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The Ubyssey Mar 23, 1967

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Array UVIC  STUDENTS  PROTEST  FIRED  PROFS
Students at the University of Victoria are proposing a boycott of classes Wednesday to protest
the administration's handling of the contract terminations and subsequent appeals of three controversial UVic professors.
The uproar toegan when the contracts of three
controversial UVic professors were not renewed
by the university. The professors are Dr. Charles
Tarlton, assistant professor of political science;
Joseph Schwartz, English lecturer, and Alan Mackenzie, an English instructor.
"An AMS general meeting will be held on
Tuesday to discuss what action should be taken,"
said UVic AMS president-elect Dave Maclean.
"A motion will probably be made proposing a
boycott of classes on Wednesday."
"The administration has not done anything for
months about the appeal of Schwartz, one of the
unwanted professors," a student spokesman said.
"We think they will drag it out after exams
and then filibuster their way through it."
The administration has refused to make any
statements regarding the issue.
Students will hold a mass meeting today at
noon to discuss the problem. Representatives from
UBC will include special events chairman Brian
Plummer, and arts US president-elect Stan Persky.
Martin Loney, one of the teaching assistants
involved in the fire-rehire hassle at SFU will accompany the UBC students.
Mackenzie is in Scotland studying on a $2,300
grant from the university. Tarlton has just received a Canada Council grant.
Steele will teach at the University of Manitoba
next year. Bush has taught for three years at UVic.
None of the unwanted professors plans to re
turn to UVic next year, even if the decision is
reversed by the presidential appeals committee
where the appeals are now being processed.
Tarlton has been offered a teaching post at
Berkeley.
The faculty association has refused to comment
on the proceedings.
"This has nothing to do with the press," an
association spokesman said.
Faculty association president, Dr. David Cha-
bassol said he will not comment as he "does not
wish to affect the outcome of the appeals".
Three other UVic professors, Jack Bush, lecturer in the philosophy department, Richard
Gavil and Dr. Leighton-Steele, both of the English
department, have resigned to protest the contract-
terminations.
Gavil said here was no "professional reason"
for the dismissal.
Has been
editors
don't die
Vol.  XLVIII, No. 61
they dine
in-Montreal
JBR
VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, MARCH 23, 1967
916
wm ?.re;/
VENGEANCE IS MINE saith the women's athletic association. Peter
Uitdenbosch, commerce president, was tanked for outspokenness.
"Make your own money," he told jocks. Jocks may have to since
referendum failed.
Bottomore out as dean
By AL BIRNIE
Ubyssey News Editor
Simon Fraser University board of
governors Tuesday accepted the resignation of T. B. Bottomore as dean of
arts and appointed A. B. Cunningham,
head of the history department, to
serve until the end of the term.
Bottomore told SFU's student
paper The Peak Tuesday that he went
to see SFU president Patrick McTaggart-Cowan that morning to ask if he
could withdraw the resignation, tendered last Thursday, but was refused.
Bottomore told The Peak: "The
president said to me, 'You no longer
have my confidence', and I presume
that of the board, and that he thought
the resignation should stand."
McTaggart-Cowan later denied
Bottomore's statement.
Bottomore told The Ubyssey Wednesday that he offered to withdraw
5    the resignation since the board had
reversed the decision which prompted
it.
Asked whether he would accept
the position again if it were offered
to him, Bottomore said: "At this moment, I'm not sure that I would. I would
have done yesterday morning, but
the situation has changed."
He said he had no plans to leave
SFU in the near future. "I am head
of a good department (Political
Science-Sociology-Anthropology), recognized across North America, and
I would like to continue working
with it."
Praised for his action in taking
the side of the TA's against the
board, he said:
"It's my job to defend students—
that's why I am in university. I did
what I had to do.
"The purpose of my original action has been achieved, and I think
the university has improved because
of it."
McTaggart-Cowan, also contacted
Wednesday, said there was no reason
for the board's acceptance of the
resignation other than the fact that
it was offered.
Fee hike squashed,
Hoye 'heartbroken'
In an extremely close vote Wednesday, the Alma Mater Society fee
increase referendum was defeated.
The referendum lost by half a percentage point — 30 students. It needed
a two-thirds majority to pass but gained only 66.13 per cent of the vote.
Out of total of 5,816, there were
3,837 yes votes, 1,965 against and 14
spoiled.
In an extremely close count, the
second largest turnout for a referendum yet, the ballot were tallied four
times.
AMS   president   Shaun   Sullivan
sailed the result "heartbreaking."
"I'm very disappointed," said trea-
GENERAL MEET
MEETS TODAY
Noon today is Thursday-go-to-the-
AlMS-general-meeting time.
Which means if you are a student,
you get to vote on several AMS con-
situional amendments; if you are an
engineer you get to dump student
councillors in wet water; if you are a
jock, you.get to vote to keep your cash
allotment the same; and if you are not
a jock, you get to cut the extramural
athletic allotment by more than 25
per cent.
The constitutional revisions include a motion to give student councillors weighted votes according to the
turnout in the undergrad society president elections.
If the revision passes, a faculty
which had a 1,000 student turnout at
its elections will have more votes than
a faculty which had only 300 voters.
Another revision will give students
the power of recall over student council executives.
If it passes, a petition calling for
the resignation of a executive will
mean a re-election so long as it has 20
per cent of the student population
signing.
President Peter Braund said the
motion to cut the athletic budget will
be supported by council.
Braund and treasurer Lome Hudson will give reports on their year of
noactions.
General meetings have always
been the scene of riot and revolution
instigated by the engineers and other
reactionary forces on campus.
This one is in the armory. Attend.
surer Dave Hoye.
AMS first vice-president Don Munton charged there were irregularities
in the voting.
"There were students urging
people to vote no at the polls," said
Munton. He mentioned a science undergraduate society councillor but
refused to name the person.
SUS president-elect Robin Russell
urged sciencemen to vote no on the
referendum in the science newsletter
Monday.
"They didn't ask for current budget expenses or make any kind of investigation as did Peter Uitdenbosch
with the jocks," said Sullivan.
"He spent three days investigating
all the facts and finally came out
against the fee raise."
New returning officer Hank
Poulos, arts 3, said: "It appears that
Munton's statement cannot be substantiated.'' Poulos said he hopes to
have all irregularities investigated before the general meeting today.
"A no vote is a parochial and uninformed vote," Haye said. He emphasized the special efforts to inform
the students made by dozens of people
in the last week, including arts, engineers and athletics councils.
"We're going to have to suggest
that the jocks be cut, along with clubs,
undergraduate societies and special
events.
'I hope students will turn out in
full force to the general meeting,"
said Sullivan. 'If we're going to increase revenue we'll have to cut the
jocks."
At one point after the third count,
Hoye said: "No matter how close this
vote is, it's what the students wanted
not the people in this room."
Commenting on the results, arts
vice-president Harley Rothstein said,
"Students actually voted for a decrease. They should realize that AMS
fees are subject to inflation like everything else."
"It makes impossible everything
we wanted to do," said Sullivan.
"Arts has to get a grant next year and
we wanted to promote higher education through the province."
The issue of more revenue for the
AMS now depends on today's general
meeting. The jocks are expected to
pack the armory in order to defeat
cuts in their budget. At least 1,700
students are needed to form a quorum.
"It's going to be a difficult meeting," said Hoye. Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, March 23,  1967
ASININE ...
... AWARDS
Coleman's convocation
The Demosthenes Society of our beloved
university awarded, Wednesday, several
UBC hangers-on with recognition of excellence in literary, artistic, cultural and governmental arts.
The following are the recipients of the
Artsy architects
ask allocation
Accomplished architects all, the arts undergraduate society asked council Monday
night if they could build the Student Union
Building.
"Considering we built an arts office for
about thirteen cents could we not with the
aid of the engineers build a SUB for $29.95?"
asked arts president Stan Persky of AMS
president Shaun Sullivan.
"Can we have working drawings?" replied Sullivan.
"You'll have 'em by morning," replied
engineering president elect Lynn Spraggs.
society's Awards of Merit.
Charlie Boylan for excellence in evading
recognition by "status quo" honorary societies, a tactic unsuccessfully attempted by
The Ubyssey editor.
Stan Persky for excellence in relevant
Arts leadership, the most prominent Arts
leadership  in  at least  three  years.
Shaun Sullivan for excellence generally
and  for  striking political  leadership.
Rod Wilczak for general excellence in
words.
Malcolm McGregor for excellence in
sabbatical location (a special bar to this
■ award for research in Demosthenes).
Kris Emmott for excellence in maintaining a sense of humor in the face of overwhelming odds.
Pat McGeer for excellence in psychedelic
publicity in the face of a hostile downtown
press.
The Demosthenes Society was conceived
by UBC-political drop-out Mike Coleman.
He started the game and still carries on
under undue pressure from local authorities.
Our hats off to Coleman for excellence
in games and things.
'Think' policy formed
The proposed "free university" will be a spontaneous interdisciplinary activity to get people to think for themselves.
"What the academic process lacks at the present time is
the capacity of the student to think," said instigator of the UBC
for free university, Jerry Cannon.
With this in view fifteen students and professors representing three faculties met Friday to establish its structure.
It is a simple one—three small sessions weekly devoted
to interdisciplinary study, discussion and exchange of ideas
around a central theme.
"Emphasis will be placed on development of spontaneous
ideas rather than on preparation and formal presentation," said
Cannon.
"Each theme will last for six weeks with an opening information session."
"We're going to have some sort of governing body to start
off with," said Dave Hoye, next year's AMS treasurer.
"Successful spontaneity must be highly structured."
"Conceptual rather than factual learning will be stressed,"
said Cannon. "We are trying to get people to think for
themselves in broad terms and in new ways."
There will be a general student meeting sometime next
week to discuss whether or not students are willing to be
involved and to accept suggestions on themes.
THE TARA
Goes Go-Go
with   the
CHANGING TIMES
Featuring
Al Wilmott & Lorill Lea
20 min on Deas Freeway — White Rock Turnoff
Thursday   &  Saturday 9-4
COMPACT
CONTACT
C8NTACT UNS
ARMSTRONG & REA
OPTOMETRISTS
EYES EXAMINED
CONTACT LENSES
2 Convenient Offices
•BROADWAY at GRANVILLE
• KERRISDALE   41s.t at YEW
UNIVERSITY CHURCH
ON THE BOULEVARD
EASTER SUNDAY
UNIVERSITY HILL
(United)
11:00 a.m. Morning Worship
'That I May Know
the Power".
HAROLD MacKAY
ST. ANSELM'S (Anglican)
8:00; 9:30 & 11 a.m.
Holy Communion
Resurrection — "Is It True?"
JIM McKIBBON
Why carry around a whole
chemistry set full of potions
for wetting, cleaning and
soaking contact lenses?
Lensine is here! It's an all-
purpose solution for complete
lens care, made by the
Murine Company.
So what else is new?
Well, the removable
lens carrying case
on the bottom of
every bottle, that's
new, too. And it's
exclusive with
Lensine, the
solution for
all your contact
lens problems.
for contacts
RARE   (like really rare--you know
like special or unique - or esien just
nicely different). That's  RARE  —
clever clothes, clothes with ideas and
imagination. And most r&re. - net too
expensive.
BABE  boutique   4^8 Richards St.
MAX DEXALL
OFFERS
10% Discount
To U.B.C. Students
See our new spring fashions
as well as our hosiery, handbags,
slippers, rubbers and umbrellas.
What ever you need in footwear you'll find it at
Dexall's. Pay them a visit — see the exciting new
styles — ladies' and men's — and ask for the 10%
discount.
Better Shoes for Less
DEXALL'S - GRANVILLE AT 10th - 738-9833
You can't
beat
the taste
of Player's
filters. Thursday, March 23,  1967
THE       UBYSSEY
Page  3
"NO, NO ... it was little red riding  hood," heckler Dietrich Luth admonishes soapboxer
who got the story wrong.   Approving  of argument,   several   hundred   students   listened.
Saskatoon profs petition,
request stand on Vietnam
SASKATOON (UNS) — A brief on
Canada and Vietnam, signed by 172 members of the academic staff at the University of Saskatchewan, has been sent to
prime minister Lester Pearson.
The brief was drafted and circulated by
the members of the ad hoc committee on
Canada and Vietnam which consists of 31
academic staff members.
J. W. Warnock, assistant professor of
the department of economics and political
science, said the purpose of the brief is to
acquaint the leaders of the country and the
public with the inconsistency of Canada's
foreign policy shown by its dealings with
the Vietnam conflict.
He said many heads of departments
were not approached because the administration of the university was against political involvment by its academic staff.
Few users found
in   drug   study
NEW YORK (UNS)—Out of jnore than
2,000 grad students at the City University of
New York only 4 per cent, 80 students,
used drugs while at university.
The students at the university answered
a questionnaire distributed to find out
whether or not they had used drugs during
their years at university.
"The use may not be so widespread,"
Dr. Samuel Pearlman, who conducted the
project reported.
"Reports have led the public to overestimate the number of users on campus,"
he said.
The brief begins:
"The undersigned members of the academic staff of the University of Saskatchewan view with alarm the continuation of
the war in Vietnam and urge the govern-
metn of Canada to do everything within its
power to seek a peaceful solution to this
conflict."
The brief says Canada should publicly
proclaim support for the three-point peace
plan of U Thant, secretary general of the
United Nations, and that Canada urge the
United States to accept Thant's proposal
as a first step toward possible peace negotiations.
It also says Canada should be consistent in its policy of not shipping arms to
trouble spots around the world and refuse
to permit shipment of military equipment
to countries involved in the Vietnam war.
The present policy forbids direct shipment to Vietnam, yet permits shipment to
parties! involved in the conflict.
By adopting the suggested policy, says
the brief, Canada, as a member in the International Control Commission, could play a
more active and effective role in a future
peace settlement in Vietnam.
Behind the problem of arms shipment
to Vietnam, says the brief, is the integration
of the Canadian defence industry with that
of the United States, a process encouraged
by the 1959 defence sharing agreement.
The military equipment trade between
the U.S. and Canada is not significant to
either country, the brief says. Therefore,
the Canadian government is urged to begin
negotiations to end the defence sharing
agreement with the U.S.
It suggests that instead of new weapons
systems, the government use this money
to encourage the industries involved to
convert to peacetime production.
Prof hits radicals
A Simon Fraser English professor and accomplished poet
spoke out Monday against those who say that a "university cannot be defined by any single commitment without ceasing to be
a university".
Stanley Cooperman maintains that a commitment to chemistry or drama is just as great a part of university as political
action.
"All of these areas are real areas of action for a university.
"The reality and the commitment of a university exists in
dozens of directions and this is what makes it special. The commitment of a university is to make it possible for scholars and
students of many different fields to pursue the action of their
chosen fields."
Cooperman said if any single group or discipline succeeds
in acting as a tribunal, the university must become a "service
station".
"All ideas and all forms of cultural action are pumped into
the same ideological tank."
The campus was paralyzed because a single group of individuals, obsessed with the need for practice in their own field
of work, decided to create a laboratory in which the entire
university would become a kind of raw material to be used.
Mime troupe cut,
Calgary rallies
CALGARY — An incident which saw the cancellation of
a scheduled performance of the San Francisco Mime Troupe has
now turned the students of the University of Calgary to a
questioning of administration powers in student affairs.
A rally of over 3,000 students last Thursday outside the
office of the university president called for complete student
control of student monies. It also demanded control of allocation
of space in the new student union building.
A later meeting on Thursday attended by 1,300 students
discussed the actual interference of the administration in the
Mime Troupe affair.
Student government officials argued that the administration
had merely stepped in as a temporary measure.
They insist the final decision cancelling the performance
was made by student council without any pressure.
Another group of students stated that in effect the student
council had no choice but to affirm the administration decision.
Investigations have been launched to determine the extent
and legality of administration interference in student affairs.
LAW ABOVE  LSD
The current hysteria of legislators over LSD may be
a result of their realization that LSD legislation would be
extremely difficult to enforce.
This is the suggesion of Dr. James Foulks of UBC's
department of pharmacology, in an interview with The
Ubyssey Wednesday.
Dr. Folks was questioned on M.L.A. Pat McGeer's
statement in the legislature that LSD is addictive and
detectable.
"From what I have read, LSD is not addictive in the
sense of there being a degree of compulsion to use the
drug, or physical and psychological dependence in it."
Some people use the term "addiction" loosely to
mean "habituation" Dr. Foulks noted. "In this sense, those
who use LSD may make a way of life around the drug
and consider their state of well-being dependent on it.
"But this is not compulsion," he said.
Dr. Foulks said that the methods of detection currently used cannot distinguish between LSD and related compounds in many cases.
"Enforcement of the proposed LSD legisation would
be very difficult because of the difficulty of detection," he
stated. "The police would need a crystal ball to read
people's minds.''
Dr. Foulks said there are great implications in laws
like the proposed legislation requiring persons to inform
on others who possess LSD.
"This is part of a tendency to put law and order above
all other social values."
3lG EXP£7vSll/E NtV/QpO*^ THt UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
the editor's and not of the AMS or the university. Member, Canadian
University Press. Founding member. Pacific Student Press. Authorized
second class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa, and for payment of
postage in cash.
The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review.
City editor, 224-3916. Other calls, 224-3242: editor, local 25; photo. Page
Friday, loc. 24; features, sports, loc. 23; advertising, loc. 26. Telex 04-5224.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies
for general excellence and editorial cartoons.
MARCH 23,  1967
Students paraded with signs bearing words
that normally are found only in The Ubyssey.
—Jack Wasserman, March 21, 1967
McGeer
There was some jubilation and even pride on this
campus when Dr. Pat McGeer was first elected to
the B.C. legislature in a by-election.
The Victoria legislature, then as now, was the
anti-educational hotbed in Canada. It contained the
lowest percentage of university graduates of any North
American legislature. It was governed by the Social
Credit Hickocracy who were for Peace River power
and Old Time Religion and against intellectuals, cities
and drink. The legislature was a trivial, depressing
place — a prize example for those who distrusted
democracy and favored Platonic dictatorship by an
educated elite.
Dr. Pat McGeer, Ph.D., was the man who was
going to change, or at least improve by example, parliamentary democracy in B.C. Dr. Pat McGeer, Adlai
Stevenson-like, was going to raise the level of political
discourse in our province. Dr. Pat McGeer was going
to be UBC's man in the legislature, UBC's answer to
the Hickocracy.
So there was a bit of disillusionment at old Point
Grey when it turned out that Dr. Pat McGeer's chief
legislative talent was not for reasoned discourse but for
political infighting. McGeer quickly became known as
the man who was out to get Ray Perrault. McGeer was
the next Liberal leader, a talented political hack but,
most were now convinced, he was nothing more. Not
that McGeer didn't still have some defenders. What
do you expect, such defenders argued, a man can't be
a scientist in the legislature. Then came this month's
LSD hysteria — the defenders are still blushing.
It was the big opportunity for McGeer, the scientist.
A legislature was never in worse need of reasoned
scientific analysis of a scientific problem. So what did
Dr. Pat McGeer have to offer ? — only what one
observer called the most hysterical speech ever seen in
B.C.'s legislature.
McGeer, a UBC student councillor charged, was
not interested in scientific truth — he was after "the
votes of the little old ladies in Point Grey." The councillor was right — if McGeer ever was UBC's man in
Victoria, he had now sold out completely.
Monday the degeneration of Dr. Pat McGeer was
finally completed. Monday Dr. Pat McGeer told the
legislature that LSD is addictive and that, such addiction
ean be as "hellish as heroin addiction." Yet, as any
scientific book or article or any student who has experimented with the drug will tell you, LSD is not and
never has been addictive. So that leaves two alternatives:
either Dr. Pat McGeer is misinformed about a crucial
scientific problem or he lied to the legislature about
LSD for political profit. Which alternative is correct ?
Ask Pat McGeer. And ask at the same time if he can
tell you what it is that can entice a scientist to prostitute
his profession to the god of political ambition.
— D. S.
Embroil, today
We urge you to attend today's general meeting
in the armory at noon.
If you do not, you may find yourself embroiled
next year in all sorts of activity you don't want to broil
in. If you do come, you will have your first and last
opportunity to tell the Alma Mater Society and all its
elected officers what to do. Or where to go.
Post script
I knew UBC had overcrowded facilities but this is ridiculotus.
OBIT ...
...BY  TOM MORRIS
Acne, Spasm and Toot
We don't mind universities firing incompetent professors.
What we object to is firing competent ones.
And universities governed like corporations,  which
they are, which we also mind. .        . .
The mother looks into the
newborn and contemplates
its future, man looks into
himself and tries to see
what the past and present
mean, friends peer over the
deadman's grave and write
mental epitaphs, and the
man born out-of-time kicks
every trashcan in his path.
Like Ana Cihronopojlous,
born 1900-died 1967, lived
pursuing something out of
time, her time at least.
Ana had his thing about
life and her environment. It
probably stemmed from her
mother at year one in the
hospital. Her mother didn't
want to have Ana just at
that particular time. She
raved about
stupid doctors and the
insane history of medi-
c i n e and
giving birth.
Anyway
Ana felt that
first maternal
MORRIS warmth, or
was it coldness, of her anti-
mother.
Sixteen years later, in a
school Ana was sure wasn't
fit for her or her fellowman,
she started her first activity
against something. It had to
start against something, why
not the school, she already
thought her parents were
crazy.
But being anti meant being
for something so Ana chose
a local group called Action
Committee for No Education
(ACNE).
The central committee met
three times nightly, discussing plots against teachers
who used black chalk and
principals who gave candy
to their parents.
ACNE was an immense success. Blackboards were painted white and the kids got the
candy. But they got too much
and the group needed a cor
rective. Besides, Ana, the
planning committee chairman,
was bored.
Ana graduated in 1917. In
her final speech to the old
pensioners wing of ACNE,
she gave a blistering attack
on the inhumanity of whiteboards and the whole concept of eating candy. Then
she left.
But she had not really left,
for she was still out of time.
In 1918, Ana entered university.
Here the story becomes
rapid, meetings several times
in minutes, organizational
meetings, protest meetings,
planning meetings, co-ordinating meetings, and meetings
to hold meetings.
And the committees, etc.,
piled high and Ana rose to
great heights. This was admittedly the peak of her
career.
There was the Kommittee
Investigating Colorless Koke,
said at one time to be under
police surveillance for supposed Kommunist activities.
KICK succeeded until Ana
departed and some say it still
meets in a local Koke
machine located beside her
grave.
And then there was the
Society Protesting Assiriine
Social Mores (SPASM). Ana
considered SPASM a failure.
It never really got started
when it seemed to go into fits
of anguish at its challenge and
is possibility of disastrous
failure.
There   were   many   more
groups in Ana's history. But
the last, and for her the greatest accomplishment, was a
smaller group called Those-
Out-Of-Times. TOOT lasted on
into the post-graduate days of
Ana, and if the truth be
known, it lasted on until Ana
met her grave.
TOOT centered on those
who felt the rest of humanity
was out of time. Let us be
clear on this point. None of
the members of TOOT were
out of time, at least not by
TOOTs constitution. The
member's role was to go out
into the world and help those
others who felt out of time. I
suppose if Ana felt any sense
of accomplishment in her lifetime, it was through TOOTing
as she affectionately called
her work.
But 1967 came, and with it
Ana's forced withdrawal from
TOOT.
Although she did go out in
true Chronopolous style. The
hole was too large, or was it
too small? It was very deep,
or was it very shallow? The
flowers were to toe many, or
were they to be none? Her
death was to be a fight against
life, or was it a fight against
death, or a fight against
neither, or just a fight?
Anyway that is not really
our concern. Her epitaph is
plain enough, written by the
chartered members and members-at-large for TOOT.
Ana Chronopolous, 1900-
1967/born against life/out of
time, found time/fought
against/ /died undecided.
EDITOR: John Kersey
city  Danny Stoffman
Newt _. Al Birnie
Photo  Powell Hargrave
Page Friday  Claudia Gwinn
Sports   Sue Gransby
Managing Murray McMillan
Focus  -  Kris Emmott
Ass't News   Al Donald
Ass't City Tom Morris
CUP  Bort Hill
Fish swim and spawn and
things, . countries fight, legislate
and castigate and Joe plays on
through it all. Even all the staff
coming and going through Joey's
fished-out rhythms could not
keep these from working: Norman
Gidney, Val Thorn, Bo Hansen,
Charlotte Haire, and John Kelsey (frog-bound defunked editor).
Where the fish could not swim,
Mike Jessen, Pio Uran and Vicki
Trerise rowed merrily through
streams  and   sports.
Photos gave reason to be for
Kurt Hilger, Al Harvey, Chris
Blake and numerous females, unknown but to the darkroom. Thursday, March 23,  1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
lETtim&G.TM^imti
I'm  damned
Editor, The Ubyssey:
The AMS wanted another
$3 to play with, so they held
a referendum. It lost! Instead
of accepting the decision of the
majority of the interested students, they hold another referendum. Is this democracy in
action? The AMS, by this action, is telling us that we don't
know what we are doing, and
I don't like it. After all, the
majority should rule.
I don't think the AMS
should get the extra $3. Hell!
I think twenty-nine dollars is
too much. It is well known
that the AMS is a beginning
for people with future political ambitions, and I'll be
damned if I like paying some-
else's tuition for "Impractical
Politics". To a lot of students
the proposed fee of $31 means
food, clothes, and books. It
means that university on a
"shoestring" becomes much
less bearable.
If the AMS cut out the inessentials such as the CUS and
athletics (in Hawaii yet) etc.
we could have a reduction instead of an increase. I urge all
students to take a firm stand
against the AMS in the coming referendum! I ask: Who
needs the money, the AMS or
you?
P. GOLDNEY
commerce 1.
Persky on SFU
Editor, Ubyssey:
The victory at Simon Fraser
was in behalf of academic
freedom. I insist on this because so many people here
at UBC failed to understand
that. I was at SFU during the
visit: the students here really
undersood what was happening; in their seriousness re-
ponsibility and courage they
made an image of themselves
that is beautiful. Their teachers came down to them and
told them what they were doing was good, and said that
it was the students who had
provided   the   initiative   for
this movement and the teachers who had responded to
their lead. At all times, the
people were sensible and not
hysterical. Their action was
not radical or revolutionary,
but just and honorable.
I believe that one of the
reasons UBC people had a
hard time understanding the
situation is because our city
newspapers (Province and
Sun) reported the news in
such a way as to confuse
people. This event is one of
importance to not only those
of us who are members of the
academic community but to
all Canadians.
STAN  PERSKY
Arts president
Dirty pool
Editor, The Ubyssey:
While, during the past
week, the university's attention has been focussed upon
the erosion of democracy upon other campuses the forces
of reaction have been at work
in our very midst. We refer,
of couse, to the department
of buildings and grounds,
which, with cynical disregard for the right of free
expression, has filled in and
planted with shrubs the
Buchanan Pond. We are dismayed, Sir, that your newspaper, which has become a
byword for its heroic defence
of democracy within the
multiversity, has, so far, failed to bring this shocking example of creeping conserva-
tivism to the notice of its
readers.
What of the cherished rights
of engineers to free speech?
How, in future, shall we obtain those precious glimpses
of the real world where engineers rule if their forum is
destroyed? What of the health
hazard? Think of this campus
if engineers, foresters, AMS
councillors and Hungarian
peasants are deprived their
free bath. And what of The
Ubyssey itself? Our president
has said that even now it is
obscene; we are sure, Sir, that
your single - handed efforts
to cleanse it and establish it
as the family newspaper of
West Point Grey are doomed
if you are deprived of the opportunity of cleansing yourself.
Michael  B.  Walbank,
George West,
Derek Turner,
Massimo Ciavolella,
Roger Brincker.
Department of Classic's
Unfair  to  Blues
Editor, The Ubyssey:
The AMS constitution stipulates that Honorary Activity
Awards for outstanding service to the organization and
administration of the AMS are
to be selected by a committee
composed largely of past winners.
Up (or perhaps down) at the
students' council level, one
Trueman charges that names
were left off the selected list
"for political reasons". His
solution? Increase the number
of winners from four to nine;
of the five new names, add
three members of council.
Yet to increase the award-
winners toy more than 100 per
cent hardly seems a significant stroke to lessen any "political reasons" behind the
awards. The effect of Mr.
man's manoeuvre is to subvert
the constitution and to bring
the award to the manifestly
meaningful level of a merely
crude and blatant display of
in-group acrobatics.
But why stop at adding
three councillors? Why not
add all such exalted embryonic
legislators?
Why not add the whole campus, on the principle that each
student serves by paying AMS
fees? An award might mollify
those students who feel that
council should be dealing with
more important matters than
"amending" award lists in
order in indulge in such reciprocal partisan toack-scratch-
ing.
MIKE COLEMAN
law 2
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THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, March 23, 1967
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HARMISH  PROTESTS
By KIRSTEN EMMOTT
Ubyssey Council Analyst
My outspacer friend Harmish came up to me last
night at the Be-In.
"This planet (yours) sends my mind into supernova,"
he complained. "Please elucidate for me this newsly report." He held up what looked like an issue of the McGill daily.
The story ran, in part, "Last night's student council
meeting was relatively quiet, with only three fistnghts,
two homosexual advances, one rape attempt, and three
fatal duels. The student union president burst into hysterical tears several times."
"Relax, Harmish," I said. "That's the MonGril Daily,
the annual goon issue put out by the McGill Daily staff.
They're just kidding."
Harmish expressed relief. "I express relief," he said.
"Still there are incomprehensibilities about our Alma
Mater Society council."
"Amen," I muttered.
"Some weeks ago, the Monday Evening Sunflower,
Knitting and Nittering Society spent 56 minutes approving
three sets of minutes," continued Harmish.
"Nothing unusual about that," I remarked.
"At the same meeting, one Bonnie Prince Charlie
was ordered out—"
"No, no, Harmish," I corrected. "He was declared
out of order."
"King Peter the Gavel said Charlie had misdemean-
ored by orating political things about a housing shortage,"
he went on.
"Yes, it seems that if the population of France had
grown at the same rate as Quebec's during the last twenty
years, it would now be 3 billion souls," I said. "The riposte
by another councillor was that if Standard Oil in Burnaby
continued to grow at its present rate, by 1990 it will have
taken over all of North America."
"Humor? Irony, I limp behind, uncomprehending,"
said Harmish.  "No worry over housing shortages here,"
"We try not to worry too loudly about anything," I
said.  "Only dirty, bearded, obscene people protest."
"Did not council protest ugly dormboxes, irrelevant
courses, people who stomp on academic freedom?"
"Then they must be dirty, bearded and obscene," I
said.
"But that's not fair," protested Harmish.
I "Careful, Harmish," I warned.   "You're protesting."
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m 8 Thursday, March 23, 1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
RESIDENCE GROWS
Experimental college set,
ex-co-op used for basis
TORONTO (UNS) — The most exciting
educational experiment in Canada may get
the go-ahead in Toronto this week.
It is Rochdale College, an 18-story student co-operative housing enterprise on
Bloor Street West. The building should be
completed in 1968.
However, it won't be known until today, when the 400 student members of the
Campus Co-op Residence Inc. vote, whether
Rochdale will be the most radical experiment in higher education on the continent
or a co-operative housing enterprise.
CCRI was founded at the University of
Toronto in 1936 by four theological students who thought university housing offered too little and cost too much.
The 12 member committee says the college is going to toe built anyway.
"So, why not try to make use of it instead of allowing it to develop into an
alienated and inhuman hotel for students?"
The committee of U of T students and
faculty are dissatisfied with the present
system of higher education.
"Some feel the university is turning into
an institution destructive to the individual
and all believe it is deficient in many ways,"
said the committee.
Dr. Martin Wall, associate professor of
psychology at U of T and chairman of
Rochdale's education committee, said Rochdale will be an unstructured community
where a person can involve himself part-
time or full-time.
The college will accommodate 850 persons; both sexes, some married, others not.
They probably will be faculty and students from UofT, Ryerson Polytechnical Institute and the Ontario College of
Art.
Rochdale will not be formally associated
with   U of T.   It   will   grant   no   degrees.
Decisions about education will be made
by the people involved in the educational
project.
The committee says there will be no
prestructuring of education experience.
Rochdale will not offer a curriculum or
calendar, and it won't rely on proven
group-learning techniques.
Instead, the college will provide a frame
work of resources — staff, physical facilities, residence space and institutional continuity — which will mean that education
will not halt at 5 p.m.
The staff will be senior and junior academics whose primary qualifications should
be that they have participated before in
worthwhile learning experiences and have
some understanding and sensitivity to those
experiences.
The committee says: "They should consider themselves just as much students as
teachers and should see their function as
one of assisting students draw on their own
experiences rather than as purveyors of the
experiences   of  others."
Dennis Lee, English lecturer at Victoria
University and education committee member, said Rochdale students will deal with
traditional questions: Who am I? What makes
my society tick? Where have we come from?
What might it toe? What has been known?
How can I grow?
"Rochdale should become the locus for
a major recreation of vision," said Lee.
"It should foster groups of writers —
not people who would rather like to try
some writing, but people who are engaged
in writing and want to get on with it in
the company of other writers.
The first two floors of the building will
contain dining rooms, a bank, a drugstore
and bookstore, a library, offices, seminar
rooms and a conference room.
The 16 residential floors will each contain one and two-bedroom apartments,
furnished suites with kitchens, furnished
suites without kitchens, single and double
rooms, and a lounge with a kitchenette.
The capital cost per unit of a campus coop is about $4,000, compared with $7,000
in a university residence, and the rental
cost per student for each academic year
is about $200 lower than in a residence.
The college will be operated by a board
of governors, all of whose members will
live in the college and each student and
faculty member will have one vote. All
decisions will toe made democratically —
from what students want to learn to what
they want to eat.
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THE       UBYSSEY
Page 9
Proposed Constitution
Changes
Following are the proposed revisions to the
AMS constitution. Today's general meeting will
consider them in two categories, non-controversial
or housecleaning (mainly changes in wording)
and significant, possibly controversial policy
decisions such as changing the AMS executive
and cutting   the jocks.
NON-CONTROVERSIAL
1. Proposed Revision
Add new article 2 (b) as follows:—
(b)To   advance  the   cause   of universal
accessibility   to   all   forms   of   post-
secondary education in British Columbia.
2. Proposed Revision
Renumber article 2 (b) to (h) as 2 (c) to (i).
3.  By-law 1 (1) (b)
now reads as follows:—
(b)All students of affiliated colleges
who have paid the fees of the Society
for the current University session.
Proposed Revision
(to) All other students registered in some
academic programme at the University of British Columbia or affiliated
college who have paid the fees of the
Society for the current University
session.
4. By-law 1 (1) (c)
now reads as follows:—
(c) All graduate and occasional sudents
who have paid the fees of the Society
for the current University session.
Proposed Revision
Delete by-law 1 (1) (c).
5. By-law 1 (2)
now reads as follows:—
(2) Active members shall be classified as
freshmen,   sophomores,   juniors   or
seniors.
(a) A freshman shall be any student registered in first year Arts and Science
or its equivalent.
(b) A sophomore shall be any student
who has completed only first year
Arts and Science or its equivalent.
(c) A junior shall be any student who has
completed first year Arts and Science
or its equivalent plus one other year in
any faculty and who is not in his graduating year and who has not received
a degree in any other faculty.
(d) A senior shall be any student who shall
have completed three fully accredited
years at the University or their equivalent.
Proposed Revision
Delete by-law 1 (2) and renumber toy-laws
1 (3) to (7) as 1 (2) to (6).
6. By-law 4 (2)
now reads as follows:—
(2) The Honorary members of the Students'
Council shall be: The Honorary President of the Students' Council who shall
be the President of the University.
Proposed Revision
(2) Honorary members of the Students'
Council may be appointed from time to
time by the Students' Council.
7. By-law 4 (4) (a)
now reads as follows:—
(a) The Honorary President shall act in an
advisory capacity and be a medium of
goodwill between the Society and the
general public.
Proposed Revision
(a) Where an Honorary President is so
designated from time to time under
the stipulation of By-Law 4 (2), he
shall act in an advisory capacity and
be a medium of goodwill between the
Society and the general public.
8. By-law 4 (4) (b) (ii)
now reads as follows:—
(ii) The President may also appoint
such further members of the Student's Council to act in an advisory
capacity on such other and further
committees and subsidiary organizations of the Society, as he shall
from time to time see fit.
Proposed Revision
(ii) The President may also appoint
such further members of the Students' Council to act in an advisory
capacity on such other and further
committees and subsidiary organizations of the Society, as he shall
from time to time see fit, or be
instructed by a majority vote of
Students' Council.
9.  By-law 7 (1) (d)
now reads as follows:—
(d) Nominations shall be signed by not
less than ten active members in good
standing of the Society. All nominations shall be delivered to the Secretary of the Society within the time
aforesaid, and shall forthwith be posted by that officer on the Students'
Council bulletin board.
Proposed Revision
(d) Nominations shall toe signed by not
less than twenty-five active members
in good standing of the Society. All
nominations shall be delivered to the
Secretary of the Society within the
time aforesaid, and shall forthwith
be posted by that officer on the Students' Council bulletin board.
AGENDA
for
GENERAL MEETING
Minutes   of   the   last   general   meeting,
March 24,  1966
Non-controversial  constitution revisions
Treasurer's report
Auditors
President's report
Controversial constitution revisions
Honorary activity awards
10.  By-law 8 (2)
now reads as follows:—
(2) With the exception of the President of
the Social Work Students' Association,
nominations for all such elections shall
not close before the Friday following the
last election of the Executive of the Students' Council. All elections under this
By-Law shall toe completed within two
weeks of the completion of the last election of the Executive of the Students'
Council.
Proposed  Revision
(2) All elections under this By-Law shall
be completed within two weeks of the
completion of the last election of the
Executive of the Students' Council.
11.  By-law 8 (3)
now reads as follows:—
(3) The President of the Social Work Students' Association shall be elected before
the second Monday in October.
Proposed Revision
Delete toy-law 8 (3).
12.  By-law 17
now reads as follows:—
The seal of the Society shall not be affixed
to any instrument except in the presence of
the signing officers as defined in By-Law 5
(2) and toy the authority of a resolution of
the Students' Council. The said officers
shall witness every instrument on which
the seal of the Society is so affixed in their
presence. The seal of the Society shall be
kept in the custody of the Secretary or such
other person, firm, or corporation as the
Students' Council may from time to time
appoint.
Proposed Revision
The seal of the Society shall not be affixed
to any instrument except in the presence
of the signing officers as defined in By-Law
6 (2) and by the authority of a resolution
of the Students' Council. The said officers
shall witness every instrument on which
the seal of the Society is so affixed in their
presence. The seal of the Society shall be
kept in the custody of the Secretary or such
other person, firm, or corporation as the
Students' Council may from time to time
appoint.
CONTROVERSIAL
1.  By-law 4 (3) (a) to (g)
now reads as follows:—
(3) The members of the Students' Council
shall be:—
(a) The President, who shall be a senior
or entering his senior year, and who
has attended the University of British
Columbia for at least two years and
and who has not previously held the
position of President of the Society.
(to) The First Vice-President who shall be
a senior or entering his senior year.
(c) The Second Vice-President who shall
be a junior or entering his junior year.
(d) The Secretary, who shall be a female
and who shall be a junior, entering
her junior year, or a senior.
(e) The Treasurer who shall be a senior
or entering his senior year.
(f) The Co-ordinator of Activities who
shall be a junior, entering his junior
year, or a senior.
(g)The Editor-in-Chief of the Ubyssey
Editorial Board, who shall be an appointed and not an elected member of
the Council. He shall be appointed by
a vote of a joint meeting of the incoming and outgoing Students' Councils
before the end of the spring term on
the recommendations of the Editorial
Board.
Proposed Revision
(3) The members of the Students' Council
shall be the following. The requirements
for successful completion of particular
years or equivalents are minimum requirements only:—
(a) The President, who shall have successfully completed his second year or its
equivalent, and who has attended the
University of British Columbia for at
least two years, and who has not previously held the position of President
of the Society.
Ob) The Vice-President, who shall have
successfully completed his second year
or its equivalent, and who has attended the University of British Columbia
for at least two years.
(c) The External Affairs Officer, who
shall have successfully completed his
first year or its equivalent.
(d) The Internal Affairs Officer, who shall
have successfully completed his first
year or its equivalent.
(e) The Treasurer, who shall have successfully completed his second year
or its equivalent.
(f) The Co-ordinator of Activities, who
shall have successfully completed his
first year or its equivalent.
(g) The Secretary, who shall have successfully completed his first year or
its equivalent.
(h)The Ombudsman, who shall have successfully completed his first year or
its equivalent. He shall be elected in
the same manner as the Executive of
the Students' Council.
(i) The Editor-in-Chief of the Ubyssey
Editorial Board, who shall toe an appointed and not an elected member of
the Council. He shall be appointed by
a vote of the Incoming Students'
Council before the end of the spring
term on the recommendations of the
Editorial Board.
2.  By-law 4 (4) (c)
now reads as follows:—
(c) The First Vice-President shall assist
the President in the duties of his office and shall assume and carry out
the duties of the President during his
absence or in the event of his resignation. He shall act as liaison officer
for such committees as the President
shall from time to time designate, and
shall represent their interests to the
Students' Council.
Proposed Revision
(c) The Vice-President shall assist the
President in  the duties of his office
MUCH, MUCH MORE ON PAGES 10 & 11 Page 10
THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday, March 23,  1967
and shall assume and carry out the
duties of the President during his
absence or in the event of his resignation. He shall act as liaison officer
for such committees as the President
shall from time to time designate, and
shall represent their interests to the
Students' Council.
3. By-law 4 (4) (d)
now reads as follows:—
(d) The Second Vice-President shall be responsible for the Public Relations of
the Society and shall assist the President in the duties of that office. He
shall have such other and further
duties as are given him by the President from time to time.
Proposed  Revision
Delete by-law 4 (4) (d).
4. Proposed Revision
Add new by-law 4 (4) (d) as follows:—
(d) The External Affairs Officer shall:
(i) Be responsible for keeping Students' Council informed of both
Provincial and Federal Government education policy. Similarly,
he shall inform those governments
as to student proposals for higher
education and to this end he shall
be responsible for preparing, in
consultation with the Executive,
and subject to approval of Students' Council, any briefs relating
HECTIC GENERAL MEET tends to bring forth
fiery orators, who sometimes get carried way,
literally  ...
to higher education to either of
the aforementioned governments,
(ii) Be responsible for maintaining
close working relations with the
Secretariat and member unions of
the Canadian Union of Students.
Furthermore, he shall be responsible for chairing the Canadian
Union of Students Committee at
U.B.C. He shall also encourage
friendly relations with other national student unions.
5. Proposed Revision
Renumber by-law 4 (4) (e) as by-law 4
(4) (h).
6. Proposed  Revision
Add new by-law 4 (4) (e) as follows:—
(e)The Internal Affairs Officer shall:
(i) Be responsible for the Public Relations of the Society,
(ii) Be responsible for informing Students'   Council   of   all   major   revisions in curricula at U.B.C. Further,  he  shall  maintain  close relations with Undergraduate Societies   and   Students'   Associations
and shall assist them in whatever
he can to promote academic reform
advocated by those Societies and
Associations,
(iii) Have such other and further duties
as are given him toy the President
from time to time.
shall be:
(a) The President
(b)The Vice-President
(c) The External Affairs Officer
(d) The Internal Affairs Officer
(e) The Treasurer
(f) The Co-ordinator of Activities
(g)The Secretary.
10. By-law 6 (2)
Proposed  Revision
Renumber by-law 4  (4) (h) as bylaw 4
(4) (j).
7
8. Proposed  Revision
Add new by-law 4 (4) (i) as follows:—
(i) The Ombudsman shall:
(i) Be responsible for investigating
any complaint of any member in
good standing of the Alma Mater
Society vis-a-vis the Alma Mater
Society, its subsidiary organizations, the University Administration or any of its ancillary services,
(ii) Be responsible for the alleviation
of any complaint where possible,
(iii) Recommend any course of action
to any other Executive member,
the Students' Council of the Alma
Mater Society, or any of its subsidiary organizations where such
action is necessitated,
(iv) Be allowed to attend all meetings
of the Alma Mater Society Executive and any of its subsidiary organizations or committees.
By-law 6 (1)
now reads as follows:—
(l)The Executive of the Students' Council
shall be:
(a) The President
(to) The First Vice-President
(c) The Second Vice-President
(d) The Secretary
(e)The Treasurer
(f)The Co-ordinator of Activities
Proposed Revision
(l)The Executive of the Students' Council
now reads as follows:—
(2) The signing officers of the Society shall
be any two of the President, First Vice-
President, Secretary, Second Vice-President, Co-ordinator of Activities and
Treasurer; provided that no one person
may sign in two different capacities.
Proposed Revision
(2) The signing officers of the Society shall
be any two of the President, the Vice-
President, the Internal Affairs Officer,
the Treasurer, the Co-ordinator of Activities, and the Secretary; provided that no
one person may sign in two different
capacities.
11. By-law 22
now reads as follows:—
Among the principal functions of the Ubyssey and other publications from time to
time serving as news organs of the Alma
Mater Society shall be the advance notification and sufficient advertisement to the
Society's membership of the events listed
in the Social Calendar of the student handbook together with the publication of such
social or athletic events or other matters
as the Students' Council may direct to the
attention of the Second Vice-President.
Proposed Revision
Among the principal functions of The Ubyssey and other publications from time to
time serving as news organs of the Alma
Mater Society shall be the advance notification and sufficient advertisement to the
Society's membership of the events listed
in the Social Calendar of the student handbook together with the publication of such
social or athletic events or other matters
as the Students' Council may direct to the
attention of the Internal Affairs Officer.
12. By-law 4 (3) (h)
now reads as follows:—
(h)The duly  elected  Presidents of the
following Undergraduate Societies and
Students' Associations:
(i) Agriculture Undergraduate Society
(ii) Architecture   "Undergraduate    Society
(iii) Arts Undergraduate Society
(iv) Commerce Undergraduate Society
(v) Education Undergraduate Society
(vi) Engineering Undergraduate Society
(vii) Forestry Undergraduate Society
(viii) Graduate Students' Association
(ix) Home    Economics   Undergraduate
Society
(x) Law Students' Association
(xi) Library School Students' Association
(xii) Medical Undergraduate Society
(xiii) Music Students' Association
(xiv) Nursing   Undergraduate Society
(xv) Pharmacy Undergraduate Society
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THE      UBYSSEY
Page 11
(xvi) Physical Education Undergraduate
Society
(xvii) Rehabilitation   Medicine   Undergraduate Society
(xviii) Science Undergraduate Society
(xix) Social Work Students' Association
(xx) Presidents of Future Degree Granting Faculties, Colleges and Schools.
Proposed Revision
Renumber by-law 4 (3) (h) as by-law 4 (3)
(j) and reword as follows:—
(j) The duly elected Alma Mater Society
Students'   Council   representatives   of
the following Undergraduate Societies
and Students' Associations:
(i) Agriculture Undergraduate Society
(ii) Architecture Undegraduate Society
(iii) Arts Undergraduate Society
(iv) Commerce Undergraduate Society
(v) Education Undergraduate Society
(vi) Engineering Undergraduate Society
(vii) Forestry Undergraduate Society
(viii) Graduate Students' Association
(ix) Home   Economics   Undergraduate
Society
(x) Law Students' Association
(xi) Library School Students' Association
(xii) Medical Undergraduate Society
(xiii) Music Undergraduate Society
(xiv) Nursing Undergraduate Society
(xv) Pharmacy Undergraduate Society
(xvi) Physical Education Undergraduate
Society
(xvii) Rehabilitation   Medicine  Undergraduate Society
(xviii) Science Undergraduate Society
(xix) Social Work Students' Association
(xx) The duly elected Alma Mater Society Students Council representatives of future degree granting Faculties, Colleges and Schools.
13. By-law 4 (4) (i)
now reads as follows:—
(i) The Presidents of each of the Faculties, Colleges or Schools (as defined in
by-law 4 (3) (h) shall be the spokesman for his respective organization.
These Presidents shall be the direct
mode of communication 'both from the
Students' Council to the Student Body
and from the Student Body to the Students' Council. The Presidents shall
sit as voting members of the Students'
Council and shall not delegate their
voting rights.
Proposed Revision
Renumber toy-law 4 (4) (i) as by-law 4 (4)
(k) and reword as follows:—
(k)The Presidents of each of the Undergraduate Societies, Faculties, Colleges,
Schools or Students' Associations (as
outlined in by-law 4 (3) (j)) shall be the
spokesmen for their respective organizations and they or their duly elected
representatives shall sit as voting members of the Students' Council. The Presidents or duly elected representatives
of the organizations outlined in by-law
4 (3) (j) shall be the direct mode of
communication between Students'
Council and the Student Body; they
shall not delegate their voting rights.
Once the voting member from such an
organization has been determined, he
and he alone has the right to cast the
vote for that organization for his elected term. In the event of the resignation,
death or other incapacity of the voting
member, the organization shall have
no vote until a replacement for the
member so incapacitated shall be duly
elected by the organization to complete the term of such memlber.
14. Proposed Revision
Add new by-law 4 (4) (m) as follows:—
(m) The Residences Representative shall:
(i)Be responsible for informing Students' Council on all matters which
affect   the   housing   of   students,
whether on campus or off.
(ii)Be a communications  liaison between    the    Students'    Residence
Advisory Committee and the Students' Council of the Alma Mater
Society.
15. By-law 8(1)
.now reads as follows:—
(l)The President of each Faculty, College
or School named in By-law 4 (3) duly
elected in accordance with the constitutions of their respective organizations
shall be members of the students' Council.
Proposed Revision
(l)The Presidents or duly elected representatives of each organization named in
By-law 4 (3) (j), duly elected in accordance with the constitutions of the respective organizations, shall be members o<
the Students' Council.
16. By-law 4 (3) (i)
now reads as follows:
(i)The   duly   elected   representative
from the Residences who shall be
a non-voting member.
Proposed Revision
Renumber By-law 4 (3) (i) as by-law 4
(3) (k) and reword as follows:—
(k) The duly elected representative from
the Residences who shall be a voting
member.
17. Proposed  Revision
Add new by-law 4 (3) (m) as follows:—
(m) One duly elected representative from
the University Clubs Committee to be
elected at the Spring General Meeting of the University Clubs Committee, who shall be a voting member.
18.  Proposed  Revision
Add new by-law 4 (4) (n) as follows:—
(n) The    University    Clubs    Committee
Representative  shall  be  responsible
for:
(i) Maintaining a close communications liaison between the University Clubs Committee and the Students' Council of the Alma Mater
Society,
(ii) Attending all Executive and General Meetings of the University
Clubs Committee.
HISTORIC SYMBOL OF GENERAL MEETING is
the AMS executive, for once, subjugating itself to the wishes of the benevolent masses.
Because it comes, however, at the end of
the year, and it doesn't matter what the
masses do to the executive anyhow, most
councillors feel it is a pain, as in (right) . . .
19. By-law 4 (5)
now reads as follows:—
(5) Each   Students'   Councillor   shall  have
one   vote   with   the   exception   of   the
Editor-in-Chief of the Ubyssey and the
representative from the Residences.
Proposed Revision
(5) (a) At any official meeting of the Students' Council, each Students' Councillor shall have one vote, except as
hereinafter provided, with the exception of the Ombudsman and the
Editor-in-Chief of the Ubyssey.
(b) Upon the moving and seconding of any
motion, any voting member of Students' Council may move that voting
on the motion before the Council be
taken by a weighted vote.
(c) If the motion for a weighted vote is
seconded and the njotion is carried,
voting on the motion before the Council will be taken and computed as
follows:—
(i) The   Executive   members   of   the
Students'  Council shall have  one
vote,
(ii) The   duly   elected   representative
from the Residences shall have one
vote,
(iii) The   duly   elected   representative
from  the   University  Clubs  Committee shall have one vote,
(iv) The Ombudsman and the Editor-
in-Chief of the Ubyssey shall have
no vote,
(v) A weighted vote for each of the
Presidents or duly elected representatives from the Undergraduate
Societies or Students' Associations
to the Students' Council of the Alma
Mater Society is based on the total
number of votes cast in the previous
year's election for the President of
the Undergraduate Society or Students'   Association,   or,   the   total
number of votes cast in the previous year's election for the duly
elected    renrpsentative    from   the
t idergraduate    Society    or    Stu-
ints' Association, whichever vote
otal is greater.
ia) If the total number of votes cast
in   this   election   is   below   500
votes, the President or the duly
elected representative shall have
one vote.
(b) If the total number of votes
castin this election is between
500 and 999 votes, the President
or duly elected representative
may cast two votes.
(c) It the total number of votes
cast in this election is 1,000 or
more, the President or duly
elected representative may cast
three votes.
(d) By 4:00 p.m. of the third Alma Mater
Society business day immediately
following the election of the Presi
dent or duly elected representative
to sit on the Students' Council of the
Alma Mater Society from any Undergraduate Society or Students' Association, the results of this election
must be filed with the Chairman of
Elections Committee (the A.M.S. Secretary) and duly certified by the
General Manager of the Alma Mater
Society, in order to officially ascertain the number of votes that may be
cast by the President or duly elected
representative of an Undergraduate
Society or Students' Association,
when a weighted vote is called for.
In the event that an Undergraduate
Society or Students' Association fails
to comply with these requirements,
the President or duly elected representative shall have one vote only.
20. By-law 14 (8)
now reads as follows:—
(8) Other than designated political clubs,
no organization in the Society shall become or allow itself to become, an instrument of partisan politics.
(a) Any such organization deemed by
Students' Court after regular proceedings set forth in Section 9 below,
to be or have been improperly acting
in the interests of a political party
(or comparable organization) shall be
liable to suffer suspension of its
charter.
(b) Such charter may be restored by the
Students' Council only if and when
the Council is satisfied that the organization concerned will serve the
purposes and only the purposes for
which it was organized.
Proposed Revision
Delete by-law 14 (8) and renumber bylaws 14 (9) to (15) as (8) to (14).
21. By-law 11 (10)
now reads as follows :—
(10) The Treasurer shall deposit a sum calculated on eighty cents (800) per active
member of the Society for the Women's
Athletic Association, such fund to be a
first charge on the revenue of the
Society and to be applied at the discretion of the Women's Athletic Association.
Proposed  Revision
(10) The treasurer shall deposit a sum calculated on fifty cents (500) per active
member of the Society for the Women's
Athletic Association, such fund to be a
first charge on the revenue of the
Society and to be applied at the discretion of the Women's Athletic Association.
22. Proposed  Revision
Add new by-law 11 (11) as follows:—
(11) The Treasurer shall deposit a
sum calculated on three dollars
and twenty cents ($3.20) per active
member of the Society for the
Men's Athletic Committee, such
fund to be a first charge on the
revenue of the Society and to be
applied at the discretion of the
Men's Athletic Committee.
23. Proposed  Revision
Add new by-law 25 as follows:—
BY-LAW 25 -
RECALL OF ELECTED OFFICERS
Any elected Executive officer of the Students' Council may be recalled by a petition
signed by no less than ten percent of the
active members of the Society in the current year.
(1) Nominations shall be opened for that
position no later than one week after
receipt of such petition by Students'
Council.
(2) Nominations shall be declared closed
one week after they have been opened
and an election shall be held, following
the procedure outlined in By-law 7 (1)
(d) to Oi), no later than one week after
nominations are closed.
(3) The incumbent officer shall continue to
hold office until the day following the
election. The candidate elected shall assume office at that time.
(4) Any elected Executive officer recalled
under this By-law and duly re-elected
under Section (2) shall not be subject
to further recall during that term of
office. Page  12
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, March 23, 1967
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THE       UBYSSEY
Page  13
—kurt hilger photo
"NAVAL, NAVAL, wherefore art thou naval. I thought I was going to the boatshow!"
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part of the Ben-Hill Tout annual  UBC salon of photography.
Labs get results,
studies prove it
More than 4,200 students annually parade under the relentless supervision of a local sergeant-major that drills recruits at
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This is how language laboratory supervisor Hal Johnson
describes his operation in the new language labs in the Buchanan ibuilding.
Research studies based on his work shop show nothing but
good results from this discipline.
"Those who benefit most are the average students, who
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it," said Johnson.
The sergeant-major is the tape-machine and the parade
square is the lab.
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Johnson.
He spends most of his time listening but he can also repeat
words and compare his performance with the machine's.
An important function of the lab is to provide English language instruction to foreign students. Time in the lab is set
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t   r Show Times:
1/        «A>. 7:30-9:30
224-3730     4375 W. 10th
BETTER BUY BOOKS
UNIVERSITY
TEXT BOOKS
NON-FICTION
PAPERBACKS
Specializing in
Review Notes
and Study Guides
4393 W. 10th Ave.
224-4144
I
GRAD CLASS
GENERAL MEETING
MARCH 30      -      12:30      -      HEBB THEATRE
STUDENT EMPLOYMENT - TRAINING PROGRAM
Boys' Clubs of Vancouver: Students, male/female, who would be interested in a part-time employment-training program during the 1967-68
school year — working with boys — are invited to contact the Placement
Office (in person or phone 228-3811) to arrange an interview for Tuesday,
March 28th — 10 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.
FILM SOCIETY PRESENTS
PRIDE
Am
PREJUDICE
THURSDAY, MARCH 23
3:30 in the Auditorium
6:30 and 8:30 Buch. 106
Admission — 50c
IMPERIAL
ARTS
ARTISTS' MATERIALS
PICTURE FRAMING
ART GALLERY
4458 West 10th Ave.
224-3933
YOU
Can Take The
AMS Charter Flight
AND
• GO TO CONVOCATION
• GO TO EXPO
• GO TO EUROPE
All For $375
Lv. Van. the evening of June 1st, and arrive in Montreal
for 1 wk; then leave for Europe June 7th. You return to
Van. Sept. 4th. Call in at the A.M.S. office, S, Brock, CA
4-3242
TRAVEL TO
EXPO  67!
/ith
CYVR
RADIO
8 days in Montreal
From  $154.00
LEAVING MAY 8th
RESERVE NOW!
FOR DETAILS:
CYVR-SOUTH  BROCK
BASEMENT
CA 2-3242 - Loc. 34
ALL  THESE  METALS
ARE  AVAILABLE   AT
GRASSIES  ON  SEYMOUR
Designed to any special requirement whether it be
watches — rings or exquisite table pieces. Come in
and ask for it by name.
STUDENT PREFERENTIAL  DISCOUNTS ACKNOWLEDGED
566 SEYMOUR . . . 685-2271 Page 14
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, March 23, 1967
VILLAGE   CAFE
"Where good friends and fine food meet"
5778 University Blvd.
(In the Village)
224-0640
GRAD CLASS
GENERAL MEETING
MARCH 30      -      12:30     -      HEBB THEATRE
1
THE   DAY  YOU   BUY  A   DIAMOND
You   are   buying   for   the  future
as   well   as   the   present   .   .   .
•
SEE US  FOR  YOUR  DIAMOND TODAY
Varsity Jewellers
4517 West 10th
224-4432
GETTING MARRIED?
PLEASE SEND YOUR LATEST INVITATION
SAMPLES AND PRICE LIST BY RETURN MAIL
TO:
RUNNERS GO KELOWNA
NAME
ADDRESS
MR. ROY YACHT,  Consultant
™" CARD SHOP
i_
Corner Robson and Burrard
I
MU 4-4011    I
1
co away!
TO EUROPE THIS SUMMER
LONDON      -      AMSTERDAM      -      PARIS
COPENHAGEN      -      ROME      -      FRANKFURT
Join a Group by Air
Take a Leisurely Sea Voyage
BOOK NOW
5700 University Blvd. 224-4391
Representing American Express
Coach Lionel Pugh takes his 32-member
track and field team to Kelwona this Saturday for  the B.C.  Indoor Track  and  Field
Bears vs rugby Birds
in varsity stadium clash
UCLA Bruins will meet the UBC
Thunderbirds in a two-game rugby series
at varsity stadium today at 3:15 p.m. and
Saturday at 2:30 p.m.
When the Birds travelled to Los Angeles
last year they clobbered the Bruins 41-6.
However this year, with a new coach,
Dennis Storer, and a much bigger team,
the LA rugger men are expected to be a
lot tougher. This season they have won
seven and lost five games.
UCLA's chances are greatly increased
because they have included in their ranks
an  international  from  Sarawak,  D.  Wink.
Basketballers bounce eastward
Coach Norm Watt's Junior Varsity basketball team heads east this weekend for the
Canadian Junior Centennial Tournament,
to be held at Saint John, New Brunswick,
on March 27-29.
The JV's, who are the defending Canadian champions, had an outstanding season
and have to be considered the team to beat
this year  also.
Championships.
Good showings are expected from many
members of the UBC team.
Chip Barrett is strong in the 50-yard
dash, Ray Stevenson and Gordon Dong are
people to watch in the triple jump, and
Don Scott has a good chance of winning
the one mile event.
According to Pugh the UBC team should
win the 4 x 440 easily. The team will be
made up of Don Scott, Dave Aune, Ron
Haddad and either Craig Nixon or Jeff
Staneombe.
The events will decide individual champions only. The members of the UBC team
will be running for themselves so there
will be no winning team as such.
Tokyo bound?
The 1967 World Student Games will be
held in Tokyo Aug. 26 to Sept. 4.
Competition is planned for eight sports:
basketball, fencing, gymnastics, judo, swimming, tennis, track and field, and volleyball.
Selections for the proposed Canadian
team in every sport but track and field and
tennis will be based upon the results of the
CIAU national championships which have
just concluded in Alberta.
The only thing holding back the CIAU-
CUS Joint Organizing Committee is money.
If the $60,000 objective cannot be reached
the proposed Canadian team of 50 athletes
may have to be cut to 20.
Western Canada's Largest
Formal Wear  Rentals
Tuxedos White & Blue Coats.
Full   Dress Shirts   &  Accessories
Morning   Coats Blue  Blazers
Directors'  Coats 10%   UBC   Discount
2500 GARMENTS TO CHOOSE  FROM
E. A. LEE Formal Wear Rentals
623   HOWE   (Downstairs)   MU   3-2457
2608  Granville   (at  10th)  4691   Kingsway  (Bby.)
RE  3-6727 (by  Sears)   HE  5-1160
Slacks Narrowed
Suits Altered
and Repaired
Tuxedos  Remodelled
Expert Tailoring
UNITED TAILORS
549 Granville St.
furniture has flair at EATON'S
NOTICE
THE BOOK STORE
will be closed all day
for
ANNUAL STOCK TAKING Thursday, March 23, 1967 THE      UBYSSEY
ROWERS TAKE TO WATER
Nine  visiting crews  will  challenge  the starts at 8 a.m.
Thunderbird oarsmen at the annual Spring The Thunderbird crew is embarking on
Regatta to be held this Saturday. its most ambitious schedule ever, with its
The powerful Oregon State rowers are ultimate goal the Pan American Games at
highly favoured to match the Birds stroke Winnipeg   on   August  2-5   and   the   North
for stroke in the senior eights race. American  championships at St.  Catharines
Three high school teams will also be on AuSust 10'13-
competing in the regatta. Two of these, .The intensified spring and summer
Brentwood and St. George's, will be racing training program for the UBC crews will
against the Shawnigan Lake crew, who will move into high gear at Kalamalka Lake
travel to Europe later this year for compe- near Vern°n in May. The near impossible
titions. training conditions at Coal Harbour prompt-
Other teams entered in the regatta are: ed tAhe move-
Lake Washington Rowing Club, Pacific iU Accommodation has been arranged at
Lutheran   University,   University   of   Puget the  °kanagan Athletic Camp  and  summer
Sound, Seattle University and University of i°bs are being sought in the area for about
Victoria. oarsmen. The ideal rowing conditions on
a      ',, , „„,„,        . .    .  ,    . . the   lake   are   expected   to   give  our  crews
wi*   Inin traCn   S       m e ^Planned their best opportunity in years to prepare
W,      . g    ;  J-V; C and  C0XleSS for the tou*h upcoming race schedule,
fours,   senior   coxless   fours,   senior   pairs,
J.V.   eights,   senior   and   junior   wherries .  The regatta race schedule is as follows:
(work singles) and an Old Boys eight Tlme Event Distance
Lake Washington and U of Victoria  are ®:°°      ^ni°r 8           2000 m-
expected to challenge UBC's supremacy in °:^      tY\«      i«n ,u'"'^"V"    200°m-
the senior and JV events. 830      Under 160 lbs" Wherries      1000 m.
ti,o  «„„i  ,.„        * ^    * ■„  t.    ^ 8:45      Senior Pair Without     2000 m.
The final race  of the  day will be the 9.00      jy 8 2000
Old Boys eight-made up of senior UBC 9:15      senior Cox'lesVV 2000m'
and VRCcrew men. They will take on the 9:30      JV wherries ";    ™™ m
Thunderbirds    Among   those   rowing    for 9:45      Junior Cox 4        2000 m.
Old Boys will be Al Roaf last year's stroke, 10:00     Senior  Wherries _____ 1000 m
and Waynne Pretty, coach of the Thunder- 10:15      Junior 8      ___ 2000 m
bird crew. 10;30      JV Cox>less 4     2000 m.
The regatta will be held at Coal Har- 10:45     Junior Wherries 1000 m
bour-Burrard   Yacht   Club.   The   first   race 11:00      Old Boys 8    _ 1000 m
Page  15
Volleyette
UBC Thunderette volleyball player Maureen Fish-
leigh may be representing Canada in the Pan American
Games.
On the weekend of March 17-18 she attended the Canadian   championships   in   Toronto,   with   the   Vancouver-
Marpole  team.
Another UBC player, Donna Bishop,
played for the team also.
Maureen was one of five B.C. players chosen to attend the national selections camp to be held in Winnipeg beginning July 1.
Twelve of the 19 women at this
camp will play for Canada in the
Games.
Maureen has played Thunderette
volleyball for three years.
During this time she has been
awarded two large blocks for volleyball.
She has also been presented with the Barbara Schrodt
Trophy for being the outstanding individual woman
athlete  and  a  WAA  Administration  Award  for  service.
FISHLEIGH
Soccer men try for third
The UBC soccer Thunderbirds continue their fight for a
playoff spot this weekend when they meet the tough Victoria
squad in the island city.
The Birds, who are currently tied with North Shore in
third place, must win this crucial game against the Pacific Coast
League's top team.
The speedy UBC soccer men are the only ones to beat
Victoria this year and will be ready to create another upset.
THUNDERBIRD OARSMEN will be sailing their shell over the salty sea on Saturday, out
to sink all opposition in their stream as they  saddle the  waves. Action begins at 8 a.m.
A & B SOUND
RECORD SALE
1,000's OF CAPITAL RECORDS LIST UP TO 5.29
$1.99 Mono
$2.19 Stereo
NAT KING COLE, THE LETTERMEN. PEGGY LEE
PETE SEEGER. NANCY WILSON, THE KINGSTON
TRIO, LIZA MIIMNELLI. GEORGE SHEARING, JUNIOR MANCE,  BENNY  GOODMAN.
All the Great Artists — Latest Hits
Broadway Musicals — Rock and Roll
Popular — Folk Music, Etc.
Hurry down — pick out your favorite record and save.
Choose from Pope, Cjassics, Show-tunes.
Also Special Sale On All Pre-recorded Tapes
A*B SOUND
Open Today Until 9 p.m.
571  GRANVILLE (or Dunsmuir)
MU 2-1919
SPORTS CAR
SPECIALISTS
1523 West 3rd
REPAIRS  and  SALES
NEW   AND   USED PARTS
The Only Exclusive Sports Car
Service   in   B.C.
Disc Brake Pads
installed $16.95
Used TR 3 Engines $100.00
Used TR 4 Engines $150.00
Rebuilt TR 3 Trans. $125.00
Rebuilt MGB Trans. $150.00
"It we can't get it, it isn't
available."
8:00  a.m.   .  Midnight—Sat.:  10-5
Sun. — Emergency Repairs
U.B.C. THUNDERBIRD
WINTER SPORTS CENTRE
SKATING SCHEDULE - 1966-67 SEASON
Effective September 12, 1966 to April 15. 1967
TUESDAYS   —
WEDNESDAYS
FRIDAYS   —
SATURDAYS   —
SUNDAYS   —
12:45 - 2:45 p.m.*
2:00 - 3:30 p.m.
7:30 - 9:30 p.m.
3:00 - 5:00 p.m.
7:30 - 9:30 p.m.**
3:00 - 5:00 p.m.**
7:30 - 9:30 p.m.
12:45 - 2:45 p.m.
7:30 - 9:30 p.m.
•Special Student Session — Admission — 15c
♦♦Except when Thunderbird Hockey Games scheduled:
Jan. 13 & 14 - Jan. 20 & 21 - Feb. 3 & 4 - March 3 & 4
ADMISSION: Afternoons —    Students .35      Adults .60
Evenings     —   Students .50     Adults .75
Skate Rental - .35 pair — Skate Sharpening — .35 pair
For further information call — 224-3205 or 228-3197 Page  16
THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday, March 23,  1967
'TWEEN CLASSES
Afro-culture considered
AFRICAN STUDENTS
Dr.   Gerard   Tougas   discusses   contemporary   cultural   patterns   in  former   British
and French Africa, today, noon, IH.
CAMPUS LIFE
Friends of College Life are invited to a
fellowship tonight, 7 p.m., Tenth and Quebec.
SAILING  CLUB
Members wanting to sail this summer,
meet today, noon, clubroom.
GEOPHYSICS
Sir E. C. Bullard discusses reversals of
the earth's magnetic field, Wednesday, 3:30,
Henn. 301.
GUEST LECTURER
Prof.   E.   Conze   discusses   the  contribution of Buddhism to Asian culture,  today,
noon," Bu. 100.
JUDO CLUB
Election   meeting  Tuesday,  noon,  math
100.
HOMECOMING COMMITTEE
Applications for 1967-68 committee available in AMS office. Must be returned by
Tuesday to box 81, Brock.
ACE
Election  meeting Wednesday, noon,  ed.
204.
Students  shuttle services
save cash, cars in Saskatoon
SASKATOON (UNS' — Students at the
University of Saskatchewan have started
a do-it-yourself project for transportation to
and from classes at minimum cost.
They have established their own bus
service, chartering city of Saskatoon
vehicles.
City transit officials are pleased because it provides them with needed revenue
and relieves congestion on regular bus
routes.
Under the student charter service, the
first of its kind in North Hanerica, the students representative council charters buses
from the city at a rate of 75 cents per mile.
The transit utility operates the buses
over routes designated by the students and
at the  times  they  require.
SRC's bus service anticipates a $4,000
profit on operations  this year.
University students are charged a fixed
rate which covers operational costs. There
is no profit for the city.
Transit superintendent Burt Scharfe
said the students may be able to improve
their services or reduce rates if they make
a profit this year.
Student services operate from September
to April. Five routes are covered. Three to
six buses are used.
Rate for each student is $12.50 a term.
This is about 33 per cent less than what
they would pay on regular buses.
SRC set up the bus service originally to
help students to find accommodation at
reasonable prices — rates close to the university were usually higher than elsewhere
and accommodation was scarce.
Because of poor bus service, other areas
of the city had been considered impractical
locations for housing university students.
Another objective of the student bus
line is to help relieve crowded parking conditions on the campus and in the vicinity.
Many students now leave their cars at home
and ride the bus.
DANCE
Shantelles
with the
Kentish Steele
and
SHOCKERS
at
Simon Fraser
University
THURSDAY, MARCH 23
tha.
TOM JONES
Shaft
brwiisA. ijdjul lo msl ojjUl jvuv
Spring- Ja&hionA-
4511 West 10th 224-7217
8:30 to  1:00
Admission: $1.00
Admission   only   to   students
from  Post  Secondary   institu-
_^V -Diamond with (SonfuLnc*
Special   10% Discount to all  UBC Students
on   Diamond   Engagement   Rings
FIRBANK'S
DOWNTOWN
BRENTWOOD
PARK  ROYAL
CLASSIFIED
Lost & Found
11
LOST: PAIR MEN'S GLASSES.
Gym lockerroom. Woodlike
frames. Phone—Scott, at HE 7-
1446.
LOST—PSYCH. 308 NOTES. NEED-
ed desperately. Reward, $10. Ph.
Vicky at  263-4170  after 5 p.m.
LOST — ZOO, 303 NOTES IN OLD
exam booklet. Valuable only to
owner. Phone Fiona Glass, CA
4-9047.	
PLEASE RETURN MY LIGHT
blue raincoat taken Mar. 17 to
H,A.   104   or ph.   Bonnie,   943-2441.
HELP! WOULD THE PERSON
who removed my purse from
Lower Mall Common Block two
weeks ago return at least the
identification and glasses to Donna Mumford, Mawdsley 412 . . .
PUL-LEASE.
Coming Dances
12A
It's  a  speculator ! !
Simon Fraser - UBC mixer with
Vancouver's   two   greatest   bands
KENTISH   STEELE
and   the
SHANTELLES
and  the
SHOCKERS
Tonight  -  Simon Fraser Cafeteria
8:30 - 1:00 — only $1
Help Wanted
SI
GREATER   VICTORIA
(School   District   No.   61)
Interviews    for    positions    in     this
District are  invited  for all  subjects
and    all    grades    including    special
classes  and   Kindergartens,   may   be
arranged   as   follows:
Bayshore    Inn    (Vancouver)—inquire
at   Registration    Desk.
Elementary—Mr.   H.   C.   O'Donnell
Secondary—Mr.   G.   A.  V.  Thomson
Monday—March   27th   and   Tuesday
March 28th,  1967.
9:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon
1:30 p.m. to    5:00 p.m.
Greater Victoria School   Board
Office
Administrative   Centre,
3128   Foul   Bay   Road,
Victoria,  B.C.
Elementary,    Secondary,    Special,
Kindergarten
Tuesday,   March   28th.
Wednesday,   March  29th.
Thursday,   March   30th.
Friday,   March   31st.
Special Notices
13
WANTED: CHAIRMAN FOR ACA-
demic Symposium 1968. For those
interested please submit your own
ideas and principles on Symposia.
Apply Box 2 AMS before April.
ATTENTION VOC BANQUETERS.
If you have a black raincoat,
size 42 tall, with sleeves that are
too long please exchange with
coat   in   VOC   Clubroom.
COME TO THE GRAD CLASS
General Meeting and raise hell,
March    30,    12:30.   Hebb   Theatre.
Travel Opportunities
16
EXPO   CHARTER   MAY   6-14;   FOR
information  ph.   224-6734.
LAST TRIP BEFORE EXAMS TO
Simon Fraser Cafeteria with the
Shantelles and Shockers tonight,
8:30  -  1:00 — $1.	
AMS CHARTER FLT. LEAVES
right after convocation for Expo
.... then to Europe. 1 week at
Expo — 3 mos. in Europe. Return to Van. Sept. 4th, $375. Only
20 seats left.
Automobiles For Sale
21
CLERK - TYPIST WITH SOME
bookkeeping experience required by
AMS publications office. This is
an 8 months per year job, starting
next September, so it is especially
suitable for the wife of a senior
student or staff employee. Applicant should be in the 21.35 age
group, without children, and preferably be available for at least
two terms. If interested, please
call manager of student publications,   224-3242.
3 ATTRACTIVE CO-EDS, FRE-
ferably with some sales experience for special Centennial promotion. Generous commission. Ph.
985-7337.
Music
63
WANTED: R&B ORGANIST WIL-
ling to travel. Jack 988-4564 or Lee
733-6724  after  six.
Instruction-Tutoring
64
FOR SALE — 1952 MORRIS MINOR
in good condition. Licensed, $140.
Phone  263-8442  after six.
1958 ZEPHYR - ZODIAC. EXCEL-
lent running order. Call Peter at
CA  4-9020.
1953 JAGUAR XK120 ROADSTER—
excellent condition, $800, or best
offer.  228-3050 days, 926.3050 eves.
1961 CORVAIR, 27,000 MILES, $995
or offer. Call Al Penland at 224-
9913 after 6:00 p.m,.
Miscellaneous
34
GETTING ENGAGED: SAVE AT
least 50 percent on finest quality
diamond rings. Satisfaction guaranteed.  Call 261-6671 any time.
WILL BABYSIT DAYS IN MY
home West End. Child over two.
Ring  MU   4-1091.
Scandals
39-A
PREVIOUS EXAMS REVISED
for relevance. Exams for sale,
20c. Bookstore, College Shop.
Canteens Ed. Smokeshop 1st yr.
Maths, Physics, His., Eng. 200,
EC.  200.
ARE    YOU    HIDING    A    TALENT
under a bushel? Let us help you—
a haircut while you wait.
CAMPUS BARBER SHOP
THE WORD IS: SIMON FRASER'S
honeys are better than UBC's.
Find out for yourself. Tonight,
Simon Fraser Caf, 8:30 - 1:00, $1,
Shantelles and Shockers.
ALL FIRST AND SECOND YEAR
subjects by excellent tutors: Sciences and arts. 736-6923.
March   Registration
TUTORIAL   COLLEGE
Experienced    tutoring    in
University
Secondary
Elementary   courses
Educational   Consultation
in Industry
THE  HUBERMAN  EDUCATIONAL
INSTITUTE
B.C.  Owned  & Licensed
263-4808        2158    W.   12th        732-5535
TUTORING IN UNIVERSITY
maths — first two years by excellent experienced tutor. No contracts.   Reasonable   736-6923.
WANTED FOR GRADE 6 BLIND
boy, mid-April through August
(possibly next term as well), 1%
hr. day. Rooms, breakfasts in ox-
change or terms re wages. Phone
733-9416.
STUDENT WILL TUTOR IN
French. Either conversational or
written. Please leave message at
946-2750 after 8  p.m.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
RESEARCH MICROSCOPE
$1900 Leitz Laborlux-Pol for
$1400 minimum. Transmitted and
reflected light. Perfect condition.
Satisfaction guaranteed. Flexible
terms. Call 224-7678 after 7:00
p.m.	
MUFFLERS, VALVES, TUNE-
ups, overhauls, transmissions, and
electrical work. We do it all
at very reasonable prices. Auto-
Henneken, 263-8121 — 8914 Oak
St.,  at Marine  Dr.
AMS CHARTER FLIGHT LEAV-
ing May 11th now full. Seats are
available on June 1st fit. (to Expo
and then to Europe) but there are
only 20 seats left.
SWIM FEST BETWEEN APRIL
4th and 6th. Happy birthday
Tucky  Tar  Pits.
Typing
43
Professional  Typing
ARDALE   GRIFFITHS   LTD.
8584   Granville   St.
70th   &  Granville  St. 263-4186
TYPING — MANUSCRIPTS, ETC.
Rates on request, Mrs. E. McCartney, Box 939, Squamish, B.C.
892-3798.
FAST, ACCURATE TYPING OF
essays and theses on IBM Electric typewriter. Reasonable
terms. Call Mrs. Muggeridge, 263-
4023.
BIRD CALLS — THERE ARE
still a few copies of Bird Calls
available at the Publications
Office in Brock Hall. The price
is only 75c! Get yours while the
supply  lasts!
Rooms
81
FURNISHED    SUITE    FOR    TWO
girls, $90 monthly. 879.4987 after 6.
COMFORTABLE ROOM WITH AD-
joining rumpus sitting room within five minutes walking distance
campus, $50 monthly. Enquire
CA  4-5952.
Room ft Board
82
ROOM & BOARD AND REMUNER-
ation in exchange for mother's
help, including full time summer
employment.   AM   3-6523,   876-0414.
Furn. Houses and Apis.
83
SCHOOL PRINCIPAL DOING
graduate work Wishes furnished
2 or 3 bedroom duplex or house
from July 1 - August 20. Write
No. 107 - 3000 15th Avenue,
Prince   George,   B.C.
MODERN FURNISHED 1-BEDR'M
apt. available May 1 . Aug. 31.
Married students only. Kitsilano.
Phone   731-5627   after   6   p.m.
ESSAYS,    THESES   EXPERTLY
typed.   Phone  733-7819.
MANUSCRIPTS,  ESSAYS, THESES
accurately  typed.   Electric   machine.
Phone   224-5046  after   6   p.m.	
EXP.   ESSAY   TYPIST
can  pick  up  on  campus
434-9558
PROFESSIONAL TYPING ON
electric typewriter — theses, essays,  etc.   299-9829 after  6.
GOOD, EXPERIENCED TYPIST
available for home typing. Please
call  277-5640.
WANTED — GIRL TO SHARE
furnished apartment for July and
August.   Phone   733-2504.
APARTMENT WANTED FOR MAY
1 by 2 male graduate students.
Phone   Rene,   224-4593,   5-7   p.m.
Houses  & Apts.—Other Cities
COLUMBIA PROFESSOR, COMING
to teach summer school, would
like to exchange house with somebody in Vancouver, planning to
spend the summer in New York.
The house, located in a beautiful
residential area, 15 minutes from
downtown Manhattan, has 3 bdrs.,
d.r., attic, den and kitchen. For
further details call Rene — AM
3-8428 eves.

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