-bed teaching
hospital and connect up with
the Woodward library.
Nursing, medical, dentistry
and physiotherapy students
use the facilities and will
eventually form part of the
hospital staff in an educational
experiment which health
science coordinator John
McCreary says is designed to
develop medical teams by
teaching them to work
together.
Right now a start is being
made on this project by
mingling students of the four
disciplines inside the building.
But it isn't this mingling that
seems to catch their attention
as much as the new classroom
facilities.
"I've   scheduled   as   many
lectures as possible into the
IRC," said one nursing student
wishing only to be called
Linda, "so I can take
advantage of the better
teaching aids.
"Sometechnical points come
across better when the prof can
show slides with her lecture
instead of just trying to explain
it and write a few notes on the
board."
IRC  LOUNGE  .
All lecture, halls are
equipped with screens of one
sort and have built-in overhead
projectors, ceiling with
additional screens for these to
be lowered from the ceiling a
button on the instructor's desk.
Particularly impressive is
the 500-seat lecture hall,
equipped with a rear
projection screen capable of
showing three scenes at a time.
modern, carpeted setting
Instructors can — and do —
use these frequently in lectures
to simplify points difficult to
explain.
These can be ordered and
run from the central control
room, where qualified
technicians can take care of
the mechanics, thus freeing the
instructor to explain and
answer questions from the
class.
"At last they're free to
answer our questions instead
of having to worry about the
equipment and trying to figure
out what the different noises
mean, and which button does
what," says Linda.
"Just because they have
their doctorate doesn't mean
they're any hot shit with slide
projectors."
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Alumni and Graduating Students
OPEN HOUSE at YAC
FRIDAY, MARCH 2,1973
UNDERNEATH THE SHAGGY SKIN OF THIS YAC THERE
BEATS THE HEART OF A SWINGER ... THE YOUNG
ALUMNI CLUB OF THE UBC ALUMNI ASSOCIATION
MEETS AT CECIL GREEN PARK (LOCATED AT THE N.
END OF CAMPUS RIGHT BEHIND FORT CAMP - 6251
N.W. MARINE DRIVE.)
Drop in and relax during
Open House
4 p.m. - 1 a.m.
Live Entertainment — Baron of Beef
Pub - Refreshments
Guest Entrance Fee $1.00 after 9 p.m.
YAC/yac/n.(f. Tibetangyac)
a long-haired, lumpy,
bleary-eyed, snorting, wild
ox-like creature found only
on the northwestern slopes
of Point Grey in British
Columbia. Both males and
females are noted for their
friendliness. Lives off malt
brew and a small animal
called the HOT DOG.
BEST WISHES and
CONGRATULATIONS to
UNIVERSITY of BRITISH COLUMBIA
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Suppliers of
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3911 Mt. Lehman Road RR3, Abbotsford 856-2534
Vancouver 534-8596
THE BOOKSTORE
UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
THE FOURTH LARGEST UNIVERSITY BOOKSTORE
IN NORTH AMERICA
SERVING THE STUDENTS NEEDS IS OUR SPECIALTY
Text Books - Reference Books - Leisure Reading
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Student Supplies For All Faculties
Hours: 8:45 A.M. to 5:00 P.M. - Monday to Friday       Phone 228-4741
Get All Your Books and Supplies With Ease and at a Saving on the Campus Friday, March 2,  1973
THE UBYSSEY: OPEN  HOUSE EDITION
Page OH  19
'Watch for falling objects'
By ROSEMARY CAIRNS
If you're walking anywhere
near the Ladner Clock Tower
Saturday about 1:30 p.m.,
watch out for falling objects!
"Galileo" will be performing
his classic experiment, on the
nature of gravity, from the top
of UBC's Ladner Clock Tower.
The experiment, one of two
which the physics department
is putting on for Open House
'73, is being followed by a
special lecture entitled More
About Gravity, given by Prof.
F. A. Kaempffer.
The other experiment to be
presented is Pascal's on the
nature of a vacuum, Friday at
3 p.m. in the Hennings
Building.
If your tastes run in a more
aesthetic vein, see John Lees'
demonstration of glass-
blowing in the Hebb Theatre on
Friday at 4:45 p.m. and
Saturday at 4 p.m. Samples of
Lees' work will also be on
display at the entrance of the
Hennings Building.
Played chess with a
computer lately? Well, the
computer science department
haven't programmed their
computer for chess, but you
can play tic tac toe or
blackjack. They assure
visitors that the computer is
programmed fairly, so you
have a 50 per cent chance of
beating it at blackjack.
Visitors will also be taught how
to do simple programming,
after a 10-minute course.
Did you know that you can
make beer in eight hours? The
microbiology department can
show you now. They are also
presenting the results of
research in two highly relevant
fields — organ transplants and
cancer immunotherapy.
Research has been in progress
on the possibilities of
immunizing people against
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HISTORIC SCIENTIST ... in physics display
certain forms of cancer which
seem to be caused by a virus.
Researchers are available to
answer visitors' questions on
donor compatibility in organ
transplants, and to explain the
methods of determining
compatibility.
Consumers will be
interested in some of the
biochemistry displays, which
teach you about the effects of
freeze-drying on coffee, the
function of vitamin C, and
permit you to test various
foods for vitamin C content.
Visitors to the zoology
display can see a physiology
lab in progress during Open
House, and to visit laboratories
demonstrating animal
behavior. The display includes
a timeline of scientific
discovery, living cancer cells,
and film and slide
presentations of human birth,
ecology of sea lions, and
nature's beauties from
Colorado to beautiful B.C.
Man and His Environment is
the theme of the home
economics displays. Breads
from around the world and a
microwave oven
demonstration are being
presented by the foods
students, while dietetics
students discuss food faddism,
special diets and obesity.
The socialization of women
in history, a multi-media
presentation, can be seen in the
reading room, where visitors
will also find displays on birth
control and venereal disease,
as well as a game which is
intriguingly entitled Create A
Family.
Congratulations
To
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RADIO - CANADA
RADIO J0IE DE VIVRE!!
VANCOUVER
Diffuse En Direct Depuis Le Foyer D' Entree
"AU BUCHANAN 106"
LES 2 ET 3 MARS 1973
Come and see us near the "French Cafe".
We are broadcasting live from UBC Buchanan Page OH  20
THE UBYSSEY: OPEN  HOUSE EDITION
Friday, March 2,  1973
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OPEN THURSDAY AND FRIDAY UNTIL 9 P.M Drama
Dried leaves
Goldrick and Kozlik from Blue Leaves.
October 4,1965 was the day to be alive in
New York City. The day the Pope passed
through Queens on his way to the United
Nations. The day when mere mortals could
forget the bleak despair of everyday life,
and share the aura of splendor and
ecclesiastical grandeur. A day of
inspiration, perhaps, for the common man.
House of Blue Leaves
by John Guare
directed by Bill Millerd
at the Arts Club Theatre
Unfortunately playwrights, John Guare in
particular, were untouched by the event.
House of Blue Leaves has an impressive
list of credits behind it. It was first
performed at the O'Neill Theatre Center in
Connecticut, and it won the New York
Drama Critics citations as Best American
play.
This is rather surprising, because the
play is hampered by several serious
weaknesses.
Artie Shaughnessy (Al Kozlik) is a zoo-
keeper in Queens, a man nearing middle
age and the grim reality of failure. Artie
clings to a tenuous thread of 'making it' in
Hollywood, but we know he'll never get
further than the El Doraldo Bar amateur
night. Bananas (Doris Chillcott) is his
estranged wife; neglected and neurotic,
she wanders the house, crying over her
wasted life. Bunny Flingus (Daphne
Goldrick), is the new spark in Artie's life,
the woman with whom he will share the
better life in California. Kozlik, Goldrick
and Chillcott are the focus of the play, and
their performances are irreproachable.
The two act play is a zoo itself; a
menagerie of events and characters. Artie
is leaving Bananas, and going to write
songs in California with Bunny. The quiet
desperation of their lives is paralled with
the pomp and excitement generated by the
Pope's visit, an unseen character. Billy
Einhorn (Harry Sanders) is Artie's old
friend, now a famous film producer and
Artie's last chance to make it to the top.
That's the general outline of the play.
Either the characters are waiting for the
Pope or word from Billy. However, this
rich field of pathos, humour, tragedy and
symbolism is unevenly harvested.
Something goes wrong, and it's after the
first act.
House of Blue Leaves is a one act play.
Artie, Bunny and Bananas dream of the
glitter of stardom, yearning for it with an
intensity   approaching   religious   fervor.
Ecstacy is found in waiting at the curb for
the Pope's blessing. The delicate fabric of
their relationship is subtly examined, and
lower class living is bared humourously,
painfully, but sympatheticially. Bill
Millerd has the act under Control, and the
play's rhythm and lyricism blossom under
his firm pacing and timing.
Guare wrote that the second act was
written three years after the first. Perhaps
a director insisted that a one act would
never sell. Perhaps he felt questions were
left unanswered. I would be most interested
to hear why he decided to extend the play.
Artie's son Ronnie is introduced in the
second act. Eric Peterson, an excellent
actor in any role, does his best to portray a
schizophrenic A.W.O.L. soldier. Ronnie is
bent on blowing up the Pope. "I'm going to
be too big for any of you," he taunts. "I'll
fool you all." The futile hopes for glory and
recognition had already been established in
the first act, and this maniacal character
does nothing to enhance our understanding.
There is an astonishing clutter of
characters and incidents in the second
act, astonishing because of their apparent
irrelevance to the play's first act. Three
nuns and an MP barge upon the scene,
shouting non-sequitors and snide
witticisms. The nuns are overdone and
overplayed. The scene deteriorates into a
Keystone Kop chase around the stage, nuns
after Ronnie, MP after nuns and Artie et al
after the MP.
Somewhere along the way Billy's fiance
Corrinna Stroller (Pia Shandel) finds room
on the stage as well. She is the victim of
Ronnie's bomb. Not to mention the one the
playwright gave her. This episode
conveniently allows Guare to bring Billy
from California to Queens. Billy is a
difficult role, for it is played up for 80 per
cent of the play, and only then does the
character make an appearance.
Unfortunately, Sanders is not equal to the
task. Billy is not the focal point of the play.
It is a structural weakness to shift the
audience's attention to a physically
unnecessary character towards the end.
Billy was another Pope figure, and the
symbolism is vitiated by bringing him on
stage.
The end is superficial, and although the
logical conclusion to the play, it fails to be
moving. Millerd tries his best, to hold the
play together, but it would require a
herculean effort to keep the play's frayed
edges bound tight.
Stephen Morris
tfFI Design Canada
INDUSTRIAL DESIGN SCHOLARSHIPS 1973-74
The National Design Council and the Department of Industry,
Trade and Commerce offer scholarships for graduate and postgraduate studies in Industrial Design to:
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• Designers, employed in industry, who have demonstrated
ability in Industrial Design but who do not have a recognized
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• Designers, holding a degree or diploma, who want to amplify
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• Designers, holding a degree in Industrial Design, who wish
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Deadline for submissions is April 30,1973.
For application forms, write to:
Registrar,
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Friday, March  2,  1973
THE       UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 3 Books
Black voids
Samuel Beckett. .. poet of despair.
We are in Beckettland and
things are pretty grim. The
Lost Ones (the title being
more richly suggestive in
French: Le Depeupleur] —
that's   the   name   of   this
The Lost Ones, A Story by
Samuel Beckett,
Translated from the
original French by the
author. I Grove Press,
1972\.	
recent   story   by   Beckett.
Presumably we (mankind?
modern   man?)    are   such
"ones" or can be "seen as"
being such "ones" and we
reside,       rather
uncomfortably, in
A bode where lost bodies
roam each searching for
its lost one. Vast enough
lor search to be in vain.
Narrow enough for flight
to be  in  vain.   Inside  a
flattened cylinder fifty
metres       round       and
eighteen high for the sake
of harmony. The light. Its
dimness.   Its  yellowness.
Its omnipresence . . .
It   is   a   strictly   closed,
gloomy, violent world on the
verge of pandemonium.  It
contains 200 "bodies" who
pass the time climbing and
descending   ladders   that
really  don't go  anywhere,
walking around  in circles,
trying   to   (unsuccessfully)
kill themselves and making
love, which is described as
"frenzies prolonged in pain
and hopelessness". Most
importantly they vainly
search for an exit from this
Inferno.
It would seem that
Beckett, like Plato with his
myth of the cave, is intent on
defining and drawing what
he sees as the pattern, the
essential character of the
human condition. As Levi-
Strauss claims for the
anthropological enterprise:
"our object is to construct a
model".
If we are in Plato's cave,
which is "a picture of the
condition of our nature" we
can begin the rough ascent
to sunlight, gaze at the light
of the stars and last of all,
leaving the world of the
senses behind, contemplate
the "idea of the good". If we
are in Beckett's cylinder
then we are really in the
soup (is this an artistic "cul
de sac" like Andy Warhol's
Campbell's soup cans?)
with no hope for
imaginative, philosophical
or spiritual transcendence.
The lost ones do have their
vain dreams, however:
One school swears by a
secret passage branching
from one of the tunnels
and leading in the words
of  the  poet  to   nature's
sanctuaries.  The  other
dreams  of    a    trapdoor
hidden in the hub of the
ceiling giving access to a
flue at the end of which the
sun and -the stars would
still be shining.
The   pattern   of   parable
requires       complex
symbolism   and   here   we
have   God's   (even   Godot,
whoever He is, is out of this
picture)   plenty:   cylinder,
tunnels,   circles,   rung-less
ladders and niches. Literary
and philosophical allusions
to the Bible, Plato, Dante,
Milton, Voltaire and T. S.
Eliot    are    immediately
recognizable.
But does The Lost Ones
succeed as a readable piece
of   art?   Is   it   more   than
Beckett  merely  doing  his
own thing, and in an overly-
literary    and     hermetic
fashion? What for instance
can   an   intelligent   reader
make       of       such       an
unforgiveably     obtuse,
Joycean sentence as:
So true it is that when in
the cylinder what little is
possible  is  not   so   it   is
merely no longer so and in
the least less the all of
nothing  if this  notion  is
maintained.
The Lost Ones has a
hypnotically repetitive
structure and rhythm
somewhat like a record
stuck on a profoundly sour
note, which rings true to
certain aspects of
contemporary life. Also it
has a coldly logical, often
tedious and unforgivably
obscure, impersonal style
that sometimes produces a
line poetic line, such as:
"The bodies brush together
with a rustle of dry leaves".
It has the form of a closely
pruned, gnarled old tree
dying in a bleak winter.
How true is Beckett's
model or myth? True or not
- I have mixed feelings — it
is most definitely
uninspiring. It
appropriately ends with the
death of the last man "if a
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Page Friday, 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday,  March  2,   1973 Friday^ March  2,  1973
THE       UBYSSEY
Page  T3
Classroom report
By BEV SICHERMAN
Eight students got an instant vacation
Thursday while their education 200 professor,
Leroy Daniels was replaced by Roland
Payette, on a visiting sabbatical.
In a welcome switch from their usual
Monday-Thursday educational philosophy
lecture, students sat, enthusiastically
participating in a round-table style discussion
on values and morality and their application to
our education.
Starting from the justice of Marten
Hartwell's resorting to cannibalism in order to
survive alone in the north, they tried to decide
who has the right to condemn another the right
of self-preservation.
If one takes a religious point of view, the soul
has gone to heaven. The body is waste. Can you
condemn a man who took this waste and kept
himself alive?
Man has always lived in groups and human
nature is often formed by group pressure. You
may half expect cannibalism in South America,
but you can't have it here in Canada.
This same type of group pressure applies in
our schools. If a child doesn't fit into
a preformed mold and the school can't cram
him into it, he is reiected bv his peers, his
teachers and his family.
By tossing a combination of questions,
ideas, and opinions at the class Payette gave
the illusion of simply being a member of a
discussion group rather than a lead. It was an
interesting and vibrant session, where
everyone had an opinion and everyone couldn't
wait to speak up.
When the 2:30 p.m. class ended, no one
wanted to leave, a feeling too seldom expressed
at UBC.
No coercion in Levy meeting
From page 1
projected expenditure and
revenue for the next three
years. . . ."
The letter requested the
board of governors release the
information by Feb. 21.
Gage replied it would not be
possible to "isolate, tabulate
and assemble the material" by
that date.
Booth denied the meeting
with Levi was intended to force
the board's hand.
"Its purpose was to present
the financial problems of
students in residences; to
express concern over the lack
of information regarding
financial details and to suggest
to the government alternative
methods of financing to offset
rent increases," he said.
At the present the
administration is still
considering recommendations
to be made to the board
concerning the rent increase.
"These recommendations
will probably be ready in the
next few days together with
whatever financial
information the administration
wants to release," Booth said.
Caucus wins AUS vote
Democratic Student's
Caucus candidates won the
arts undergraduate society's
president and four council rep
positions in Wednesday's
election.
Bill Moen, arts 3, defeated
Tony Formby, arts 3, 220 to 106
for president.
Teresa Deveson, arts 2; Tom
McNeney, arts 3; Janice
Sandomirsky, arts 2; and Jim
Schoening, arts 3; were elected
Alma Mater Society council
reps. AMS treasurer David
Dick ran second last, polling
only 95 votes. Three other
candidates also ran.
AMS president elect Brian
Loomes said Thursday he was
very pleased with the election
results because "these people
will continue the work which
was begun this year. They are
familiar with our programs
and the political issues such as
student representation.''
Elected by acclamation to
the AUS executive were
Andrea Trudel, vice-president;
Kim Pollock, arts 2, treasurer;
and Jennifer Sullivan, arts 2,
secretary.
Rep-elect Deveson said the
executive will begin work on
the   arts   anti-calendar   and
organization of departmental
• unions. She said they also want
to expand publication of their
newsletter and an arts
magazine called Natural
Growth.
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324-4644 Page   14
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, March  2,   1973
Retiring dean of women:
Post needs impartiality
ByLENJOHNSON
The prime function of the
dean of women must be
service, although she should be
able to hold her own in the
academic community.
Not only this but she must be
absolutely objective and fair
according to retiring dean
Helen McCrae.
McCrae said in an interview
Thursday it is most important
for her successor to have
experience in human relations.
She says the office of dean of
women is not a popular job
and easily misunderstood.
"If you're with the
administration you're
automatically suspect," she
said.
McCrae, who has been on
the faculty since 1950 and dean
of women since 1959, obtained
her B.A. from University of
Toronto and her master of
social  work  at  UBC.
McCrae discussed the
changing role of the dean of
women and the part the office
plays on the campus and in the
community, saying the
position was first created at
ihe request of women students
who were having difficulty
finding places to live at a time
when the only residences were
for men.
At that time the main
functions of the office were
housing, employment and
personal counselling.
Although the office has been
thought to have a disciplinary
role, its main function has
always been advisory, she
said.
McCrae said the office has
acted as an ombudsperson and
has no particular allegiance to
anybody.
HELEN McCRAE . . .
retiring dean of women
"I never felt that I could take
a political orientation because
I wanted to be associated with
any group which wanted me to
act in advisory capacity," she
said.
You can't take sides. Anyone
in an administrative position
should not take the side of one
group against another.
"This office should be open
to anyone who wants to use it,"
she said.
She said the role of the office
has changed over the years "to
be more open and flexible and
able to be conscious of the
opportunities that are
available."
Although she still deals with
many women on campus,
much of McCrae's time is
spent counselling older women
who want to return to
university.
"Sometimes women get tired
of their roles and want to
change them," she said.
"Many of these women are
housewives or women who
didn't get a chance to complete
their education and want to do
so now."
McCrae said the office has
sponsored campus-wide
events, such as Civilization, a
free movie series offered this
year and last, and the
Vancouver symphony
orchestra.
The office is also partly
sponsoring a visit by women's
activist Kate Millet, who will
speak here March 20.
Meanwhile, a committee has
been struck to discuss the
appointment of another dean of
women.
One of the committee
members, Dr. A. M. Johnson,
student health service
director, said the main point of
discussion has been whether or
not McCrae's successor should
be academically or
administratively-oriented and
whether or not the office should
be political.
N||$ vofe March 23
The National Union of Students membership referendum
was set back two weeks to March 23 by Alma Mater Society
council Wednesday in an attempt to assure a quorum.
The referendum, which requires a 20 per cent quorum was
originally scheduled for Wednesday, but will now be held March
23 with advance polls March 19 to 22.
Council members said they believed more advertising was
required to get the 4,000 students out to vote.
For That Special
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This article has been printed by the U.B.C. Campus Crusade For Christ Club -   for more info, phone us at 325-2701 or 732-3133
(ADVERTISEMENT) Friday, March  2,   1973
THE       UBYSSEY
Page   15
HILLTOP GULF
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NEW PIT . . . cozy drunks
$250,000 Pit contract let
The contract to build the new Pit in the
basement of SUB has finally been awarded,
Alma Mater Society co-ordinator Bob Angus
announced Thursday.
The negotiable contract, to a maximum of
$250,000, was awarded to Halls-Martin
Construction, subject to final approval by the
board of governors.
"We will approach the BoG Tuesday to get
the final design and the contract approved. We
will also be asking for an extension of the $15
SUB building fee for two years, which is
necessary to finance construction," Angus
said.
He said he anticipates no problem in getting
the necessary BoG approval.
If approved, construction should start within
the next two weeks and the Pit should be ready
by the beginning of August, said Angus.
"That will give the Pit manager a month to
familiarize himself with the new location and to
determine the operation of the place," Angus
said.
"I am very happy we have finally sent it to
tender. Each time a new executive came in, the
Pit was talked about, designs brought in, but
nothing was ever done.
"We have already spent $50,000 just on
designing the Pit," he said.
If you have a
publishing problem . . .
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Vote to Join
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Advance Polls March 19-22
— Government Recognition through numbers
— A Pressure Group on Student Issues
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... LET'S GET IT TOGETHER .... Page   16
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday,  March  2,   1973
Poppy concert loses money
The Alma Mater Society lost a
substantial amount of money on Wednesday
night's Poppy Family concert.
"There was a whole series of screw-ups,"
AMS treasurer David Dick said Thursday.
The concert had been scheduled for earlier
in the month but couldn't be held because
guitarist-singer Terry Jacks was injured in a
car accident.
"By this time we had incurred publicity
expenses and other commitments totalling
about $1,400," Dick said.
"Rather than cancel the concert and lose all
this money we decided to reschedule it. It
turned out to be the wrong decision," he said.
He said a total of about $4,800 has been spent
on the concert. However until the final figures
are in he won't know the extent of the loss.
"I don't know why the concert lost money.
There's no way of telling about these things in
advance," Dick said.
In other news, council voted to condemn
Denny's restaurant after hearing a plea from 15
persons who were recently fired and are now
picketing.
The AMS also voted to donate $50 to the
group to assist in fighting their case.
The AMS also passed a motion supporting
the daycare council's brief to the March 6
meeting of the board of governors asking for
acknowledgement of responsibility for daycare
and to appoint a full time paid daycare coordinator and additional day care staff.
The day care co-ordinator would be
responsible for supervising existing day care
services, publicising day care to the university
community and provincial and federal
authorities and for improving the facilities.
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$20,000 grad funds
to be divided
By STEVE BROWN
The grad class gifts' committee is now considering
applications received for $20,000 in grad class funds, committee
chairman Doug Woodruff said Thursday.
Members of the graduation class will vote March 8 and 9 to
decide which of the 70 applications received will be allotted
funds.
The committee has accepted applications from community
organizations as well as those at UBC and is endeavoring to
support any needy, non-profit group, Woodruff added.
Among the applicants is the international Greenpeace
foundation which is requesting $3,500.
Dorothy Metcalfe of the Vancouver-based foundation said
Thursday the money would be used to pay debts incurred in
communications with the other Greenpeace groups and to
support Canada's protest to the proposed French nuclear tests
in the Pacific.
She added that plans for the protest against the French
government are underway with demonstrations in the capital
cities of the world. A Greenpeace vessel is sailing to the
Mururea atoll blast zone from New Zealand with the full support
of the New Zealand government.
Grad committee chairman Woodruff said that he is
sympathetic with the Greenpeace effort but added that groups
in and around, UBC should be the first consideration in
distribution of the money.
Aside from the money to be given to the various
organizations, each faculty's undergrad society will receive a
$1 dollar "kickback" for each of their graduates. Woodruff said.
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SI
S.U.S. ELECTION
An election for the position of PUBLICATIONS
OFFICER is being held on Tuesday, 6 March. The
candidates are:
Nancy Dower, Science 2
Hobart Irwin, Science 1
An all-candidates' meeting will be held on
Monday, March 5 at 12:30
in Hennings 200.
SCIENCE UNDERGRADS: VOTE ON TUESDAY
Polls in Hebb Theatre & Chem Building
10:00-4:00, 6 March.
Rip off
STUDENT-RAILPASS
The way to see Europe withoiitf eeling like a tourist.
Student-Railpass is valid in Austria, Belgium, Denmark,
France, Germany, Holland, Italy, Luxembourg, Norway,
Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland.
Eurailpass, Box 2168, Toronto 1, Ontario
Please send me your free Student-Railpass folder order
form. □
Or your free Eurailpass folder with railroad map. □
Name	
Street..
City	
Zone_
_Prov._
UBY 3
So you plan to spend the
Summer in Europe this year. Great.
Two things are mandatory. A ticket
to Europe. And a Student-Railpass.
The first gets you over there, the
second gives you unlimited Second
Class rail travel for two months for a
modest $135 in Austria, Belgium,
Denmark, France, Germany,
Holland, Italy, Luxembourg,
Norway, Portugal, Spain, Sweden,
and Switzerland! All you need to
qualify is to be a full-time student up
to 25 years of age, registered at a
North American school, college or
university.
And the trains of Europe are
a sensational way to travel. Over
100,000 miles of track links cities,
towns and ports all over Europe. The
trains are fast (some over 100 mph),
frequent, modern, clean, convenient
and very comfortable. They have to
be. So you'll meet us on ourtrains. It
really is the way to get to know
Europeans in Europe.
But there's one catch. You
must buyyourStudent-Railpass in
North America before you go.
They're not on sale in Europe
because they are meant strictly for
visitors to Europe—hence the
incredibly low price. Of course if
you're loaded you can buy a regular
Eurailpass meant for visitors of all
ages. It gives you First Class travel if
that's what you want.
Eitherway if you're going
to zip off to Europe, see a Travel
Agent before you go, and in the
meantime, rip off the coupon. It
can't hurt and it'll get you a better
time in Europe than you everthought
POSSible. Pnc.-.q^t-d   -U   S. dollars
Ripping-off Europe?
Student Railpass available from AOSC.
Association of Student Councils
Room 100B, Student Union Bldg. Univ. of B.C., Vancouver (604) 224-0111
Also available: student flights to Europe and within
Europe, car rentals, international ID cards, tours,
student hostels and jobs abroad. All at Student prices Friday, March  2,  1973
THE       UBYSSEY
Page  17
Hot flashes
Motorcycle
framing
Aspiring motorcyclists will
have a chance to perfect their
techniques at the B.C. safety
council's motorcycle training
course, beginning Sunday.
The novice course will be given
on seven successive Sundays from
9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the professional driver centre, off 72nd St. in
Delta at the Boundary Bay airport
and will be repeated at six-week
intervals during the spring and
summer.
Use of motorcycles is included
in the $30 course fee, and helmets
are available at a nominal charge.
Participants must be 16 or over
and have a learner's license.
For details call Garry Walton,
946-2424.
Environment
Environmental activist Donald
Chant will lecture at 3 p.m. today
about the role of citizens' groups
ip environmental decision-making.
The talk, in lecture hall one,
instructional resources centre, is
sponsored by UBC's Westwater
research centre.
Anarchist
Anarchist philosopher Murray
Bookchin will speak on revolution
in post-industrial societies, noon,
Monday  in the SUB auditorium.
Bookchin, an ecologist and
author of Post-scarcity
Anarchism, and according to
informed sources, one of the
finest speakers around.
Admission is free to the talk,
sponsored by the arts
undergraduate society and the
volunteers.
CLASSIFIED
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Counselling and help with
course planning in the faculty of
education will be available from
noon to 2:30 p.m. March 8 in the
education lounge.
The Directions Day program is
also open to students in other
faculties considering teaching as a
career.
Novelist talks
One more chance to hear
Canadian novelist Hugh McLennan speak here at UBC.
The author of The Watch That
Ends The Night and Two Solitudes will speak on writing in
Canada over 30 years, noon today
in Buch 106.
Mo, no, no
Well, you say, here it is one
month before The Ubyssey stops
publishing and I always meant to
work there. Now I won't get the
chance. Too bad.
Not so, not so, we hasten to
cry.
Reporters, photographers and
people with sundry other special-
Tween classes
TODAY
WOMEN'S ACTION GROUP
Meeting, noon, ed. 1211.
YOUNG SOCIALISTS
Richard Thompson speaks on students and social change, 8 p.m., 1208
Granville.
SATURDAY
YOUNG SOCIALISTS
Joan Newbigging speaks on revolutionaries and the NDP, 2 p.m.,
1208 Granville.
SUNDAY
YOUNG SOCIALISTS
Evelyn Reed speaks on biology and
women, 11 a.m., 1208 Granville.
Art Young on Quebec at 2 p.m.
MONDAY
UBC CONSERVATIVE CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 111.
EL CIRCULO
Talk about Peron, noon, IH
402-404.
TUESDAY
SFFEN
General meeting, noon, SUB 115,
CAMPUS MINISTRY
Development demands justice —
Don Luce on South Vietnam
political  prisoners, noon, SUB 207.
WEDNESDAY
CAMPUS MINISTRY
Ash Wednesday service, noon, SUB
clubs lounge.
ties (either to do with newspapers
or debauchery) are always welcome.
Come see us in SUB 241K,
Monday or Thursday.
Scholarships
r           ,                                              Dances                                          11
Forms for the new government             	
scholarships are now being distrib-     IH   presents dance of the
, .    _     , , 3 year.   Serenaders   Steel   Band   and
Uted in Buch. 207. Continental Cavaliers.  Sat.,  March
rri      , ■       ,. .       .       ,, 3rd.  $1.75.   S-l a.m.
The   friendly   people   in   the
scholarship and bursary office (or Lost & Found                           13
the Walter Gage den of iniquity      —	
and financial matters, as habitues     	
are prone to call it) are handing     Special Nolicei     15
out the new one-page forms, due rent whistler condominium
back in by March 15. ££ More^nf Ph- 732-°1?4
New awards mean $200 for all	
non-qualifying-year       students, '^.^S-.S^a^SS?
whether they intend to return to I?0,4 °i DI»covery and Weet 2nd.
' Refreshments.
university or not, if they place in	
the ton 17 ner rent DR  BUNDOLO AND HIS PANDE-
tne top I / per cent. monlum     Medicine     Show    seek
This   replaces   the   traditional        wfliai  asylum   in  8UB   movie
, .   , ,      , theatre March 8, 12:30. It's Free!!!
one-third,    one-half    and    three-	
quarters    of    tuition    fees    paid dennis — —
previous|y- iiizz^SIzzzzi
China tour
Five women from UBC leave
Saturday for a tour of China,
including stops in Canton, Shanghai, Peking and Hangchow.
They are travelling as part of a
16-woman group organized by the
centre for continuing education
and plan to examine the conditions of women in China.
Organizers deliberately chose a
cross-section of Canadian women
including academics, housewives,
women from government and
business and women's rights
activists.
Among the group are women's
action group member Shelagh Day
and dean of women Helen
McCrae.
Rates: Campus — 3 lines, 1 day $1.00; additional lines, 25c;
Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $1.50; additional lines
35c; additional days $1.25 & 30c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline & 11:30 a.m., the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room 241 S.U.B., UBC, Van. 8, B.C.
Special Events
15A
NOW $75 FOR 25c
40 Bonus Coupon* In This
Year's Bird Calls
BUY YOURS TODAY!
—  Bookstore and  SUB  —
Trarel Opportunities
16
CONTACT AOSC FOR COMPLETE
travel services Including scheduled
and charter flights, rallpasses, car
rentals-purchases, tours, International Student ID, etc. AOSC Rm.
100B,  SUB,  UBC.   224-0111.
Wanted—Information
17
WED., FEB. 28, 8 A.M. ON S.W.
Marine Drive between Alma and
Highbury, any witnesses please
contact Barry, 228-2652 (work) —
266-2609   (home).
•fTOJTTTf
h
RENTAL & SALES
+ D.B. & S.B. Tuxedos
+ D.B. & S.B. White Coats
+ D.B. & S.B. Suits
+ COLORED SHIRTS
Parking at Rear
f
BLACK & LEE
Formal Wear Rentals
|
631 Howe                   688-2481
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
MPA OPENING NEW RESIDENCE.
We can use any type of home
furnishings. Phone Jack Jackson.
738-5177, 738-1422.
AUTOMOTIVE
Autos For Sale
21
'58 PONTIAC, RADIO, PLATES,
brakes good. 6-auto. $150 or offers.
733-0895.
4560 W 10th.
919 Robson St.
1032 W Hastings
670 Seymour
duthie
BOOKS
•71 FIAT 850 CONVERT., ONLY
13,000 miles. New engine installed.
Sell for $1900. Phone 524-2045.
Auto Parts
Motorcycles
Babysitting 8c  Day Care
BUSINESS SERVICES
Photography
23
25
32
35
Rentals—Miscellaneous
36
MARDI GRAS COSTUMES. 10%
deduction with AMS card. Dunbar
Costume Rentals, 5648 Dunbar —
263-9011.
Typing
40
FAST ACCURATE TYPING OF ES-
says and thesis. Reasonable terms.
CaU Mrs. Akau, days 688-5235 —
weekends and evenings, 263-4023.
YEAR ROUND ACC. TYPING FROM
legible drafts. Phone 738-6829 from
ten a.m. to nine p.m. Quick service
on short  essays.  Reasonable rates.
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING.
My home. Essays, thesis, etc. Neat
accurate work. Reasonable rates.
263-5317.
EXPERT IBM SELECTRIC TYPIST.
Experienced Thesis Typist. Specialize in Formula and Math. Reasonable  Rates.  Mrs.  Ellis. 321-J838.
TYPING OF ESSAYS, ETC. DONE
efficiently. 35c per page. Phone
224-0385 after 5:30 p.m.
ESSAYS. THESIS, PAPERS. FAST,
efficient, accurate. Near 41st and
Marine Drive. 266-5053.
Typing—Cont.
40
RUSSIAN — SPANISH — ENGLISH.
Translation — Thesis — Editing &
Typing by qualified B.A., M.A. &
AB.D.   Contact J.   Daniel  Le  Van,
261-7069.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
ESTABLISHED DIAMOND IMPOR-
tlng firm requires 12 senior student
sales representatives for the UBC
Campus. Clean, Neat Dresser.
Good Sales Ability. 3rd or 4th Year
students with pleasant personality
and some sales experience. Fluent
In English. Excellent commission
structure. Include in your application a recent photograph of yourself. Mr. Mel Battensby, General
Delivery, Vancouver Postal Station
A, Hastings & Granville, Vancouver.  B.C.
THE SURREY PARKS AND RE-
creation Commission has openings
for the position of Lifeguard-
Swimming Instructors from mid-
May to early September. Minimum
requirements: Red Cross and Royal
Life Saving Instructors Certificates.
Wage rate starting at $3.13 per
hour. Please contact the Surrey
Parks and Recreation Commission
at 10276—-135A Street Surrey, or
telephone 581-6107.
PART-TIME DISTRIBUTORS
wanted. Any hours of work. Phone
228-8836.
Work Wanted
52
MALE MODEL. NUDE AND SEMI-
nude. Experienced. All positions.
Ian, Rm. 388, Haida T.P. Ph. 224-
9066.
Special Classes
62
DR. BUNDOLO IS INTERESTED IN
tuba players who can play "Flight
of The Bumblebees" without blowing their brains out. Thursday.
March 8, 12:30 in SUB Theatre. As
usual it's Free!!!
Tutoring Service
63
WJm\
Speakeasy SUB Anytime!
228-6792 - 12:30-2:30
TUTORIAL
CENTRE
For Students and Tutors
Register Now! 12:30-2:30
INSTRUCTION &  SCHOOLS
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
12-STRING GUITAR (EKO), $125.
Phone 261-6742.
YAMAHA G170A GUITAR $90.00 OR
trade for ten-speed worth that.
Phone 531-2503 evenings only.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
_
Rooms
Room & Board
82
ROOM & BOARD, $75. W. 63rd AVE.,
Vancouver. Phone 266-7420.
Communal Housing
85
Houses—Furn. & Unfurn.
86
uunnnnnnnnrtnnnnnnrrnT^^^
Use Your
Ubyssey
Classified
OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO Page   18
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, March  2,  1973
Trouble with Olympics?
Unknown team faces soccer Birds
The UBC soccer team, idle in
league play since Feb. 18 when
they downed Cliff Ave., play
Olympics 3 p.m. Saturday at
Empire Stadium.
Another two points for the
Thunderbirds against their
Inter City League opponents
would keep them in the top four
in the Pacific Coast League
standings.
The Olympics are in 5th
place in the ICL, and are an
unpredictable foe with only
three wins in 12 starts.
Their losses, though, are
usually either one goal wins for
their opponents or a complete
washout — the latter result
would increase the Birds goals
against average.
The Birds have six games
left in league play and coach
Joe Johnson expects his team
to pick up eight points from
their next four games, one of
which is against arch-rival
Simon Fraser University of the
ICL.
The game between the two
universities is  scheduled for
Help Wanted
Positions NOW open for:
(1) Intramural Director
(2) Co-Ordinator
(3) Referee-in-chief
(4) Publicity
(5) Assistants
•
Reply with letter to:
Mr. Nestor Korchinsky
Room 208, Memorial Gym
7:30 p.m. Monday, March 19th
at Empire Stadium.
In a recent article, the Peak,
SFU's student newspaper,
quoted the SFU coach as rating
his team's ability "as good as"
UBC's.
The game should resolve
that question, one that has
been around among the soccer
fraternity on both campuses
since last year when the
interlocking series between the
PCL and ICL was conceived.
The UBC team is injury free
and in good physical shape for
the upcoming game.
JOE JOHNSON .. . hopes to
move up in league standings
",*■,
Women advance
to  nationals
The basketball Thunderettes, who swept the Canada West
University Athletic Association league with a 19-1 win-loss
record, advanced to the national basketball finals in Montreal
Thursday.
Their only loss came at the hands of the University of
Victoria Vikettes a few weeks ago.
Norm Vickery, coach of the Thunderettes, has been named
as the Canadian women's basketball team head coach for the
world student games in Moscow nest August.
&
Wfe Skimanio £«fc
SUNSHINE SKI CLEARANCE V*'
SKIS
Reg. Price Sale Price
ROSSIGNOL ROC 550
FISCHER SUPERGLASS
FISCHER SUPER GT
LANGE GS
K2 HOLIDAY
HEAD HRP
HEAD GK03
KAZAMA BRONZE
KAZAMA DIAMOND
NEW WOOD SKIS
*19000
19900
17900
18500
no00
16500
HO00
6995
7995
28°°
s165oo
ISO00
12995
14500
7995
12995
85°°
45°°
55°°
10°°
PRICES
EFFECTIVE
MARCH 1
to
MARCH 17
POLES
Reg. Price   Sale Price
COLIN POLES
ABC POLES
RAMY POLES
10
95
$C95
695 495
15°°     II95
THURSDAY, FRIDAY
9 a.m. - 9 p.m.
WEEKDAYS and
SATURDAYS
9 a.m. - 6 p.m.
BOOTS
Reg. Price   Sale Price
LANGE PROS
LANGE SWINGERS
LANGE STD. LADIES
TYROL
TYROL
LADY KOFLACH
HUMANIC FOAM
HUMANIC PREFOAM
115500
13500
10000
6500
8500
8500
120oo
10500
$11995
9995
7995
45°°
50°°
50°°
85°°
6995
NORDICA BOOTS
AVAILABLE AT SAVINGS
CROSS COUNTRY
EQUIPMENT
Skis, Boots,
Poles, Harness
25%
OFF
CLOTHING UP TO 50% OFF
WE ACCEPT
-ALL SALES ARE FINAL
CHARGEX
1 ~* -J*9&Sfi*^ * I 1
IVOR WILLIAMS
SPORTING GOODS LTD.
2120 W. 41st Ave.
KERRISDALE
261-60 7 7 Friday, March 2,  1973
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 19
Western wrestlers wrest titles
UBC heavyweights
show winning strength
Wrough wrestlers wreck wribs and wrists in wround-wrobin wracus.
Tourney ends
—mark hamilton photo
By SIMON TRUELOVE
The intramural basketball
tourney will be wound up 8
p.m. tonight in War Memorial
gym.
The 12 games played
Tuesday and Wednesday have
narrowed the field down to four
teams: p.e. (thefavourites) vs.
Fort Camp, and dentistry vs.
. commerce.
Engineering narrowly
missed the semis in a close
game with Fort Camp while
p.e. beat betas quite easily.
Good conditioning hustle and
bench strength could win the
tourney for them.
Come and watch this evening,
to find out. The consolation
round will be played at 6 p.m.
Anyone who happened to see
the Memorial gym field at 4:30
p.m. Wednesday will have
observed almost 20 possible
lunatics (unrecognizable from
mud) chasing an odd-shaped
leather object. This was one of
the more memorable
intramural rugby games in
progress; dentistry vs. p.e.
The p.e. footballers barely
squeezed out a 10 all tie in the
last couple of minutes.
The hockey playoffs (super-
league) take place at 7:45 p.m.
next Thursday on the main
rink at Thunderbird area.
Also coming up is the
wrestling weight-in Monday,
tug of war, cycle drag, and
track meet one week Saturday.
Don't forget the tug o' war
spectacular Monday noon
in — where else — War
Memorial gym.
The 1972/73 collegiate wrestling season ended last week
with the Canadian wrestling championships held in Guelph,
Ont.
Taras Hryb and Bob Ormond of UBC repeated their winning
, performances of the Canada West tournament held at UBC one
1 week ago and captured two national titles.
Ormond dominated his weight class by defeating his
opponents from the Atlantic provinces, Quebec, and the Great
Plains region by decisive scores of 19-0,8-2 and 7-2.
His final bout with his opponent from Ontario ended in a 2-2
draw.
The tie was broken in Ormond's favour because of passivity
on the part of his opponent during the match.
wiuunm
Hryb pinned his opponents from Quebec and the Atlantic
provinces. He also beat his opponents from Thunder Bay and
York University by scores of 5-0 and 10-0.
Both UBC wrestlers have been invited to attend a summer
training camp and hopefully they will proceed to the world
student games to be held in Moscow in August this year.
UBC hosted the Canada West championships at Gym A one
week ago. The Birds faced stiff competition from the University
of Alberta, Lethbridge, Calgary and Saskatchewan.
Individual results of the Canada West tourney were: John
Cipalato, 3rd, Dennis Tazumi, 5th, Bill Duncan, 4th, Bruce
Grist, 2nd, Ormond, 1st, Hyrb, 1st, George Richey, 3rd, and
Brian Westall, 2nd.
Upsets in the tournament were Westall and Richey.
Westall lost a 2-0 decision to past national champion Lutz
Keller in the heavyweight class.
Last year, Westall beat Keller and proceeded to the
National Collegiates where he placed 2nd.
Richey seemed a certain first after beating his opponents
from Alberta and Saskatchewan. However, he lost his final bout
to Rick Penny of Calgary.
Penny, who had previously lost to the opponents Richey had
beaten, managed to throw his adversary and pin him in the
third round.
Richey had been injured for a three week period before the
meet and therefore was not at top form.
Both Hryb and Ormond decisively defeated their opponents
to capture top honours in their weight classes. They then
journeyed to Guelph to win the national titles.
Sign for tennis, bowling
JOCKETTES
keep those
For those who feel the need
to release their frustrations
woman's intramurals offers
you the chance to bat around a
few balls on the Armory tennis
courts. It starts Sunday and
goes till March 15. Days
available for play are every
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday,
or Thursday at 12:30 p.m.
But, for all of you sassy
young things who prefer to
play ball with the guys, we
have two co-ed. events coming
up. If you like to follow the
straight and narrow, try your
hand at bowling on Tuesday or
Thursday from 7 a.m. till 9
p.m.
If you want to shoot some
balls, grab a cue on March 13th
or 15th from 7 p.m. till 9 p.m.
Grab some guys or come
alone to the SUB Games Area
for these exciting events.
Next   oiv  the   program   is
orienteering. Try it. . . you'll
like it! Just think of the
pleasures of slogging through
mud, bushes, and other
assorted obstacles.
This, too, is co-ed. with
teams of two guys and two
girls. The date of this great
trek is Thursday, March 15th
from 12:30 to 2:30 p.m. Meet in
the foyer  of War  Memorial
gym.
Orienteering is finding it on a
compass and telling them
where to go.
Don't forget the women's
intramurals' awards banquet
on March 21st. All women's
intramural participants are
welcome.
Also, don't forget to sign up
on your organization's
intramural board or outside
room War Memorial gym 202
for these events.
Have fun!
terM*^
h*,*
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i *-?t*.
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-mark hamilton photos
iballs moving Page   20
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday,  March   2,   1973
King Kong
returns to Kelly's
With 3 new music systems and low, low prices!
I   !*
L ***%?-
'**M*    ,*
*«&*
rts^tH^ '
«*t
Bose speakers are famous for their Model 901
speakers which have revolutionized the audio industry.
The Bose 901 's have a unique direct reflecting system
with 89% of the sound reflected for bigger,
better sound. You really must hear the Bose 901 's to
appreciate the unbelieveable difference. Previously
marked at $640 for the pair, the 901's compare to
speakers at twice the price!
The Sansui SEVEN is a brand new am fm receiver
with all the reliability, controls, flexibility and
performance you would expect from a Sansui.
The 160 watts of power will drive the Bose 901's to
symphony orchestra volume levels. Previously marked at
$669.95, the Sansui Seven includes walnut case, too. The
Dual 1229 is their best and has been rated the best in'
the world. What more can we add? With base,
cover and a $44.95 Empire magnetic cartridge, the Duaf
was previously marked at $269.45. A remarkable package.
We feel that this combination of components offers
the best value anywhere near <t'
our sale price of
1299.
(PS: our sale price saves you $280.40!)
This package available at most stores.
"-•Hetlfc-i
*$$
^*S*;
m
mi
m
IT* *.**
m
#«'
wmm
«!?♦>.
v?
s499buys
All this
I
•S»»te**''
each cabinet and a twei e
$V50ot our sale price ot$649V3.
mt. • aA8030 am/fm receiver
£k°! V214 automatic changer
$379.95
99.50
299.90
44.95
25.00
$807.25
Walnut base, t.»— - JETtCe
Total previausly marked pr.ces j^ 95
1 Sate price
10r-Q5t
deck'0n,Po^
SfOta
*e/i       tfes „      —. n
ceiver has a full'44watts1Z ^T The 3,°'*
tuner section. The Cl UU *?*"** °m Qnd *■»
gentle and reliable andtracIUT"** chan9er «
the Empire cartridge The KLH it" '7 grams "«■
gongbusters and therein J S-Peakers se" ,ike
A'- in rfl an ouS ^s'c %£? — *■*
KLH 32 speakers
Walnut case, tinted cover
tmp,re magnetic cartridge
Total previously marked price
SalePrice
""do
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r'es
%:"rjffV^c%
4**
6 SUPPIV
lfty3j!Sgj^
$299.95
$99.50
$145.00
$25.00
$29.95
$599.40
$499
Qrea.nl_lfyoulj
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-■ c, Kelly *^,c0 Ma
Visit *«ur nearest Keiiy
P„,kR.Vo\,0oto^^^Kw.ns1e|(
smart-S"»P stere°*_.

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