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The Ubyssey Oct 17, 1980

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 Media c'tee 'backstabbed'
Members of the Alma Mater Society media commission
said Thursday they feel backstabbed by actions taken by
AMS executives during the summer.
It was learned Thursday that anticipation of a clubs supplement in The Ubyssey led to club budget cutbacks by the student administrative commission as early as July. But the
clubs supplement proposal has never been approved by student council or accepted by The Ubyssey or CITR.
One   of   the   purposes   for      ■	
establishing the media commission The commission has representatives
in June was an examination of the from student council, CITR radio
feasibility of such a supplement.     and The Ubyssey.
But according to members of the
commission, some council executives are out to "get" The
Ubyssey and have used the commission as a cover to attack the paper.
"We have been stabbed in the
back," said commission member
Allan Soltis, AMS external affairs
co-ordinator. "We were used as an
excuse to get at The Ubyssey."
Soltis made the charges after it
was discovered Thursday that the
debating society's budget request
for $586 for advertising had been
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXIII. No. 17
Vancouver, B.C. Friday, October 17.1980
228-2301
reduced in July by SAC to $200
because SAC members informed
the society that it would be able to
obtain free advertising in the proposed clubs supplement.
Debating society president
Richard Clark said Thursday that if
the supplement is not approved by
student council the society will attempt to get its advertising budget
restored to the level requested.
Soltis said he suspects AMS administration director Craig Brooks,
who chairs SAC meetings, was
responsible for the debating society
budget cutback. (Brooks, along
with AMS president Bruce Armstrong and finance director Len
Clarke, was behind a proposal
made during the summer to
establish an AMS media board that
would appoint The Ubyssey editor
and dictate the paper's content. The
board would have also appointed
ELECTRIC SHOCK TREATMENT for chronically bow-legged people
gets experimental run at UBC Thursday. When light goes on subject
must improve posture or face 500 volt charge that automatically snaps
—arlc aggartaon photo
knees together. Actually PE week demonstration tests balancing ability of
victim. PE week ends today after successful rebirth by athletic-minded
students and electric gizmos.
Students urge council to fight fee hikes
UBC students say they want student council to fight the proposed
13 per cent tuition fee increases for
the next academic year.
"I'm against the increases. I
don't want to pay any more and I
think students council should take
action," Dave Loui, applied
sciences 1, said Thursday.
Judith Harms, arts 3, said the increase will add an extra burden to
students, who are already facing
tough times.
"It doesn't please me. Right now
it's costing me $6,000 a year for
eight months of school. Another fee
increase will force people that
aren't being sponsored by their
parents to take a year off to work
before they can come to school. It
all adds up," she said.
She agreed council should do all
it can to oppose the fee increases.
"I think they should keep it (tuition fees) at the very most at the
rate of inflation. A lot of students
can't afford it," said Peter Pann-
backer, science 2. He also said
council should fight the increases.
Maureen Norman, physical
education 4, said she's opposed to
the increases but added that taxpayers put $20,000 into each student  graduating   from   university
and students should foot part of the
bill.
"But 13 per cent is quite a
jump," she said.
Student board of governors
representative Anthony Dickinson
said administration president Doug
Kenny wants to increase tuition fees
by 13 per cent in order that students
continue to pay 10 per cent of the
university's operating budget.
But in Thursday's Ubyssey he
seriously questioned Kenny's
figures in calculating the hike.
Dickinson said he in not opposed
to "reasonable" tuition hikes, but
feels council must challenge the
board's figures.
According to Dickinson, students
are already paying 10.8 per cent of
the university's operating costs.
However, according to figures in
UBC's budget for 1980-81, tuition
fees account for only 8.6 per cent of
the total budget. Dickinson said this
means students are paying for
research grants and gifts.
"Students have the right to fight
for the ideal (of low tuition fees).
Students must play their part," he
said Thursday.
Allan Soltis, Alma Mater Society
external affairs coordinator, said
students council has been too slow
in picking up the issue.
"We may be slackers. We should
have been reacting a lot earlier," he
said.
Council has yet to assign a committee to examine the fee increase
issue and the work so far has been
done by an external affairs subcommittee, Soltis said.
"I   hope   council   takes   more
positive steps to find out about
these increases. We've only got a
month left (before the board
meeting to decide fee increases take
place)." he said.
AMS administration director
Craig Brooks agreed the board's
figures must be closely examined by
council.
SFU rape raises cry
Canadian University Press
Vancouver's Rape Relief is concerned about recent sexual assaults on
women at Simon Fraser University and is planning to alert women on campus about the attacks.
"There are many places where assaults are happening at SFU," Carol
Nielsen of Rape Relief said Thursday. "At some point we hope to do some
organizing on campus."
The concern follows reports confirmed Thursday by the SFU women's
centre that a woman was badly beaten and raped two weeks ago on a campus jogging trail.
Women's centre spokesperson Lisa Price said a poster campaign warning
women is a possibility although previous campaigns have run into difficulties when posters were removed shortly after they were put up.
"There's a lot of people out there who don't want women to speak up
about sexual assaults," said Nielsen. "In this culture it goes back to the
fact that women have always been silenced. When we go against that people don't always respect it."
Tom Bennett, SFU director of ancillary services, said Tuesday that
although he has heard rumors of campus assaults, he has not received any
first-hand reports.
the CITR program director. When
the board proposal was rejected by
council the media commission was
formed to examine media on campus and make recommendations to
council on possible changes in
structure.)
Media commission member
Hilary Stout, president of CITR,
also attacked the SAC and executive action.
"I think there's no way they
should have reduced the debating
society budget until they actually
had the supplement," she said.
"It's ridiculous. They're just power
tripping."
Stout said the actions of AMS executives who have ignored the
deliberations of the media commission have made the commission a
farce.
She charged that the commission
was established to cover up the real
ambition of some council executives, which she said was to "go
for The Ubyssey's throat."
But both Soltis and Stout said
they feel attempts to undermine the
media commission will fail.
"They (the AMS executive) are
going to face a lot of opposition at
the next council meeting now that
all this has come to light and they'll
have to retreat," he said.
Stout and Soltis also charged that
the clubs supplement proposal is be-
See page 3: MEDIA
NAIT council
attempting
paper purge
EDMONTON (CUP) — The student council at the Northern Alberta Institue of Technology is telling
students what they can read.
The council has set up a publications board to control what the student newspaper, the Nugget, prints.
The board is screening the Nugget's
mail and confiscating communication with Canadian University Press
(CUP).
CUP is a co-operative of Canadian student newspapers, of which
the Nugget is a member.
Nugget editor Janet Bougie was
told by the board she will be fired if
she prints any news from the CUP
news exchange package.
The Nugget, as a CUP member,
agreed to follow a statement of
principles which prohibits any sexist
or racist material. It also states student papers should be free from
pressure by student governments.
Last year the council forced the
Nugget to print sexist material. As a
result, the Nugget's CUP membership was jeopardized.
The council disagrees with the
CUP definition of sexism.
"What our students consider sexist is not necessarily what others
consider sexist," said board chair
Linda Hause.
The board voted to withdraw
from CUP last June because it felt
restricted by CUP policies, said
Hause.
But Bougie is opposed to leaving
CUP.
"The council simply wants to exert total control over the
newspaper," she said.
The council may face a lawsuit
for breach of contract with CUP
and its advertising affiliate,
Youthstream.
The Nugget is obliged to run all
advertisements sent to it by
Youthstream. The council has
refused to run any ads.
If the Nugget withdraws from
CUP, the council will lose about
$3,000 in advertising revenue.
Hause said she is going to sell
local advertising, but Bougie said
previous attempts to do so have
been unsuccessful. Page 2
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THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Constitution
Trudeau trashed
By RANDY HAHN
The best way the French language
in Canada can be protected is by
elevating the social status of those
who speak it, according to a prominent political scientist.
"The whole process that has been
started is increasing the prestige of
the French," Leon Dion told 100
people in Buchanan 104 at noon
Thursday.
Dion said there has been tremendous change in the status of the
French language in Quebec during
the last four or five years.
"The prestige of French in
Quebec is increasing," he said.
According to Dion many
businesses have accepted the
changes and thus there are many
more opportunities open for French
speaking people to succeed in the
business world. He said businesses
are in fact beginning to find they
can conduct their affairs in French
on an international level too.
Dion vehemently disagreed with
the constitutional proposals put
forth by prime minister Pierre
Trudeau.
"Trudeau does not have an idea
on how to have the French language
become acceptably used," he said.
Trudeau's proposal to entrench
language rights is an attempt to impose a solution from above rather
than try to affect significant change
within the existing structure, Dion
said. Despite the fact that up to 96
per cent of French speaking Canadians live in Quebec, New
Brunswick or a small part of Ontario, the western provinces would
be under the same constitutional
constraints for the benefit of only a
ver small few, he said.
"If you live in  B.C.  I  don't
— graan appla ahampoo photo
SMILING WOMAN approaches greasy-haired photog to give free sample
of Green Apple Shampoo. Yes that's right Green Apple Shampoo. Photog
was later heard to say Green Apple Shampoo left hair shining. Green Apple
Shampoo, the shampoo preferred by more than half of Ubyssey photo
department.
understand why it would be important, unless it's part of your culture,
to speak French," Dion said.
Despite changes in recent years
Dion still sees the English language
as very dominant in Quebec. He
pointed out Montreal has more
English language radio and television stations than French, and
McGill University continues to
overshadow the French-speaking
universities in Montreal.
Dion views Trudeau's attempts to
solve the problems as self defeating.
"Trudeau is like a boxer about to
give Quebec the final blow," he
said.
Dion is a professor of political
science at Laval University. He
served as a special advisor to the
royal commission on bilingualism
and biculturalism.
TRUDEAU . . . plan no laughing matter
Chemical use criticized
WINNIPEG (CUP) — A
Manitoba government health and
safety officer has charged that a
cancer-causing chemical in use in
laboratory experiments at the
University of Manitoba is a health
hazard and should be banned.
Ivan Sabesky said the use of
hydrazine, a known carcinogen, in
organic chemistry labs scheduled
for December at the U of M is
dangerous and should be stopped.
Although the lab manual warns
students of the danger in using the
chemical ("Hydrazine is a carcinogen: use care and carry out the
experiment in the fume hood")
Sabesky warned this procedure will
only protect students from inhaling
the carcinogen. The real hazard,
Sabesky said, is that skin contact is
just as harmful in this case.
Sabesky explains that carcinogens are detemined by a series
of physiological tests. In the use of
hydrazine there were positive inhalation tests and positive skin contact tests.
Sabesky said hydrazine
"shouldn't be used" in lab experiments because of these results.
Another chemical carcinogen,
benzene, has recently been banned
from laboratory assignments at
both the University of Manitoba
and the University of Winnipeg.
Articles on the use of the chemical
appeared in the student newspaper
at the U of W, The Uniter, and in
the Winnipeg daily papers.
The administration at the University of Manitoba does not feel
hydrazine fits into the same hazardous category as benzene. In
disputing Sabesky's claims,
chemistry department head B. R.
Henry pointed to the fact that
"hydrazine is a common reagent in
every department in Canada and
the States. I doubt if there's any
problem."
"There is a carcinogen material
in almost everyone's kitchen,"
Henry said.
Henry was also quick to refute
test results.
"Only trace amounts are used in
laboratory conditions, and . it's
washed off right away," he said,
adding that in order for a student to
be harmed, up to "five grams of
hydrazine would have to be applied
to a person's skin for a few days."
NUS enters fee fuss
with increase plans
TORONTO (CUP) — The National Union of Students is proposing a fee
increase to its membership to prevent a serious decline in the organization's
services.
NUS is asking for a fee increase to $4 from the current $1 per student in
each member association. Kirk Falconer, NUS treasurer and the author of
a report on financial planning, said the association's ability to maintain
current levels of resources is seriously threatened.
"We now find ourselves in a position where we are grappling to preserve
the status quo," said the report.
"After five years of no fee increase. NUS must now raise its fee or risk a
loss of more staff and a further decline in resources by 1981-82," it said.
Falconer does not think a small increase would be better because it would
only "modify" the existing revenue base and not benefit long term goals.
The report further suggested increasing the prospective membership fee
to 50 cents from 25 cents. UBC is not a NUS member but has participated
in NUS campaign's against tuition increases and for increased student aid.
NUS members are meeting until Oct. 18 in Winnipeg.
Carleton fo skin mags
OTTAWA (CUP) — The sale of
skin magazines on campus may be
banned by the Carleton University
student council.
The council is taking steps to prevent the sale of Playboy, Penthouse
and similar publications from the
council's campus store.
"We think it is a gross contradiction to be against sexism on principle .. . and profit from it," said
council president Greg McEUigott.
Magazines of this type are "clearly sexist, degrading to all women
and to a civilized society," he said.
The first step toward removal of
the magazines will be a motion
from the council, expected Tuesday. The council will decide
whether or not it will "publish or
promote any publications on campus which contravene our efforts to
promote an academic and social atmosphere free from prejudice."
The council is not going after all
magazines with sexist content but
only "those magazines which are
most blatantly sexist, those intend-
Media commission raps AMS executive action
From page 1
ing pushed by some executive
members and not the clubs.
"The ten people they've lined up
for writing the supplement are all
from undergraduate societies. They
don't give a shit about clubs," said
Stout. She added that if the supplement plan is rushed ahead it will
backfire.
"This hypothetical clubs page is
really going to look amateurish. If
they don't watch what they're doing, they're going to look very
foolish. And they're going to get
egg all over the clubs' faces," Stout
said.
But Brooks Thursday denied
allegations that he and other executives are responsible for pushing
the supplement proposal.
"A lot of clubs and undergrad
societies are pushing this. They're
applying the pressure, not us," he
said.  "We're not pushing it. All
we're doing is acting as a resource
to clubs and undergrad societies."
Brooks said the supplement is being organized without input from
the media commission or approval
by students council because the
commission is taking too long on its
own.
He said the supplement is urgently needed by campus groups.
"The commission should talk to
these people," he said.
Brooks said he wants to see the
first club supplement published in
the first week of November.
Arts council representative Brian
Roach said he expects the club supplement issue will be a major battle
front at the next council meeting on
Wednesday.
"It's a horrible mess," he said.
He said several council members
will be angry about being kept in
the dark over the issue. "But this is
quite often the case with council
See page 6: SUPPLEMENT
ed specifically to objectivity and
degrade people," said council executive vice president Dan Loewen.
The council executive has the
power to remove the maganzines
but McEUigott said it would be unfair to do so without debate.
If council agrees a magazine is
sexist, it would be obligated to carry
out its mandate not to stock the
magazine. But journalism professor
Tom McPhail objects to such a
move.
"I think it's a shame that at a
university they want to restrict
freedom of expression — an elite
group deciding what people can and
can't read," McPhail said. "The
next thing you know, they'll want
to take certain books out of the
library."
But Loewen disagrees, "We are
not limiting freedom of expression.
These magazines can still be
published and sold and can still be
brought on campus. They can even
be bought on campus (in other
stores)," he said.
McEUigott said he will try to have
the magazines banned elsewhere on
campus. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 17,1980
Don't forget
Those who have been reading The Ubyssey recently might have noticed several articles about the October crisis of 1970, when the Canadian
parliament turned this country into an instant police state.
Why dig up the mistakes of the past? Because the legacy of the War
Measures Act is still with us, particularly in the form of the Public Order Act
which replaced it soon after the crisis was over.
At any time, for almost any reason, our own government can wipe
away nearly a millenium of human rights legislation and concentrate all
power in the cabinet, presided over by the prime minister. Yes, Canada the
good, Canada the fair and tolerant, Canada the country which condescends to less liberal nations, has within it the means for turning itself into a regime comparable of Chile, Brazil or the U.S.S.R.
And, to refute those who trust our governors, it has already done it. In
October, 1970, hundreds of Canadian citizens were thrown in jail without
charges laid, kept without trial and released with never an official explanation.
Armed soldiers patrolled the streets of a country that had not been at
war for 25 years and had considered for several years whether it was
necessary at all to maintain a standing army.
In high schools and universities — not just in Quebec, but throughout
the country — instructors were told that speaking about the FLQ without
condemning it and all its actions would be considered as an announcement
of resignation.
The myth of Canada as a country of inviolate good and tolerance, a
myth that had been eaten at by the destruction of native peoples, racist immigration quotas and the internment of the Japanese in the Second World
War, this myth of an enlightened liberal country was shattered. Forever.
Human rights have never been encoded in our laws, and at this very
moment are considered a mere bargaining point in the constitutional
discussions which will likely shape our laws for generations to come. Even
dictatorships present a facade of upholding such rights, but in Canada they
are dealt with as lightly as customs regulations and freight rates.
What happened 10 years ago this week could be among the most important events in the history of our country, some day to be studied
alongside the rebellions of 1837, the act of confederation and the growth of
independence through the two world wars.
Each of those other events eventually led to an improvement in our
stature as a nation, as citizens of a nation and as human beings with inalienable rights.
If we remember the War Measures Act, and hold it in our minds as an
example of what cannot be imposed on a free country, we will be able to
make our opposition to it another of our acts aimed at reaching an ideal of
responsible citizenship served by a responsible and responsive government.
Human rights are important, important enough to remember for a
long time. Ask any native person who has seen the children of his people
starved or taken away from their parents to be taught how to hate.
Ask any Japanese-Canadian who was alive when Canada had its own
concentration camps and a minority to put in them. Ask any Quebecois
whose friends or family were arrested in the street and thrown in jail
without recourse to the laws that are our only protection.
Ask any man or woman on this great green earth who has had their
rights taken away. They will tell you of the absolute necessity for always
remembering what has happened and always fighting for an end to legislation designed to take rights away from free citizens — such as we supposedly are.
THE UBYSSEY
October 17,1980
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and not of the
AMS or the university administration. Member, Canadian
University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial office is in
room 241K of the Student Union Building. Editorial departments, 228-2301; Advertising, 228-3977.
Editor: Verne McDonald
Tha ctuba aupplamant was almoat ready to 00. Jannifar Ryan, Lori Thicke and Merrilee Robaon had
written up a kaan story about tha Nicaneaa Club, and Bid Tieleman, Stava McClure and Alice Thompson had written a snide reaction from the Nastiness Club. Keith Betdrey, Eric Eggertson and Heather
Conn wrote about the Red-headed League, which brought the attention of mystery cartoonist Randall
(Surelock) Holmes. The Wheelhouse Manor Club, represented by Julie and Geof, wrote a great PR
preview pice about the upcoming Hallowe'en party there and Nancy and Doug of tha Campbell club
had a photo essay depicting the re-enactment of the castration of McDonalds like Verne. Gill and
Maclntyre wrote articles about the famous Evan Fan Club, where anyone named Evan can teal superior
to the likes of Ranoy Hann and Glen Sanford. Nancy the Trottskyist thought that Kan Swartz must be
the only real member of Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club, who will meet with every member of The
Ubyssey staff Sunday at 1 p.m. at 3413 W. 20th Ave.
Ju© U U0X S
Future bleak for UBC
I spent last week at the University
of Toronto where I encountered
our future, if present trends continue. We will not make it. The
education financial crisis is quickly
leading that institution into
mediocrity.
UBC's financial cutbacks will be
even more devastating because we
are, in some sense, just emerging as
a top quality university. U of T has
more to fall back on.
Not only is the financial crunch
affecting quality but it leads to
scapegoating. Jack Davis' so called
study is mild compared to
statements that are uttered in
Toronto. The "blame" is placed on
"foreign" students for using up
valuable resources.
Like here, "foreign" is not determined by visa, but by color and
shape of one's eyes. Thus the starvation of higher education creates a
future that is more mediocre, both
in quality of knowledge and attitudes of civility.
Some illustrations of the impact
of cut-backs at U of T: One grad
student I know said that only part-
time teaching assistantships are
available, to encourage grads in
coming there, but cutting the
overall cost of TAs. Another student has no lab space until after
Christmas because of lack of equipment.
There are botany labs being held
in the men's and women's
washrooms because of increased
enrollment and lack of money for
new space. Generally speaking
profs are more unavailable because
of more students and more physical
drain.
The crisis at U of T has even
become front page news in some of
the Toronto papers.
Hopefully we here at UBC can
reverse ... "if present trends continue". As a footnote to the discussion we need to be clear on the
meaning of the university budget.
Some of those who have begun to
raise the issue sometimes confuse
operating grants with capital grants.
When the university builds a parking  lot  that  does  not  come off
operating grants, nor, under the
present government, would have
that money been available for
"educational" needs. It is important, then, not to see capital costs as
that which takes away money for
education.
Secondly, let us resist the temptation to make "foreign" students
scapegoats. They in no way increase
the cost of education. Thus, let us
oppose all interpretations that lead
to narrow provincialism in our attitudes.
George Hermanson
Co-operative Christian
Campus Ministry
Let's hear it for sexists
I would like to congratulate Kurt Preinsperger (Oct. 16) for his open-
minded personal opinion on the existence and purpose of pornography.
He is wrong on one point though; pornography does not act, I believe,
as "a surrogate for sexual adventure," but merely supplements them. And
he is right in saying that the reason pornography acts in this way is because
of the unavailability of women.
Not that women are by nature aloof, but they are brought up to be
passive in a relationship, not to take the initiative.
Men are not sex maniacs, and Preinsperger is right in saying this, but
we do resent having to appeal to women for relationships when the sexual
attractiveness of both sexes (let alone intellectual attractiveness) are supposed to be equal.
He talks of moral zealots: Lori Thicke et. al. sounds right at home
among them. What right have the "anti-sexists" to assault us with their
moral reasoning? They are no better than Bernice Gerard and Co. if they
start telling us that we aren't educated and their reasoning is better.
I think Kurt Preinsperger is right on telling the other side of the story
that we don't usually hear.
Chris Fulker
arts 3
First aid actions commendable
j
This letter describes some of the
heroics performed by Greg Franklin
on Tuesday Oct. 15 in our
Psychology 206 class. Greg is someone I met two years ago in
Biology 102 (we were lab partners).
During our days in biology, I
started calling him Dr. Franklin; today 1 know why.
We were in the middle of one of
Dr. Signori's infamous lectures on
psychoanalytic theory. In his
typical deliberate style, Dr. Signori
was discussing how to set up an en-
vironment to deal with
psychoanalytic patients.
In the meantime, the students
were all getting the writers cramp
taking notes. Anyone who has had
Dr. Signori knows that his notes are
as good as gold.
Well, in this case, Dr. Signori
paused during the lecture; he rubbed his forehead looked up at the
class and he continued, "I'm not
sure what's happening to me, but
whatever it is, it certainly isn't very
oleasan:."
He yawned and some oi the people started to laugh. After all, this
was Dr. Signori cracking a joke in
class again, wasn't it?
Immediately Greg left his seat
and approached Dr. Signori who at
this time was shaking and trying to
grasp the podium. At this point, it
became evident that he was not trying to be funny. Three more
students came rushing down to aid
him.
They laid him down and watched
as Greg took over the situation. In a
firm yet controlled voice he introduced himself: "I'm Greg, I've
taken industrial first-aid. Now, Dr.
Signori, have you have any previous
heart trouble? He continued to
manipulate his hands to get some
vital signs.
He requested that someone get
ready with a pen and piece of paper
to write down the signs. In the
meantime someone had called the
ambulance.
By the time the men from Squad
99 had arrived (one minute later),
Greg had placed Dr. Signori in a
comfortable position on the floor
and had gained the confidence of
not only Dr. Signori but also the
students who were mesmerized by
the situation.
It makes me feei good to Know
that  someone like  Grep  Franklin
was able to recognize the situation
as an emergency. Not only was he
the first one to recognize the
emergency but his take charge attitude and overall knowledge of
first aid procedure was commendable.
Kara Dhillon
commerce 2
P.S — Get better soon Dr. Signori.
The Ubyssey welcomes letters
from all readers.
Especially those who type their
letters, triple-spaced, on a 70 space
typewriter line, because these are
the people who are most likely to
see their letters printed sometime
before next Dunn's Day eve.
Pen names will be used when the
writer's real name is also included
for our information in the letter and
when valid reasons for anonymity
are given.
Although an effort is made to
publish all letters received, The
Ubyssey reserves the right to edit
letters tor reasons of brevity, legality and taste.
Neatness counts. Friday, October 17,1980
THE    U BYSSEY
Page 5
&V^\*^J™5*' ...;£-
*&
Serious look needed at clubs' supplement
We would like to applaud The
Ubyssey's editorial of Thursday,
Oct. 16. As members of the media
commission, we feel there are one
or two things that need to be
pointed out, not just to the students
at large, but specifically to those
students who consider themselves
'more equal' than the rest of us.
You know who you are.
Our commission was set up five
months ago, after an attempt was
made by students' council to control CITR and the Ubyssey. Six of
us, two from the paper, two from
the station and two from council,
met almost weekly all summer long,
discussing the problems of communication on campus. Our mandate was to propose a solution.
We came up with the media
liaison committee, to which any student or student group with a complaint of any kind against any of the
three bodies will be able to come in,
talk with informally, and get
something done about their problem.
We also recommended that a
survey of all UBC students be conducted, which would gauge their
feelings about media on campus.
Finally, we recommended that a
clubs   insert   be   discussed   and
Porno rock not hot
As a member of The Ubyssey staff allow me to say that I am disgusted
with the publication of a letter in Thursday's paper from Charles Slade, entitled Porno rock wows cock. Had I been present in the office for the
debate which took place about printing the misogynist missive I would have
made the following points:
• The idea that printing such drooling drivel is in any way defending
the freedom of the press or freedom of expression is an erroneous conclusion. Had Mr. Slade's masturbatory fantasies involved small children or
gays or a racial group in society, I have no doubt his letter would not have
run. But because he concerns himself with a female singer it's apparently
acceptable.
• Secondly the letter reinforces the myth, perpetuated by males, that a
women who dresses in a certain way, "erotically" according to Mr. Slade,
is obviously a slut, a loose woman, a whore etc.
• The letter, aside from all its sexism, is basically in extremely bad
taste. Although it's interesting that Mr. Slade is so sexually self-adept the
letters page of The Ubyssey is hardly the place to hear about it. Perhaps
Mr. Slade should place an ad in the Vancouver Star classifieds describing
his penchant and fellow vinyl voyeurs can gather at his apartment. But I
don't want to read about it in these precious few pages.
• Finally Mr. Slade is not, to the best of my knowledge, a student at
UBC or a member of the university community. While I have no objections
to printing letters from outside the university when space permits, on issues
of concern to students, this letter has no relevancy to UBC whatsoever.
Sadly, the printing of Mr. Slade's letter can only reflect badly on The
Ubyssey, especially when the paper takes strong stands against sexism and
discrimination against women.
Bill Tieleman
arts 4
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seriously considered at the very first
meeting of this yet-to-be formed
committee. These recommendations will go to a vote at the next
council meeting, and the committee
will be set up immediately.
Although members of the commission feel the committee is a great
idea, we want to point out that it
was not CITR or The Ubyssey's
idea in the first place. Certain
members of council came up with
the idea, council set up the commission and council will set up the committee.
Why, then, are those same certain members of council, the very
ones who pushed for the commission in the first place, totally ignoring the hard work their own commission has done?
Issues like the clubs insert are
within the purview of the media
liaison committees, NOT within the
purview of Craig Brooks. Such an
idea must be approved by all of
council, after close study and a
well-thought-out recommendation
by the committee that council itself
set up to deal with exactly this sort
of thing.
If hordes of undergrad societies
and clubs are foaming at the mouth
with righteous indignation against
the paper, why haven't they talked
to the members of the commission?
Why haven't they talked to the
paper? Why have they only talked
to Craig Brooks?
And since when have the
undergrad societies started bleeding
for the clubs? The "ten people"
that have been found to write the
insert are all reps from undergrad
no
societies. As far as we know,
club people are involved.
We don't need this, and we hope
that the rest of student council will
take a serious look at what's going
on. God knows, we tried.
Hilary Stout
CITR station manager
Alida Moonen
senate rep to student council
No complaints here
A note from one club on its
treatment by The Ubyssey. We
have no substantial complaints.
Last year The Ubyssey was far
more helpful than the student
administrative commission when
we co-sponsored the Festival of
Religion and the Arts.
In advertising our events we
find the paper makes judgments
about Hot Flashes and
sometimes our requests meet
their criteria. But no complaints
there as far as the staffers represent the continuum of bias found
everywhere. Given the time
available to the student, those
who turn up week after week
have to be admired (the same
with the hacks in the AMS).
Let us be one club that goes
on record as seeing no need for
an editorial board or media
board. If, though, we can get
more free PR we don't mind if
the AMS wants to pay for an insert of upcoming activities.
But let that be separate and
unrelated to the editorial decisions of The Ubyssey. Let it remain, with its good and bad
issues, a source of frustration,
humor and occasional insight,
something to read on the bus or
in the john.
The Student Christian
Movement Page 6
THE   UBYSSEY
Friday, October 17,1980
Supplement questioned     fnT^TklDiaA
From page 3 "I,m   lon8  P351   getting  bitter   we're going to go back to SAC and    \^^_^J^^m ltaOl A    aT^W ^^aT^^C 1
reps. They (the executive) don't tell    about   anything   that   happens   ask   for   our   full   advertising    /^^^^ %^^\m     ™     >N*^^V^
Obyssey «A6s ?
From page 3
reps. They (the executive) don't tell
us anything," he said.
Soltis agreed with Roach's assessment but added that he is not bitter
about the affair.
PANGO PANGO (UNS)—The
end of the world made its first appearance on earth in this tiny
kingdom Thursday. Lack of
photographers and cartoonists was
followed by severe shortages of
everything, particularly the belly-
button lint held sacred by the hairy
puce blorgs here.
Appeals were made to Pert
Priestburner, local shaman of the
Bokononist cult, but the Hellhound
Heretic could only produce the
familiar miracle of producing garbage from a dry sock.
Archiebishop Blorg Sperman's
Son denounced the Heretic's
espousal of doing without a spouse
in favor of spouting while looking
at pieces of paper.
'I'm long past getting bitter
about anything that happens
around these offices," he said.
Meanwhile, the debating society
is waiting for the question over a
clubs supplement to be resolved.
"If the supplement come out in
time for the supermouth competition, there's no problem," said
Richard Clark. "But if it doesn't,
we're going to go back to SAC and
ask for our full advertising
budget."
Clark said he is in favor of a supplement.
"We don't want to depend on
The Ubyssey. We want publicity
but they want to put out a
newspaper. That's not what clubs
want," she said.
CAMPUS
BICYCLES
Open 7 Days A Week
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IN U.B.C. VILLAGE
KCESJORKS -
5708 University Blvd.
2244)611
Yes, you can escape, from classes,
bad relationships or simple boredom.
Join the Ubyssey. Write, draw or take
photos. Become a bon vivant. Use bon
mots. Eat bon bons. C'est une bonne
idee. In room 241K of SUB, every Monday, Wednesday and Thursday.
Your skin is worth it.
RK Men's Bar.
You can wash with ordinary soap or you can use RK Men's Bar.
The difference is a little money and lot of benefits. Many soaps can
be drying and alkaline. RK is non-alkaline. Its pH of 5.5 matches
your skin's slightly acidic state and helps protect its natural
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Come in to our RK Retail Center.
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NOTES FOR
FRIDAY
OCTOBER
17th
nf
DO MY BIT FOR CHARITY
Buy ticket for the Shrum Bowl...All
proceeds go to the United Way. (By the
end of the year I may need Help myself.)
Ef
rv^
CATCH A GREAT FOOTBALL
GAME
Watch   the   Clan   take   on   U.B.C.
Probably the best game of the year.
ryr snare the last of the
L-'  GREAT BARGOONS
So the ticket cost me three bucks...The
ticket stub saves me a buck and a half off
an eight or twelve slice pizza at Mother's.
Gosh, I'm shrewd.
itf1
rc/T MEET THE GROUP BACK AT
L-J   MOTHER'S
Just over the bridge in Richmond, a lot
closer to downtown with a lot less hassle.
The only way to start a weekend.
Pizza Parlour & Spaghetti House
8440 Bridgeport Rd., Richmond
270-8434 Licensed Friday, October 17,1990
THE    UBYSSEY
Pago 7
Decriminalization
There are 7,000 people
languishing in Canadian
prisons, jailed for simple
possession of marijuana.
They are victims caught in a
twilight zone between public
acceptance and the time it
takes for politicians to codify
that acceptance into law.
By Tom Schoenewolf
for
Canadian University
Press
It is not a minor offence.
More than 300,000 Canadians have faced criminal
charges for possession of
cannabis in this decade.
More Canadian citizens are
arrested per capita for
possession than in any other
country in the world.
Many federal politicians
have said they believe a
criminal record for possession is needlessly harsh, as
have some judges. They promise decriminalization, yet
delay.
Ted Seifred is a Vancouver
lawyer and, as a coordinator
for the National Organiza
tion for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML), is
fighting what he feels are
bizarre narcotics laws.
Seifred says it is an ''absurdity" that 90 per cent of all
convictions under the Narcotics Control Act, which includes possession of heroin,
morphine and LSD, are for
simple marijuana possession.
"You're turning people
who aren't criminals into
criminals," he says. "The
government and the police
say they're not really hassling
people over this anymore.
That's bullshit."
Half of the 7,000 people in
jail for possession are serving
"time in default," meaning
they have been arrested after
having failed to pay a fine.
"In case of time in
default," Seifred says, "the
judge didn't really mean for
them to go to jail, but
because they don't have any
money they wind up serving
time for reefers. This is absolutely bizarre."
NORML claims that
decriminalization will save
money because it says more
than $400 million has been
spent in the past 10 years in
Canada to enforce possession laws.
Attempts to decriminalize
marijuana, an action endorsed by the federal LeDain
Commission on the nonmedical use of drugs, the
Canadian Medical Association and the Canadian Bar
Association, have been met
only with scattered promises
and bureaucratic delays from
federal Liberal governments.
Seifred says decriminalization is being delayed because
only about 15 per cent of
Canadians smoke marijuana.
"On the one hand you're
dealing with a lot of young
people in Canada; you're
talking about 2 to 3 million
people. The government
agrees these people shouldn't
go to jail, they agree they
shouldn't be getting criminal
records, they say they're not
arguing with us. But what
they are saying in not so
many words is that until it's
politically acceptable to the
majority of people, until they
gain votes by passing
something, they're not going
to do anything."
MP Pauline Jewett (NDP-
New Westminster-
Coquitlam) calls the
Liberals' refusal to amend
the Criminal Code a
"betrayal of what they
earlier said they would do."
"The Conservatives didn't
put it on the agenda at all, let
alone high on the agenda,"
said  Jewett.   "The Liberals
have said they are concerned,
yet despite all of our questioning in June and July they
didn't seem to be placing a
very high priority on it at
all."
NDP justice critic Svend
Robinson (Burnaby) is even
more pessimistic. He says
decriminalization is "a long
time coming."
Seifred says that "ever
since the LeDain commission came out in 1972 calling
for decriminalization,
they've been saying, 'we're
going to do something about
it really soon.' But the fact
remains that they still aren't
doing anything."
In 1923 cannabis was
brought   under  the   federal
opium and narcotic act,
which was changed to the
current Narcotic Control Act
in 1961. Indictment for simple possession carried a maximum sentence of seven
years. The only alternative to
a sentence was probation.
In 1969, possession was
broken into indictment and
summary conviction. Indictment was still seven years,
while summary conviction
was a $1,000 fine or imprisonment for six months,
or both, for a first offence.
Today, partly due to marijuana's increasing acceptance, a person charged with
possession generally receives
a fine between $100 and
$250. Yet they still receive a
criminal record.
Another problem working
against decriminalization,
says Seifred, is the presence
of  fundamentalist  religious
and other lobby groups who
oppose reform of marijuana
laws.
"The mail after the
Liberals' comments on
decriminalization has been
strongly against it," he says.
"Most of the people who are
smoking reefers by and large
are not letter writers. We tell
them to write to their MPs,
but people are obviously extremely cynical about that,
for a good reason."
Fears that decriminalization will encourage the use of
marijuana have been largely
disproved in the U.S., where
11 states have decriminalized
possession. A survey conducted in Oregon, which
decriminalized possession in
1972, indicates a mere one
per cent increase in. consumption.
Says Seifred; "From a
cynical point of view you can
almost say Canada is going
to change its drug laws after
the States does. When the
States act federally, then
we'll follow in their
footsteps. But unfortunately,
not until then."
Get th£e bEHiuo
SflTANU).
MY government^
Told me, alU
ABOUT Dope AND
I'ArX A GOOD GIRL^ Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 17,1980
'Tween classes
TODAY
NDP
Sun Paraky apeaka, noon, SUB 212.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Ganaral maating, noon. Lounge I.M.
SHRUM CLUB
Annual football ahowdown between UBC and
SFU, ticket! 13, 8 p.m.. Empire Stadium. No
buaea thia year, no PNE beer. Pre-Shrum Bowl
victory celebration, 4 p.m.. Pit.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSN.
Severl volunteer poaftiona are atill open for interested atudents, drop by any weekday, noon to
1:30 p.m.. SUB 236.
POTTERY CLUB
Clay pickup, noon, SUB 261.
DEPT. OF ECONOMICS
Lecture by Leon Dion on "A debate on the constitution: aftermath of the Quebec revolution,"
7:30 p.m., Buch. 104.
TROTSKYIST LEAGUE
Political forum with speaker Brian Campbell
discussing "From the NDP to Trotskyism,"
noon, SUB 205.
MUSSOC
General meeting, noon, SUB 211.
DEBATING SOC
General meeting, noon, SUB 215.
PEUS
Inner tube race, noon, Empire pool.
INTRAMURALS
Peripheral road run (8 km) for men and women,
noon, Maclnnes Field.
SATURDAY
CVC
Car rally, 5:30 p.m., Beaver gas station,
Oakridge.
ROCKERS' CO-OP
General open jam session, 1:00 p.m., SUB 215.
MUSSOC
Auditions for cabaret night, noon to 5:00 p.m.,
hut M-24.
CSA
Sports night ia cancelled. Would have been held
tonight in winter sporta gym.
SUNDAY
SPORTS CAR CLUB
Car slalom, 10:30 a.m., B-Lot, rain or shine.
Registration opens at 9:00 a.m.
MUSSOC
Auditions for cabaret night, 2:00 p.m. to 6:00
p.m., SUB partyroom.
UBYSSEY
Staff meeting, 1 p.m., Wheelhouee, 3413 West
20th. Important meeting and 8timulants.
MONDAY
GAY PEOPLE OF UBC
Spiritual fellowship group meeting, 5:30 p.m.,
Lutheran Campus Centre.
CVC
Roller-skating party, 8:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m.,
North Van Stardust rink.
ROCKERS' CO-OP
General meeting, noon, SUB 211.
HISTORICAL DANCE CLUB
Renaissance dance class, noon, SUB 113.
WUSC
Slide presentation on 1980 WUSC summer
seminar on development in Tunisia, noon, Buch.
205.
Hot flashes
Roll up your
0f"ffl 0IICf • • •
Nursing week runs from Oct. 20
to 24.
On Monday there will be a fun
run open to the campus community. Interested people should show
up at the acute care parking lot to
run a mile and a half. Tuesday there
will be fitness tests and a lifestyle
fair in the SUB main foyer. And
Wednesday Marion Greenwood will
be speaking in IRC-6 at 12:45 on
"Alternate Nursing Roles."
Wasn't that painless?
No Shrum but
First the bad news: there will not
be any buses running from UBC to
Empire Statium this afternoon for
the annual Shrum Bowl game bet
ween Simon Fraser and the
T-Birds.
The good news is the Pit will be
open for a pre-victory celebration,
starting at 4 p.m. More bad news is
that there will not be beer for sale at
the game.
Sooooo. . . .buy tickets for $3 at
the Alma Mater Society ticket centre in SUB, go to the Pit, don't get
drunk and drive downtown
yourself, but don't get drunk and
hassle bus drivers who won't make
rest stops.
Aftermath
Tonight take your evening constitutional with an expert.
Leon Dion, noted political
science professor from Laval
University, speaks at 7:30 p.m. in
Buch. 104 on the constitutional
debate and the Quebec referendum's aftermath.
Thea Koerner House
GRADUATE STUDENT CENTRE
Did you know? Membership is open to students in the Faculties of
Law, Dentistry, and Medicine; the School of Architecture; or people
enrolled in one of the following programs: Licentiate in Accounting;
Diplomas in French and German Translation, Education, Applied
Linguistics, and Art History; Masters in Social Work and Librarian-
ship. Postdoctoral Fellows and Staff Personnel are also eligible.
CENTRE:
9:00 a.m.-12:00 midnight (Monday-Friday)
4:30 p.m.-12:00 midnight (Saturday)
CAFETERIA:
9:15 a.m.-7:00 p.m. (Monday-Friday)
Lunch 11:45 a.m.-1:30 p.m. s
Dinner 5:00 p.m.-7:00 p.m.
LOUNGE:
5:00 p.m.-12:00 midnight (Monday-Friday)
WINDSURFING
General meeting, noon, SUB 111.
NUS
Fun run, approximately 1 ft milee, noon, NW
corner of acute care unit parking lot. No regiatra-
tion, just show up reedy to run.
TUESDAY
PRE-MED 80C
Dr. Hill apeaka on paediatrics, noon, IRC 1.
EL CIRCULO
Conversation groups, noon, Buch. 218.
SLAVONIC STUDIES DEPT.
Dr. John-Paul Himka apeaka on "Ukrainians and
Jews: village roots of ethnic conflict," noon,
Buch. 212.
NUS
Life-styling fair, noon to 4:30 p.m., SUB main
hallway. Marion Greenwood, RNABC career
counsellor, speaks on "Alternate nursing roles,"
noon, IRC 6.
UPCOMING
SKI CLUB
Hallowe'en party at Whistler UBC ski cabin,
evening, Nov. 1. Bus available for $6 return. Call
228-6185 for more info, or drop by SUB 210.
SUBFILMS presents
A temptingly tasteful comedy
for adults who can count
38^?     BLAKE EDWARDS
K>
o
16-19
Thurs., Sun. 7:00
Fri., Sat. 7:00 & 9:30
$1.00 w/AMS  card  SUB
Aud.
Friday, Oct. 17, 1980
9:00 a.m.-12:00 Noon
International House
Upper Lounge
University of
British Columbia
For more information contact:
A. F. Shirran
Director, Student Services
University of
British Columbia
2075 Wesbrook Mall
Vancouver,   B.C.,   Canada
V6T1W5
(604)228-4325
c
<5
c
o
Get facts
on the law
school
admission
process.
Twelve law school
representatives participate
in a panel discussion,
of curriculum, admissions,
and placement.
Check out
these law
schools.
An open discussion allows
you to talk to the law school
recruiters and pick up
application forms and
literature on their schools.
California Western
School of Law
Golden Gate University
School of Law
Gonzaga University
Law School
McGeorge School of Law
University of the Pacific
Pepperdine University
School of Law
Southwestern University
School of Law
University of Puget Sound
School of Law
University of San Diego
School of Law
University of San Francisco
School of Law
University of Santa Clara
Law School
Whittier College
School of Law
Willamette University
College of Law
Open to all students and
alumni of colleges and
universities in this area.
' '■tMSmi^_W_mmms
v-??Tfi§iifi^
?';'3a«K^^
5 — Coming Events
THE VANCOUVER INSTITUTE
Free Public Lecture
PROF. STANLEY COREN
Psychology, U.B.C.
The Psychology of Visual
Illusions
A Lecture-Demonstration
SATURDAY, OCT. 18
Lecture Hall No. 2,
Woodward Instructional Resources
Centre at 8:15 p.m.
11 - For Sale — Private
1971 PONTIAC Grndsaf stnwagon, loaded.
Many new parts, v. good condition. $1200.
224-9636. Ask for Scott.
SLINGERLAND DRUM SET. plus hard
cases, 5 pes. and cymbals, hvyduty equip.
$1100. 224-9836. Ask for Scott.
15 — Found
66 — Scandals
MATH LESSON FOR TODAYI -36 + 24
+ 36 ="10." Tutoring on Thurs., Sun.
7:00, Fri., Sat. 7:00 & 9:30. $1.00 in SUB
Aud. Instructor: B. Derek.
70 — Services
20 — Housing
DRY CLEANING - ALTERATIONS: UBC
One Hour Martinizing. 2146 Western
Parkway, 228-9414 (in the Village). Reasonable rates. Student rates.
ON-CAMPUS RESIDENCE available for
women: shared accommodation at Totem
Park and Place Vanier residences. Apply
at the Student Housing Office, Ponderosa
Building, 8:30-4:00 Monday-Friday. For
info: 228-2811.
80 — Tutoring
85 — Typing
Improve Your Study
Habits Through
SELF HYPNOSIS
Fee: $35 for 3
$45 for 4
Mondays 6:15-7:30 p.m.
starting
Oct. 20, 27 or Nov. 3
Blue Room, Arts 1 Bldg.
U.B.C. Campus
25 — Instruction
30 — Jobs
10 — For Sale — Commercial
NOW THAT YOU'RE HERE
ENJOY ("IT")
It gives the Acid Test
(Aspirants To Be)
Tomorrow's Productive Actors
Will Order "It" Today
"Curious" ("It")
From the Book Store
SEE OUR AD PAGE PF 11
CX PHOTOLAB
OFFSET
OPERATOR
PART-TIME FOR
AMS COPY CENTRE
Contact
Norm Rollerson
228-3974
HAVING TROUBLE with your written
English? Essays scrupulously proofread,
insightfully edited and competently typed.
Reasonable rates. Call 224-1582.
TYPING SERVICE RICHMOND Spec,
student rates. Dorothy Bygrave, 273-9737/
277-5537.
FAST, EFFICIENT TYPING near campus.
266-5053.
ESSAYS, theses, manuscripts, including
technical, equational, reports, letters,
resumes. Fast, accurate. Bilingual. Clemy,
266-6647.
EXPERT   TYPING.   Essays, term   papers,
factums   $0.85.   Theses, manuscripts,
letters,   resumes  $0.85+. Fast  accurate
typing. 266-7710.
TYPING. $.80 per page. Fast and accurate. Experienced typist. Phone Gordon
873-8032.
TYPING SERVICE for theses, correspondence, etc. Any field. French also available.
IBM Selectric. Call 736-4042.
35 - Lost
90 - Wanted
TUESDAY MORNING a small gold bracelet.
Great sentimental value. Reward $. Phone
Alana, 224-1747.
BROWN LEATHER WALLET Fri. evening
Oct. 10, somewhere between Pit and meter
parking behind SUB. $20 reward for return
of AMS card to "Proctor" in SUB. No
questions asked. Thanks.
99 — Miscellaneous
11
For Sale — Private
FOR SALE Ladies Indian wrap style sweater
size 10, $110. Phone 872-4834 after 7:00 pm
FOR SALE 2 tickets for B-52 concert at the
Gardens Tues. Oct. 21. Call Mark 327-5381.
40 — Messages
50 - Rentals
60 — Rides
See you at the
SHRUM BOWL
Tonight
Empire Stadium
3 p.m. PJk&E Fl^ID
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,     :.     :« f    ■ loctober 1970
Canadian democracy in crisis
By GEOF WHEELWRIGHT
Quebec's university campuses were in turmoil in those numbing days of the October
Crisis 10 years ago. While there was general
support for the goals of the Front de Liberation du Quebec, there was almost unanimous
condemnation of their methods in the
English-language universities.
That changed following Pierre Laporte's
death and the implementation of the War
Measures Act.
Laurier Lapierre, now a Vancouver television host and newspaper columnist, was
director of McGill University's French
Canada studies program during the crisis. He
was also an outspoken critic of the suspension of civil liberties.
"A democracy doesn't protect itself by
people removing the rights of its own
people," Lapierre said then. "When a human
being's life is at stake there is no such thing
as 'giving in' to demands. Confronted by the
choices, I would have preferred that the
government make the choice of negotiation
and exchange."
Ten years later, Lapierre still believes
Canada's huge police force threatens to
abuse civil liberties.
Page Friday: Do you still believe in the
comments you made regarding the War
Measures Act in October, 1970?
Lapierre: Yes, I have not changed my
mind about that. I consider it to have been an
abuse of power and a response of panic. I
think I made one mistake then — to impute
to Mr. Trudeau the culpability of being part
of the conspiracy plot on the part of the
police and the administration of Montreal
and of the Bourassa government — which
was to rid society of so-called leftists.
It's now apparent that Mr. Trudeau was
not implicated in that. Although we were
right in saying that there was a conspiracy
and that it was largely promoted by the Montreal provincial police and the RCMP through
their inability to get along together, there's a
tremendous lesson we must draw from that.
We have too many police forces, there is a
great potential for abuse that was seen in October '70. I think that the Drapeau government was panicky, the Bourassa government
was ever more panicked and I think that the
federal government should have used its intelligence and common sense and dedication
to civil rights in order not to Cave in.
The police will utilize whatever power they
think is necessary — whether it is legal or
not. Therefore to prevent the establishment,
even for a moment, of a police dictatorship,
the political authorities cave in. And I think
that is disastrous and sad and ought not to
have been done.
Let it be a lesson that the more power the
police seek, they do so at the expense of the
liberties of the individual and society and
they must be resisted at all costs.
PF: Do you think that the circumstances
that created the abuse of power in Quebec in
October 1970 could realistically occur again?
Lapierre: That terrorism can occur
anywhere — the answer to that is yes. That
men and women could take it upon
themselves in their schizophrenia to plot I
have no doubt about it at aB. People will be
kidnapped for the sake for political advantage of one group over another — that is
quite possible. Quebec has no monopoly on
this sort of action — it occurred there purely
accidentally because of cultural and poWncai
circumstances that made it possible.
Look at the way {former Vancouver mayor
Tom) Campbell behaved in B.C. That mayor
who wanted to use the War Measures Act to
put all the hippies in jail. What do you consider to be a hippie? I have no doubt that it
(abuse of power) is possible. Whether it will
be done for Quebec independence — I have
great doubts about that.
I don't think there was In 1970 any more
than there is now a political base for it. Of the
460-odd who were apprehended, the 35
known felquistes (FLQ members) were not
arrested with the crisis going on. Therefore
you can well imagine {the small political)
base of the terrorist action.
They are as ridiculous and stupid as the
IRA, I suspect. Or anybody else who through
political and social schizophrenia and their
own sense of power endanger people's lives.
PF: What do you think is the most impor
tant lesson Canadians should have learned
from October 1970?
Lapierre: The important lesson is that
with the panic of the police forces and of the
authorities, the liberties of the individual get
ransacked. That's the first lesson.
The second lesson is that the panic creates
a form of assent that weak politicians like
Drapeau and Bourassa capitalize on and
manipulate to their advantage.
We also discovered that courage was not a
fundamental characteristic of those who
made decisions for us.
Lastly we have discovered that the police
behave in accordance to an immutable law.
The police are basically stupid and behave
stupidly.
PF: Do you think that enough people
with the power to change anything have
recognized these lessons?
Lapierre: Well, Trudeau certainly has. His
entire obsession with the entrenchment of
civil rights arises directly out of October '70. I
have no doubt about it at all. His entire process of existence has been to enlarge man's
freedom, not to limit it. The best speeches he
has made have been on that theme — to protect the individual against big government,
big business and big labor. It has been the
essential crux of his career as a public person.
Like all of us, he is prey to a tremendous
amount of pressure. I, among many, was
quite disappointed. The intelligentsia of
Canada actually clapped for Trudeau in October 1970 — applauded him. The list is long
of the intelligentsia, in terms of the pundits in
the press, the professors at the universities
and a considerable number of artists and
writers who applauded him.
There were only a few of us who fought
the imposition of the War Measures Act.
Those who assented — I didn't talk to some
of those people for years. It seemed such a
betrayal of the very fabric of what it is what-
we were about, to enlarge people's freedom,
not to limit it.
Trudeau under pressure, to which he will
have to answer to his own conscience and
his own sense of vetoes, caved in too easily.
But it can't be criticized as a political act. I
think today his determination to entrench
basic fundamental rights arises directly out of
October 1970.
The entire attempt by the Liberal government to diffuse the power of the police
department through the MacDonald Commission is an example of an attempt to cope
quite realistically with the problem of the
growing police force.
There are more police per agitant than
there are in dictatorships. It's an astonishing
statistic.
PF: How much support were you getting
for your views on the War Measures Act in
October TO?
Lapierre: Not very much. There was
some support from leftist groups, but for
their own political purposes. What shocked
me in October 70 was that civil rights and
human liberties could not be seen outside of
partisan, petty politics. That turned me off
politics for the rest of my life.
Ifs when die circumstances test men, is
when you can see how men take them
seriously. There were very few people who
could look at human rights and liberties and
say: 'That's a condition of my goddam life, I
have not assented to this, what's happening
here?"
Most people looked at the rights of the
state to be primordial.
PF: Do you think even with an entrenched
bill of rights the same abuse of power could
re-occur?
Lapierre: Yes, it could. It could by increasing the powers of the police or closing
its eyes to the dower of the police, caving in
to the powers of the police. It could at the
same time make exceptions for the suspension of these rights and we have to guard
ourselves against that.
I think that an emergency can be made only upon the assent of parliament, and I know
that that causes a delay. However, we don't
need anymore to have people in parliament
to debate. An MP should be equipped at
home to have audio-visual direct links with
the House of Commons so they can still participate in debate if they are away. We have
the technology for that.
LAPIERRE . . . distrusts civil authorities
It's absurd that they have to go to this
house that was built in the 19th century and
perform their talk there. There's no reason to
say we have to act quickly. It's as difficult to
get 26 members or 32 cabinet members in
one room as it is to get 275 or 290 MP's
across the country, with the chief justice as
the protector. I think there has to be person completely immune and detached. That
will prevent abuse from taking place.
If we are also on our guard and entrench a
bill of rights then we'll have to be careful how
it is written in the constitution that it can
supercede. If parliament gives with one hand
and takes away with the other we will just
have to laugh them out.
PF: Do you think the basic nature of Canadian police forces has changed since the October Crisis?
Lapierre: No, the abuse of power we have
heard through the MacDonald commission
and the ravenous demands by the police
chiefs for more power — no doubt about it
— the police haven't learned a goddamn
thing.
When the police are asked to police the
moral fibre of society the end result is abuse
and more of our laws tend to deal with personal, basic morality while murder and death
are not moral issues. Pornography is immoral
but the protection of that is the individual's
task, not society's.
PF: Do you agree with a recently released
Quebec government report that suggest
Pierre Laporte's death was accidental and if
so, is that important?
Lapierre: The death of Pierre Laporte I've
always felt to be an accident. It doesn't make
any difference. It was not in the purvue of
the people who kidnapped Laporte, it must
have been an accident of some sort.
However, the condition of his incarceration
created a violent act that made anything
possible.
Those who deprived him of his liberty are
as guilty of his death as of his kidnapping,
perhaps not legally — but morally.
What they did was immoral and
abominable and was in no way a political act,
it was an act against the basic tenets of
society.
PF: Do you think any official changes in
attitude towards the October Crisis will take
place on the 10th anniversary of its occurence?
Lapierre: I suppose Mr. Cross will be
brought out again and somebody will put a
wreath on Mr. Laporte's grave. I think that
what should take place is for the people who
took the decision to impose the War
Measures Act, the people who demanded it,
the police who participated in it, and the people who kidnapped Mr. Laporte and those
who created the condition where violence
was the only answer that people had, should
ask themselves the question whether they
did not also kill Laporte.
It's all very well to blame the Roses, and
the Simards but there is a moral dimension to
that and how society responds to a crisis.
This idea of being macho and never giving
in to terrorists is an absurdity but I understand it's practiced by everyone in the world.
My first consideration would be to save the
people and then deal with the terrorists. If
that incident leads to another and precedents
are created perhaps the government ought to
look in their own backyard.
PF: Do you think the rise of the Parti
Quebecois has channeled off some of the
frustration that might otherwise have fueled
the FLQ?
Lapierre: No. I think the FLQ was part
and parcel of the terrorism of the times. It
was part of the political activity arising out of
the sixties. It was a perversion of a very noble
aspiration.
The battle for civil rights in the U.S. had no
terrorism attached to it. There was very little
violence except for those who were opposed
to it.
Terrorism is a reaction against nobility and
was an act that was accepted in the sixties as
a political statement. Many of us then, including myself, deluded ourselves into thinking there was some nobility in it. It doesn't
take much reflection to realize that was sheer
sentimentality on our part.
You change society by changing the
hearts of men and pooling their resources to
create a new society.
Page Friday 2
THE    U BYSS EY
Friday, October 17,1980 \history\
Are B.G's
scrap yards
and fields
any place for
our aviation
heritage to
end?
By KENNETH SWARTZ
In some parts of the world
aviation history is housed in
museums. In B.C. historic
aircraft are active and flying.
But the question remains:
will the richness of B.C.'s
aviation heritage be preserved for future generations?
One wonders.
Powered flight came to
Canada on February 23,
1909, when the Silver Dart
left the icy surface of Bad-
deck Bay, Nova Scotia.
Since that day aviation has
grown to play a significant
part in the development, exploration and protection of
Canada, not to mention
transportation. It has also
been a place of industrial innovation and an outlet for
romantic fancy.
It was for these reasons, and the
desperate realization that other nations were slowly claiming our
aviation artifacts, that in the early
1970's a group of Vancouver enthusiasts came together in an effort
to preserve as many as possible of
those aircraft and artifacts
representing Canada's rich and colourful aviation history.
In the back of their minds, these
enthusiasts remember the unfortunate legacy of aircraft preservation in Canada. The Silver Dart was
junked; the Avro Jetliner, North
America's first jetliner, was scrapped; and all traces of the advanced
Avro Arrow, from aircraft-to-
blueprints-to research data, was
destroyed (an episode that still
haunts Canada's industrial and
defence policy, 20 years later).
Added to this was the growing
activity of British and American
museums seeking acquisitions in
Canada. There was a cause for
legitimate concern and a reason for
action..
Aviation exploits in B.C. began in
early 1910 when an American airman, Charles K. Hamilton,
displayed his Curtiss-type pusher
biplane before a crowd of 3,500 at
Richmond's Minoru Park race
track. This was quickly followed in
September 1910 by the flight of the
indigenously designed and built
Gibson Twin-Plane from a field
north of Victoria.
In subsequent years local Minoru
and Hastings Park race tracks were
the sites of many local first flights;
aviation   highlights  in  Vancouver
during these early days were the N
country's first parachute jump from «
an aircraft, over Hastings Park in s
1912 and the first flight by a woman ~
pilot, Alys Bryant, in 1913. »
In 1919, Vancouver became the |
focus for the first official airmail
flight between the points in Canada
and the USA; on March 3rd an
American Eddie Hubbard, with W.
E. Boeing, president of the Boeing
Company, as passenger, departed
from Vancouver harbour in an early
Boeing C3 seaplane. The B.C. connection with the Boeing Company
was to continue for a further 25
years; in altered form right up to the
present day.
The Royal Canadian Air Force
came to B.C. in 1923 and with it,
the establishment of a seaplane
base at Jericho Beach, not far from
the present UBC Campus. Jericho
Beach was one of the first RCAF
airstations and the home of aviation
activity until the end of the Second
World War.
Jericho Beach was also to
become the focus of the first attempts to establish a home for a
local aviation museum.
With the decision to establish a
B.C. based aviation museum questions arose concerning the form it
should take. Eventually, in 1977,
two museum societies were incorporated; the Pacific Aviation
Museum would be for indoor
display and archives, and the Canadian Museum of Flight and
Transportation was to pursue the
establishment of a flying collection.
A provincial government decision
to dispense with the former military
GRUMMAN AVENGERS . . . waterbombers at Abbotsford that are now extinct in Western Canada though
one can be found at Duxford, England.
the place of assembly and first flight
of 17 Blackburn Sharks, biplane
torpedo-bombers, aircraft licence-
built by Boeing of Canada at their
factory at Georgia and Denman.
The locaton was close to tourist
traffic and accessible by water
(allowing exhibitions to be barged
in). The provincial and later,
municipal governments, were
unreceptive to the museum
organizer's overtures and the rest of
Jericho's fate is history.
Aviation on the west coast has
always had unique aspects. Vancouver's close proximity to the
mountains and ocean make bush
flying feasible within 10 miles of the
city's core.
A west coast aviation museum
should reflect regional interests,
local aviation artifacts and an international dimension. However the
main obstacle to establishing a
museum is not a shortage of artifacts but a lack of space and the
need for a permanent home.
Over the past three years both
local museum groups have tried to
seek government and indusry support for a permanent home. It was
ultimately the need for a united
BOLINGBROKES
over B.C. in 1942, will they return?
property at Jericho Beach, with its
hangars became a rallying point.
Jericho Beach would have made
an ideal home for an aviation
museum. It was an historic site: one
of the first established air facilities
in Canada. During the '20's and
'30's government aircraft had
departed from Jericho on fishery
patrols and taken early photo-
surveys of B.C. In 1939 it had been
front that lead to the merger of the
two groups last month under the
umbrella of the Canadian Museum
of Flight and Transportation. Now,
with a collection of more than 30
aircraft, the need for a home is even
more acute, particularly since airport managers see the museum's
aircraft, stored at their airports, as
junk or eyesores.
Currently the collection rests at a
farm at Crescent Beach. On northern Vancouver Island, the
museum's PB4Y 2 Privateer
bomber awaits barge transporation
and a place to accommodate its
wing span.
At Fort St. John a group of UBC
students and local aviation buffs
have been preparing the museum's
52 foot long helicopter, a Vertol
H-21 "flying banana" for road
transport to Vancouver. And just
like all fishing expeditions, conversation ultimately comes around to
those that got away.
British and American aircraft collectors were active- in Canada long
before efforts came about to
establish a local museum. During
this period the national aeronautical
collection was dominant, and practically the only, aviation museum in
Canada; a country that has the second largest collection of private
and commercial aircraft population
in the western world.
The NAC's resources and
priorities were firmly set and consequently few were in a position to
object to dozens of aircraft leaving
the country. Airworthy examples
are the most missed; the first jetliner to break the sound barrier, a
CP Air DC-8 retired last year; the
Supermarine Stranraer flying-boat,
once of RCAF Jericho Beach, and
later of Queen Charlotte Airlines
(the forrunner to Pacific Western)
now rests in the RAF Museum in
London.
The last airworthy Lancaster
bomber in Canada left Edmonton in
recent years for a collection in
Scotland. Dozens of relics. Hurricane fighters, B-24 Liberators,
Tiger Moths trainers, Harvards and
dozens of Harvard trainers lay in
prairie fields where they had been
salvaged for useful parts after the
war.
In 1976 only two aircraft were
slated for preservation in B.C.!
Several other aircraft or local
significance rested thankfully in Ottawa. Yet many rare and historic
aircraft were working, active and
still commercially valuable to thier
owners. These included a wide
range of war time aircraft used for
firebombers: Grumman TBM
Avenger torpedo-bombers and
Douglas A-26 Invaders both at Abbotsford; Second world-war vintage Catalina and flying boats at
Victoria and the Port Alberni based
Martin Mars.
Oh, the Catilana'sand Mars. During the last war, Boeing of Canada
built 362 Catalina's at Sea Island,
home of the present airport. These
aircraft served, and continue to
serve around the world as water
bombers, rescue aircraft, and company hacks.
By comparison the Martin Mars,
built in 1946 as a troop transport for
the American Navy is the largest
operational flying boat, rivalled only
by the Hughes Flying Boat (unofficially the Spruce Goose). The
wing span is 200 feet, the length
of a city block, the two story interior is as big as a 15 room house,
its water carrying capacity is 600C
gallons, but like the TBMs (which
are gone), the A-26, and the
Catilina, the preservation of a Martin Mars is not assured.
The list of worthy aircraft for
preservation is long. Some are still
active, some are derilict, others rest
on the mountains and in the lakes
where they crashed long ago. The
fate of others is unknown.
The last Grumman Goose built,
occasionaly flys over the UBC campus. A British-built Twin Pioneer
with a history of service in the Imperial flight of the Iranian airforce,
sits derelict at Ross River Yukon,
waiting to be transported to a
museum or scrapped. Vickers and
Fokker flying boats were recently
salvaged from their northern B.C.
crash sites by a Winnipeg museum
after resting, untouched for 50
years. And what did become of the
Sopwith Camel, the type Billy
Bishop flew, that lingered on the
UBC campus for years unknown.
The Canadian Museum of Flight
and Transportation has more than
300 members in B.C.; it owns more
than 30 aircraft and helicopters.
Other artifacts include old engines,
parts and accessories. Members
have been actively searching the
world for additions to the collec-
tons, others have interviewed
oldtimers while still others have
copied and collected old
photographs.
Many of the museum's aircraft
need restoration, including a Hurricane fighter. Tiger Moth trainer
and Norseman bush-plane. Others
are airworthy; such as a De
Havilland Leopard and Hornet Moth
biplanes of 1930's vintage, 1930
Waco INF Sport Biplane and a
former RCAF Fleet Finch biplane.
A rise of the future collection will
be a wooden twin-engine De
Havilland Mosquito fighter and a
Westland Lysander "spy plane".
Other aircraft have been promised if
a home is found.
The museum needs members
who can sponsor specific retoration
projects, assist in acquisition and
transport of artifacts. Members to
join special collection expeditions to
all parts of North America. Hikers
and divers could especially assist in
recover programs. A home at reactivated Boundry Bay airport is being
sought.
If your interested in applying your
talents to a local project that has
romance, adventure, and a love of
aircraft and flying wrapped up into
one you can reach the museum office at 592-4031 or by writing 11040
Cambie Road, Richmond, V6X 1L2.
The Page Friday cover this week
is a photograph of a Westiand
Lysander 'spy-plane'. It is currendy
stored at Crescent Beach near
White Rock. The Canadian
Museum of Flight and Transportation hopes to have it airborne by
1982.
Friday, October 17,1980
THE   UBYSSEY
Page Friday 3 \ photography]
This week's photo essay is by Alice Thompson, BFA 4. Aspiring Cartier-
Bressons are invited to submit their efforts anytime to Page Friday for
consideration.
Page Friday 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 17,1980 \images\
Goya etchings
depict horrors
of revolution
By HEATHER CONN
A nude male torso hangs lashed
to a tree, its severed head impaled
on a branch as sliced-off arms
dangle uselessly. An old woman
carries food to the starving, lying
heaped against a wall like dead
leaves . . .
Mouth gaping in pain, a man's
head lunges forward, the enemy's
rope around his neck choking his
last breath. A lone woman stands
on dead and wounded bodies to
load a cannon and blast the foe.
Such are the combined horrors
and dignity of human revolution, as
poingnantly depicted in the etchings of Spanish artist Francisco
Goya. His 80 plates, on display at
the Vancouver art gallery until Oct.
26, portray the anguish and agony
of the Spanish people who fought
Joseph Bonaparte and the French
in a war of independence from
1808-14.
The Spanish waged a battle
against famine and brutality, one in
which 20,000 people died of starvation. Goya captures the contempt
towards the French in his plate entitled: "But they are of another
breed:" a smug French officer
dressed in rich uniform surveys a
group of dying bodies, visually condemning their feebleness while a
Spaniard, gaunt and skeletal, stares
out vacantly, drained of life.
The artist strikingly conveys the
plague of typhus fever which struck
i;'"' s>^te*
Spain in 1809, killing an average of
350 people daily. One man, with a
crazed expression and hair standing
on end, vomits over the piled
bodies of his comrades, long since
dead from lack of medicine and
food.
Spanish soldiers can be seen
stripping their dead to gain much-
needed clothing and supplies.
Spanish civilians hide their faces in
grief, unable to bear the sight of
dead soldiers in the plate entitled:
"Bury them and keep quiet." In
another, a child runs weeping after
her mother, who lies dead in the
arms of strangers.
Amidst the starvation, Goya's
titles evoke the sense of futility expressed by the Spanish: "There is
no one to help them"; "It's no use
crying out" and "Oh what use is
one cup?" But even in such
desperate times, human dignity
must always prevail, suggests the
artist with his caption Le Peor Es
Pedir (The worst is to beg.)
In contrast, the French soldiers
always appear savage in this series
entitled "fatal consequences of
Spain's bloody war with
Bonaparte. And other striking
caprichos ..." They are the killers,
the torturers, the plunderers. In one
scene of barbarism, French soldiers
hold a nude prisoner upside down,
about to slash off his testicles with
a sword.
Such crudely compelling events
in stark surroundings are a far cry
from the plush interiors and plump
figures in Goya's paintings such as
the Maja Nude; his portraits of the
Spanish royal family done while he
was the king's principal painter are
intense but they reveal no heart-
rendering suffering or violent
human struggle.
Only his painting Saturn Devouring One of His Children with its
chewable and unsettling blood-red
body can surpass the etchings in
vivid horror. In this series, Goya's
etchings are severe and gripping.
Fanged vampires gorge themselves
on dead Spaniards as wolves deal
evil pacts with the people.
The artist's use of aquatint allows
heightened contracts of light and
dark. Shadows effectively convey
darkness or evil and his scenes are
simple and uncluttered. Behind the
detailed human figures might be a
simple tree, clouds, archway or
tower; these never detract from his
plates' immediacy of war and
human tragedy.
Etching involves the inscribing or
etching of a design into a metal
plate, which is then placed in acid
Resucitara? (Will she live again?)
shows Truth, embodied in a
woman, sending out light rays to
a darkened circle of people around
her. A single man,.his mouth gagged so he can't be heard, kneels
before Truth, absorbing her light.
The artist makes satiric stabs at
the Church and State, depicting
priests, many of whom left their
monasteries before the French invasion, as wide-eyed, confused souls
lost in the outside world.
His most obvious denunciation of
the Church is his etching Que
Locura! (What madness!); here, an
obese monk, spoon in hand, lifts
to deepen the design's etched
grooves. The length of time in the
acid determines the depth of each
groove and its subsequent ability to
fill with ink.
Ink is then applied to the plate,
wiped off so it only fills the
grooves, and then put through a
press with the finished print paper
on top. On the print, the deepest
grooves will come out darkest, the
most shallow grooves the lightest.
Women are seen taking an active
role in the cause of war in these etchings. They directly engage in
fighting or support and encourage
the men in their goal of independence. Goya has one woman
clutching a baby in her left hand,
while with her right she stabs a man
in the pelvis with a cannon rod.
Meanwhile, in the same plate,
another woman lifts a large rock
above her head, preparing to heave
it at an enemy soldier.
Goya depicts the Spanish hero
Agostina, who in long simple dress
and dark flowing hair, takes over for
fallen soldiers to fire a cannon during the French seige of Zaragoza in
July 1808. Elsewhere, women bear
swords and knives, protecting each
other against attacking men.
His    last    plate    entitled    Si
his habit and squats to defecate,
surrounded by devotional pictures
and a row of hooded figures.
Art critic Bernard Berenson said
of Goya in 1932: "Here in Goya is
the beginning of our modern anarchy."
Goya likely chose the latter satire
following Ferdinand VM's return to
Madrid in 1814, when the monarch
reopened and paid compensation to
every existing monastic settlement.
The religious payments drained
Spain economically and even the
Pope saw that they were unnecessary and unjustified.
Although Goya created the plates
for this series during and after the
war of independence, they were
not printed until after his death in
1828. In 1863 they were published
for the first time by the Real
Academia de Nobles Artes de San
Fernando and given the title: "Los
Desastres de la Guerra."
Included with Goya's works are
nine large color etchings of British
artist Frank Bragwyn (1867-1956)
using rough detail and shadows to
portray the anonymity of workers in
industrial England.
Friday, October 17,1980
THE    UBYSSEY
Page Friday 5 Cinematheque satisfies film freaks
By JENNIFER RYAN
Is film the first love of your life?
Are foreign language films your
driving passion? If so, you probably
know of Pacific Cinematheque
already.
If you don't. Pacific Cinematheque is a non-profit film organization that has been operating in Vancouver since 1972. The core program is in the National Film Board
theatre. A film classics series is
shown in the Varsity Theatre on
Sunday afternoons. Cinematheque
has a year's experimental contract
with the Centennial Museum
theatre and they use the Robson
Square theatre for special events.
Cinematheque shows about 300
films a year.
"We show films that aren't otherwise available, such as documentaries," says programmer Russell
Wodell.
Cinematheque acquires some
films from the Canadian Film Institute. Other films come from consulates. This summer's Japanese
and Italian film series were co-
sponsored by the Japanese and
Italian consulates. Cinematheque is
in contact with other film societies
in the U.S. and Europe and gets
more films from them.
Most of the films are shown in
series that try to highlight a
thematic connection. Two years
ago Cinematheque ran a series of
every film made by German director
CUSO
Tuesday
October 21
12:30- 1:30
McMillan 158
KEN SHIPLEY
Manager of Canadian
Operations will give
information on CUSO
postings overseas in
Agriculture and Engineering.
Further information — 228-4886
Frunch
lessons*
rfrunch-as in Fr  'ay
J? lunch. 15 class.c burgers,
tons of other great stuff.
Intriguing starts, fabulous
desserts. 11:30 on-7 days a
week. Yum. 2966 W. 4th Ave.
and Bayswater.
Fassbinder.    Other   series
grouped by nationality or star.
are
"These are not films just for
entertainment but for historical interest. This is why we do series,"
says spokeswoman Mary Jane
Cowan.
The films aren't always in the
best condition, especially if they are
old or rare prints.
"We never know when we get a
film what is going to be a good print
or bad. For people who are really interested in film they want to see it
anyway," Cowan says.
Cinematheque has a library of
film classics as well as books and
periodicals. There are fifty films in
the library. It included a special collection of films by west coast film
makers and an archive of films produced in B.C. Cinematheque rents
films to colleges and universities.
They also bulk rent films to small
theatres throughout B.C.
"It's a way of encouraging people to form their own film
societies," says Cowan.
Money    is    a    problem    for
Cinematheque. Their funds come
from the Canada Council, B.C.
Cultural Fund, the City of Vancouver and the National Film
Board. Cinematheque applied to
the B.C. Cultural Fujid for $21,000
and got $10,000. The program was
cut back by exactly one salary so
they are short staffed. They
therefore have enough money for
operating expenses but no capital
with which to buy new equipment.
According to Wodell,
Cinematheque is just breaking
even.
"We're devoted to film as an
educational medium and as an international language. We're not interested in commercial aspects."
Cinematheque's five dollar
membership fee helps keep the
society on its feet. But it has
another, equally important purpose. Because Cinematheque is a
membership society they don't
have to submit their films to the
B.C. censorship board.
A year ago Cinematheque hoped
to have the new Robson Square
theatre as its permanent home. This
is the only government owned,
public access theatre that has both
thirty-five and sixty mm. equipment. However the request was
denied.
"The government thought we
would be monopolizing," said
Cowan. Cinematheque applies for
use of the Robson Square theatre
like any other group and uses it for
special events.
"They want to make money like
anyone else. Their position is
perfectly consistent from their point
of view," said Wodell.
Cinematheque is still looking for
a new home. The eighty-two seat
National Film Board theatre requires that members and one guest
per member only be admitted.
There are plans for a new theatre on
Granville Island but this is "two
years down the road."
After you buy the five dollar
membership you can see most of
the Cinematheque's films for two
dollars. Probably a good buy for
anyone who takes films seriously.
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299-3344
Open 7Days A Week 10a.m.-5p.m. — Thur. & Fri. til9p.m.
(block east of PNE & Macdonalds)
Back To College Contest
Winners
1st prize — Mens — John Quinton, 4th yr. Science
1st prize — Womens — Betty Cameron, 2nd yr. Law
3rd prize — Barbara Norell, 2nd yr. Commerce
4th prize — Doug Hansen, 2nd yr. Arts
Congratulations to the winners & thank you to all the
students that entered and made the contest a big success.
The one-of-a-kind on-campus student store.
HOURS Lower Floor - Student Union Bldg.
Monday-Friday 9 a.m.-8 p.m. or) -   1Q1 1
Saturday 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Z+C.H- I C7 I I
Page Friday 6
THE    U BYSSEY
Friday, October 17,1980 \film\
Woody Allen falls flat on his face
By JULIE WHEELWRIGHT
Annie Hall was really entertaining, Manhattan was good but it
lacked the warmth and humor of
A.H., and now Woody Allen gives
us Stardust Memories, and it's
lukewarm.
Allen plays the same neurotic
character, obsessed with the problems in his love life and feeling
frustrated with his job. It's getting
boring and difficult to watch.
Stardust Memories
Playing at the Vancouver Centre
Cinema
Directed by Woody Allen
Sandy Bates (Allen), is a successful film director, lured into
spending a weekend at the Stardust
hotel, (hence the title) where his
movies are shown to a select group
of film buffs and Bates conducts
question and answer periods with
the audience. Needless to say Bates
is the star attraction of the
weekend.
Throughout the film there are
clips from Bates' films, flashbacks
from his childhood and recollections of his relationship with his
former co-vivant Dory (Charlotte
Rampling). While some of these
scenes are amusing they create a
sense of disorder and confusion.
The development of the plot
drags out and once again Allen is
left grappling with the problem of
the women in his life. He's left Dory
and now Isabelle (Marie-Christine
Barrault) has left her husband and
ALLEN . . . funny absurdist turns pretentious bore.
Bates tries to convince her to come
and live with him.
In a revealing conversation with
his sister, played by Anne De Salvo,
Bates admits the reason he is attracted to Isabelle is because she is
French, "and that's very romantic."
His other lover. Dory, is admitted to
—Get the
Power
^Z^/^ m
^'S/'
a psychiatric ward after she breaks
up with Allen, but we learn later in
the movie that she is living in
Hawaii and is "making it."
The third encounter that Allen
makes is with a violinist for the New
York Philharmonic played by
Jessica Harper. For a man who, in
his earlier films, expressed a
distaste for such meaningless verbiage as 'neat/ and 'keen' it is surprising to be inundated with lines
like "you're so beautiful," and
"why don't we run away together."
Harper is the victim of both cliches
but she declines Allen's offer.
His treatment of women goes
beyond his old bounds and in one
scene where he visits his sister, interrupting her yoga class, he makes
fun of a bruised woman as she explains how she was attacked and
beaten by a gang of thieves the
week before.
Perhaps it was the particular audience but the women's description
of her attack and bondage brought
laughs from the audience. This
casual mention of violence against
women is hard to dismiss. The
women in this film overall are
reduced to mere trophies for Bates
to pursue.
There is a gritty quality to this
black and white film that borders on
ugliness. The people who follow
the famous director Bates clamoring for his attention and autograph
are lewd, fawning, and treated
without sympathy.
The problem Bates faces is his inability to make funny movies
because he "sees too much tragedy
in the world." The people in his film
reflect that frustration. Yet Bates
does nothing to relieve the suffering he sees, he just creates it in his
own relationships with people.
The warmth, humor and insight
that made Annie Hall a success are
almost totally lacking in this latest
effort by Allen. Everyone
throughout this film keeps urging
Bates to go back to his earlier, funnier types of films. Maybe Allen will
take this advice to heart and stop
churning out this continuing soap
opera about rich, neurotic. New
York artists. It's getting dull.
Stunt man assaults senses
By SHAFFIN SHARIFF
The Stunt Man, starring Peter
O'Toole, is a high-speed, off-the-
track rollercoaster of a movie. From
frame one. The Stunt Man is a
vigorous assault on our senses, a
rapid succession of startling, exciting images.
The point of view in The Stunt
Man belongs to Cameron (Steve
Railsback), a wanted criminal on
Since The Stunt Man retains the
subjective point of view, we see
things as Cameron sees them, in a
violent, confused state of mind. We
gasp in horror as a war scene being
filmed on a beach turns into a
bloody massacre, only to realize a
few minutes later that what we
have just seen is part of the
wonderful art of movie magic.
We are continuously being trick-
While the camerawork and direction of the stunt scenes are great,
the performances, for the most
part, are not. Railsback tries to
communicate an intensity that he
does not have. It's an empty, one-
expression piece of acting stretched
to the breaking point. He is a rehash
of the Charles Manson personality,
and it doesn't work here.
Barbara Hershey also appears in
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RAILSBACK . . . flys under Peter O'Toole's machiavellian umbrella.
the run who finds shelter under the
machiavellian umbrella of Eli Cross
(Peter O'Toole), a film director
making an anti-war movie.
The Stunt Man
Directed by Richard Rush
Playing at Denman Place
But what are Cross' motives in
protecting Cameron? Is Cross a
savior who wants to help Cameron
or a cunning sadist planning
elaborate, dangerous stunts to
crush Cameron? Cameron is never
sure. He is trapped in a world of
make-believe, wondering whether
his next stunt will also be his last.
ed this way. Unrelated frames and
scenes are intercut, giving a completely false impression of the unfolding events. Just when we think
that we have the movie down pat,
director Richard Rush pulls the rug
from under us.
Rush plunges us into a world in
which there are no absolutes;
judgements are meaningless. What
appears real one moment becomes
a mirage the next.
The Stunt Man is without question a director's movie. With intricate skill, he invites us into his
parlor where he weaves action
shots with clever camera angles
and cinematic techniques.
this film and it's a wasted effort.
The movie seems to slip into quicksand when she's on the screen.
Both Railsback and Hershey are
limited actors in poorly written
roles.
The exception is Peter O'Toole,
who rises above the material and
maintains his larger-than-life
character.
The Stunt Man provides good
stunts, an off-beat performance
from Peter O'Toole, and a
reasonably good time. Read
anything more into this film and it
crumbles.
Friday, October 17,1980
THE    UBYSSEY
Page Friday 7 \music\
Doobies in form for cool crowd
By STEVE PALMER
The Coliseum was dry...surprising the Doobies ever got rocking
with paper cut-outs for an audience... impossible sea of still
forms in the face of a professional
dance band...so dry for the longest
time...but the band did finally
groove a response out of the silent
masses...took off on an R&B
tangent...thanks be to Tiran Porter
(the rhythm) and Cornelius Dum-
pus (the blues)...once Hughey,
Dewie and the Louie's (or
something unfortunately similar)
were dead and buried — where was
this opening act dredged up from
anyway? — the Doobies appear and
start in loud and lousy...the opening number so bad it can't really be
them...but, yes, Mike McDonald is
up behind the keyboards dispensing cream from the tonsils...Patrick
Simmons with a haircut — respectable for a change...instead McFee
looks like the hippy — hair down to
his ass...yeah, it's the Doobie
Brothers alright, but what's the
matter?...they just go through the
motions for a few songs...old ones,
new ones — no energy...hard to
get worked up in front of an au
dience more suited to a Nana
Mouskouri concert...no one standing up...no one dancing...no one
screeching approval...all cowed
passively into their reserved seats
and doling out the mandatory
applause between numbers . . .
whatever happened to rock concerts? . . . maybe eleven dead in
Cincinatti, man, there were ten
thousand dead at the Coliseum
the other night...only thing that
keeps the Doobies from out-right
mediocrity through all this is Tiran
Porter, the bassist...looking like an
Angolan guerilla in army cap and
black shades...sly smile on his
face...forces the rest to at least
adhere to his right-on
rhythms...he's patient and waits a
long time for the others to catch
up...they do eventually...Simmons
decides it's time to kick the crowd
in the ass.. .jumps off the stage with
his antenna guitar and weaves his
solo through the aisles . . .
unbelievablel everyone's on
their feet at last and going
wild...Simmons sprints back...big
grin now...leaps onto the stage and
the boys get going on some good
old    fashioned    L.A.    cruisin'
music..."without love, where
would you be right now, na na
now"...Cornelius lays out a few
soul sermons with his
saxophone...the light show
beautiful like sunshine through the
trees...rays askew and streaming
down on the drummers who are
really pounding piss out of their
skins now...the Doobies are
everything all of a sudden...
southern soul rockin' jazz men
laced with a squirt of smooth
blues...the/re trading vocal spots
and throwing around licks that
mesh the tunes at the seams.. .finally into it...but the masses are still
fearful of the fascists in the blue
blazers and can't bring themselves
to boogie...up on stage the Doobs
are in the blissful middle of "Shinin'
on"...then into motorcycle gospel
"hold on, hold tight"...cool off
momentarily with a clean and sunny
blue-grass duet right back into
some funky dixie-land, "pretty
mama gonna take you by the
hand"...soon after this they disappear and the crowd finally
understands they're going to have
to defy the fascists if they want the
Doobies back...they're on their feet
Life just a long movie
By EVAN GILL
Anyone who has not seriously
considered the fact that their life is
an ongoing movie is simply not in
touch with reality.
To this end, and after careful
observation of the lack of crazed
creativity in this land of ivory,
literature, and serious people in
professional faculties, I have come
up with a series of proposals to add
a little color to your life.
For starters, you can be your
own video artist without the trouble
of cameras and such technological
trappings. The next time you are
walking meditatively past the
skylights of Sedgewick Library,
watch your image in the mirrored
surfaces. You will notice that as
you move by, each surface will
reflect a slightly different angle of
your body. It is somewhat like watching a film that is running in slow
motion. However, if you prefer fast
paced movies, you can jog by. This
simple activity, available free of
charge to anyone, answers that
eternal question: what does my ass
look like between classes?
The romance of lush films dealing
with turn of the century social
events like balls can be captured by
a trip to SUB cafeteria at noon. All
you have to do is walk into the
crowd looking for someone. It is
really not necessary that there be a
specific goal to this quest. But it is
essential that you are earnest in
your search. Study the people who
look up at you from their lunch.
Smile at strangers. If you do see someone that you know and care to
visit, greet them. Join their table
and become part of the throbbing
scene. If the visit comes to naught,
you can fade out slowly and go
directly to the skylights above
Sedgewick Library.
Finally, I have a couple of little
hints that will help you with the
realization of your stardom in this
sea of hams. Swear at. inappropriate times. At first this will
shock. But I have found that in time
swearing effectively neutralizes the
words used.
Last but not least, offend. This
can be accomplished in many excusable ways. Light a cigarette in
class. This can backfire when you
realize that the majority of the class
are in fact addicts and the lecture is
drowned out by the clicking of bics.
But all is not lost. As you sit in the
smoke filled room think about the
gangster movies from the forties
and fifties.
There are a plethora of ideas that
can be used to realize the potential
film value of your life. The key
points to remember are: observe
closely and never miss a cue. We
are all allowed at least 15 minutes
on the world stage. Think about
that and maybe you too will be able
to remember the way you weren't.
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DOOBIES . . . doobie-doo, wan-wan with audience
and jamming into the aisles...the
music comes back to life
briefly...encore: boogie
freely..."oh, oh, oh, listen to the
music"... and things are really
underway at last...but too late.. .the
Doobies are gone again and the killjoys in the control room turn the
house lights on to quell any further
enjoyment... the Doobie Bothers
were hot but the Coliseum was so
cold...performance spontaneity
croaked along with those eleven
rock 'n rollers crushed by inefficient
ushers and a dangerously late
sound check...lament for the death
of my rock...
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•■—S,. .WARNING:!
Frequent gory violence. B.C. Director!
j SHOWTIMES: 2:15
(4:00 5:50 7:50 9:45
VOGUE
918   GRANVILLE
685  5434
ERROR
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SHOWTIMES: 2:00 3:40 5:40 7:40 9:40
A battle beyond time...
beyond space.
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951   GRANVILLE
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ROBERT THOMAS
GEORGE PEPPARD
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WARNING: Frequent I
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'SHOWTIMES: 2:001	
4:00 6:00 8:00 10:00    851  GRANVILLE      ■
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SHOWTIMES: 7:30 9:30
(MATURE) WARNING: Some coarse lang-
^^"■■"■■^  uage. B.C. Director ^
cofctt
AMBIE at  18th
WALTER MATTHAU • GLENDA JACKSON
(GENERAL) WARNING:Occasional
^ ' coarse language.   B.C.
Director
OLIVIA NEWTON-JOHN • GENE KELLY
(MATURE) WARNING: Not suitable for children. Frequent coarse language and swearing;
satire on drugs and swearing. B.C. Director
DROAdwAV 1
)7   W. BROADWAY
8741927
SHOWTIMES: 7:15
9:15 fe
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BURT REYNOLDS • JACKIE GLEASON
(MATURE) WARNING:   Frequent   coarse
language. B.C. Director
SHOWTIMES: 7:30 9:X
DROAtlVVAy 2
70 7 W   BROADWAY!
8741927
(DUTCH W/ENG. SUB.)
(MATURE) WARNING: Some gory
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224-3730 SUNDAY MATINEE 2 p.m. only - John Ford's "The Man
4375 w. ioth     Who Shot Liberty Valance" (1962)
Soldier Of
Orange
Page Friday 8
THE   U BYSSEY
Friday, October 17,1960 \drama-film\
Tom Williams needs no introduction
By MERRILEE ROBSON
It was a less rowdy audience than
a rock concert's. Tweed and strings
of pearls were more in evidence
than leather and safety pins. But
the genteel crowd still line up two
hours early and pushed into the lecture hall to see Tennessee Williams.
Spectators filled lecture hall 2 of
the Woodward Instructional
Resources Centre and overflowed
into two other rooms where television screens made it possible to
share at least partly in the experience.
Williams was introduced as "a
man who needs no introduction."
The author of A Streetcar Named
Desire and Cat on a Hot Tin Roof
had managed to attract the crowd
with only the usual Vancouver Institute publicity.
The title of the evening's program was 'Tennessee Williams,
Readings and Discourse.' Williams
began by reading some poetry that,
due to his cold and the level of the
sound system, was impossible to
hear.
The sound was louder for the second piece, a longish short story. It
describes a man who wakes in the
morning to find his wife gone from
their bed. Throughout the day he
searches for her as the story
touches on their past together,
their friendships, and the beauty of
their now-gone youth.
The man, advised by a magazine
article to dress his blues away, sets
out in a white suit, sure of his splendour until he sees himself in a store
window. Then, shocked by the odd
way the jacket stands out behind
him, and suddenly noticing that
none of the women are looking at
him, he retreats to the home of a
friend where he is further
humiliated.
His wife finally returns, as
dismayed by her day alone as he
has been.
The story was engrossing —
touching and humorous. It was
read in a slow, southern voice that,
though the story was set in New
York, made you think of warm,
semi-tropical days.
After the readings the audience
was given the opportunity to ask
questions, presumably an opportunity to get to know Williams. He
was whisked through the other two
rooms and past the crowds in the
main lobby, so that those people
could see him.
Some of the audience's questions ranged from the uninspired to
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2
the ridiculous. Williams was aked
about his favorite play. It's Streetcar Named Desire, followed by Cat
on a Hot Tin Roof.
Williams was asked what he was
currently working on. He was
writing his newest play, called the
Fruit Bat's Droppings, in a non-
naturalistic style and he had just
decided that he can't write that
way. So the play has to be rewritten.
His play The Red Devil Battery
Sign opens at the Vancouver
Playhouse Saturday. They've been
having probelms with the actors'
union about the number of nonequity student actors in the production. Williams said he had been trying to keep out of the dispute.
Williams got his start as a
playwright in 1939 when he won a
special award for American Blues, a
group of one-act plays. After that
he started to receive letters from
agents. One wrote to him that she
was not interested in serious plays
but she was looking for a good
'vehicle.' Williams wrote back and
said the only vehicle he could offer
was a second-hand bike. He later
chose another agent, Audrey Wood
and worked with her for years.
Other people wanted to know
what he would name a play about
the American presidential election
(God Loves Peanuts) and whether
he would have written differently if
he's lived in a temperate climate.
(Cat   on   an   Icy   Tin   Roof   just
wouldn't have been the same.)
One woman wanted to know
why all his female characters were
the same while another stated that
he seemed to have an almost
perfect understanding of the female
psyche.
Shouting out questions in a room
filled with hundreds of people
wasn't quite an intimate discussion.
One didn't get much of a chance to
find out about Tom Williams, the
person. But fighting the mobs was
worthwhile. It was an entertaining
evening, one that should be
remembered whenever Streetcar
Named Desire is the late movie on
television and Marlon Brando is
screaming, "Stellal"
Goldie Hawn shines on
By LORI THICKE
Private Benjamin will not make
any lists of the best movies of 1980,
but for a commercial comedy the
film is surprisingly good. It is a
welcome departure from the usual
insipid Goldie Hawn vehicles.
The movie takes an unbiased
look at a contemporary theme: the
search for self identity by a woman
who has always been either a
daughter or a wife, who has "never
not belonged to somebody".
Private Benjamin
Directed by Howard Zieff
Playing at the Capitol 6
Goldie Hawn plays Judy Benjamin, a woman whose one desire
in life is to be married to a professional man. She is "28 and trained
to do nothing." She is treated like
an obtuse child by her condencen-
ding parents and her patronizing
new husband. Widowed on her
wedding night (one of the movie's
funnier scenes involves his demise
while they consummate their mar-
HAWN . .
riage vows) the protagonist finds
herself alone for the first time.
She arrives at an army recruiting
centre eight days after the funeral
Are you a starving student?
But still want to look good?
by TERRY, KAREN or DEBBIE
With presentation of this ad — Offer expires Oct. 31/80
KEN HIPPERT HAIR CO. LTD.
5736 UNIVERSITY BLVD. 224-1471
BUYS!
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Semi-automatic direct drive precision turntable complete with
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Powerful three way bass reflex speakers with 12" woofers.
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An excellent all new receiver with 60 watts rms total power
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. no dope she
confused and depressed. Before
you can say "Uncle Sam" she is at
Fort Biloxi boot camp wondering
where the yachts and condos her
recruiter promised her are.
A no-nonsense drill sergeant
and a sadistic captain make it
eminently clear to Judy Benjamin
that "this is the army". She tries
everything to get out of the boot
camp from sweet-talking Capt.
Lewis to scaling the barbed-wire
fence after Gianelli, another female
recruit, beats her up.
When her parents come to
rescue her, Benjamin and the rest
of the women from the barracks
have pulled guard duty — in the
pouring rain — as punishment for
the Benjamin-Gianelli fight.
Although Private Benjamin is billed as a comedy, the laughs are not
as frequent as one might hope. In
one of the film's better moments
Judy Benjamin and her cohorts
from boot camp get lost in the
swamp while playing war games.
They spend the night around a
campfire smoking dope and trading
stories about their first orgasms. "I
had an orgasm once," says one,
"but I was alone."
The acting in Private Benjamin is
at times superb, at times mediocre.
Eileen Brennan gives a top-notch
performance as the sarcastic,
sadistic, bisexual Capt. Lewis who
makes Judy Benjamin's life in boot
camp miserable. Goldie Hawn's
wide-eyed performance is good,
but unexceptional. Mary Kay Place
and the actress who plays the
tough-talking Gianelli (whose name
whipped by on the credits) also give
excellent performances.
Private   Benjamin   is   a   good,
entertaining movie that says what k
wants to say and says it well. An ir.
tellectual piece its not, but neitn::
is it fiuf;.
Friday, October 17,1980
THE    UBYSSEY
Page Friday 9 ■J^^^This Week
Queen City
Kids
FRASER ARMS
1450 S.W. Marine Dr.
—>»»»•>•»••••»■■•••
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Pizza
Steak & Pizza —, Lasagna
Spare Ribs — Ravioli
Chicken — Greek Salads
Souvlaki
Fast Free Local Delivery
224-4218 - 224-0529
Hours: Mon.-Thurs. 11:30 a.m.-2:00 p.m.; Fri.
11:30 a.m.-3:00 p.nv Sal 4:00 p.m.-3:00 a.m.;
Sun. 4:00 p.m.-1:00 a.m.
';' 2136 Western Parkway
SPECIALIZING IN
GREEK CUISINE
& PIZZA
FREE FAST DELIVERY.
228-9513
s£^%
Hard Day
At Classes?
Relax at the Sands Bayside Room
overlooking English Bay
DENMAN and DAVIE, 682-1831
f.
a restaurant of
distinction
Superb
Cantonese recipes
Exceptional Continental cuisine
Relax in a unique,
contemporary setting
for lunch, Sunday brunch,
nightly dining
or drop in anytime
for coffee,
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Buffet served daily at lunch $5. SO
Fri., Sat. & Sun. evenings    $8.95
Banquet Facilities
V All major credit cards
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228-9114
10% Discount on ill
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Mon.-Fri. 11:30-9:00 p.m.
CLOSED SATURDAYS
Sundays and Holidays
4:00 p.m.-9:00 p.m.
2142 Waatam Parkway
U.E.L. Vancouver, B.C.
(Oppoalta Chsvron Station)
SPECIALTIES
Fully licenced
•
Gourment meals
at moderate prices
•
A large selection
of fine wines
•
15 fantastic
specialty coffees
•
Ample free parking
•
Easy to reach, right on
Broadway near Granville
•
Party facilities for up to
30 people
(And we can prepare a
special menu too)
•
STAUFFER'S
1412 W. Broadway
at Granville
736-1914
WHITE TOWER PIZZA &
SPAGHETTI HOUSE LTD.
KITS - OUNBAR - FT. GREY
A variety of great dishes including    Moussaka,    Kalamari
Souvlakia, and Greek
salads.
Mon- Thurs 4 pm-2:30 am
Fri & Sat 4 pm-3:30 ami
Sunday   4   pm-12 . pm
738-9520
or 738 1113.     | DOWNTOWN
3611 Waat Broadway ■ **• •»".E'on
PARKING AT REAR SSBO#»l
Oinins Loun»« • Full Facilitiai -
Taka Out or Homa Oalivary
Late ttelivery call l'i rtour bafore closing.
Salad Bar * Caesar Salad
Charbroiled Steaks • Seafood
Licensed Lounge
PIZZA
Free Delivery
Open Daily from 11 a.m.
SUNDAY from 4 p.m.
4450 W. 10th Ave. '
224-3434 224-6336      \
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HUfitattrant $c fllmaigc
4685 Dunbar at 30th 224-2521
3 COURSE LUNCH SPECIAL 3.50
3 COURSE DINNER SPECIALS from 6.50
Plus complete Menu Selection
of Salad, Sandwich and
House Specialties
Open: 11:30 - Midnight
Monday thru Saturday
ENJOY ENGLISH PUB-STYLE
FOOD IN AN AUTHENTIC SETTING
Make "The Cheese" Your Local
Before or After
the Shrum Bowl.
Enjoy Yourself
■i
I
NOW, A NEW
BURGER THAT'S
MORE BURGER
THAN
RUN
Introducing the new hamburger from the DAIRY QUEEN
BRAZIER store. In a new "six to a pound" size that really
gives you some meat for your money. Instead of a banquet of
bun.
You see, while other burger chains
get as many as ten hamburgers from a
pound of beef, we get only six. And
that gives you "more burger than
bun." A burger that's tender,
deliciously-cooked. Every time. The
new burger from DAIRY QUEEN
BRAZIER.
2601 W. Broadway
Dairy
Queen
brazier
Page Friday 10
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 17,1980 wistal
DON'T . . . just  sit  there,  read  Vista  and  get  out and  discover
Vancouver's culture.
Free At Last which runs from
Oct. 18 to Nov. 3 at the Studio
Theatre opens at the new Granville
Island home of Westcoast Actors
on Nov. 8, starring Terence Kelly.
Connie Kaldor will open the
Surrey Centennial Arts Centre's
1980-81 theatre season at Guildford
Park Community School, 14577
-106A Ave., Surrey, on Sunday,
Oct. 19 at 3 p.m. Volunteers are
needed to work theatre events for
the Arts Centre, for more information phone Ethel Seaman at
596-7461.
There will be an art exhibit by
Jad of Tahiti, of his Anti-Nuclear
World Tour Exhibition including
150 Protest Paintings at the Robson
Square from Oct. 16 to Oct. 25. The
exhibits coincides with the United
Nations Disarmament Week, Oct.
24 to 30.
Acoustica, 4607 West 10th
Ave. presents a Sunday evening
concert series featuring a variety of
musical styles by Westcoast musicians and songwriters. On Oct. 19
Chris Cario and Friends are
featured with Lisa Paquette and
Francince Bedard. The concert is
at 8 p.m. and admission is $3.00.
UBC Fine Arts Gallery is
presenting   an   exhibition   of  the
drawings of Marianne Schmidt
Tuesday to Saturday 10 a.m. to 5
p.m. in Main Library Building, in
the North Wing basement.
There will be an exhibition of Liz
Magor's productions and reproductions, at the Vancouver Art
Gallery, opening Oct. 24 from 8 to
10 p.m. and running until Nov. 23.
Well known local poets from the
faculty at Simon Fraser University
and Capilano College are holding a
Red Queen All Saints Day
reading, Nov. 1 at 8 p.m. Admission is $3.00 at the door and John
Pass reading new poetry, Sharon
Thesen reading from Artemis Hates
Romance, George Bowring reading
from Burning Water, and Mike
Beddoes, guitar will be at the Robson Square Media Centre.
Soprano Marilyn Home will join
Kazuyoshi Akiyama and the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra for the
next trio of concerts in the Jubilee
Series, Sunday, Nov. 2 at 2:30 p.m.
Monday at 8:30 p.m., and Tuesday
Nov.  4 at 7:30 p.m.  in the  Or-
r
- Decorate With Prints —~~-
Me? grin
w     bin
Halloween Masks
Posters — Prints
738-2311
3209 W. Broadway, Van.
' Decorate With Posters
FREE FILM
NIGHT
Thurs., Oct. 23
7:30 and 8:46 p.m.
FILM: Truck/Camping Expedition, South America.
SLIDES:        Australian
Coach/Camping tour.
NO BOOKING NECESSARY
WESTCAN TREKS
3415 W. Broadway-734-1066
... the people who brought
you aural sects
CITR-UBCRadio
is now at the new position of
100.1 cable FM
650AMGage&Vanier
... we really do give great ear!
't&&
pheum. The concert is sponsored
by Kaiser Resources so remember
to bring your BCRIC shares for
reduced rates.
Baccanal Times, a film depicting the happier side of life in the
Caribbean shares the bill with The
Harder They Come, a tough and
cynical thriller, made in 1972. Both
films are playing next week at the
Savoy Theatre with live performances between features by the
finest talents from Vancouver's
West Indian Community on stage
with music and comedy.
Opening Oct. 22 and continuing
until Nov. 30 the Burnaby Art
Gallery is presenting Frank Perry's
sculptures produced during five
separate stays in Florence.
On Wednesday Oct. 29 Frank Perry
will be giving a lecture demonstration at the Burnaby Art Gallery at
8:30 p.m.
The Belle of Amherst is opening Oct. 23 at the Waterfront
Theatre on Granville Island.
Directed by Kathryn Shaw, artistic
director of Westcoast Actors, this
play will be the opening production
of the company's season.
Have you ever
thought about
cross-country skiing?
Call SIGGE'S!
Sigge's Sport Villa Ltd.
2685 W. Broadway
731-8818
Chicken
out.
More than just classic
. burgers (15 varieties)
we've got super barbecued
chicken (cheap, too!).
P.J. Burger & Sons. Lots of
great food. Lots of great fun.
11:30 on-7 days a week. 2966
W. 4th Ave. and Bayswater.
DANCE
UBC Sailing Club Presents:
»    MAGIC    »
Saturday, Oct. 18. 8:00-12:30
SUB Party Room
$3.00
Tickets at AMS Box Office, SUB
L CX PHOTOLAB
cx
cx
cx
cx
cx
cx
cx
cx
cx
cx
cx
cx
cx
cx
cx
cx
cx
cx
cx
SPECIAL
Reprints
Prints from Slides
.30 each
.45 each
5x7Color Enlargement $1.49each,
from negatives or slides
LEAVE YOUR FILMS HERE
We use
Kodak paper.
lor flie oooa look*
offer expires
October 22, 1980
#3-4480 West 10th Avenue
Vancouver, B.C.
224-4215
LADIES NIGHT IN
THE PIT
Saturday, Oct. 18th
LADIES FREE AT THE DOOR
Ladies ONLY 7:00 p.m.-9:00 p.m.
featuring SPECIAL ENTERTAINMENT
"Mr- Campus" Contest
HALF PRICED DRINKS FROM
7:00 p.m.-9:00 p.m.
Men $1.00 at the door after 9:00 p.m.
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
1980 AUTUMN LECTURES
BY VISITING PROFESSORS
Elias P. Gyftopoulos
The Ford Professor of Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Professor Gyftopoulos is now a Director of Thermo Electron Corporation and serves as a consultant for several
U.S. corporations. He was Chairman of the National Energy Council of Greece until 1978, and
since then an advisor to the Greek Government on matters of energy policy. Because of his ability
to talk sensibly and intelligently about future energy options — nuclear, solar, and, on the demand side, greater conservation — his talks should be of interest to both the academic community and to the community at large.
THE BROADENING ROLE OF THERMODYNAMICS IN SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
Monday, October 30     In Room 1215, Civil Engineering/Mechanical Eng. Building, at 3:30 p.m.
OVERVIEW OF ENERGY SUPPLY AND DEMAND
Tuesday, October 21      In Lecture Hall 2, Woodward Instructional Resources Centre, at 12:30 p.m.
ENERGY PRODUCTIVITY IN INDUSTRY
Friday, October 24 In Lecture Hall 2, Woodward Instructional Resources Centre, at 12:30 p.m.
ALL LECTURES ARE FREE
Sponsored by The Cecil H. and Ida Green Visiting Professorship Fund
Friday, October 17,1980
THE   U BYS S EY
Page Friday 11 Page 20
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 17,1980
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The Yamaha Audio Cr86 receiver packs 25/25 watts of continuous RMS power with distortion at an unbelievable low
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U.S. Audio Magazine said, "Without a doubt
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479
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ONKYO CP-1010A
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mode" oscillation)
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299
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TAPE DECKS
OPTONICA 6006
OPTONICA Model RT-6006 Cassette Deck Automatic
Program Search Ststem, Dolby noise reduction, output
volume display and Opto peak level display are some
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329
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