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The Ubyssey Feb 16, 1968

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Array 'STUDENTS MORE SOCIALLY AWARE TODAY
By FRED CAWSEY
Ubyssey Academic Reporter
Students today are more socially aware than
ever before.
This opinion was shared by six UBC deans
interviewed Thursday.
Arts dean Dennis Healy thinks students are
probably more vocal in their dissent than in his
school days. He attributes this to the increased
effectiveness of such communications systems as
television.
"It's hard now not to get involved in world problems when you see wars and riots recorded as they
actually happen. Television hits you where you live,"
he said.
"There is a large group of students who take
a more active interest in world problems than they
used to."
Healy also think good students who graduate
from UBC are excellently prepared for graduate
work and jobs.
"We are receiving excellent  reports about  our
students from universities such as Oxford, Cambridge, and Harvard."
Science dean Vladimir Okulitch thinks students'
attitudes are essentially the same as in his days as
a student, but the issues they are concerned with are
more public.
"Students have a greater interest now in politics
and world affairs, which is good, but they often
neglect problems in their more immediate environment.
"I think they could put a little more emphasis
on such issues as the bookstore, food services, and
library facilities."
One disturbing aspect Okulitch sees resulting
from increased student awareness is the lack of trust
young people have in the older generation.
"Even younger faculty members seem to doubt
that older faculty members are doing their best for
the university," Okulitch said.
Acting UBC president Water Gage, dean of interfaculty and student affairs, thinks people take students more seriously now than they did previously.
"If students are more vocal  than before,  it is
probably because the news media give more coverage to their views now," Gage said.
He thinks they work just as hard as years ago.
""Because there are so many more distractions at
university than in my day students probably have
to work liarder now."
Law dtban George Curtis is pleased with the wider
interests bf students.
"Today's students are more interested in human
problems, and that's to the good," he said.
Medicine dean John McCreary regards students
today as brighter and more capable than over before.
"We have a much better quality of students applying for medicine than ten years ago. In 1958, there
was a low ebb in quality."
Neville Scanfe, education dean, said today's students are better people than previous students.
"They are more enjoyable to be with and more
bothersome too," he said. "I say more bothersome
because they are harder to keep up with.
"Students today are more eager, enthusiastic
and questioning than ever before. Even high school
students are developing better critical attitudes."
Pork chow mein
on a  tulip
SUE
I fit
won't do
Vol. XLIX, No. 48
VANCOUVER,  B.C., FRIDAY,  FEBRUARY 16,  1968
<*S5SW*
224-3916
— lawrence woodd photo
VARIETY SHOWS HAVE unlimited possibilities, grunts a prostrate bass fiddle, knocked out
by a voluptuous moustress performing in ed. TOO Thursday. Two mousers in background
laugh  lasciviously at lacy lingerie which  left goggle-eyed audience gasping.
Forestry   building   opens
What goes on in that new brick building at the south end of campus will be
revealed Saturday.
The faculty of forestry will tell all in
its first open house at the H. R. McMillan
building from 9:30 a.m. to noon.
The open house will enable students to
become acquainted with the forestry faculty's curriculum, meet the 20 staff members, and view the teaching and research
facilities, said Roger St. John, forestry 3.
Representatives of the Vancouver section of the Canadian Institute of Forestry
will be present to counsel students in
career opportunities.
Provincial
grants short
-Armstrong
Provincial university operating and capital grants for 1968-
69 are inadequate, UBC deputy acting president William Armstrong said Thursday.
Armstrong, dean of applied science, was commenting on
grants to UBC, Simon Fraser University and the University of
Victoria in the provincial budget announced by Premier Cece
Bennett.
"The funds received were not adequate
for the students we have," he said. "There
will be quite a serious shortfall to pick up
at UBC."
A total of $74 million was granted to all
post-secondary institutions in B.C. The three
universities   received   $65   million.
The B.C. Assembly of Students say the
universities alone require a minimum of $77
million in operating and capital funds.
"The shortage is serious," Armstrong said.
With more funds, he said, UBC could provide
temporary undergraduate study space.
"We won't get any additional capital until the next five-
year plan in 1969," he said. An $8 million biological complex
can't be started until then. A new engineering building has also
been delayed.
Last year the three universities asked for $66 million —
but received $53 million — $45 million in operating grants and
$8 million in capital expansion grants.
This year the universities get $53 million
operating and $12 million capital to be split
$5 million each for SFU and UBC and $2 million for UVic.
Armstrong said earlier not enough priority
is being placed on education, although education minister Peterson has been sympathetic.
He also said the biggest single problem
on campus was lack of student study and
sitting space. Immediate study space needs
total about 50,000 square feet, which would
cost about $500,000 to build, he said. BENNETT
Allocation of operating funds to each university won't be
known until an advisory board to the department of education
makes its recommendations later this month. The board is
headed by Dean Sperrin Chant and includes government
appointees.
INSIDE: PAGE FRIDAY REVIEWS
CONTEMPORARY ARTS FESTIVAL
ARMSTRONG Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday,   February   16,   1968
WHILE  UNDERGRADS . . .
. . . EAT HUMBLE PIE
Grads eat  like  kings
Good grief. Most grad students like the food
they get at the grad student centre.
According to a Ubyssey poll, grad student
food is not only good, it is very good.
"It's excellent," said grad student Darryl
Downton. "Far tastier than any other food on
campus."
"The food is incomparable to any other place
on campus," said Virginia Carter.
"I like the food here very much, and the
view makes it better,"  said David Maroun.
"This is great," said Susan Watson, arts 1,
who was eating as a guest in the centre.
But Audrey Breckenridge, dietician at the
centre, disagreed that grads get better food. "It's
psychological," she said. "The atmosphere just
makes it seem as if the food is better."
Grad student Bill Reid concurred. "This is
a civilized way of eating," he said, "Not like an
army camp."
When diners are finished their meals, a calm
crew-cut steward takes the dishes away. But
all this does not make the food more expensive.
Reactions in the Brock cafe differed somewhat from those in the grad student centre.
Grads  apathetic
Apathy is alive and hiding among graduating
students.
Only nine out of the 973 fourth year arts
students showed up for an arts grad class council meeting at noon Thursday.
An earlier meeting this week attracted only
one   student.
"We've given up trying to hold arts graduating class meetings," said arts grad representative Susan Moir.
However, arts students can join those from
other faculties at this year's grads general meeting  Tuesday noon  in Ang.   104.
"Horrors," said Sally Mahood, arts 3, when
the thought of Brock food occured to her —
because she was asked about it. "I prefer to go
off campus to eat, Brock food is so bad."
"The only thing worth eating at Brock is
the cinammon buns," said Pat Akerly, arts 2.
"I'd gladly pay more if that would improve
the poor quality of the food," said Phil Aldrich,
science 2.
Nancy Hooper, back at the grad centre, remembered the time she found steel shavings in
her Brockburger.
The only complaints from grads came from
Mary  Symons  and Ruth  Orcutt.
Both said that grad student food being better
was unfair to undergraduates.
| THE VILLAGE CAFE
_  Where Friends Meet & Dine
"      DISCOUNT ON
|       PIZZA TO GO
IVi Block East
of Memorial Gym
_     at 5778 University Blvd.
■ Phone 224-0640
No rules in motel
LONDON.  Ont.  (CUP) — The Trade Winds
will blow  sweet air for London  students  next
-year.
The operator of the Trade Winds motel near
London plans to offer University of Western
Ontario students rooms in his motel at the same
same $1,000 cost for two terms as the university's residences.
Both the motel and the residences offer
three meals and a single room at this price, but
the hotel is kicking in radio and television, wall-
to-wall broadloom, private washrooms and maid
service.
And th? motel will have no residence rules.
Chinese  examined
Dr. Edwin Pulleyblank, a leading Chinese
history scholar, will speak to the Vancouver
Institute Saturday at 8:15 p.m.
He will speak on The Chinese Fact in Bu.
106.
A&B SOUND
RECORD SALE
WIDE SELECTION AT LOWEST PRICES IN B.C.
MONO  &  STEREO
Featuring:
JOHN WESTLEY HARDING
AS I  WENT OUT  ONE
MORNING
DEAR LANDLORD
$3.5S
Reg. $4.98
Featuring:
SUZANNE
MASTER SONG
WINTER LADY
A&B SOUND
MU 2-4846
Open Friday Until 9 p.m.
571 GRANVILLE (at Dunsmuir)
MU 2-1919
RENTAL & SALES
• 2,500   GARMENTS   TO
CHOOSE  FROM
• Full  Dress  (Tails)
• Morning  Coats
• Directors' Coats
• White and Coloured Coats
• Shirts   and   Accessories
E. A. Lee Formal Wear
(Downstairs)
623 Howe 688-2481
BOOKS
* Hardcover   books
*  Textbooks
* Paperbacks
* Review     Notes
* Study    Guides
If   you   are    looking   for   a    required
text   or   for   casual   reading   try:
Village Book Shop
5732   UNIVERSITY   BLVD.
228-8410
Open  10 a.m.   to 9 p.m.
DRIVING IN UK
OR EUROPE?
• RENTALS
• LEASINGS
• PURCHASE
IN ANY^COUNTRY
This Coupon Or Phone For
FREE  BOOKLET
EUROPEAN CARS SERVICE
82 RICHMOND STREET, W.
MITE 1002, TORONT01, ONT, CANADA
PHONE 366-2413
SAVE
QUEEN   ELIZABETH
THEATRE
Sunday, Feb. 18-8 p.m.
NIGHT CLUB
REVUE
A cavalcade of stars
featuring    2Vfc    hours   of
singing,    dancing
&  novelty  acts
Tickets   at
Vancouver Ticket Centre
and all Eatons Stores
$2.00 - $2.50
QhooML (L (biamond.
Special 10% Discount to all UBC Students
Convenient Terms Available
on Diamond Engagement Rings
FIRBANK'S JEWELLERS
Downtown
Seymour at
Dunsmuir
Brentwood
Shopping
Centre
Park
Royal
CARIBBEAN
STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
presents
AT  INTERNATIONAL  HOUSE
MONDAY,   FEBRUARY   19-12:30  P.M.:    An address by a West Indian graduate
student, Patrick Alleyne, "The Role of
the scholar in the emerging West
Indian    nation".
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 120-12:30 P.M.: A paper by Bert Nepaulsingh, Graduate Student — "West Indian Literature
In   English".
WEDNESDAY,  FEB.   21-8   P.M. :    A   Caribbean    Revue—An   Evening   of
West Indian Entertainment, Featuring
Calypso, Folk - dancing, Steel-band
music,  etc.
11:30   A.M.:    "Cook   Up"   Lunch   Time.
8   P.M.:    An  Evening of West Indian Films.
THURSDAY,   FEB.   22
FRIDAY,   FEBRUARY  23-8   P.M.
to  1   A.M.
LEGION   HALl-6th   &   COMMERCIAL
Calypso   Carnival   dance,   Music   by
Trinidad   Moonlighters  Steelbanrf,   and
the   Caribbean   Natives   Combo.
Admission:   $2.00.   Tickets  are  obtainable  at   International   House.
In   addition   to   the  above,  there  will   be   an   exhibition   of   Art,   Crafts,   and
Literature  daily  in  rooms  400 and  404,  International  House. Friday,  February   16,   1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
—   kurt hilger photo
RALLY ROUND THE POLE, boys, says an unidentified student trotting among horseless
carriages at the start of Thursday's education-phys ed. car rally. Rallying object, a baleful
totem   pole,   carries   on   a   silent   background   dialogue with lamp posts.
Homecoming archaic—Hoye
Homecoming should be scrapped, says Alma
later Society  treasurer Dave Hoye.
Hoye was commenting Thursday on a brief
ubmitted to the AMS by homecoming chairman
'aul McFayden.
In the brief, McFayden says a drop in alumni
ttendance at this year's homecoming was the
ssult of poor co-operation between alumni and
tudent representatives.
McFayden says he plans fewer events for this
ear's homecoming in an effort to encourage
reater student-sJumni participation.
"That's nothing new," said Hoye. "It's just a
efinement of the present system. Homecoming
Dsts far too much for what the university gets
ut of it."
Hoye said he would rather see a conference
un on some topical issue that could involve
lumni.
"Homecoming is archaic,"  he said.
McFadyen says this year's main homecoming
vent will be  the  second  annual  UBC - Simon
Fraser University football game.
Student-alumni seminars are also on the tentative list of events.
"Students at UBC are extremely apathetic
and as a result become apathetic alumni," McFadyen says.
Social events planned include two fashion
shows, a pep meet, and visits of queen candidates
to the four residences.
Oops!  Sorry  about  that
Oops.
In Thursday's Ubyssey, a statement on
page one opposing the recommendations of
the senate language requirements committee
was erroneously attributed to English prof.
Dr. William Fredeman.
The statement, at Wednesday's senate meeting, was actually made by Dr. Sydney Friedman.   Sorry, Dr. Fredeman.
Bosses approve
advisory group
Two UBC officials Thursday approved an advisory committee announced toy education minister Leslie Peterson to
study the relationship between the three major universities.
Peterson told the legislature Wednesday the board will work
to cut education costs by ending fruitless competition and unnecessary duplication of facilities at UBC, Simon Fraser and the
University of Victoria.
He said the rising expenditures of the universities may be
caused   by   trying   to   include   too   many   disciplines and specialties within disciplines.
"Unnecessary duplication should be avoided," said acting UBC president Walter Gage.
"It's unnecessary to duplicate professional
schools or special kinds of education. Medicine, for example.
"The   committee could  do  a  lot  of  good
. if it looked at the problem objectively."
UBC deputy president William Armstrong,
dean of applied science, said the three universities must co-operate to a greater degree than
they have. PETERSON
The main area of co-operation lies in long range academic
planning, he said. He agreed that the universities should avoid
duplication of professional schools like nursing and law.
Armstrong also said the only area of co-operative academic
planning so far is the $19 million tri-university meson facility
(TRIUMF), in which the University of Alberta, Simon Fraser
University and UBC are co-operating.
"The Ontario universities have been doing this (long range
co-operative academic planning) for two years with great success," Armstrong said.
At present, bursars and registrars of B.C.'s three major
universities meet and discuss mutual problems. A trucking service exchanges books with SFU's library on a short term basis.
"We must now insure that there is neither redundancy of
effort nor fruitless competition among the institutions," Armstrong said. "This province cannot give free reign to escalating
university costs."
Faculty elections  on
Two undergraduate elections will be held today.
Home economics hold their first slate elections while commerce fills positions not already filled by acclamation.
Rus Grierson, comm. 3, and Keith Guelpa, comm. 2, arc
contesting the commerce presidency. Bob Drury, comm. 2, and
Glen Rickard, comm. 3, are running for the office of external
vice-president.
Jim Swanson, comm. 2, is first vice-president by acclamation
and Bob McCericher, comm. 3, is the new second vice-president,
also by acclamation.
Treasurer, Otto Reive, comm. 3, and secretary Bev Anderson, comm. 1, both took office by acclamation.
In home ec, Donna Bryant, home ec. 3, and Lynore Strickland, home ec. 3, are running for secretary. Trying for social
chairman are Gaye Hampton, home ec. 3, and Jane McGuire,
home ec. 3.
Athletic chairman will go to either Bev Webber, home ec.
3, or Shirley Wongmoon. home ec. 4.
Home ec. second slate nominations will open Monday for
the   vice-president,   treasurer,   and  publicity   chairman.
Ed week electronic
Electronics helped spread the joys of education week
Thursday.
As 300 students crowded into a noon variety show in ed.
100, others watched proceedings on closed circuit television sets
placed in the education building.
At the same time outside Brock hall, 75 cars waited in a
patient line before speeding away in an education car rally.
Today, education will hold a dance in Brock at noon, and
in the education lounge a dean's forum will discuss the difference
between UBC and  Simon Fraser University teacher  training.
Gary Gumley, education president, said tickets are still
available for the wind-up Rhapsody in Blue ball in the Vancouver Hotel Saturday night. TMUtYSStY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the editor and not of the AMS or the university. Member,
Canadian University Press. Proprietor, Ubyssey News Services (UNS). The
Ubyssey subscribes to the press services of Pacific Student Press, of which
it is founding member, and Underground Press Syndicate. Authorized second
class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa, and for payment of postage
in cash. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and
review. City editor, 224-3916. Other calls, 224-3242: editor, local 25; photo,
Page   Friday,   loc.   24;   sports,   loc.   23;  advertising,   loc.   26.   Telex  04-5224.
FEBRUARY 16, 1968
Funny money
Viewed objectively, the Socred education budget
is as large a humiliation to B.C. as Cece Bennett's buffoonery at the constitutional conference.
The whispered sighs of relief sounded by administration and student officials when the budget was announced must not be mistaken for satisfaction with
Bennett's higher education provisions. Those concerned
with UBC's financial situation were satisfied only that
a feared total disaster had been averted. As applied
sciences dean William Armstrong points out in today's
Ubyssey, the government's $65 million still leaves the
three universities woefully underfinanced.
The Socred budget says in effect that UBC authorities will not be able to begin work on an adequate long-
term plan. They do not know when, or if, the necessary
capital funds will be available.
The budget says too that immediate space needs
at the university are not about to be satisfied — which
means an enrolment cut must remain a strong possibility.
Bennett's budget says further that attempts to improve undergraduate education at UBC will continue
to proceed with painful slowness.
And it says that the long-time dream of a first-class
graduate school here is as far away as ever. Even to
talk of upgrading the UBC graduate school today is to
indulge in cynical black humor.
We repeat: Bennett's financial provisions for university education are a humiliation for B.C. They are a
humiliation because B.C. is a rich and expanding province that can well afford the best educational facilities.
We believe it is no longer realistic to speak about
pressuring and persuading the Social Credit government to change its naughty ways. It is time to realize
that the Social Credit government is interested not in
the future welfare of B.C. but in the present welfare of
the Social Credit government. The Socreds' power base
is in a segment of the population which does not value
higher education. And the majority of British Columbians who do value education have split their support
among the opposition parties.
While student efforts to inform the public about
university needs should continue, the time for submitting
briefs to Socred ministers has long past.
All students must now be aware that UBC will
operate on starvation budgets as long as" the Bennett
government is in power. Such awareness should lead
to the realization that students can best work to brighten
UBC's future by working to defeat the Socreds in the
next provincial election.
See here, mint
Which minty federal bureaucrat, we ask, has done
away with the 50-cent-piece?
Change for a Brockburger these days usually comes
in the form of five skinny dimes. The 50-cent-piece is
apparently no longer to be had.
While worth only four-bits, the 50-cent-piece was
a fine piece of cash. When a man had 50-cent pieces
to jangle in his pockets, he knew he had money.
Dimes, we say, are too skinny — they are merely
bus tokens with a picture of the queen. Nickels, with
that mousy looking beaver, are not dignified enough.
Quarters aren't bad but 50-cent-pieces are better.
We urge the mint to shape up.
EDITOR:   Danny   Stoffman
City           Stuart  Gray
News          Susan  Gransby
Managing        Murray   McMillan
Photo          Kurt  Hilger
Senior       Pat Hrushowy
Sports       Mike   Jessen
Wire    Norman  Gidney
Page Friday     Judy Bing
Ass't. City    Boni  Lee
Crash went the boom — but who
heard? Sure, but don't tell your local
haberdasher. Paul Knox, Alexandra
Volkoff, the perlankus Mike Finlay,
Fred   Cawsey   (not   a   woman),   Irene
Wasilewski, Judy Young, and the
nauseating Lin Tse-hsu wrote this
paper.
Steve Jackson stuck his head in the
door, eyed the scene and, precipitously,  departed.
Lawrance Woodd and George Hollo,
the candidate, photographed some
photos. They did it because they are
photographers. Hilger stirred ire by
locking  up  the   paper  too   early.
Who should write The Sporting
News but Beverly Feather, Jim .Maddin, Bjorn Simonsen and Brian Rattray.
Certainly, the blorgs convene today.
Why  shouldn't  they?
"Sunday mahout!
';--«><.
Papers prod students
away from  conformity
The following editorial was
broadcast on Vancouver radio
station CHQM.
One of the healthiest things
now happening in greater
Vancouver is the more searching and critical attitudes about
public affairs being developed
in the universities. University
students are beginning to relate public policy to their own
situation, which is the beginning of public awareness. They
are being sharply critical of
the establishment, especially
that part of it which directs
university affairs.
A few years ago we used to
think of university students as
a group of junior conformists,
saturated with the mores of
the system that produced
them, with their eyes on only
one thing — how they could
best fit, individually, into this
'"best of all possible" systems,
once they got their sheepskins.
CLEAN BREAK
But all that is changing very
rapidly. If one judges by the
material that appears in their
university newspapers, the
Peak for Simon Fraser, and
Ubyssey for UBC, elements of
the student body are making a
clean break from the rabbitlike conformity of the past.
And all students are being exposed to new lines of free inquiry, political opinion, independence of judgement, criticism of university administration, criticism of government
financing, of teaching method,
of student attitudes, in a way
that promises development of
a new mental vigor on the
campuses.
PASSIVE ACCEPTANCE
The old business of passive
acceptance of everything that
came from the faculty, and the
establishment generally, is out
the window. Anyone who cares
to read the latest issues of the
two university newspapers will
have no doubt of that. These
young people are not developing into hippies or bolsheviks.
They are radical, to be sure.
But that's the life-stuff of independent thought. Universities that do not develop inde
pendent thought are just going
through the motions of teaching — mass-producing sheepskins.
Judging by the tone of critical articles now appearing in
the university press, the young
writers feel there is a lot of
ground to cover to wake up the
general student body. The
transformation that seems to
have begun, has only begun.
These changes of general attitude do not occur in a few
weeks. It takes years. Another
point is that if there were not
a reactionary establishment,
and a government that doesn't
think too highly of science and
technology, the humanities,
and higher learning generally,
there "would be nothing to
fight.
INDEPENDENCE
One   writer   in   the   current
issue of the Peak, remarks on
the strangeness of a reactionary establishment creating
such a potentially lively and
radical institution of learning
as Simon Fraser. It does seem
strange. But it also seems to
be a formula that will develop
action and reaction, of a sort
that will speed up change. The
proper spirit of criticism and
independence that gives life to
academic freedom, and free enquiry, is no longer a minus
quantity, as it was not so long
ago. The sharp young people,
who are breaking out of the
mould of conventional thought
at both universities, are doing
an immensely good service,
for their own institutions and
the community. Their press is
no longer a big yawn. It is
taking on a new life and bite.
It relates.
Introduction
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Please excuse me for bothering your precious time with
my sudden letter. My English
is very poor but I have always
been wishing
to make a
friend in Canada since I
have seen the
picture of
woodland
scenery in
Canada.
I could not
get any information how AKIKO
to make a friend, but I was
told by the Youth Council that
the best way is to write to the
editor of the newspaper. So,
I wrote this. Would you please
introduce me someone?
AKIKO INOUE
149 No. 3 Maruyama,
Okayama City.
Okayama-ken,
Japan
p.s. Let's introduce myself.
I am 17 years Japanese girl
and go to Sei Sen senior high
school. I like animals, plants,
trees and frowers. (sic)
Beware  of  Mike
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Mike Coleman's general contempt for student opinion and
his neurotic fear of Stan Persky have put him into another
position where he is forced to
expose himself as the insincere
individual he is .
Faced with student court's
recommendation that the constitution be changed to make
the residence requirement more
reasonable, Mike put forward
a motion and worded the upcoming referendum. It was his
motion and the referendum was
in his own wording. And yet in
Thursday's Ubyssey (p.5) he
advocated the defeat of his own
proposal. His irrational fear of
Mr. Persky is obviously getting
the best of him. What sort of
silly game is he playing? Beware of Sally's brother, because his intentions are suspect. Mike, I await your cozy
parimentary reply, etc.
CAREY LINDE
AMS vice-president-elect MLLE. GABY1 DESLYS PERFORMING THE NEW DANCE IN "THE NEW ALLADIN."
It will be remembered  that we  published,  a few  weeks ago,  illustrations of  the  new  ju-jitsu  waltz,   which  was  then  being  danced  in  Germany.    The  dance  has   now  been   brought   to  England,  and  is
creating   a   good   deal   of   interest. pf   2 WO J
By KEITH FRASER
For the drama backbencher who
hoardes production programs, the past
week has provided a fine heap of them.
Certainly the caucus of plays at the
Arts Club and Stage 2 Theatre downtown, and on campus at the Festival of
Contemporary Arts, has proved a tub-
thumping delight for everyone.
Two of the one-act rituals which
play until Feb. 24 at Stage 2, continue
a precedent established by James Rea-
ney's Listen lo the Wind, which opened
this theatre - in - the - round last month.
Both The Miracle Wolf of Gubbio and
Kafka attempt to generate themselves
as they evolve.
The Miracle Wolf is G u i d o ' s
(Thomas Shandel's) play: he carries a
script and attempts to produce a play
about St. Francis of Assisi (Gregory
Reid). This attempt, however, is cut
short by his carousing compatriots who
engender their own play revolving
around persecution of the Wolf (Roger
Dressier). The subsequent action brandishes scorn at the historical trappings
and practises of the Roman Church.
Only the whore (Marti Wright )sees in
the Wolf some controlling nobility, but
she is unable to save him. What coauthors Sheldon Feldner and James
Bierman appear to say is this; only by
spontaneous development (as exemplified by their own play) can pernicious
dogmatic control be eliminated. If the
Wolf represents Christ, then not even
the saint who has been declared patron
of animals ultimately understands the
essence of Christianity.
Kafka, by UBC's Brian Shein, is
perhaps the most original drama ever
written in Vancouver. This play received its first production at the
Alumni Festival last December and was
the undeclared winner. Part of its attractiveness lies in Shein's professed
assumption that his ritual is open to
any number of interpretations. Conscious of itself on stage, Kafka aims at
a theatrical experience which will involve the entire congregation. The initial production in December, directed
by John Rapsey, focused upon a robot
approach which achieved a wonderful
symphonic pattern of language. The
current production, directed by John
Wright, does not reach toward such a
canticle movement because it stresses
more the individual characters. The
quality of the Elizabethan poetry is
heightened by characteristic speech and
costumes. But because neither interpretation stands out as the correct one,
therein lies the beauty of Kafka. It is
an eternal ritual constantly recharging,
rewriting itself, each time it is performed.
Doktor Weerd, also by Shein, is less
original than its precursor. Performed
during the Festival of Arts last week,
this play owed much of its plot to the
too familiar quack scientist. But once
again the experimenting Shein has done
with the inter-rhythm of language provided a cathartic experience. Concerned, I believe, with first man (Scott
Swan) and first woman (Joan Sukava)
who were controlled by the omniscient
Doktor Weerd (David Petersen), the
play reached backward and forward in
time to provide a universality with
Coleridgian overtones.
Along with Shein's play, Daddy
Violet was the most unusual campus
offering of the past week. Flown directly from New York, this production
starred Dan Leach, Carole Getzoff and
George Birimisa (who wrote the play).
Like Kafka (both plays are reproduced
in the latest issue of PRISM international) it aspired toward a total rapport
with its audience, but proceeded in a
^completely different style.   The house
estival nX|
&
iTx
lights remained up throughout, and the
set remained simply a disordered stage
coalescing in no way with the action.
For the most part the actors and actress bantered with the audience who
appeared to relish Birimisa's flagrant
disregard for accepted theatre. At one
point members of the audience danced
with the performers to become, in effect, part of the cast.
This somewhat casual rapport with
the audience was, however, not without
danger because it proved inimical to
the part of the play where Birimisa
got about his message. When he observed with the other characters the
Salinas Valley — forced their attention
from the Mekong Delta — the play
reached its crucial center which the
characters has attempted to discover
within themselves. At this point in the
performance I saw, some member of
the audience, clinging to the accepted
pattern of informality established previously, disrupted the impact of the
moment. What is important is this:
while the play comes off surprisingly
well, there will always be the peril
of its losing cohesion when this cohesion is needed most.
There were other intriguing plays
this week at UBC, all student-produced.
I found Birdbath by Leonard Malfi particularly interesting because of the
direction it received from Jace Vander-
Veen who nicely redeemed himself
from File No. 12 which he directed last
December. Leanne White and Mark
Parry seemed perfectly cast and rendered illuminating performances.
Orison, a short one-act play by the
French-writing Spaniard, Frenando Ar-
rabal, was competently arranged by
Adrienne Wintermans who sought from
Jeremy Young and Michele Bjornson a
childlike relation of expression. Staged
about a candle-lighted coffin the play
debated the absurdity of ethic and
moral codes, and asked such questions
as "What is felicity?" "What is injustice?"
At Sea is a one-act comedy in style
of the Absurd. Three men stranded on
a raft and dressed in tuxedos attempt
to resolve their hunger problem by
resorting to cannibalism. The antics of
the cast, directed superbly by Josephine Patrick, provided a delightful
look at our political system by the
Polish author, Slawomir Mrozek.
Finally at the Arts Club, what is
probably the tightest production of the
current season, runs until Feb. 24.
Help Stamp Out Marriage is a flimsy
negligee as far as story goes, but the
acting is outstanding. Derek Ralston as
the frustrated husband has a pitch to
his voice which he manipulates with
the same dexterity as he does his face.
The result is hilarious
By REILLY BURKE
During the Festival of the Contemporary Arts we witnessed many interesting extensions of Renaissance art
forms, but perhaps the most unwittingly relevant event was that staged in
the Fine Arts Gallery.
The display titled Random Samples
N-42, and Piles was a spastic selection
of everyday things and rubbish coupled
with a few desperate rationalizations
pinned to a tackboard.
Arnold Rockman and Iain Baxter
maintained that something profound
happened when "profane" or commonplace objects were placed in a "sacred"
environment.
The profundity does not, however,
arise from this rather awkward juxtaposition, but lies in the fact that the
art gallery in the traditional sense is
no longer a sacred place. The Random
Sample show was inadvertantly an
acknowledgement that the relevance of
the contemporary arts comes from an
extreme involvement with process, the
end result being not nearly so important, and that the art gallery is nothing
more than a vestigial hangover from
the book age.
The exhibitors were vaguely aware
of this shifting emphasis when they
decided to include the correspondence
concerning their various decisions.
Other than this almost accidental revelation there is no recognition of the
fact that community artistic involvement is rapidly outgrowing the tedious
restrictions of scale and place.
We are all participating in the
death agonies of the art gallery, and
Mr. Rockman with Mr. Baxter's assistance is unknowingly dealing a few of
the fatal blows. It is ironic, but heartening, that the destruction of the gallery concept is at the hands of the
Insiders, the artists themselves.
The Outside People, too, are beginning to realize that art galleries, like
outhouses, are repositories for the remains of a complex digestive process,
and that to habituate the gallery is not
unlike looking down the shit-house
hole. It may be fun the first time, but
after that it becomes obvious that the
act of doing is more significant than
the end product.
film
By ED HUTCHINS
Once again, out of the Parnassian
woodwork, the Contemporary Art Festival, in full and eerie cry, stridently
informing us that we live in today.
(Actually, I had noticed this.)
Each year the art seems to say less,
the celebrated dissent seems more institutionalized, (or just phony,) the artist more and more a courtier of the
rich or of academic institutions.
Immersed in these and other comradely thoughts I approached the festival films with fangs bared, but in
fact they weren't half bad (the films,
I mean, not the fangs.)
Let it be understood that the presentation of these films followed the
well-known Vancouver multi-media environment tradition, that is, a modest
opening speech followed by simultaneous breakdown of everything, so that
my appreciation was surely incomplete.
Be that as it may, my impression is
that I saw no masterpieces and, I guess,
no really good films either. What I
did find was a mood in which, I believe,
honest people can make honest art.
Since Vancouver's artistic mood is pure
fascist hothouse, this is doubly surprising.
We began on Friday with films and
kines    from    a   CBC   program   called |
Enterprise.
The film-makers involved were unaffected. They kicked up their heels
engagingly and cheerfully communicated the feeling that it's great to be young
and in.
A film called "Suppose You Threw
a War and Nobody Came" (or some- '
thing like that) by Morrie Ruvinsky
deserves special comment. This film
is not only well put together but has
something cogent to say, although it
could be shorter. It differs from the
other Festival films in that Mr. Ruvinsky plays it very safe and uses only the
most tried and true neo-Dada 1950's
images, plus some Bruce  Conner.
This was probably the best film I
saw, but not the most felicitous. Ruvinsky is plainly on the way up. This does
him credit as a person, but not when
it appears as part of the mood of his
film.
Tuesday we had films from the
Vancouver School of Art and from
SFU. The VSA films were very in, but
seemed to have been made by rather
sober people, and I found them a bit
off-putting. They were however, well
prepared and photographed.
The SFU films were fewer in number than the press releases from this
bastion of non-conformity had led me
to expect. A film called Swami by
Paul Bryant seemed to embody the
virtues and defects of this group. Beginning from a cut-and-dried idea, Mr.
Bryant produced a routinely photographed and edited movie that unexpectedly developed some odd and perturbing imagery, which he then left hanging in mid-air in a way that suggested
that he would rather make an incomplete film  than   an emotional one.
Finally, I believe more attention
should be paid to Arnold Saba. While
I saw no one film of his which I particularly liked, his work as a whole
suggests that he is an honorable gentleman with a fine eye, who is very
industrious and doesn't give a damn if
he makes a masterpiece or not. These
are perilous times. Modern art is not
troubled by its enemies but is in immediate deadly peril from its friends.
Perhaps the approach of Saba and his
partner Gordon Fidler is the best, after
all.
'%
■•»-*
— lawrence woodd photo
In the beginning was Homer. Various ancient and not so ancient
Greeks lay around on couches stoned. There were also damsels. In one
corner,.  Homer  arose,  twanged   plaintively  upon   his   harp,  and   iliaded.
That,   Virginia,   is   how   poetry   began.
But naughty William Caxton came along, and it all got printed.
People read. Now, unaccustomed as we are to public speaking, we find
it difficult, almost impossible, to listen to poetry. So we turn on, and there
are pretty lights likewise turned on, and grass harps twanging plaintively,
and we iliad again.
That, Virginia, is how poetry ended. p£   3hre«
Cultural Oppression in the Affluent Society
By GABOR MATE
Hundreds of millions of men,
women, and children live in conditions of severe deprivation throughout the world. They are poor, diseased, and hungry — and they are
oppressed. That is, the opportunity
to improve their lives is denied to
them by the social-political systems
they live under. They suffer, but they
are not allowed to alleviate their
suffering. This is what one usually
means by oppression.
While it is becoming increasingly
evident that poverty, disease, and
hunger are no strangers to North
America either, it is also true that
in a strictly materialistic sense large
portions; of the North American population are in an incomparably better
position than the majority of the
world's peoples. Does this, however,
mean that oppression is alien to our
continent?
Nobody would seriously argue
that the North American blacks, Indians, as well as the poorest section
of the white lower classes are not
oppressed at least to some degree —
but what about the so-called affluent
majority? More specifically, what
about the white middle class?
Part of the oppression of the black
American has been the cultural image
he was forced to accept of himself.
Not only was he overly treated as an
inferior, he was also made to believe
in his own inferiority. To enslave
someone permanently, he must be
given the mentality of a slave. Oppression, thus becomes not merely a
political, but a cultural expression as
well.
The white middle class does not
possess this consciousness of inferiority overtly — they think of
themselves as being free, the rulers
of their own destiny. But considered
in any real context this consciousness of freedom reveals itself as a
false consciousness, as a mask for
the real lack of control these people
exercise over their own lives. Their
real oppressed status is kept from
them by this cultural mask of freedom.
In this supposedly democratic
society the people involved in any
particular institution have little or no
say in the running of those institutions. Students share no control in
the daily life on their schools and universities, workers have no control
over their places of employment,
and so on. People are constantly
manipulated, just as the consumer is
constantly manipulated so that his
freedom to choose becomes the mean
ingless activity of succumbing to this
or that Madison Avenue technique.
What is know as democracy becomes the ritual selection of one of
two or three sets of candidates every
four years — candidates amongst
whom any real differences are nonexistent. But even if this democratic
process was in itself a meaningful
one, it does not extend to the level
of affecting the people's daily lives.
For the day to day decisions that affect people's lives are not made on
the strict political level, tout rather
in the institutions in which people
are involved in from day to day. And
it is precisely in these institutions
that the pretense: of democracy is not
even made.
From this situation follows that
while people think they are free, they
at the same time have a very acute
feeling of impotence about the forces
that   shape   their   lives.   Their belief
For this society is largely composed
of individuals who are forever pursuing goals which cannot possibly
satisfy them. All the values of this
society reduce them to the pursuit
of the possession of objects so that
people themselves become objects in
each other's eyes.
What is an object? An object is
something we wish to use for our
own selfish purposes without any
regard to the effects of our actions
on the object itself. And in this society people are forever using each
other.
A sexy women is an object and
what we wish to do with her flows
not from our recognition of her humanity, but only from our recognition
in her of those qualities which we
think would satisfy us. Conversely,
women are made to share the same
attitude towards men. Thus people
are   very often  mistrustful   of  each-
ses," says the artist, "simply would
not understand:" Not really understanding the real forces which operate in the world, the artist and the
poet denies the existence of any order
outside his own mind, and his art
and his poetry reflects a very bleak,
disordered view of the world.
In many cases art abandons the
search for order, for real understanding and declares that real understanding is not even possible. Rather
than being a journey into the world,
it becomes an escape from it.
And this need for escape is also
reflected in the widespread use of
drugs of all kinds in North America.
People bewail the spreading use of
marijuana, but they do not understand the underlying social causes
which impel so many young people
today to attempt an escape from their
real lives. The use of drugs is not a
revolution, but it is a rebellion —
however an unconscious one—-against
in their own freedom coupled with
their actual inability to act in any
meaningfully free way produces confusion, disillusionment and alienation.
Probably nowhere in the world is
there mass alienation on such a scale
as in North America. Probably nowhere is there such widespread
scepticism about the nature of man,
of society, and the political  process.
Alienation, we are told, is the
inevitably product of life in a "modern, industrialized society." It is assumed that modernity and affluence
in themslves will impose a particular
quality on any society which becomes modern and affluent. McLu-
han's "the medium is the message"
is thus accepted at face value, Modernity and affluence are the medium,
and quite aside from the content of
the particular modern and affluent
society, this medium will carry a
message of alienation. The real
sources of alienation, the forces of
cultural oppression acting in North
America, are thus not recognized.
And yet the effects of this cultural oppression are all around us.
They are evident, first of all, in the
false values this society tries to impose   on   the   individuals   within   it.
other — they are mistrustful of
being uaed. (i.e., they are mistrustful
of being objectified). They see themselves and each other not as full human beings, but as a conglomeration
of particular usable qualities, repertoire of functional roles.
To protect themselves from being
used people react in the same way
one usually acts when he is threatened: they build up defenses. Each
man thus becomes his own ego-fortress. Constantly being manipulated,
one sees the threats of manipulation
in everything and everybody. He
thinks he is free, and yet he is helplessly trapped. His attitude towards
the world he lives in becomes increasingly coloured by scepticism and
despair. Being alone in his self-made
ego castle he feels nobody does and
and nobody can understand him. The
search for a soul-mate, an understanding fellow human being becomes an
overwhelming need.
One needs to look only at our
current modes of artistic expression
to recognize the degree of loneliness,
alienation, and despair in this society.
The artist has virtually abdicated any
effort at communication with anyone but a few like souls — "the mas-
the drab respectability, the aimless-
ness, the lack of real values in North
American life.
Everything becomes a "problem"
—there is the "problem of the youth",
the "Negro problem", the "drug problem", and "Vietnam problem" —
and it is never seen that these are
all mere symptoms of a much deeper
social malaise in North American
society. The wealthiest society in history is also the most screwed-up society in the history of the world. And
yet many people—hung-up, screwed-
up, alienated, and despairing — cannot see themselves as victims, the
victims of a new form of oppression.
Oppression, of course, is not new.
Nor is the fact that the underlying
causes of oppression are basically
socio-economic and political new. But
the form that this oppression imposes on North American culture and
on the minds and personalities of
North American individuals shaped
by this culture, this form is new. Or,
more correctly it is the most sophisticated and widespread development
of the cultural oppression that has
been inflicted on the western world
throughout the twentieth-century.
f
Poems by
February   16,   1968
ON THE COVER: Let's all
get up and dance to a
song that was a hit before
your    mother    was    born.
The late Judy Bing, Arnold Saba, Reilly Burke
and Gordon Fidler wallowed in the gutter. Stephen
Scobie was out of sight
and out of (his) mind.
"Such bourgeois decadence," muttered Bert Hill
looking in the direction of
Hanoi.
THE LEG IRONS
With hungry mouth open like a wicked
monster,
Each night the irons devour the legs of
people:
The  jaws   grip   the  right  leg   of every
prisoner:
Only the left is free to bend and stretch.
Yet there is one thing stranger in this
world:
People   rush   in   to   place   their  legs   in
irons.
Once they are shackled, they can sleep
in peace.
Otherwise they would have no place to
lay their heads.
— from Prison Diary
Chi Minh
LEARNING TO PLAY CHESS
To  wear  away  the time,  we  learn  to
play chess,
In thousands, horses and infantry chase
each other.
Move quickly into action,  in  attack  or
in retreat.
Talent and swift feet give us the upper
hand.
Eyes must look far ahead, and thoughts
be deeply pondered.
Be bold and unremitting in attack.
Give   the   wrong   command,   and   two
chariots  are rendered useless.
Come   the  right  moment,  a  pawn  can
bring you victory.
The   forces   on   both  sides   are   equally
balanced,
But victory will come only to one side.
Attack, retreat, with unerring strategy:
Then you will merit the title of a great
commander.
Friday,  February  16,  1968
THE      U BYSSEY OTon" magazme
turns to steel
By BRAD ROBINSON
The first two appearances
of Iron, published out of
Simon Fraser, were unremarkable; but No. 3 appears
and BANG! It moves into the
remarkable.
Iron could easily have become an organ for all those
disposed to "creative writing", a collection of the silly
pap of misdirected sensibilities. But Iron III has shifted
away from that current and
has struck some kind of
shore. Whether it is known or
unknown, is too early to tell.
But that's why I'm writing
this. So as many as possible,
who want to, can follow this
'small community of poets' as
they do their mapping. In
that sense, the community
will grow and the new land,
if it is new, will be settled.
What exists in Iron III is
the evidence of at least four
poets who have been exchanging among themselves
the "energies" of Blaser and
Spicer. There is a clearness
of perception, an assured
handling of things, an exciting presence of imagination
in all  of the various  poems
| printed.
For   me,    Colin   Stuart's
I poem   is   the   strongest   and
most    assured.    Perhaps    be-
1 cause of the flow there, the
grasp I can't resist that car-
| ries  me  through  to  the  last
lines:
I to adorn Psyche's arms tangled
around
| the limbs of the sleeping Eros
Inside of the Nighfs door.
There   are   people   around
who freak out at names like
' Psyche    and    Eros,    cawing
"Academic!   Academic!"   But
it just ain't so. They are a
recognition, a naming, a coming to. To use the intellect is
not selling out. It's the slap
that makes it. Makes a man
carry it, his eyes bent a bit,
newly. If Psyche is there, in
the presence, she's got to be
there in the poem. Not as a
game —- which is the diff.
Which, in a sense, is why
Brian Fawcetts poem "Orph-
eous up North" doesn't quite
make it for me. I get the
feeling he's tooling around
with something that isn't always there. But still the idea
of the poem is a trip:
One caught him  (Orpheus)  on
the forehead another smashed
the lyre
three loggers caught him in the
can where he hid
and kicked him to death
That's the first poem in the
series and gives us location:
we know (and if anybody
doesn't, they ain't bin in B.C.,
ever) those loggers. Orpheus
into B.C. But after Poem No.
1 Fawcett takes us back to a
place where the sensation of
the event is no longer present.
Orpheus in B.C. Nobody has
to look that far. Orpheus is
one thing. And comes to us
here. But Eurydice. Eurydice
is that child full of innocence
— the Indian child — look
at an Indian child — Eurydice
is the child. Is Blake. Is Jack
Spicer. Waiting for the open-
ess of Orpheus' look. Which is
the disclosure of realms.
Death does not exist without
the vision of it. And for me,
Fawdett does not give me
that. Just because he tools,
■where  Colin Stuart doesn't.
What I have said are personal notes. What follows is
that Iron be read.
Yes, we get letters
Editor, Page Friday:
It has occurred to me recently that a creeping insidious blackguardly manoeuver is being perpetrated before
our innocently ingenuous unused to penetrating the depths
of perfidy eyes; I refer namely to the subtle undermining
of all higher impulses exhibited Friday-ly by Uncle Gordie,
Uncle Arnie and Cousin Al plus, as we see in the February
2nd issue of your esteemed and much (and justly) lauded
journal and font, by an ever-growing ever-alarming array
of (shall we call them?) relatives (one is moved to ponder
gloomily the exact nature of these (relationships); the
thoughtful reader of integrity and keenness cannot help
seeing, in the enlarging of the circle of unabashed relatives,
the most telling sign so far of the truly tenacious and baleful attraction of these (as the image-makers have it) unpretentious noble-browed, limpid-eyed young journalist —
there could quite possibly further be found in the use of
the appelations "uncle", etc., reminiscent of beloved childhood legitimate newspaper columns of birthday greetings,
childish dreams and scarcely-breathed ambitions, the very
darkest plot, striking at the very roots of all we held
dear. Is the influencing of our wee ones to be the next
stage in the still nebulous tenebrous but obviously inexorable emerging <as serpents from a fen) PLAN?
But I grow exhausted as haunted fears tumble over
each other in stretto — these nefarious plotters of revolution and such-like displayed irreverence and worse two
weeks ago towards religion, from whose foundation when
rattled, as is well known, run rampant trembling reverberations throughout the constructs of our entire community.
This week (February 2nd issue) they blatantly capitalize
upon the sensationalistic employment by three cartoonists
of sexual assualt, swearing and naked heroine, a capitalization so base, even for the uncles, that one can only clasp
pone's hands to one's bosom tremulously.
MINNA PANKSTROM
North Vancouver
rsr%^in*$F\
By MICHAEL UDY
Now we know what Judy Collins has been
singing about: Leonard Cohen's album has at
last been released in Canada (Songs of Leonard
Cohen, on the Columbia label).
The jacket is quite simple with a picture of
Cohen's face on the front and a painting on the
back of a young woman in a cell, engulfed in
flames, manacled at the wrists, while her
hands and her serene face are lifted upwards.
The style of the painting is also quite simple,
but there is something curious about it. Why
is this very simple picture with its obvious
symbolism decorating the album of Cohen's
subtleties?
Whatever the answer, it has something to
do with Cohen's attitudes to romance and realism. It seems that this is a time that demands
honesty and fact. We can no longer tell the
story of our lives in Spenser's terms, or Emily
Bronte's, or Margaret Mitchell's, for we know
life now precludes such romance except perhaps, for the rich who are not like you and me.
Cohen knows this, and his songs do not ignore
casual love, homosexuality, or sado-masochism
and other facts of the age. We know facts are,
but what have they got to do with us, or what
do they mean? To Cohen they mean love, and
each man has his love. Sometimes it seems
Cohen is walking a line between romance and
fact. "Dress Rehersal Rag", which is not on this
album, but which Judy Collins has done, on
In My Life, poses this problem. The content of
the song presents a very down picture, an ex-
tlfSjr^^ "V\\\W
rloration of degredation; the difficulty is to
know on what level Cohen means this. Are we
supposed to react directly to the song and say,
"that's beautiful, romance has its price", or are
we to say, "well, it would be easy to fall into
liking the song directly, but things like that
don't happen to most people, I suspect my misty
feelings". The end of the song doesn't solve
the problem, it just puts a tremendous distance
on it. Where is the line between romance and lc
realism?
To those who have become accustomed to
Judy Collins' arrangements of Cohen's songs
this album may be a bit of a surprise. Cohen's
music is not as intricate and pretty as Miss
Collins'. His voice occasionally doesn't quite
make the note, and there is not the same sense
of space in his arrangements. But it is Cohen,
chanting, close and hypnotic. Behind his guitar
are a variety of sounds, orchestral and vocal.
"So long, Marianne" uses the chorus very playfully to remind one of an old Phil Spector production "To Know Him is to Love Him". The
end of "One of Us Cannot be Wrong" uses a
combination of peaceful whistling and frantic
"ah-ing" to produce a very distressing feeling.
None of this means the music is bad, quite the
contrary; it's just very different from Judy
Collins'.
The songs are about love. Cohen has a
mythology of love involving teachers, strangers,
friends and lovers. The teachers show us what
we might have found out if only they hadn't
come and told us first to establish their power.
They give us the feeling we're one step behind:
It is certain that we can
look forward to new releases
being thought of as not songs
at all, but short movies —
and surely they ■will sometimes drop music, to be
simply the latest popular
movies to be played at home.
Just what medium they will
be — tape, film, or discs —
depends on what comes out
first and cheapest. Right now
Almost by definition, pop
music and pop art make use
of the most modern of equipment and techniques, to produce a result strikingly
meaningful to men in our age.
What will happen tomorrow, when we really do enter
the global Village universe
that we are promised (provided we are able to survive
it)? Perhaps a hint of just
one of the possible developments can already be seen.
A principle of pop music is
its general availability and
low price. The one element
that the popular artist in this
vein is missing is obviously
visual. The music is almost at
the point where it will be
demanding its own visual accompaniment, to complete the
total experience.
Certain steps towards this
have come about. In France,
there was a craze a few years
ago, for juke boxes that played a film simultaneously with
a record. The Beatles are in
the habit of making a short
film to go with each of their
new releases, although they
are seen only once, on television. The most promising
advance is the invention of
discs that play not only
sound, but still pictures on a
screen as well.
costs are prohibitive, but
that won't last long.
As popular entertainment
moves away from diversion,
towards enlightenment, fewer
people are dancing, and more
are listening. As it becomes
this total experience, one supposes that "stereo" video effects will arrive, then perhaps total reality 3-D type
presentation, and, ultimately,
experiences that can be plugged right into your mind, to
"live". Hopefully, there will
be inexpensive mind-recorders, too, for setting down
rapid thoughts, or for "imagining" home movies.
It is a new style of popular
art that is quickly approaching us, and the first people
into it will undoubtedly become pop heroes, or bloody
rich, or both.
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Friday,  February   16,   1968 / was handsome, I was strong
I knew the words of every song
Did my singing please you?
"No, your words were wrong."
Strangers are those who live in their own
;, looking for its fulfillment:
You stand there so nice in your blizzard
of ice
Oh please let me come into the storm.
3ut strangers are not teachers:
Please understand I never had a secret
charm
To get to the root of this or any other
matter.
'riends are like "The Sisters of Mercy":
If your life is a leaf
That the seasons tear off and condemn
They will bind you with love
That is graceful and green as a stem.
overs are mysteries:
And just when you mean to tell her
That you have no love to give her
Then she gets you on her wave length
And she lets the river answer
That you've always been her lover.
11 these are part of Cohen's testimony to
sligion of each man's love.
By PETER LINCOLN
1967 witnessed (accident?) the death
of John Coltrane and Otis Redding, both
giants in their separate and related fields
of Afro-American music.
Trane was the universe's greatest
tenor saxophonist at the time of his
death. His playing influenced not only
young musicians just starting (band
bitches, all night jam sessions and finally blowing before the ACT) but as
well his contemporaries and pretem-
poraries — people who already had the
talent, the experience, the name, the
crowds and the stuff that man does not
live alone by (usually its a collective
thing.) He left behind a legacy of what
the new jazz feels like and where its
going. On Atlantic and Impulse. Also
scattered on other brands with Thelonius
Monk, Miles Davis, Cannonball Adderly
and others. Listen right here at the UBC
record library to what he heard.
Redding was a rhythm and blues
vocalist, composer and producer, selling
mostly in the American r&b (ghetto)
markets but starting to penetrate the
other American hit parade as well. He
had a unique blues singing style and
his records usually featured excellent
guitar and brass arrangements and of
course, the drums. The Rolling Stones
used a few of his titles, Bob Dylan contrasted him to Rick Nelson and Marshall
McLuhan somehow was used in describing his style. Recognition. Two of
Redding's classics are "Respect" and
'Try a Little Tenderness." On Volt-
Atlantic.
But   1967   had   some   hopeful   signs |
(Detour Ahead?), as two already acknowledged   jazz   talents,   Aretha   Franklin
and    Cannonball    Adderly    arrived    in |
Popular 100 terms.
Aretha Franklin had received quite
a few years back a Downbeat New Star
Award as a jazz vocalist and had had
a minor popular success with "Running
Out of Fools" — seemed to be heading
for the oblivion reserved for most other
colored artists. A switch to Atlantic,
a million-seller, "I Ain't Never Loved a i
Man", a few more and in one year from
"Who?" to No. 1 female vocalist as per
Billboard (No. 2 Nancy Sinatra).
Sister Aretha's new sound is gospel.
The ground for it had been broken to a
degree by the Staple Singers, also receivers of a Downbeat award, a straight
gospel group. Gospel has always been
an important part of r&b but it took
Aretha to bring it home and consequently a large part of it to the bank.
Also in 1967 a funky little instrumental, "Mercy, Mercy, Mercy" became
a big hit for Julian Cannonball Adderly.
The alto sax player had over the years
developed a reputation for this type of
in-the-groove music with two compositions penned by his trumpet-playing
brother Nat—"Sack o' Woe" and "Work
Song."
Like Aretha and more so, Cannonball
was a recognized man-mountain in the
modern jazz field and his popularity
with this instrumental penned by his
Austrian-born (those Austrians sure
have rhythm) pianist, are a good thing
for jazz; better than the few commercially successful jazz-pop records that Ramsey Lewis had in earlier boss radio
time. Lewis' records were basic and
simple statements as was "Mercy" but
Lewis unfortunately never goes much
deeper so that people who listened to
him never found out what was going
on in jazz today, With Adderly, just
flip over the record and, you're listening
to jazz being made right in front of
your ears;  jazz right here,  right now.
UNRULY HAIR?
Best Men's Hairstyling Service
at the
Upper Tenth  Barber
4574 W. 10th Ave.
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send $1.00 AIRMAIL to: ISIS,
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Friday, February  16,  1968
THE     UBYSSEY take off
on an
elephant kick
with pants
and
body shirts
They're the new fun-and-games looks by
MR. LEONARD . . . and going great in the
Inner Circle! Join the "Group" . . . pair up
the new low-rise wide-ankle elephant pants
with a skinny form-fitting body shirt . . .
and get in on the fun of it!
A. Cotton   jertey   knif   body   shirt,   \1   colours.   S.M.L.   $12
B. Gangster   stripe   elephant   pants   in   wool.    Navy, grey
or   brown.   6 - 14 $20
C. Long    sleeve    body    shirt.    12    colours.   S.M.L. $14
D. Tattersall   check  elephant  pants   in   wool.   6 - 14 $17
From   the  exciting   Mr.   Leonard  collection
in    the    Bay   Inner   Circle,    third   floor
iSiuteon's 13ay, (Tompann
INCORPORATED  2*-u MAY 1670 pf 7even,
LEFT OF QUEBEC
By FRANCOIS FRIGON
To the Left, the problem of French Canada is an
economic and social one. It is safe to say that there
is within the Left a general consensus as to what should
be done:. Where the different factions differ is on the
means. Before analyzing the various attitudes, a brief
description of the problem is necessary.
The main problem now as in the past is to improve
the standard of living and the opportunities for individual development of the working class. While this
is Canada's as well as Quebec's problem, it is especially
acute there.
Industrialization has made Quebec a nation of proletarians (see Porter's Vertical Mosaic). The traditional
alliance of the English and French-speaking elites best
known as Duplessisism succeeded in keeping the standard of living and of education of this class at a much
lower level than in the comparable province of Ontario.
Consequently, the average Quebec worker is much more
vulnerable to unemployment and has much less opportunity than the average Ontario worker. The collapse
of this alliance released the discontent which had for
so long been building up.
A tremendous desire for change swept Quebec after
1959. This attitude is manifested in the strength and
especially the militancy of the trade union movement
and in the scramble of the old parties to adopt reformist images. Yet, this mood is in part frustrated by the
fragmentation of the unions, by the absence of a political arm and by the pull of traditional loyalties. Nevertheless, this is the dominant force behind the pressure
for social change.
Another social problem, which does not concern
the Left except as an obstacle to change, is that of the
traditional elites. This group with its ultra-conservative
mentality was the self-appointed guardian fo Quebec's
culture. It dominated Quebec's French speaking society.
But now it finds itself shoved aside by foe rising working class and, as we shall see, by the Bewly dominant
bureaucratic elites. To regain or to nvM&tain at least
the vesli ges of its former position, it has had to abandon
its traditional opposition to social and economic reforms
in order to win allies.
BUREAUCRATIC ELITE
The unknown quantity, -the variable,; of this situation is the new bureaucratic elite. Child of the indus-
11 i.i!3ration and the accompanying liberalization of
Quebec, this group with its new attitude and skills wants
1!.'' same opportunities which its English-speaking coun-
u rpart enjoys. But tt:finds itself blocked in national
j.wlitual and economic institutions by the dominant
Knglish-speaking elite. At the provincial level, it block-
«d to a lesser extent especially by the c'l-rical segment
<rf the traditional elite. *^h^ result is tin* nationalism,
1he anti-clericalism and tKe T*&hq$Q$gx',pt thise KrouQJh
It is on the basis., at this Buid!* situation that :jfoe
various segenients of ||J& Left havavllad to mate»-€^>ice
as to the best means of Implementing their |§|ji: Many
like Pierre E Tritriea&and J^-4$lM&fad h^Sjfe^fitosen
^IbS"""0 ^nt*~"S™'^*ad "gradCtirf t^Mtn^^Si the
Liirjjfll party. Why?^.TOe^-;"are |ohy&ie«t, first of all,
that 'fhe new nationaffeSi'-is fcut-'a jiesgV-iand potentially
even more repressive fornuol the- old. Secondly, they
believe that a true social reform party cannot take
hold in such a traditionally conservative society. Their
fear and their despair, however, has driven them into
that ancient trap of radicals and reformers—the Liberal
party. That it is a trap is all too obvious. The English
speaking establishment and its French speaking allies
have a long experience in dealing with this type.
It is probable that the largest part of the Left including Rene Levesque and UBC's own Daniel Latouche
have chosen nationalism with its up-to-the-minute image
of swinging radicalism. This group escapes the traps of
the Canadian establishment only to fall into those of
the Quebec establishment. They see clearly, for one
thing, that the Confederation arrangement has been
used successfully to block fundamental reforms. Another factor is the blurring of cultural and social — economic issues. This is due to the Quebecois' position of
inferiority not only socially and economically but also
culturally. Furthermore, the dominance of the new
elites with its "radical" attitude in the Nationalist
movement heightens this confusion of cultural and
social issues. On top of all of this, Nationalism appears
to provide a short-cut to change. It appears to be a
very "realistic" means of implementing the Lteft's
program.
Yet, there is another way. There is a way which
avoids these traps and ensures the ultimate triumph of
the Left. In Quebec, this middle way is the Nouveau
Parti Democratique. Admittedly, the weakness of this
party makes it an "unrealistic" option at the moment.
But the potential is there. To make it into an efficient
instrument of change adapted to Quebec's needs requires
patient, dedicated and clear-sighted work. Above all, it
requires tliat profound realism which is the soul of
Left.   Does the Left in Quebec have what it takes?
BETTER BUY BOOKS
UNIVERSITY
TEXT BOOKS
NON-FICTION
PAPERBACKS
Specializing in
Review Notes
and Study Guides
224-4144
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Students $1.00
Adults $2.00
imc
Special Events Regrets That
JUDY   COLLINS
has cancelled her engagement
and will not be appearing
at UBC March 7
Friday, February  16,  1968
THE      UBYSSEY JAZZ
There's a full weekend ahead for blues
and jazz fans. Appearing at Isy's is the original king of rock and roll, Lillle Richard,
belting out songs like "Lawdy Miss Clawdy",
"Boney Maroni", "Long Tall Sally" and other
sentimental favorites. The band under the
leadership of Bumps Blackwell, of Ike and
Tina Turner fame, provides the excellent
backing for Little Richard and two fine supporting  acts.
Over at the Marco Polo the exciting
Gospel Jazz Singers bring back some of that
old-time religion with some very new-time
sounds. And if you still have some money
left and you're still willing, the Elegant Parlour features singer-organist Aaron McNeill
and The Revolving Door, and they keep going way into the wee wee hours.
There aro also two free shows you can
catch.
The first is on CHQM-FM at 4 p.m. Saturday
and two and a half hours later Bill and Bob's
Record Shop provides us with some more of
the good music on CKLG-FM. Whatever you
do this weekend make sure you have enough
money two weeks from now when Nina
Simone makes her appearance at the Marco
Polo, and you'll be more than amply rewarded by this great musician's talent.
DANCE
For all ye who like to dance, Vancouver
is not lacking the latest in music and light
shows.
Every night until Sunday My Indole Ring
is performing at the Village Bistro, on Fourth.
They are pretty well established as one of
Vancouver's four top bands.
Perhaps the most uninhibited dance-light
show of the year will be the one at Brock
Hall tonight at 9 p.m. It is the grand finale of
the Contemporary Arts Festival, and features
— get this — a body-painting contest. The
person who arrives with the biggest percentage of body decoratively painted wins $20,
and the best painted face wins $5. Total nudity
is encouraged. Admission is only $1.25.
$r
U. S. S. R.
Special tour leaves Aug. 24.
Moscow,  Leningrad,   Samarkand,
Tashkent, and others.
Led by Mr. A. Ohanjanian
Dept. of Slavonic Studies
3 Weeks $1205 (all inclusive)
Those in Europe already, may join
tour in Moscow. Cost and details
on request.
Hagen's Travel  Service Ltd.
7 OFFICES
2996   W.   Broaway
738-5651
982   Denman   St.
682-7254
925   W.   Georgia
684-2448
4841    Victoria    Drive
879-4575
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431-6674
|407   Columbia,   N.W.
526-7878
1425  Marine  Dr., W.V.-
926-4304
HAGEN'S
Open 9-5  p.m.  Incl.  Saturday
TRAVEL
ON  A SHOE  STRING
The Youth Hostel organization is well established
in over 40 countries. Youth Hostels exist in Asia,
Europe, North and South America and Africa. In
all 4000 well-equipped Youth Hostels are ready
and at your disposal when travelling. Travel the
economic   hostel  way.
WITH THE
YOUTH HOSTELS
1406 West Broadway, Vancouver 9
738-0918 Days
738-9838 Evenings
DEPARTMENT OF THEATRE
presents
!&
THE SCHOOL FOR SCAUDAL
Witty Comedy of Manners
by   RICHARD   B.  SHERIDAN
ANNUAL STUDENT PRODUCTION
Directed  by John  Brockington
Designed by Richard Kent Wilcox
FEBRUARY 20 ■ 24,  8:30 p.m.
Student Tickets $1.00
(available   for   all   performances)
SPECIAL STUDENT PERFORMANCE
Thursday, February 22 — 12:30 p.m.
Tickets:  Frederic  Wood  Theatre  Rm.  207  or  222-2678
Support Your Campus Theatre
—i^—FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE——-
A
When flower-power isn't
quite enough
here's how to register
another kind of protest
Join CUSO. Protest against the knowledge gap that separates the developed and
developing countries of the world. That's what CUSO is all about. The salary is
small (you're a kind of economic drop-out for two years) but the satisfactions are
large. CUSO has about 900 people at work abroad. If you are qualified in a
professional or technical field and are willing to work overseas for two years, join
CUSO, Canadian University Service Overseas.
-Tell us what you can do. We'll tell you where you are needed.—i
I would like to know more about CUSO.
My qualifications are as follows:
I (will) hold_
(degree, diploma, certificate or other verification of skill)
from
(course)
(university, college, trade or technical institute, etc.)
Name_
Address_
_Prov.
Send to:
Mr.   Jack   Thomas,
International   House,
University  of   British   Columbia,
Vancouver,  B.C.
CUSO
A world of opportunity (C-68)
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday,   February   16,   1968 THE     UBYSSEY
Page 13
Student uptight over bind
UBC's main library has put at least one student in a bind.
"It's one for the books," said Perrin Lewis,
arts 4, as he told Wednesday of his battle with
library bureaucracy.
Economics major Lewis borrowed two copies
of a book entitled Physics and Politics, by Walter
Bageot, to do research over the Christmas holidays.
The editions were published in 1948 and
1956. The only other copy in the library is the
first edition, published in 1896.
The books were due Jan. 12. Lewis returned
them a few days overdue.
SFU   cartoons
teach   sciences
BURNABY (CUP)—Simon Fraser University
is going into the cartoon business.
They figure it's the easiest way to get the
message across to students raised on Bugs Bunny,
the road runner, and Mr. Magoo.
They've recently installed a $14,000 animation stand for use in drawing the cartoons.
Al Sens, the cartoonist on staff there, plans
to use the animated films to help students grasp
complex subjects in biological sciences, chemistry, psychology and other areas of study.
Sens believes use of animated films in education will l>ecome widespread in future.
He says students are already trained by television to receive information this way.
"The techniques that sell soap flakes can be
used just as effectively to put across educational
material," he said.
"But then I got a letter from library assistant
Monica James informing me that I had borrowed
a copy of Physics and Politics, that it was long
overdue and that this was my final notice," he
said.
An attached note said the stacks had been
searched for the book and that unless it was
returned Lewis would have to pay for its replacement as well as the overdue fines.
"What in the name of the Dewey decimal
system does this mean?" Lewis asked.
He returned to the stacks, found the two editions on the shelf, checked them out and then
checked them back in.
"Then I sent a rather rude note to Miss James
telling her obviously my stack search was better
than hers and asking that I not be bothered
again," he said.
But Tuesday morning Lewis received a letter
from Miss James informing him that the missing
book, published in 1896 had not been returned,
and that her search was as thorough as his.
"That really shook me up," said Lewis.
"I looked at the IBM print out list and saw
the book was out in my name, then went to the
stacks to look for it.  It was there."
Lewis then checked the book out and took
it to Miss James.
"I brought your book back," he said.
"Good. Then you didn't really have to write
that rude letter," said Miss James.
"I found it in the stacks," said Lewis. He
then showed her that the book's card said it
hadn't been checked out since 1962.
"Everything is fine now, as long as I don't
get charged," he said. "But the whole thing
stacks up pretty badly against library bureaucracy."
WHY CHEMISTRY
SUPPLEMENTS ?
They make your course easier . . .
giving you a new understanding
by providing step-by-step explanations
of what you are studying.
They help you get more out of your course
by covering specialized subjects in
clear, concise language.
General Chemistry Monograph Series
THE STRUCTURE OF MOLECULES: AN INTRODUCTION TO MOLECULAR SPECTROSCOPY, by Gordon M. Barrow, Case Institute of Technology.
COORDINATION CHEMISTRY: THE CHEMISTRY OF METAL COMPLEXES, by Fred
Basolo, Northwestern University, and  Ronald  C.  Johnson,  Emory  University.
NUCLEI AND RADIOACTIVITY: ELEMENTS OF NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY, by Gregory R.
Choppin, Florida State University.
THE SHAPE OF CARBON COMPOUNDS: AN INTRODUCTION TO ORGANIC CHEMISTRY, by Werner Herz, Florida State University.
BEHAVIOR OF ELECTRONS IN ATOMS: STRUCTURE, SPECTRA, AND PHOTOCHEMISTRY OF ATOMS, by Robin M. Hochstrasser, University of Pennsylvania.
HOW CHEMICAL REACTIONS  OCCUR,  by Edward L. King, University of Colorado.
TRANSITIONAL ELEMENTS, by Edwin M. Larsen, University of Wisconsin.
ELEMENTARY CHEMICAL THERMODYNAMICS, by Bruce H. Mahan, University of
California, Berkeley.
Other Books of Related Interest
PROGRAMMED SUPPLEMENTS FOR GENERAL CHEMISTRY, by Gordon M. Barrow,
Malcom E. Kenney, Jean D. Lassila, Robert L. Litle, and Warren E. Thompson, Case
Institute of Technology. Two volumes.
STOICHIOMETRY AND STRUCTURE: FRESHMAN CHEMISTRY PROBLEMS AND HOW
TO SOLVE THEM, PART I, by Michell J. Sienko, Cornell University.
EQUILIBRIUM: FRESHMAN CHEMISTRY PROBLEMS AND HOW TO SOLVE THEM, PART
II, by Michell J. Sienko, Cornell University.
Visit Your
UBC   BOOKSTORE
VOLKSWAGEN
SPECIALISTS
Large Stock of Parts on Hand
CERTIFIED  MECHANICS
UNIVERSITY SHELL SERVICE
4314 W. 10th 224-0828
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LUTMCftAN
Alma  Mater  Society
OFFICIAL  NOTICES
NOTICE OF REFERENDUM
The following referendum will be held on
Tuesday, February 27,, 1968:—
"Are you  in  favour of amending  By-Law1 4  (3)(a)  of the
A.M.S. Constitution to read as follows:—
'(a) The President, who shall have successfully completed his second year or its equivalent, and who
has attended the University of British Columbia
for at least one year, and who has not previously
held the position of President of the Society.'
Yes No "
By-Law 4 (3){a) now reads as follows:—
"(a) The President, who shall have successfully completed his second year or its equivalent, and who
has attended the University of British Columbia
for at least two years, and who has not previously
held the position of President of the Society." Page  14
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday,  February  15,  1968
'TWEEN CLASSES
Body  painting  prized
$20 prize for the most painted body at the dance tonight,
Brock, 9 p.m. Three bands —
admission $1.25.
ED  US
Dance in Brock noon today
with Tomorrow's Eyes. Admission 25 cents.
FREDDY WOOD
Charlie, a hilarious one-act
play by Slawdmir Mrozek at
the Freddy Wood studio, noon.
Free.
FORESTRY US
Open House Saturday, 9:30
a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Tour of new
forestry building.
LSM
Freeway through Chinatown? — political responsibility and freeways. Dr. Walter
Hardwick Monday, noon, Bu.
104.
Chicago Street Scene. Lutheran student summer social
workers in Chicago slums,
Sunday at 3 p.m., followed by
supper at the Lutheran student
centre.
EAST ASIA SOC
Prof. Iida, dept. of religious
studies, Friday, 8 p.m., 1032
Davie. Bring refreshments.
DANCE  CLUB
Friday — open, Monday —
tango; Tuesday — review;
Wednesday — stepping out;
Thursday — pin classes; Friday
— open.
DESERET  CLUB
Grant Heaton speaks on Red
China, Monday, noon, Bu. 106.
SLAVONIC   CLUB
Regular  meeting,   noon,   IH,
music room.
JUDO CLUB
No club practice today.
IH  &  PHRATERES
International coffee hour.
Open to all women students
free of charge. Hear Jim
Tweedie, sociology dept. speak
on the Changing Role of Man.
CHORAL SOCIETY
Important practice Saturday,
2   p.m.,   mu.   113.   Picture   retakes.
'68 GRAD CLASS
Important gjeneral meeting
Tuesday, noon, Ang. 104. Tickets for grad party at Johnann
Strauss Feb. 21 available from
AMS or faculty reps. $2.50
per couple.
PC   CLUB
Tory  Inn   Saturday,  8  p.m.,
1132   Howe   Street.   Everyone
welcome;   refreshments   available.
VCF
Headmaster Harker of St.
George's school for boys
speaks noon today in Ang. 110.
CURLING  CLUB
Inter-varsity bonspeil at winter sports centre this weekend.
First draw Friday, 7:30 p.m.
Draw to be posted Friday noon.
GERMAN  CLUB
Kommen   Sie   und   sprechen
Sie   Deutsch   Dienstag   Mittag,
IH  402,  Kocktael  Parti,  Mitt-
woch.
UBC  VIETNAM
COMMITTEE
Planning    meeting    Monday
noon, Bu. 216.
MAA
Meeting Tuesday noon, bowling alley, men's gym, all managers and interested parties.
Agenda — discussion of Coliseum fiasco, MAC agenda and
budget, if available.
HELLENIC CULTURAL
SOCIETY
Dr. G. W. Elliot, classics
dept., will lecture on the Parthenon, Monday, IH. Greek
Dances, music, refreshments
will follow. Everyone welcome.
HOUSING SURVEY
COMMITTEE
The housing survey is out.
If you received one, fill it out
and return it as soon as possible to the AMS office.
NOW IN  J
THE UBC |
AREA
TAKE-OUT and    j
HOME DELIVERY I
* Chicken * Shrimp  *  Ribs    j
*   Fish   *   Pizza j
736-9788  |       j
CHICKEN!
DELIGHT®
3605 W.   Fourth  Ave.
MEL
BORING
former
BERKELEY
CHAPLAIN
speaks   on
"A MODERN
PENTECOST"
ANGUS 212
Noon: Mon.-Wed.
•        •        •
Thursday Seminar
'Holy Spirit Today"
Lutheran  Student Center
4:00  p.m.   &   6:00  p.m.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students, Faculty & Clubs—3 lines, 1 day 75*, 3 days $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00, 3 days $2.50.
Publications Office, BROCK HALL, UNIV. OF B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
CARIBBEAN '  WEEK     IS     COMING
soon!     Feb.   19-23.
DANCE TO PAPA BEAR'S MEDI-
eine Show on Feb. 17. 9:30-1:00 in
Place  Vanier  Ballroom.
'68 GRAD CLASS PARTY — AT
Johann Strauss, Feb. 21. Tickets
$2.50 per couple from A.M.S. or
Faculty Reps. Hurry —> Supply
Limited.
DANCE THIS FRIDAY FEB. 16
with George Cuba Quartet at International   House.
Greetings
12
DEAR   D.T.S.   —   THIS    IS   THE   BIG
one sweetheart,  happy 21st!   Luv K.
Lost & Found
It
SUEDE JACKET TAKEN BY Mistake last Friday from Cecil Green
—Please return to receptionist at
Cecil   Green   Park.
LOST IN DEC. WHILK HITCH-
hiking, one purple shoe, please leave
message  at   RE   8-2978.
OLD..?
NEW..?
We're experts at both . . .
Our factory-trained mechanics
repair many of your cars.
Volkswagens are our specialty
.... come in and see . . .
Free estimates and of course
all work guaranteed
only    al
AUTO-HENNEKEN
Specialized   Service
8914 Oak St. (at Marine)
phone Hans — 263-8121
BUY LINE
. . . your direct telephone line to fast, efficient
service for ordering items from Eaton's.
For other store business: Downtown 685-7112,
Park Royal 922-3325, Brentwood 299-5511
and New Westminster 526-6766.
EATON'S
LOST — WHOEVER HAS MY Library copy of Schurmann's Ideology
and   Organization,   please   return   to
SedKewick.
Rides & Car Pools
14
Molorcycles
26
HONDA-FIAT
Motorcycles -   Cars
Generators  - Utility Units
New  and  Used
SPORT  CARS
N T
O      Motors      S
R E
T       W
145 Robson H 688-1284
BUSINESS  SERVICES
Miscellaneous
32
6EE IT LIVE AT CORKY'S. EVERY
day a new act. See cute Corky;
devilishly devastating Ralph and
the most delightful clipper of our
time,   Len   Fong.
MONDAY'S   FKATURE—
R.C.M.P.   Musical  Ride!
Corky's 4th Avenue Barber Shop
4th   and   Alma   Road
Phone 731-4717 for your appointment
CARPOOL NEEDED AFTER MID-
term break. Monday, Wednesday,
Friday, 8:30 and 5:30. Cambie St.
Bridgeport Richmond. Phone Jerry
278-1337.
NEED RIDE TO OOSYOOS OR
close on, Wed. 22, will share exp.
Phone  224-9986,  Jay,   leave  message.
NORTH   VAN    CARPOOL   NEEDED,
8:30   to   5:30,   phone   Bob,   987-8587.
Special Notices
15
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSURANCE
rates? If you have a valid driver's
license and good driving habits you
may qualify. Phone Ted Elliott,
321-6442.
PA  BEAR'S  MED.   SHOW.
Vanier   9:30-1:00   Sat.   Feb.   17th.
RITUALS AT STAGE 2. 8:30 TO-
night through Feb. 24. Tickets at
Van. Ticket Centre, Eatons or Door
L.M.T's $1.25. Stage 2 Theatre
I >unsmuir-Beatty.
RUMMAGE SALE — WEDNESDAY,
Feb. 21. Lions Gate Memorial Hall
2611   W.   4th   Avenue.
DANCE TO THE MUSIC OF GEORGE
Cuba at the Valentine Dance at I.H.
from 9:00-1:00. Co-sponsored by the
African Student Association and the
U.N.   Club.
OPEN     DOOR    DROP - IN     CENTRE
(Coffee   bouse   in   Church   cellar.)
Every   Friday   night,   9-12   midnight,
corner   of   11th   and   Fir.
DROP INTO INTERNATIONAL
House, Saturday, Feb. 17. Live
folk entertainment. Pizza! Coffee!
Fun!!   8   p.m.   on.
TRUDEAU   MEETING   NOON   BUCH.
204,    Today   —    Noon    for    Trudeau
Trudeau   meeting   Buch.   204   today,
Noon   —■  Trudeau   today.
ACTION GALORE THIS SATURDAY
night, Feb. 17, at Canada's only
Professional Indoor Motorcycle
races, Cloverdale Fairgrounds. Just
20 short miles from Vancouver. Special added attraction, Laurie Craig's
High Performance Camero Sports
car on display. Top professional
riders from Pacific Northwest
competing. Action starts at 7:30
p.m.
UBC BARBER SHOP, OPEN WEEK-
days 8:30 till 6 p.m., Sat. until 5:30
p.m.,   573S  University Boulevard.
Travel  Opportunities
IS
TWO GUYS WANT TWO GIRLS.
Ski Borderline and maybe Todd.
Midterm.   Bob   224-0142.
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
GET INVOLVED WITH CAMPUS
activities! Work on the Homecoming committee. Applications in
A.M.S.    Office.
AUTOMOTIVE & MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
11
1961 STUDEBAKER LARK. GOOD
Condition. Owner returning England. Available early March. $550
or near offer. 733-4464 after 4:30
p.m.
$85 OR NEAREST OFFER. 1955
Dodge 2 - Door Hardtop. Reliable
Transportation. Call Norm, 224-7298
after   7:00  P.M.
65 YOLKS DELUXE, RADIO, heater,
seat belts, 25,000 mi., new brakes,
excellent.   $1280.   or   ?   RE   1-3957.
1953      CHEV.      EXTREMELY      GOOD
condition.    Phone    255-3036.
1965    V.W.    IN   EXCELLENT    COND.
31,000   mi.   Phone   224-6332.
HELP — BUY MY '69 CHEV. GOOD
rubber, body and motor excellent.
Call Fred,  945-4754 aft 6 p.m. please
HILLMAN 1951. BEST OFFER. CALL
John,   AM  6-9544   after  6.00.
'58 VAUXHALL VICTOR. A ONE-
owner car. Best offer takes. 224-
9108.
1'BO BEAUTY SALON EXPERT
stvling and cutting. Reasonable
rates 5736 University  Blvd.  228-8942.
Scandals
37
SELLING YOUR TEXTBOOKS? TRY
The Bookfinder. 4444 West 10th
Ave.  228-8933.	
LA TROUPE GROTESQUE (SATIRI-
cal comediens) will perform at 8:30
p.m. in Room 100 of the Jewish
Community Centre, 41st Ave. &
Oak St. on Sunday. February 18th,
Admission   50   cents   per   person.
GOLDIE     MEET     PAPA
Place   Vanier   Sat.   Feb.
BEAR    AT
17th,   9:30.
HEAR THE WORD! INTERESTING
sermon by Terry Burke 9:00 a.m.
Sunday. Anglican Campus Chapel.
All   Welcome. 	
WOULD THE ARTSMAN FRAT
member who was last seen in Pitt
Meadows on February 10th please
reclaim   his   handcuffs?
Typing
40
EXPERT    TYPIST    -    ELECTRIC    —
224-6129    -   228-8384.
EXPERT   ELECTRIC   TYPIST
Experienced   essay   and   thesis   typist
Reasonable Rates TR. 4-9253
ESSAYS AND THESES TYPED.
Please call Dallas Simkins. 926-
2741.
"GOOD EXPERIENCED TYPIST
available for home typing. Please
call   277-5640.
SHORT NOTICE TYPING
on weekends. 25 cents page. Phone
RE   8-4410.
TYPING: FOR EXPERT TYPING OF
essays, theses, letters etc., call
988-2087   after   6:00   p.m.
EMPLOYMENT
Help W'ied—Male or Female    53
LIFEGUARDS—CITY OF KAMLOOPS
Riverside Park. Positions open for
2 males and one female. Apply in
writing before March 15 to P.S.
Hail, Beach and Pool Supervisor,
Apt. No. 4, 2176 W. 40th, Van. 13.
263-6144.
INSTRUCTION
Tutoring
•4
FRENCH, ENGLISH, HISTORY, RUS-
sian, Library Science tutoring given
by   B.A.,   M.A.,   B.L.S.   736-6923.
SPANISH LESSONS GIVEN BY
Spanish Journalist. Art Critic. $2
hour.   736-5008   after   7   p.m.
EXPERIENCED TUTORING IN 1st
& 2nd year English, French, His-
lory, Math, Chemistry, and other
languages. For appointment phone
Mr. Huberman—B.A.-LLB.—Huber-
man Educational Inst. 2158 West
12th.   Phone   732-5535—263-4808.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
—   OLD   TOTEMS   FOR   SALE   —
1963,   1965   &   1966   issues   50c.
Campus   Life's   25c.   Publications  Off.,
Brock   Hall
FOR SALE. ONE TIRE. GOOD
shape. 5.60x15. Phone 325-4530 —
Warren.
21" RCA TV. EXCELLENT CONDI-
lion.    $39.50.   Phone   987-7407.	
FOR SALE: MEN'S SKIS, POLES,
and boots (size 10M.). Used only
once.   $40.00.   Phone   733-0381.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
fl
MOVE ONTO CAMPUS — ROOMS
available (M) 224-9662, $40.00 mo.
2250 Wesbrook. Meal Services close
at  hand.	
LARGE PRIVATE ROOM & BOARD
for <iuiet male student. 4595' W. 6th.
Phone 224-4866.
Room & Board
M
LARGE SINGLE ROOM & BOARD
for quiet male student, 4595 W. 6th
phone   224-4866.	
IT'S UNANIMOUS! BEST ROOM &
hoard on campus at the Deke House.
Phone 224-9691 for more information.
EXCELLENT FOOD — R E A S 0~N^
able rates on Campus. Phone 224-
9986.	
ON CAMPUS ROOM AND BOARD.
Double room places for three men.
St.   Andrew's    Hall    224-7720.
Furn. Houses  & Apts.
83
GIRL TO SHARE FUR'N. SUITE
with 3 others. 5th and Balsam. 733-
8058.
ARTS 3 STUDENT (MALE) WANTS
someone to share his furnished
apartment in Kerrisdale. Phone
224-4280   after   3   p.m. Friday,  February   16,   1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page  15
SPORTS . SHORTS
SWIMMING
The Aqua-Birds are heading for rough water this weekend
when they take on Simon Fraser on Friday starting at 6 p.m.
and on Saturday at 2 p.m. when they meet University of Utah.
WOMEN'S   BASKETBALL
The five Western Canadian Intercollegiate Athletic Association women's basketball teams from UBC, University of Alberta
at Edmonton, University of Calgary, University of Saskatchewan
and the University of Manitoba meet here Saturday for their
championships. Tournament time is 4 p.m. at memorial gym.
GYMNASTICS
The UBC gymnasts compete against the Everett Junior College team in a dual meet at the War Memorial Gym starting at
1 p.m. on Saturday.
WRESTLING
The UBC team is participating in the B.C. Senior and Canadian Olympic Trials on an individual and team points basis.
The meet will be held at the Vancouver YMCA and starts at
1 p.m. on Saturday.
JUDO
This Saturday several members of the UBC judo club will
be competing in the Vancouver judo competition at the PNE
Garden Auditorium..
The events will start at 1 p.m. with the senior and black
belt events in the late afternoon and early evening.
CURLING
This weekend the UBC curling club sponsors the fifth annual
Inter-Varsity Bonspiel at the Winter Sports Center.
The first draw gets underway at 7:30 p.m. on Friday, the
banquet is on Saturday night and the final games are on Sunday
morning at 11 a.m.
FIELD HOCKEY
All UBC teams will be playing this Saturday. The Birds
take on Hawks 1 starting at 1:30 p.m., the Braves take on Jokers
3 at 3 p.m. and the Scalps also play at 3 p.m.. when they meet
the Hawks 4. All these games are at UBC's Spencer Fields.
The Tomahawks are the only team playing off campus as
they meet the Vancouver 2 at Memorial Park.  Game time is
1:30 p.m.
VOLLEYBALL
The UBC volleyball Thunderettes are in Calgary for the
annual Western Canadian Intercollegiate championships to be
held today and Saturday.
This year's strong team has a good chance of improving
on last year's second place finish.
YOUR PRESCRIPTION . . .
. . . For Glasses
for that smart look in glasses ...
look to
Plesclibtiori Optical
Student Discount Given
WE HAVE AN OFFICE NEAR YOU
PACIFIC COAST LEAGUE
SOCCER
THUNDERBIRD STADIUM
SAL, FEB. 17-2 P.M.
UBC Thunderbirds vs
New Westminster Labs
UBC Students Free
SUPPORT YOUR THUNDERBIRD SOCCER TEAM
GRANT HEATON SPEARS ON RED CHINA
Participated in peace negotiations of Korean War
Co-ordinator of Religious Ed. for Mormon Church.
MONDAY, FEB. 19 - 12:30 - BU 106
1967-68 SEASON FEATURES
it Greatly improved highway access.
ir Chalet tripled in size, including a dining
room and a small children's play room.
*k 3 T-Bars with an entirely new Westridge
T-Bar Area. No line-ups.
ir Daily operation.
For further information write—
BIG WHITE SKI DEVELOPMENT LTD.
1481  Water Street   •   762-0402
Kelowna, British Columbia, Canada
it Long November to May 1 season.
ir Dependable dry powder snow.
it Beginners, intermediate runs packed by
snowcat and packer.
-A- Finest view from any B.C. Ski Area Chalet.
it Accommodation on  the Mountain and in
Kelowna at Skiers' rates.
SKI SCHOOL
Directed   by  Brian  James
Attention Skiers...
ONE  GIGANTIC
SKI SALE
From Feb.   16th to March  1st
ALL SKI EQUIPMENT MUST GO
ski
special
Clearing Everything at 25^b Off
THESE ARE SOME OF YOUR SAVINGS
TYROL SKI BOOTS
Reg. $49.95 — Now   Wf'""
GRESVIG ATTACHE SKIS
Reg. $45.00 — Now  $«$«>•'**
JACKETS
Reg. $35.00 — Now  V*V*^
METAL SKIS
Reg. $100.00 — Now  V 4 V*""
Seal Skin After Ski Boots
Reg. $27.95 — Now  J|)ZU*"**
SWEATERS
Reg. $31.95 — Now  J15«''«
Be smart, while the skiing is great take advantage of these tremendous savings and buy now. Merchandise is all top-quality
and this year's stock—Don't hesitate come in and see for yourself.
Sale Items Do Not Include Franchise Lines
VARSITY SKI SHOP
Ivor Williams Sporting Goods
4510 West  10th - Phone 224-6414
Just 2 Block Outside the Gates Page   16
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday,  February  16,   1968
Were number one
"We're number one," was the cry in the dressing-room of
the UBC soccer Thunderbirds Wednesday night after their 3-1
victory over the North Shore Luckies. '
Saturday the Birds will toe out to retain their first place
position in the Pacific Coast Soccer League when they host
New Westminster Labs in Thunderbird Stadium. Game time
is 2 p.m.
With their victory over North Shore, UBC moved one point
ahead of Columbus and New Westminster who are tied for
second place in league standings with 15 points.
Gary Thompson's two goals in that game gave him seven
for the season. This ties him for the league lead with Sergio
Zanatta and Bobby Smith, both of Columbus, and Victoria's
Ike MacKay.
Braves   make   Hyacics   run   gauntlet
The ice hockey Braves will play Ladner at 7:30 p.m. on
Monday in the Winter Sports Center. On Thursday night the
Braves defeated the New Westminster Hyacks 9-5.
THE SKI  BUM
By BJORN SIMONSEN
Anyone who has been skiing during the last two weeks
knows that spring skiing has arrived early this year.
Ah, spring skiing. No more clumsy ski jacket and long underwear. Throw away your itchy toque and put on your cut-off
jeans, smear your face with sun tan lotion and head for the
  hills.
Get up early and pack a sack full of
sandwiches, some cheese, a bottle of wine and
a few beer. Catch the first chair up the mountains and get some good runs in before the
sun turns the snow to crud.
You may get a few more runs in on the
shaded   hills   but   once   the   snow   turns   into
sloppy, break-a-leg stuff, it's time to quit and
enjoy the best part of spring skiing.
SIMONSEN As you sip your wine and soak up the hot
sun you may be entertained by some merry group who brought
along a guitar or perhaps an accordian.
If it's a real warm day you will probably see bikini-clad
ski bunnies schussing by. If you get lucky, one of them will fall
and right before your very eyes a two-piece bathing suit becomes
a one-piece and a size 36 quickly shrinks to a 32. Brrrr. . . .
The nice thing about skiing in this area is that you can enjoy
spring skiing for almost four months a year. Last year Whistler
Mtn. had terrific spring conditions from the end of February
until the beginning of July.
Thus at the same time that skiers in other parts of Canada
are putting their equipment away for another year, we still
have several months of good skiing ahead.
The corn snow that comes with spring skiing may not be
quite as challenging to ski in as powder but is probably just as
enjoyable and you don't have to bundle up against the cold.
SPOR TS
Will Saints bring own hoop?
The UBC basketball Thunderbirds, still smarting from
their 64-39 lacing at the hands
of SFU Clansmen, take on the
St. Martin's University Saints
this weekend at War Memorial
Gym.
This series is an annual affair. Last year the Saints won
both games by scores of 87-68
and 93-81.
For the Birds this will be a
chance to regain some of their
poise before they enter the
arena again, against the nasty
old Clan from the hill.
For those who are interested
in the return match between
our heros and the other guys,
tickets may be procured in the
following odd fashion.
You must go to the UBC-St.
Martin's   game   on   Friday   or
Hockey Birds
host Vikings
The ice hockey Thunderbirds
host the University of Victoria
Vikings Saturday in the Birds'
final tuneup game before facing the powerful University of
Alberta  Golden  Bears.
The game, in the Winter
Sports Center, starts at 2:30
p.m. The Birds tackle the
Bears on successive weekends
beginning February 24 and 25.
Jayvee coach Andy Bako-
george is again expected to
handle the coaching reins in
place of regular coach Bob
Hindmarch who is picking up
tips at the Olympics in Grenoble.
Klillers
CONVENIENT   TERMS
Special    Discount   to   U.B.C.
Students   and   Personnel.
Ulillers
655  Granville  St. 683-6651
Vancouver
47  W.   Hastings St.,      682-3801
Vancouver
622   Columbia   St. 526-3771
New  Westminster
NEWMAN BAIL
B.C. Ballroom, Hotel Vancouver
RECEPTION  .  .  .  BANQUET .  .  .  DANCE
FRIDAY, MARCH 1st
7:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m.
$7.00 Couple, Black Tie Optional
Music by Claude Logan
and His Orchestra
- FULL FACILITIES -
VALENTINE DANCE
At International House
WITH
THE GEORGE CUBA BAND
TONIGHT - 9-1 - $1 per person
FILM SHOW 8:00-9:00
Saturday night at memorial
gym.
Here you will be given a
numbered ticket.
There will be a draw at half
time at each of the games and
those lucky people holding
'winning' tickets will be allowed to purchase for 50 cents
a ticket to the UBC-SFU game
the  following weekend.
The last thing of importance
in the little raffle is the fact
that the tickets must be purchased the night your number
is drawn.
The UBC Jayvees will play
Big Bend Community College
on Friday night and Trinity
Junior College on Saturday
night. Both games are prelims
to the Birds' games and start
at 6:30 p.m.
ARMSTRONG & REA
OPTOMETRISTS
EYES EXAMINED
CONTACT LENSES
2 Convenient Offices
■BROADWAYat GRANVILLE
■KERRISDALE   41s.t at YEW
GOING BY CHARTER?
WHY NOT
LEASE A CAR?
Rates for Britain and Europe
Now Available
WORLD-WIDE
ON CAMPUS
5700 UNIVERSITY BOULEVARD — 224-4391

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