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The Ubyssey Oct 10, 2013

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 SAVING WATER
Engineering students aim to help rural
communities treat water and save lives
BICYCLE ART ON SHOW P9
SPORTS NUTRITION: ATHLETE FUEL P8
AMS VP ACADEMIC ELECTIONS P3 // Page 2
WHAT'S ON
THURSDAY   10
GREATPANCAKE RACE
12:30 P.M. @ MACINNES FIELD
Teams will compete in the fifth
annual UBC United Way Pancake
Race. The goal is to build community through costumes and flipping
good fun.
Free
FRIDAY ' 11
BASKETBALLBIRDSVS.
HAWKS
7 P.M.® WAR MEMORIAL GYM
The men's basketball team take
on Wilfred Laurier University's
Hawks. Watch to see who is the
Big Bird of the CIS. It will definitely
be a slam dunk. Adults$10, youth,
seniors and A-Card $5, UBC
students $2, free for Blue Crew
': W$l a
SATURDAY ' 12
TWO TALES BY CARLO
GOZZI
7:30 P.M. ©DOROTHY
SOMERSET STUDIO
The Love of Three Oranges and
The King^ Stag are both edgy,
funny and sinister plays "for mature audiences only." The double
feature runs from Oct. 10 to 12.
Free
ON
THE
COVER
At a late afternoon shoot with some engineering friends outside the
design centre, features editor Arno Rosenfeld gets his first shot at being
an art director. It was pretty fun. Photo by Carter Brundage.
Want to see your events listed here?
Email your events listings to
printeditor@ubyssey.ca.
<**-
^|THE UBYSSEY
OCTOBER 10, 2013 | VOLUMEXCV| ISSUEXIV
EDITORIAL
Coordinating Editor
Geoff Lister
coordinating@ubyssey.cs
Managing Editor, Print
Ming Wong
orinteditor@ubyssey.es
Managing Editor, Web
CJ Pentland
webeditor@ubyssey.es
News Editors
Will McDonald +
Sarah Bigam
news@ubyssey.es
Senior News Writer
Brandon Chow
ochow@ubyssey.es
Culture Editor
Rhys Edwards
culture@ubyssey.es
Senior Culture Writer
Aurora Tejeida
atejeida@ubyssey.es
Sports + Rec Editor
Natalie Scadden
sports@ubyssey.es
Senior Lifestyle Writer
Reyhana Heatherington
"heatherington@ubyssey.es
Features Editor
Amo Rosenfeld
features@ubyssey.es
Video Producers
Lu Zhang +
Nick Grossman
video@ubyssey.es
Copy Editor
Matt Meuse
eopy@ubyssey.es
Photo Editor
Carter Brundage
ohotos@ubyssey.es
Illustrator
Indiana Joel
joel@ubyssey.es
Graphic Designer
Nena Nyugen
nnyugen@ubyssey.es
Webmaster
Tony Li
webmaster@ubyssey.es
Distribution Coordinator
Lily Cai
cai@ubyssey.es
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LEGAL
The Ubyssey Is the official studentnews-
aaper of the University of RritKh Cn-
umbla. It is publish^
andThursdaybyTheui
tlons Society. We are ai 1 dutonomous,
democratically run student organization, and all students are encouragec
to participate.
Editorials are chosen and written by the
Jbyssey staff. They are the expressec
opinion of the staff, and do not necessarily reflect the views ofThe Ubyssey
Publications Society or the University
of British Columbia. All editorial content
appearing In The Ubyssey Is the property ofThe Ubyssey Publications Society. Stones, opinions, photographs anc
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aographlcal errors that do not lessen the value or the Impact of the ad.
OUR CAMPUS//
ONE ON ONE WITH THE PEOPLE WHO MAKE UBC
When it comes to projecting films in the Norm, Alex Westhelle is the star of the show.
Alex Westhelle is the
man behind the screen
CERI RICHARDSffHE UBYSSEY
Jack Hauen
Contributor
At the Norm Theatre, Alex
Westhelle runs the show.
A fourth-year art history
student, Westhelle is the man in
the rafters who makes sure the
movie you're watching doesn't
burst into flames. Don't laugh —
it's happened before.
Westhelle is the projectionist
for the Film Society (FilmSoc),
and as his title suggests, he's
responsible for all that goes on in
the projection booth: getting the
show up and running on time,
fixing audiovisual problems, and
keeping the assistant projectionist volunteers in line. With a
contagious passion for film and
its culture, he's well-suited for
the job. He loves what he does,
and plans to be involved in filmmaking or film archiving after
his time at UBC.
Westhelle first learned to
project halfway through his first
year. "I saw a flyer for the Film
Society here, and it said, 'Do you
want to run the show?' I thought
it was just an incredible opportunity," he said.
Afterwards, he started to
volunteer as an assistant projectionist. Before he knew it, he was
going into the clubroom four times
a week. "I was so giddy," he said.
"I feel like the first real friends I
made were in the Film Society."
After a year and a half of
assisting the team in place at the
time, Westhelle was promoted
to full projectionist status. This
meant going through the "projectionist test": a full day of hazing
and obstacle course running to
set up the dismantled projector
and find the pieces of film to
show that night.
What do the projectionists do
while the movie's playing? "We
hang out, watch a bit of the movie
or play a board game," he said.
The current FilmSoc favourite is
Settlers of Catan. When he's not
volunteering at the projection
booth, Westhelle can be found
watching movies or playing ball-
in-a-cup.
The Film Society doesn't just
show films, however: they also
have a monthly beer garden,
where beer and cider are served
- while a movie plays, of course.
In October, they'll be showing
the remake of The Wicker Man.
It's not all fun and games in
the projection booth, though —
sometimes, things go wrong.
"It's important to make sure
you do the prep work right,"
Westhelle said. "One time, I no
ticed the sound was a bit wonky
during a show, so I went down to
the theatre to check on it. When
I came back up, everyone was
gathered around the projector,
which was spitting film all over
the floor and on fire inside....
The audience that night got to
see Simon Pegg's face burst into
flames. Oh, and I showed The
Muppets upside-down once. I
fixed it, though." XI
If you're interested in learning
how to project, or if you have a
film you'd like to show, contact
Alex Westhelle at alex.westhelle@
ubcfilmsociety.com.
QUICK FACTS
Favourite movie: Punch-
DrunkLove
Favourite Norm Theatre
experience: Watching
Groundhog Day Ave days ir
Favorite theatre in
Vancouver besides the
Norm: Pacific Cinemathegue
FRIDAY OCTOBER 25, 2013   7:00am - 5:30pm
Presented by Eaton Educational Group
At the Westin Bayshore Hotel, Vancouver, BC
®Neuroplasticity
and Education
Strengthening the Connection
Educators, parents, psychologists, counsellors, speech language pathologists, occupational therapists,
Faculty of Education students and anyone interested in the connections between the fields of
education and neuroscience are welcome to register to hear this amazing line-up of speakers
Register at: www.neuroplasticityandeducation.com
SPEAKERS:
F.frU
Bonus Session.
Brain Basics
Exercise is
Medicine for the
Brain
DR. J. BRAD
HALE
Teaching
Changes Brain
Function: How
Neuroscience Will
Revolutionize
Education
BARBARA
ARROWSMITH
YOUNG (MA)
The Intimate
Connection
Between Mental
Health Issues
and Learning
Disabilities
DR. GAB OR
MATE
Afternoon
Keynote: From
Emotion to
Cognition: Love
As The Ground
For Learning
Hardwiring
Happiness:
Growing Inner
Strengths in
Children, Parents,
and Teachers
m ®
eaton
arrowsmith
school.
i eaton cognitive
' improvement
centre
<fr
agnussen
SCHOOL // News
)RS WILL MCDONALD + SARAH BIGAM
RSDAY, OCTOBER 10,2013
TRANSIT »
TRANSLINK at a glance
Years this plan covers
Years this plan outlines spending for
Total predicted spending in 2014
Total predicted revenue in 2014
The year by which TransLink anticipates
they will no longer be running a deficit
Amount by which transit fares will
increase annually, starting in 2015
Amount of trips Metro Vancouver wants to
make possible by walking, cycling, or
transit by 2045
10
S1.49B
$1.44B
2020
2%
l
TLE PHOTO STEPHANIEXU3THE UBYSSEY
Translink's 2014 base plan says nothing about increasing service hours or adding new buses to anywhere in the city.
No increased service hours in TransLink plan
Sarah Bigam
News Editor
Those hoping to see increased
public transit to UBC may be out of
luck for now.
On Oct. 3, TransLink released
their 2014 base plan. This yearly
report, which will be finalized in
November, outlines TransLink's
budget for the next three years, and
provides a seven-year outlook on
TransLink's future.
The report does not include
increased service hours, new buses
or new SkyTrain cars to anywhere
in the city. The report identifies
"improved capacity and reliability
of the Broadway 99 B-Line" as a
priority, but does not include any
money to put toward a rapid transit
line to UBC.
"We only have existing funds to
sustain what we have, so right now
we're not in a position to expand the
system," said TransLink spokesperson Derek Zabel.
Zabel said TransLink can only
afford to continue with plans
underway, such as the establishment of the Evergreen Line and
the introduction of a 96 B-Line in
Surrey.
TransLink's total predicted
expenditure of $1.49 billion for the
year is spread out between operation and maintenance charges, as
well as upgrades to buses, the Expo
Line, SkyTrain stations, cycling
paths, the Major Road Network and
the BC Parkway.
The report also includes a
$299-million expenditure to fix the
Pattullo Bridge, up from the $150
million laid out in last year's report,
due to new information about the
bridge's condition. It also includes a
further contribution of $322,141 to
the Evergreen Line, an extension of
the SkyTrain line from Lougheed
Town Centre to Coquitlam which
is set to be operational by 2016.
Capital projects, such as a rapid
transit line to UBC, are included
in the annual supplemental plan,
which will be released in the next
few months.
TransLink is also aiming to
make itself more efficient by
moving transit vehicles from routes
with lower demand to routes
with higher demand. According
to the report, doing this enabled
TransLink to increase bus boardings per service hour by 3.4 per
cent by shifting 56,000 hours
of bus service from low to high
demand times.
TransLink is predicting revenues
of $1.44 billion this year, and an
annual deficit until 2020. They aim
to save $39.8 million over the next
three years by changing bus schedules and fleet sizes, and reducing
SkyTrain frequency on weekends.
"New funding sources will be
needed to accommodate current
demands and future growth," the
report said.
TransLink is also making less
money from the fuel tax, their
second-largest source of revenue, as fuel sales have declined
sharply since 2011. Current fare
rates, which make up 34 per cent
of TransLink's income, will stay
the same until 2015 when the new
Compass Card is fully implemented, at which point they will
increase by two per cent per year.
Operating the Compass program
will cost TransLink $19.8 million a
year for the next three years.
The report was done in line
with the new Regional Transportation Strategy, which was
released in July 2013. The strategy
aims to make half of all trips possible by walking, cycling or transit
by 2045. However, the report
predicts only "limited progress
toward this goal."
The plan is expected to make
"moderate progress" on cutting
emissions due to the opening of the
Evergreen Line, but the report predicts that in coming years population growth and an increase of jobs
outside areas currently well-supplied with public transit will work
against this goal.
The report concludes that the
steps it outlines "are still not enough
to meet the current and future
needs of the region.... Our revenue
sources are insufficient to make the
investments we need."
Students who care about transit
may be able to make their voices
heard at the provincial referendum
on transit funding scheduled for
2014. The referendum questions
have not been released, but the report says the results could influence
funding decisions in the future.
TransLink also plans to host their
own discussions.
"We really want to have regional discussions with everybody to
prioritize different transit projects
and take a look at what the region
can afford," Zabel said. However, he
could not provide specific details of
the form these would take or when
they would take place. 31
NEWS BRIEFS
Arts Undergrad Society elects
new student reps
The Arts Undergraduate Society
elected new representatives in a
fall byelection.
The AUS represents almost 12,000 undergraduate
Arts students.
Around eight percent of Arts
students voted in the election.
Margot Kimmel and Alexandra
Lee Mann won the two first-year
rep spots, with Kimmel getting the
most votes.
David Markwei won the
second-year rep position against
Sisi Zhou.
Two first-year rep candidates,
Scott Lee and Steve Kim, were
suspended from campaigning for
slating during the election.
Candidates for third-year rep,
general officer and AMS reps all
ran uncontested.
Vyas Saran was elected as
third-year rep, and Danny Aw will
serve as general officer on AUS
council this year.
Ahmed Barry, Maria Mohan,
and Nina Karimi tookthethree
AMS representative seats.
Barry and Mohan were elected
to the two full-year positions, and
Karimi got the half-year position.
As AMS reps, they will sit on
both AUS and AMS councils, and
vote on behalf of the Arts student population at AMS council
meetings, xi
ELECTIONS »
VP Academic
candidates debate
housing, mental
health
Brandon Chow
Senior News Writer
VP academic candidates Anne
Kessler and Adam Melhem
debated in the SUB conversation
pit on Tuesday, ahead of this
week's byelection.
The two candidates debated
topics ranging from student housing
to mental health on the last day of
campaigning for the interim VP
academic position.
After brief introductions from the
two candidates, the debate moderator asked what the candidates
thought the most important academic issue is for the VP academic.
Kessler said student mental
health is the most important issue,
explaining that its longevity and
extensive influence on all aspects of
student life warrants its importance.
Melhem said the Flexible Learning initiative, one of his major platform points, is the most important
academic issue. "Being spoken at for
an hour is not an effective way to
learn," he said, adding that flexible
learning will affect generations of
students to come.
A series of rebuttals from
both candidates ensued, debating how they should think about
mental health.
"If you want to address student
mental health, first of all you have to
PHOTO ILLUSTRATION CARTER BRUNDAGE AND WILL MCDONALD3THE UBYSSEY
Candidates Adam Melhem and Anne Kessler debated at the SUB conversation pit on Tuesday.
come up with a description... as well
as how you want to move forward
with it," said Melhem.
Another question addressed
student housing on campus. Both
candidates held similar opinions
on this issue, choosing Acadia Park
and Ponderosa Commons as areas
of housing that they would focus on,
specifically in regards to affordability.
Kessler used this question to
bring up one of her platform points,
which involves modifying the
student housing agreement to give
students more protection.
After the official questions, the
moderator opened the floor to questions from the audience.
Ubyssey coordinating editor
Geoff Lister asked whether Melhem
or Kessler would run for the position again in the January elections.
Kessler said her decision would
depend on her graduation timeline
and if she liked the position during
her term in office.
Melhem said he would "ab-
so-fucking-lutely" run again. He
later said he sometimes has a
tendency to say things he shouldn't,
which he gave as an answer for
why students might not want to
elect him.
Former VP academic Kiran
Mahal asked two questions: how
would the candidates transition
into working with executives who
have been in office for months, and
where they would take her on a
"transition date."
Kessler said she has previous experience working with the people
who hold those positions, while
Melhem said he would work to find
common ground with the goals of
current execs.
In response to Mahal's second
question, Kessler suggested climbing the Grouse Grind trail and then
taking a "romantic stroll through
the forest." Melhem said he'd
take her back to his home country
of Lebanon.
Voting will last from Oct. 9 to 11,
both online and in voting booths
around campus. XI NEWS    |   THURSDAY, OCTOBER 10, 2013
CLUBS»
Photo Society snapping back into action
C J Pentland
Managing Editor, Web
The AMS is getting one of its most
notable clubs back on its feet.
The Photo Society, better known
as Photosoc, ceased operations
in the summer of 2013 after they
failed to elect new executives. The
AMS told the club in March of 2012
that they had to vacate their club
space located in the basement of
the SUB due to construction for the
New SUB. Instead of continuing
the club based out of a temporary
location, the execs decided to
disband it.
"In order to develop our stores
and storeroom and also our loading
bay, we would have to piggyback on
the existing loading bay and repur-
pose our south side and lower level
for the new storerooms there," said
AMS designer Michael Kingsmill.
"We needed an outside location [to
service the airflows], and Photosoc
was the space that was earmarked
for this."
According to last year's Student
Administration Commission (SAC)
vice chair Adam Melhem, Photosoc
was told the AMS would do their
best to find a temporary club space
until their new location in the
New SUB was ready. Despite being
provided options, Adrien Chen, the
last president of the society, decided to mothball the club without
telling the AMS.
According to current SAC
chair Nina Scott, elections for club
executives are supposed to happen
in March and April, and the clubs
then send the results to the AMS.
"We didn't hear anything from
Photosoc, and we tried several
times to get in touch with them. By
and large, the exec disappeared,"
said Scott.
To help get the society back up
and running, the AMS is holding
PHOTOSOI
In/
Photosoc ceased operations as a club in 2013 when they didn't elect new executives.
an AGM for future and prospective
club members. They will act as an
interim executive and ask members
to run for the positions of president
and treasurer, the two positions
required to run a club. Those candidates will then be given two weeks
to campaign, with members getting
to vote at the end of that span.
The AMS also promises that
Photosoc will have a make-shift
area in the old SUB. Being a purpose-built space, they will not have
all the same amenities that their old
space had, such as a darkroom and
studio, but Kingsmill said that the
old SASC office on the main floor
will act as Photosoc's temporary
club space. Equipment can be
stored there, and the AMS Art Gallery will act as a temporary studio
during the gallery's off hours.
"We hope we can keep it
together. We would be very
upset to lose any club, and I don't
think that's going to happen,"
said Kingsmill. "We're obviously
spending quite a bit of money to
create a new Photosoc, but to just
be able to perpetuate it over these
difficult times would be something that we're really trying to
do."
=HOTO CARTER BRUNDAGEffHE UBYSSEY
The Photosoc AGM will be held
on Friday, Oct. 11 at 1 p.m. in the
SUB Ballroom, a
Editor's note: Ubyssey coordinating editor Geoff Lister is a former
Photosoc executive and has been
working to revive the club. Ubyssey
photo editor Carter Brundage is a
former member of Photosoc and is
also working to revive the club.
ENGINEERING))
UBC-based researchers develop new way to filter water
Technology aims to bring clean water to rural and First Nations communities
Karen Wang
Contributor
Water filtration technology
being developed at UBC could
improve life in rural and First
Nations communities.
New technology developed by
RES'EAU WaterNET, a nation-"
wide program based at UBC, may
provide a solution for the millions
of people living in Canada who
do not have access to clean
drinking water.
RES'EAU WaterNET, which
involves nine universities across
Canada, aims to develop water
treatment technology for rural
and First Nations communities that don't have access to
clean water.
The new technology involves
turning on a lamp in the water
emitting UV radiation with
extremely short wavelengths,
which causes highly reactive
components, or radicals, to form
and react with both bacteria
and chemical contaminants in
the water.
The UV radiation generated
can get rid of both the bacteria
and chemicals in water.
"The mandate of this program
is really to work toward solutions
that are sustainable with respect
to delivering clean drinking water
to small and remote communities," said Madjid Mohseni, the
scientific director of RES'EAU
WaterNET and a professor in the
chemical and biological engineering department at UBC.
For a solution to qualify as
sustainable, Mohseni looks at
three factors.
"They have to be cost effective," he said. "These people,
communities [and] households
are living in very remote communities — they don't have a lot
of resources."
The second factor is what
Mohseni describes as social
sustainability - meaning the
idea must be well received by the
members of the community.
"In a small village, everyone
knows each other," he said. "They
talk to each other, so they [all
know] where the water is coming
from and what is happening
with the water, so they have a lot
of say in what happens in their
systems."
Mohseni said it is also important that the water treatment
system is easy to operate. "The
people who live in those remote
communities and the people who
operate these systems are not
necessarily engineers or PhDs,"
Mohseni said. "They're average
people who are often volunteers
... so the systems need to be simple and user friendly."
After nearly five years of
research, they have been able to
■3S- W'v,*.ats5«t. jm£~>
The new water filtration method will be used in the Lytton First Nation community.
develop a water treatment system
aligning with these conditions.
The first design is to be implemented in the Lytton First
Nation community in B.C.
"I think we hope to have a
design in place by March," said
Jim Brown, the maintenance
manager and supervisor for the
Lytton First Nation. Brown said
they have often had to issue boil
water advisories to the communities because of the high
bacteria levels in the creek water.
With the new system, water
from the creek will go through
UV disinfection as well as
chlorine treatment.
"To me, I think it's a good
idea that we work with UBC,"
=HOTO WORLDOFJAN/FLICKR
said Brown, "to have them offer
alternatives to using engineering
firms. It might be cheaper in the
long run and they listen to comments from operators."
So far, two other non-First
Nations communities have also
expressed interest in the water
treatment options provided by
RES'EAU WaterNET. XI // Sports + Rec
EDITOR  NATALIESCADDEN
T-BIRDS 5-ON-5
GOALIES. ALL OF THEM.
1. Why did you start playing goalie?
Onegamethe keeper
on myteam was sick, so
I stepped in and loved it!
Plus less running.
Our goalie was away, so
ljumpedin net and we
wonthetournament.
Beeninneteversince.
I wanted to know what it
would feel like to make
a diving save in mid-air.
After five years of
playing both I decided
I was better at being a
goalie.
I can't really remember,
itwasso long ago. I am,
whatyou may call, a
mature student.
2. Do you have any game-day superstitions?
always wear my rings
under mygloves.
step out of bed with
my left foot first, and
put my left shoe and left
glove on first.
have to put the pads
on in exactly the same
order everytime.
I'm in my own world
before games. I tape my
stick, drink a coffee, and
then attempt to juggle.
usually spend my day
shuttling my kids around
to their sports events
and suddenly realize, I've
gottoplaytonighttoo!
3. What's your strangest habit?
I have an addiction to
Subway.
I have a weird thing
about making sure that
all my possessions are
in the right place.
There are too many.
Probably flushing
toilets with my feet.
Singing in theshower.
4. What reality TV show should you be on?
The Amazing Race.
Hopefully, I should be on
/MTVCribsoneday.
Dog Whisperer
Maybe we should have
an "intervention" around
the lack of joy reality tv
gives me.
The Voice. Unfortunately, I can't sing.
5. Finish this sentence: Roberto Luongo is..
...expensive!
...overpaid and undera
lot of pressure.
.back for more.
..a very good tweeter.
...in fora tough season.
I wouldn't want to be
him.
HOCKEY»
Men's hockey revamped
Team looks to continue building after best season in 12 years
Jack Hauen
Contributor
"Everyone knows where we want to
be in March."
When playoff time comes around
this season, UBC men's hockey head
coach Milan Dragicevic expects his
revamped Thunderbirds to compete
for a Canada West title.
Last season was the best on
record for the Thunderbirds in 12
years under Dragicevic, but it wasn't
good enough to get past the Calgary
Dinos, who took the best-of-three
opening round playoff series 2-1 for
the second straight year.
This season, the familiar
matchup will be renewed on
opening weekend.
"We've played them two years
in a row in the playoffs now," said
Dragicevic. "They're the biggest
rival we have. We'll have to be at the
top of our game."
Dragicevic stressed the importance of special teams, especially
against Calgary. "We have to be able
to generate offense and gain momentum on our powerplay — that's
the biggest thing. If we do that, we'll
be successful."
The Thunderbirds will look to
build off their 14-11-3 regular season
record with a different-looking
squad. For starters, standout goal-
tender Jordan White is no longer at
UBC. "Jordan's a huge loss for us,
[he was an] all-star for two years,"
said Dragicevic.
But the goaltending situation is
far from dim, as former Regina Pats
starter Matt Hewitt will don the
'Bird uniform this season. Hewitt
was definitely stellar for the Pats,
maintaining a .901 save percentage.
"Mart's a proven goaltender," said
Dragicevic. "He's been a starter in
the WHL for three years, he's one of
the top goalies in the league — he's
going to get the opportunity to step
right in and play."
Competing with Hewitt for the
starting job is Steven Stanford,
who has played two seasons at
UBC as White's backup. He went
4-7 last season with a 2.73 goals-
against average and a .900 save
percentage.
Other notable absentees from the
Thunderbirds lineup this season
include captain Justin McCrae (who
will be replaced by defenceman
Ben Schmidt, a three-year veteran
of the team), high-scoring forward
Max Grassi, and defenceman
Mike McGurk.
Among the new faces at UBC,
however, is Wes Vannieuwenhuizen,
the 6-foot-3,205-pound former
captain of the Vancouver Giants.
Dragicevic called him a "tough,
physical, stay-at-home defenceman"
who is intimidating on the ice.
"Wes makes forwards pay the
price. That's what we want from
him, to be tough in front of the net
and in the corners."
Vannieuwenhuizen will be on the
blue line alongside former Giants
teammate Neil Manning, who was
named to the CIS All-Rookie team
and awarded with UBC's male rookie of the year award last year.
The Thunderbirds' off-season
recruiting also snatched up another
former WHL captain in Luke
Lockhart, who played for the Seattle
Thunderbirds. Dragicevic said
Lochkart is a natural leader who
plays hard in all three zones.
There are four other former
WHLers to wrap up an impressive
list of new recruits. This includes
Nick Buonassisi, a speedy centre
will be crucial on the forecheck, and
Anthony Bardaro, who should add
some offensive spark to the team after racking up 57 points (25 goals, 32
assists) in 70 games with the Prince
Albert Raiders last season.
Overall, the 'Birds have stocked
up on scoring power, along with a
healthy dose of grit and toughness,
during the off-season. "Hard work
in our league wins a lot of games,"
said Dragicevic. "If you're ready to
pay the price, you'll be successful."
PHOTO CARTER BRUNDAGE3THE UBYSSEY
Former Regina Pats starting goalie Matt Hewitt is one of seven former WHL standouts
who have been added to theThunderbirds lineup this season.
"We're very excited with our
hockey team," he said. "We feel
that we have the pieces in place,
and the roles and expectations are
set." XI
UBC gave Simon Fraser a taste of
their new lineup in late September,
sweeping a two-game exhibition
series 6-2 and 5-1. However, the
team dropped their more recent
two-game series in Alaska, 2-1 and
8-1 versus the University of Alaska-Anchorage and the University of
Alaska-Fairbanks, respectively.
Despite ending the preseason on
a poor note, Dragicevic is optimistic
for the regular season.
UBC will begin their regular season
with two games this weekend in
Calgary. They'll return to Thunderbird Arena for their home opener on
Friday, Oct. 18 against the Regina
Rams.
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David Scott, a senior receiver
on the football team, hauled in
seven passes for 170 yards and
onetouchdowninUBC'svictory
overthe No. 10-ranked Manitoba Bisons this past Saturday.
Amongst these was a 58-yard
completion that put UBC inside
the 15-yard line. Greg Bowcott
would go on to complete the
touchdown and give UBC a 7-3
lead early on. The T-Birds finished
the game 28-24, and with the win
improved to .500 on the season. FEATURES    I    THURSDAY, OCTOBER 10,2013
NGINEE
Words by Lawrence Neal Garcia and Jenny Tan
Photos by Carter Brundage
n egg-shaped race car zooms by the Engineering Design Centre — or EDC, a breath-saving acronym engineering students are grateful for — and executes a fluid U-turn. The rumbling motor breaks the Saturday
slumber and the typically sleepy air of an empty campus is notably absent from the cluster of buildings on
Point Grey's south end.
A disposable water bottle, perhaps
a fuel tank of some sort, is attached
to the back of the race car. The
driver whoops as she zooms back
through the alleyway. A teammate
watches in satisfaction and follows
the car along the lane, exchanging congratulatory remarks with
the driver.
BUILDING A COMMUNITY
The EDC bustles with activity. Its
concrete floor and whitewashed
walls lend a raw industrial feel to
the building, preparing entrants
for the nature of the work within.
Machines line the inside of the
"competition space," the area
where vehicles in various stages
of completion await hours more of
sweaty wrenching. The tall glass
windows and high ceilings add an
air of sophistication and the soft
red cushions and communal tables
create a comfortable sense of welcome — quite the achievement for
what is essentially a factory.
A student in a forest-green
shirt sits by himself at the edge
of a wooden table at the atrium's
centre, but he's not alone for long.
A friend comes by and soon they
are talking about what they'll be
majoring in. In the next few hours,
he'll be joined by a stream of familiar faces — an occurrence typical
of the space, even on a weekend.
Articulate and confident, Rory
Smith is perhaps not what some
would think of when they picture a
typical engineer. As a second-year
mechanical engineering student
— "I'm in Mech 2," he explains to
fellow engineers — the concrete
applicability of the field had him
hooked early.
"I don't need to have a hammer
and a nail and hand tool," Smith
said, "but I wanted to do something ... tangible and physical".
Smith hints at another draw of
the program that engineers only
find when they enter it.
"I've seen the same 30 people
for the last four weeks, nine
hours a day. It's very easy to build
relationships." He laughs and adds
lightheartedly that such a situation
is "not necessarily negative or
positive."
The sheer amount of time
engineers spend working with the
same group of people is remarkable. Smith will continue to see
the same 30 people nine hours a
day for the duration of his time
at UBC. The community bonding
from that much time with a small
group of peers is not insignificant.
SOCIAL DYNAMICS
Chelsea Scheffel and Janice
Savage, second-year electrical
engineering students in the biomedical option, know something
about spending a lot of time with
the same people. With only 24 students in their biomedical option,
they will have the majority of their
classes with the same cohort for
the entirety of their degrees.
Women in engineering are a
rare breed. The men interviewed
for this article estimated that the
female-to-male ratio in engineering is one to 10.
But Scheffel and Savage both
saw the gender makeup as more
balanced.
"About one to four," Savage
guessed. Scheffel nodded.
Perhaps their answer is indicative of the equitable treatment
they say they receive in the faculty
despite the gender ratio. When
asked whether the gender makeup
had any impact on their degree
experience, both women said it
didn't.
"Engineers are welcoming,"
Savage said.
When asked if they were ever
reluctant to ask males for help
with assignments or vice versa,
there was a long pause, as if the
possibility had never even occurred to them.
"Well, guys ask for help too,"
Scheffel answered. "Different
people need help in different
subjects, so you balance each other
out."
As with any faculty, stereotyping engineering is inevitable. But
the generalizations engineering
students say they face aren't necessarily negative.
In fact, Scheffel joined Engineering partially because she felt
that she fit the mould of a stereotypical engineer.
"The engineers, we kind of have
this stereotype that we're really
quiet and focused, and I kind of
feel like I fit in with that stereotype."
But, as good sense would
predict, engineers can be found
all along the spectrum of personalities.
"We have the extremes,"
Scheffel said. "We have the people
who are party animals, and then
we have the people who study all
the time, and there's the middle
ground where there's half and
half."
What remains consistent,
however, is the strong sense of
community.
So what is it about the engineering faculty that cultivates this
sense of community that UBC as
a whole tends to lack? Standard
timetables, more common in engineering than in other faculties,
certainly help. The proximity of
the engineering buildings and seeing familiar faces during classes
and in hallways is also another key.
Various social events for students,
a regular occurrence around the
engineering faculty, may be part of
the answer too.
After two weeks of frosh and
a slew of barbecues and socials
throughout the year, many engineers look forward to E-Week or, as
the Engineering Undergraduate
Society website puts it, "the only
week that really matters."
With everything from E-Ball
soccer to the annual engineers'
ball, the week is perhaps the most
important social event in the
faculty. In addition, the academic
workload of the degree offers a
surprising amount of insight into
the cultivation of community.
Studying in groups is a common
occurrence, lending the engineering common spaces a bustling
sense of purpose. Shared classes
required for engineers in different
departments or even different
years also help cement a sense
of camaraderie.
Scheffel thinks nothing of asking upper-years in the hallways for
help with homework. Engineers
seem to tackle school together,
collectively pushing through the
barriers of school.
These aspects can only explain
so much. Even for Scheffel and
Savage, there's still another community bond they can't quite put
their finger on.
"It's just this feeling," said
Scheffel. "Maybe because we all
have that small piece of geekiness
— some people have a bigger piece.
And that just matches with all of
us. Maybe it's like we just gel. We
have that piece of the puzzle."
GETTING TECHNICAL
Despite the importance engineers
attach to their community, other
students associate engineering
mostly with its infamously heavy
and technical workload. But for
some, it simply comes with the
territory.
"In order to properly be a
qualified engineer," Smith points
out matter-of-factly, "there are THURSDAY, OCTOBER 10, 2013    |    FEATURES
We have the extremes. We have the people
who are party animals, and then we have
the people who study all the time, and
there's the middle ground where there's
half and half.
Chelsea Schefel
Second-year electrical engineering student
things that you need to know, and
whether or not they're hard is
immaterial."
The necessity of the technical focus of the degree may
be indisputable, but the view of
an engineering degree as less
well-rounded and lacking emphasis in the arts and other fields
of study has some grounding in
facts. Outside of 18 "complementary studies" credits in the degree,
little room is left for non-technical
courses.
"But I think [the lack of
well-roundedness] is the same on
the reverse side," points out Edwin
Chen, a fifth-year engineering
physics student. He noted that
other faculties aren't expected to
study engineering courses either.
He makes a good point, as the
minimum science credit requirements of other faculties, such as in
Arts, are what their title suggests:
minimal.
"I don't think there's any way
around [the lack of course diversity]," said Chen, who will have
reached over 180 credits when he
graduates in May, almost all of
them from technical engineering
courses. "It's inevitable because
as an engineer you need to know
so much technical stuff, that you
can't... study everything."
With all this classroom time
dedicated to technical study, this
brings into question the availability of opportunity for engineering
students to engage with philosophical questions common to
college twenty-somethings.
For Chen, personal reflection is
not a matter of being in a particular faculty.
"I think as a human being you
will just think about it," he said.
"It's inevitable. You will just think
about who you are, and what you
are doing and what the meaning
of life is. These are questions that
everyone will somehow have to
think about and answer in their
[lives], and I think that this is true
to every engineer."
Chen talked about the environments in which he tends to reflect:
on his travels, during his alone
time, listening to music — not
necessarily in a classroom.
But if all these questions can be
answered outside of the classroom,
what then does that say about the
value of a non-technical degree
such as a BA?
Chen paused, reflecting on
the question.
"I have total respect for people
who are really doing serious things
in Arts programs," he said. "I
think they are contributing to this
society, there's no doubt [of that]."
LIFE* OUTSIDE
ENGINEERING
Chassis of cars from previous
years line the walls. The UBC Formula team's workspace is surprisingly neat, given the sheer amount
of equipment in it. A xylophone
of wrenches, arranged according
to size, hang against an ocean-
blue tool board. Like an overseer,
a straw doll in a red-blue dress
perches up top on a high corner,
her bonnet shading her eyes from
the fluorescent glare. A sleek black
race car shell is the focal point of
the room surrounded by the 10
or so students bustling around
the workspace.
Eric Thibault absentmindedly
runs his hands along a steering
wheel. It will find its home on the
car the Formula UBC team will
race at an international competition in Nebraska in June 2014.
Marko Lolic explains that the
paddle-shifting mechanism on
this year's steering wheel allows
the driver to clutch in and shift
gears without taking her hands
off the wheel. Given that Formula
One cars can easily reach up to 320
kilometres an hour, it's a feature
that anyone who has driven a standard transmission vehicle would
appreciate.
The fourth-year mechatronic
engineers look at each other when
asked how many hours they spend
working on the car each week on
top of schoolwork. "25 to 30?"
Thibault guesses.
The easy camaraderie between
the Thibault and Lolic is clear as
they expand on and finish each
other's thoughts almost seamlessly. The two are asked point
blank: do they have a "life" outside
of engineering?
Thibault laughs.
"We do and we don't," he said.
Lolic interjects, clearly disagreeing with the image of the
one-track engineer.
"Well, it depends on what you
mean by 'life,'" he says. "I think we
do this because we're committed
to what we do."
Lolic expanded on this point.
"Some kids may go home and
learn how to program a microcontroller on their own time, as
nerdy as it is, but still, that's what
they like to do," he said. "[Engineering] is one of the more easily
applicable degrees.
"It's not like [if] I'm a doctor,"
Thibault said with a laugh, "I'm
going to go carve up my cat."
ENGINEERS: MADE, OR
BORN?
Chen paused when asked if he
would choose the 180-credit
engineering physics if he had the
chance to do it all over again.
"I really like having a general
sense of what society ... is built
on," he said, referring to the
knowledge of the engineering
principles of modern technology.
"Of course I survived ... and I'm
happy with the result. [But] if
you'd shown me the typical day
I would have for the next three,
four years, I probably wouldn't
do it."
Lolic, his hands resting lightly
on the workbench behind him,
addressed a similar point.
"There are some kids who
don't like engineering even
though they're in the program
... but I think most of us are here
because we love what we do."
Did he know that he was going
to be an engineer when he was
growing up? Lolic laughed.
"I had no idea what I wanted
to do after high school... but now
I know that engineering is exactly what I want to do. I wouldn't
want to do anything else." XI
This article is the third in an occasional series on academic issues and
culture at UBC.
Top to bottom: first-years get the tour of engineering buildings; Edwin Chen, a fifth-year engineering student, will graduate in May;
ERTW is a modest acronym for Engineers Rule the World. 8    I    SPORTS + REC    I    THURSDAY, OCTOBER 10,2013
SPORTS NUTRITION »
Eat to win: how UBC athletes fuel for success
Nutrition is the key for improving performance and proper recovery following exercise
Adrienne Hembree
Contributor
On each race day after weigh-in,
UBC rower Julie Sheppard eats a
bowl of oatmeal with a banana and
chocolate protein powder.
This go-to race day meal will
fuel her body throughout the
intense two-kilometre event while
ensuring that she maintains her
"lightweight" status, which for
female rowers means no more
than 130 pounds. Since larger,
taller people have a significant
physical advantage in rowing, the
lightweight category gives average-sized athletes the ability to
compete and adds more universality to the sport.
For athletes like Sheppard,
excellent nutrition habits and
competition are inseparable. Not
only must she maintain a healthy
weight at all times during the
season, but she must also balance
school and rowing at optimal
performance levels.
"I put a lot of emphasis on nutrition," Sheppard said. "I compete in
a weight class and have to keep up
with two practices a day."
Like Sheppard, UBC swimmer
Heather MacLean — who competed at the London 2012 Olympics
as a member of the Canadian
women's 4xl00-metre freestyle
relay — strives throughout her
season to maintain an "ideal" body
weight at which she and her coach
feel she performs best.
"My coach wants to make sure I
stay within my optimal weight and
that I am recovering properly so
I can continue to make improvements in training," said MacLean.
NUTRITION FOR
PERFORMANCE AND
RECOVERY
The advantages of sports nutrition
go beyond simply maintaining an
ideal weight. Sheppard, MacLean
and Nordic skier Rob Ragotte
closely monitor what they put into
their bodies in order to continually
increase their performance, recovery and physical and mental focus.
Ragotte has been Nordic skiing
for seven years, and he competes
in everything from sprint distances to the grueling 50 km race.
"A big part of nutrition for my
sport is how to eat during a race or
workout," he said. "You're going
to need to take a few 'feeds'... to
make sure you can make it to the
end of the race."
Sarah Cuff is a registered holistic
nutritionist and coach at Eat 2 Run,
an organization she founded in early 2012. "When we change the way
we eat, we can absolutely change
the way we benefit," she said.
After completing nine marathons and failingto meet her goal of
finishing in under four hours, Cuff
was about to give up. Instead, she
developed a different philosophy
about how she was going to train
and eat. In her 10th marathon, she
smashed her personal record, shaving 25 minutes off her previous time.
"I was pretty pumped," she recalled.
Cuff puts huge emphasis on
recovery nutrition, which is key in
allowing the body to build muscle
and become stronger with each
workout. The goal of recovery nutrition is to rebuild worn-out muscles, reduce lactic acid buildup and
help the body to become stronger
after each workout.
"If you are able to get a recovery
shake within 30 minutes of completing your workout, it can cut your
recovery time in half," Cuff said.
BREAKING IT DOWN
UBC women's rugby coach Maria
Gallo urges her athletes to eat
plenty of protein and carbohydrates within 30 minutes of a
game. Protein contributes to
muscle development and allows
the body to build lean muscle and,
when combined with training, cut
down on excess fat.
Carbohydrates provide energy,
and complex carbohydrates provide
long-term benefits. While simple
PHOTO BECCAWILLIAMSffHE UBYSSEY
Oatmeal is a staple of many athletes'diets, including UBC rower Julie Sheppard's, who combines it with bananas and protein powder.
carbohydrates and sugars — think
cookies, white pastas, white bread,
etc. — provide a quick boost of
energy because the body processes
them very quickly, complex carbohydrates like whole grain rices,
pastas and breads break down more
slowly, allowing the body to rely on
the energy created by those sugars
for a longer period of time.
A former rugby player and
trainer for the Canadian national
team, Gallo majored in biomedical
sciences in her undergrad and
quickly discovered a passion for
proper nutrition and its connection to sports performance. "[Nutrition is] what's going to sustain
you throughout your sport," she
said. "Most athletes should eat six
to eight times a day."
Gallo wants her athletes to
have basic knowledge of what
proper nutrition looks like. She
NUTRITION TIPS   for exercise lovers
Even if you're not training at the varsity level, take these tips to get the most out of your workout.
Follow the "golden window" rule: Recovery is key to performance, so eating within
30 minutes after a workout or competition ensures that your body can rebuild and
improve.
Practice makes perfect: When you are training, be sure to also practice your nutrition.
Figure out what works for you before, during and after workouts or competition, and stick
to that plan.
Variety is the spice of life: Don't eat the same foods every day. Especially when on a
meal plan, variety will help you obtain the calories you need while providing your body with
necessary vitamins and minerals.
Say no to burgers, fries and cookies: While fried, fast foods are high in fats and
unhealthy calories, sugars also cause inflammation that will slow down recovery time and
cause your body to age faster.
Take a break: While you shouldn't go crazy, it's ok to allow your mind,
and body to relax. Remember to balance, but continue to choose
the healthiest options available for your favourite treats.
Customize your nutrition: Choose a plan or foods that work for
you, and don't get too caught up in the details or the nutritional
breakdown of every food you put in your body.
Source: Sarah Cuff, Maria Gallo
GRAPHIC NENA NGUYEN3THE UBYSSEY
understands that less-than-ideal
residence meal plan options and
the stresses of adjusting to school
and social life make focusing
on nutrition difficult, mentally
draining and time-consuming —
not to mention expensive. Gallo
encourages her team to use Costco
as a good resource for cheap and
healthy snacks.
"The [residence] meal plan
makes it incredibly challenging to
eat healthy without breaking the
bank," said Ragotte.
In their freshman years, both
Sheppard and MacLean relied
heavily on the salad bar at UBC
for their meals. "I knew what was
going to be in my meal when I prepared it myself," Sheppard said.
Gallo said the main concern is
that athletes are eating enough
calories, and making good choices.
"Athletes are beasts of routine,"
she said, but she instructs them
to obtain vitamins and minerals
through a varied diet.
Athletes need to consume more
calories than non-athletes to maintain the physical and mental stamina required for competition. But
depending on the sport, calories
aren't always the best measure of
good nutrition.
Cuff said it's not all about
set nutritional components, or
specific percentages of fats,
carbohydrates and proteins. "The
biggest area we get stuck in is
trying to break down our foods,"
she said. She encourages athletes
to focus more on the foods that
work specifically for them, and to
avoid sugars and alcohol, which
slow recovery and break down
the body faster.
NO ONE BEST DIET
Athletes are encouraged to develop a game-day eating plan and
stick to it. For Ragotte, his go-to
pre-race meal, oatmeal, can be
prepared in a hotel room coffee
maker. "That's the other catch of
nutrition for races — you're often
in a hotel without a kitchen. You
have to be creative," he said.
MacLean has success with
"carb-loading", or eating large
quantities of complex carbohydrates
in the days before a big swim meet.
The adrenaline, metabolism boost,
and energy output needed to perform at high levels of competition
means that the body burns through
its calories more quickly. Carb-loading before a race allows the body to
build up a store of fuel that can be
relied upon for sustained energy
and endurance.
"During a competition, I eat quite
a lot, I think from all the racing my
body really needs the fuel," she said.
Gallo also emphasizes that
nutrition varies depending on the
sport. For women's rugby players,
weight is not a restriction. "You're
not really dealing with a lot of
individuals that are afraid to be a
certain size," she said.
Gallo teaches a first-year
kinesiology course, and uses it as
a chance to talk about nutritional
goals and body image, making sure
that students — especially women
— understand that health is "not
about the number on the scale."
BALANCE IS KEY
MacLean, Ragotte and Sheppard
follow a structured diet when
training, but they tend to give their
minds and bodies a break during
the off-season.
"My off-season diet is way
different than what I try and keep
during season," admitted Mac-
Lean, who indulges in sweets and
fast food and enjoys the break
from thinking about food all
the time.
Ragotte's constant need to
maintain endurance during the
season contrasts starkly with his
off-season diet. "It's weird to go
from being constantly hungry
to never thinking about food,"
he said.
Cuff believes there are mental
and emotional benefits to relaxing a diet during the off-season,
within reason.
For her part, Gallo knows
that student athletes are 18- to
22-year-olds. "They are going
to eat their burgers, drink their
alcohol," she said, "[but] the offseason is meant for improvement,
[and] that also means improved
nutrition."
Cuff said it's easy to get caught
up in the ideals that the media
sets in terms of nutritional goals.
While it is important to consume
healthy foods that have plenty of
nutritional benefits, nutrition is
not a one-size-fits all concept —
especially for student athletes. 31 II Culture
cum OR  RHYS EDWARDS
ART»
AMS Art Gallery goes locomotive
Bike Co-op launches second edition of community art showcase
fypt    i
The show includes pieces made in a variety of styles and media.
PHOTO ALVINTIAN3THE UBYSSEY
Ruby Chen
Contributor
How do you celebrate cycling
with art? The AMS Bike Co-op is
presenting the Spare pArts exhibition at the AMS Art Gallery in the
Student Union Building until Oct.
18, showcasing artwork created
by students and local artists that
combine bicycle parts with this
year's theme, outer space.
"The purpose of the bike art is
to engage people with bicyclefs],
the bike culture. If you can make
an art out of it, you can learn the
names [of the bicycle parts], learn
how it looks, without having
any pressure," said show curator Veronika Khvorostukhina
as she touched a black chandelier made up of wheel rims and
portage straps.
"Bike art is not intended to be
precise and perfect. It's meant to
be kind of messy, kind of weird."
Spare pArts emphasizes audience engagement, a value shared
by Norbeto Mantik and Rebekah
McGurran of local print shop
The Hive Printing. "We are both
cyclists, so that's what inspired us
to make bike art," said Mantik. "It
connects us to other cyclists and
with Vancouver."
Mantik also created a deploy-
able candle holder. "The idea was
to interact with the community
so that just like a bike, you make
something you can play with and
move around, so in a way you
transfer your energy to it as well,"
he said.
Hungarian artist Brigitta
Kocsis takes a very different
approach to bike art. Her collage
combines magazine cutouts
with drawing, markers, and
acrylic paint.
"Once these images are
removed from their original
meaning, they become fragmented
to the point of abstraction, with a
suggestion of mechanical component," she said.
So how did the outer space
theme factor into the show?
"The idea is the freedom of
movement, the idea that your bike
can take you where ever you want
to go," said Khvorostukhina. "A bicycle is just a bunch of metal parts
— it's the way you put them together that makes it an art, a transport,
or anything you want it to be. It's
the bike parts plus imagination."
The exhibition will end with
a 19-plus closing gala on Oct. 18,
where all donated art pieces, including three adorable yarn bikes
and a golden vintage-style chandelier, will be auctioned to raise
funds for the Bike Co-op. tJ
Visit the Bike Co-op in the SUB for
more information. The Hive Printing will be selling their bike T-shirts
and other designs in the SUB with
East Side Flea on Nov. 8.
RSDAY, OCTOBER 10,2C
CULTURE VULTURE
Theatre
Two Tales by Carlo Gozzi: The
Love of Two Oranges and The
King Stag, directed by MFA
alumnus Chris McGregor, will
run from Oct. 10-12 at the
Dorothy Somerset Studio on
campus. Admission is free and
performances start at 7:30 p.m.
Both of these one-act plays
will feature UBC BFA acting
students who, in the true spirit of
the Commedia dell'Arte, will all
be wearing elaborate masks to
portray outrageous characters.
The show, intended for mature
audiences, guarantees comedy
throughout the sinister plots,
love interests, fantasy and overall ridiculousness.
Awards
The UBC cultural precinct was
awarded "Best Reason to Go to
UBC Outside of Classes" in the
annual Georgia Straight "Best
of Vancouver" issue. Editors
referred to the quality programming of the Chan, MOA and
both the Opera and Theatre
programs.
The Dick Knost Show, starring
UBC alum Tom Scholte, won
"Best BC Film" at the Vancouver
International Film Festival, tl
FOOD»
Student blog sells high-class cooking on a no-class budget
MAGECOURTESY ALISON FUNG
Alison Fung's meatball and broccoli
flatbread pizza is a tasty dinner that's easy
to make.
FOOD WITH...
Jessica Christin-Hametner
You won't normally find the phrases "gourmet food" and "student
budget" in the same sentence, but
one intrepid student is working to
change that.
Alison Fung, majoring in computer science and biology at UBC,
created a food blog, My Secret
Recipe Book, two years ago for
students and food connoisseurs
alike, sharing some of her best-
kept secret family food recipes.
"I created My Secret Recipe
Book while working at Hazelmere
Golf Course restaurant in White
Rock, where I learned a lot about
how to make food and prepare
it from the chefs working in the
kitchen," Fung said.
However, brilliant master chefs
weren't the only source of cookery
inspiration for Fung.
"The name of my blog was
definitely inspired by my mom,
who loves to cook," she said. "Most
of the foods she cooks are her
own recipes or recipes that her
grandma passed on to her, so that's
why I named my blog My Secret
Recipe Book — because I share my
family's recipes, which my mom
has taught me to make."
According to Fung, My Secret
Recipe Book is the "ultimate blog
for homemade food." Ravenous
students can find a variety of
diverse yet easy-to-make and
affordable recipes to recreate at
home, which includes everything
from mouth-watering exotic Asian
cuisine and the humble chocolate
cookie to inviting gourmet salads
and delectable tiramisu cups.
Although a student herself,
Fung has plenty of kitchen
wisdom to share. With tips and
tricks at hand to help cook for
almost any occasion, she creates
many of her own recipes even
when she has next to nothing in
the fridge.
"I think cream puffs are a good
treat for students," Fung said.
"Usually they're quite expensive
to buy, but it's actually really easy
and affordable to make."
Fung's approach is to think big:
the bigger, the better.
"Make food in batches and then
freeze it, because then you don't
have to go out and buy groceries
that often. It's very convenient,"
she said. "Usually when you buy
bigger sizes, it's cheaper too."
Fung's multicultural background has influenced her cooking, but so has travelling across the
world. Her journeys served as the
catalyst that sparked her gastronomic creativity.
"Because we're Chinese, my
mom cooks Asian food a lot — Chinese food, mainly, but she also likes
cooking Thai, Korean and Malaysian food, which she has taught me
to make. And as for travelling, if I
go to some place and I really like
the flavour of the food, then I want
to try to make it back home."
As a self-confessed food lover,
Fung is a true gourmet with a
discerning palate. But why exactly
does she love to cook?
"I'm happy to see people enjoy
the food that I make, especially
making food for my friends and
family. It gives me a sense of
achievement," Fung said.
Hoping to expand her blog into
a professional website in the near
=HOTO CARTER BRUNDAGE3THE UE
Alison Fung's culinary expertise comes
from a mix of exploration and experimentation.
future, gastronomy is to Fung
more than just cooking or nourishment; it is about discovery, and
being eager to try and taste new
foods the world has to offer, loving
every mouthful, tl
Check out Fung's recipes at mysecre-
trecipebook.tumblr.com, or try her
cream puffs at the UBC Jazz Cafe
event this Friday October Hat 6:30
p.m., with student-friendly pricing
between $l-$2.
F
E YOUR rfc
■■■■ "       ^^ AT WCCTFRN r.ANArv
ADMISSION INCLUDES UNLIMITED ACCESS TO
6"fO    MONSTERS
\*m  OF SCHLOCK
HAUNTED HOUSES.      RIPES GRUESOME COMEDY ACT*
.   TWM ■&
AYLAND    PNECLIPS
OPENING WEEKEND SPECIAL
OCT 11-13
($25 AT THE GATE)
AT WESTERN CANADA'S SCARIEST HAUNT
ON SELECT DATES FROM
OCT 11-NOV 2
SAVINGS AND DETAILS AT FRIGHTNIGHTS.CA
FRIGHT NIGHTS
*Monsters of Schlock will not be performing on October 11-13 10    I    CULTURE    |    THURSDAY, OCTOBER 10,2013
FILM»
Drivers, dancers and drugs
With two days left, there's still time to catch a cool independent film at the Vancouver International Film Festival. Don't forget that some of the most popular films in the festival, including several major-
award winners, will receive repeat screenings at Vancity Theatre, SFU Woodwards and the Rio Theatre. In the meantime, checkout our latest reviews.
MAGESCOURTESYOFVIFF
THEFUTURE
LEAP4YOURLIEE
HELI
Directed by Alicia Scherson, The Future is a quirky commentary on the purpose of life with a dash of surrealism on
the side.
The film revolves around a recently orphaned girl named
Bianca and her brother Tomas. They spend their days mindlessly lounging around in their apartment in the tragedy's
aftermath, struggling to make ends meet financially. Things
take a strange turn, however, when two of Tomas' "friends"
abruptly move in with them and propose to burglarize a
blind, washed-out English movie star by having Bianca form
a relationship with him. Simultaneously, both siblings try to
tackle their own inner struggles and personal desires.
Although the plot seems straightforward and rather predictable, it is the content of The Future that makes it fascinating. Many scenes contain interesting dialogue and surreal
visual arrangements alluding to philosophical ideas like
existentialism and pessimism; these ideas are conveyed in
the form of a normal argument, as well as strange sequences
involving non-existent sunlight and even sexual wrestling
scenes. However, the execution of these scenes makes it very
obvious what subtext the film is trying to convey, and sometimes it's rather nonsensical. Also, the narrative abruptly
comes to a halt in the end, and only feels half-resolved.
Overall, The Future is an interesting parade of symbolism
and metaphors, albeit a messy one.
-Miguel Santa Maria
Playing at the SFU Woodwards Theatre on Oct. 10 at 11 a.m.
Sexual confusion, family dysfunction and narcissistic high
school students dominate the plot of the comical dance
mockumentary Leap 4 Your Life.
Inspired by her experiences growing up as a competitive dancer, Taylor Hill began working on the script while
finishing her undergraduate degree at Simon Fraser University.
The film follows the lives of four senior dancers from Sashay Dance Studio as they battle it out to win the trophy at
the 10th annual Leap 4 Your Life Dance Competition (hosted, incidentally, at UBC's favourite study space, the Irving
K. Barber Learning Centre). Though based on the cliche
storyline of every dance competition movie, the quirky characters, lighthearted jokes and unexpected twists make this
movie into a laughable family affair.
That isn't to say the film doesn't contain some serious
dance moves and talented performers. With dance routines created by choreographers featured on So You Think
You Can Dance Canada, and original songs from Canadian
country singer Mackenzie Porter, this Vancouver-based
independent film is anything but amateur. As the winner of
this year's Must See BC Award at VIFF, Leap 4 Your Life has
also scored an additional red carpet screening in the festival
later this month.
-CarlySotas
Playing at Pacific Cinematheque on Oct. 10 at 2 p.m. Red Carpet Screening at VanCity Theatre on Oct. 12 at 6p.m.
As audiences left the last screening of Heli at the Rio
Theatre, one comment could be heard over and over again:
"That made me sweat."
The film, which garnered Amat Escalante the award for
best director at the Cannes Festival, is unremitting in its
naturalism. Set somewhere in the depths of the Mexican
wilderness, Heli presents audiences with a brief insight into
the ravages of corruption, drugs and the sex trade that have
mired the country for years.
The eponymous Heli, a teenager responsible for taking
care of his father, sister, wife and child, gets accidentally
caught up in the drug trade; murder and rape ensue. Though
the trajectory of the film is apparent before the end of the
first act, Escalante's attention to nuanced cinematography
shows that his concern is always the way in which the story
is told, rather than the plot itself. To this end, some scenes
are excruciatingly difficult to watch.
Escalante's vision of contemporary Mexico is largely
bleak, though interspersed with moments of beauty as the
camera pans over immense deserts and bleached fields. If
there's one problem with Heli, it's that it doesn't do much to
counter preconceptions of Mexico.
-Rhys Edwards
No longer screening.
BENDS
EIEI HOWLS FROM HAPPINESS
DOWNRIVER
Bends is a film as concise and understated as its title.
Two individuals on opposite ends of the social spectrum
share equal measures of anxiety in this drama about the
deteriorating life of a Hong Kong socialite, Mrs. Li, and her
poor mainland Chinese chauffeur Fai. What sets this drama
apart from the numerous other films that portray social
class relationships through driver-boss juxtapositions is its
utilization of a physical border — the border between Hong
Kong and mainland China — which ultimately serves as a
metaphorical device.
The elegant Mrs. Li, portrayed by Hong Kong veteran
actress Carina Lau, strives to keep up appearances after
her husband disappears, while the financially hapless
Fai, played by famous mainland Chinese actor Chen Kun,
struggles to find ways to have his second child born in Hong
Kong to avoid the hefty second-child fee. Neither character discloses their personal anxieties to the other, perhaps
thinking that due to their differences in social status, the
other will not be able to relate.
The film's ending implies that, had the two characters
conveyed their troubles to the other the ending would have
been better for one of them. Despite its slow pace and minimal dialogue, Bends is a gripping drama that captivates its
audience with its relevance to real-life emotional struggles.
-Alice Zhou
No longer screening.
Fifi Howls From Happiness, directed by Mitra Farahani, depicts the last months of Iranian artist Bahman Mohassess.
The documentary serves a dual purpose: it attempts to create a portrait of Mohassess while forming an understanding
of why he left Iran permanently in 2006 to all but completely disappear from history.
Farahani, in allowing Mohassess to continuously talk
about his artwork, not only provides context for him as
an artist; the interview-based format of the film enables
viewers to see Mohassess through his own eyes, and to
understand his rejection of Iranian culture.
With the use of moving classical music, Farahani
successfully captures Mohassess' desire to be a part of
history, and the obsessive, destructive nature that ultimately led to his own undoing. While the subject matter
often borders on depressing, Farahani's slick, in-your-face
narrative drives the movie forward.
Set and filmed almost exclusively in the Rome hotel
room Mohassess lived in, Farahani contrasts its white
walls with the artist's paintings and sculptures. This creates a sense of loss, allowing the audience to clearly see a
man who is almost lost within himself.
Fifi Howls From Happiness provokes thought and discussion on what it means to be an artist, and carve a place
in history for yourself.
-KariLindberg
No longer screening.
Written and directed by Ben Ratner, Down River is an
stirring story of three women — an actress, a singer and an
artist — balancing on the edge of personal breakdown and
creative breakthrough, and their relationship with an older
woman on whom they rely for hope, inspiration and support.
Written as a tribute to VIFF veteran actress Babz chula,
who passed away in 2010 at the of 63, Down River effectively captures the emotions of heartbreak, pain and joy as it
follows the lives of the women. Each is incredibly different,
yet they are similar in their own ways. Although focusing on
adult characters, elements of a traditional "coming of age"
tale are apparent in the growth and realization not only of
the characters' experience, but that of the audience's, too. As
the film progresses, each of the young women must learn to
face up to their fears. Whether it is religion, marriage, work,
art or music that draws one's passion, Down River engages in
them all.
Set entirely in British Columbia, the landscapes are both
familiar and beautiful. Comprised of a small, largely female
cast, Down River allows audiences to sense the close, familial bonds between the characters, both on and off screen.
This is a film that provokes discussion on the values of
life; as such, it's entirely deserving of its honourable mention
in the BC Spotlight VIFF category. '81
-Olivia Law
No longer screening. II Opinions
LAST WORDS//
GO VOTE, PLEASE
The AMS is your voice on campus,
and the VP academic has a direct
line in to the bowels of your university. Your vote does matter, and
it is important that you exercise
your opinion. While a student
council election may seem trivial,
it has real-world effects on your
education. It determines who will
be advocating for you, how your
money will be spent and what sort
of events will happen on campus.
It takes seconds to vote and only
a few minutes to get informed. As
the old saying goes, you don't get
to complain if you don't vote, and
we like it when you write us angry
letters.
ENGINEERING GOOD
Engineers do a lot of projects in
their spare time: building soccer-playing robots, developing
fuel-efficient cars to race in Texas,
and planning to crossing the Atlantic in a robotic sailboat are just
a few of their activities that we've
written about recently.
They also have a great internal
community, as discussed in our feature this issue. But sometimes they
get knocked for not having a broad
enough outlook on the world. This
is understandable when you have
to take so many credits associated
with technical engineering skills,
and when those courses take up so
much of your time studying.
That said, it's great to see
RES'EAU — led by an engineering
professor at UBC — apply their
engineering knowledge in a different way: to help people in remote
communities, who frequently get
bacteria warnings about their
water, have access to clean water.
FILM FESTIVAL
SYNDROME1 STRIKES
AGAIN
In light of our coverage of the
Vancouver International Film
Festival, it's about time we took
a step back and addressed one of
the main problems with independent film production today: Film
Festival Syndrome.
FFS is frequently contracted
by young directors eager to
decorate their titles with coveted
laurel wreaths — no matter how
backwater the award jury. Works
directed by individuals with FFS
are characterized by any and all of
the following:
• Abrupt presentation of the
title card (extra distinction
if the title is in a sans-serif
font)
• Opening credits with
no background footage
or music
• Miserable German narrator
• No soundtrack to speak of
• Entirely superfluous nudity
• "Realistic" sex scenes
• Footage of children riding
bicycles (extra distinction if
in monochrome)
• Footage of children playing
in a street (extra distinction
if one of the children looks
at the camera and smiles)
• Footage of an empty field
shot from a car window as it
drives by
• Long shot of a person/bicycle/car making their way
across a field/desert/beach,
crossing from one edge of
the frame to another
• Incredibly dull footage of
desert landscapes, rocks
in fields, trees blowing in
the wind
• Agonizingly long shots of
characters looking wistfully
out of a window/at the camera/at a desert landscape
• Abrupt ending
• Neutral color
Films with these elements tend
to pick up a lot of awards at festivals.
However, if these festivals are meant
to encourage innovation, then such
accolades are counter-intuitive; they
reinforce stereotypes while creating
a culture of homogeneity under the
pretense of auteurship.
Not all film festival film directors
have FFS, but these tropes are becoming increasingly standardized.
For the sake of a vibrant film culture
in the future — mainstream or independent — we encourage current
film studies students to immunize
themselves as soon as possible.
Did we mention that we have a blog? Visit ubyssey.ca/the
blog to read our blog. Read about ourVancity Buzz story,
the Ponderosa letter and round-up of UBC social media.
Custom silk screened
t-shirts for your
campus club
or team.
Mention this ad and
receive 5% off your
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Tel: 604-408-5236
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BOUNTY
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Vancity
Buzz
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COME BY THE UBYSSEY OFFICE
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LLUSTRATION INDIANAJ0EL3THE UBYSSEY
Whoever wins the election for interim VP academic will only serve for a few months before new elections are held for the full term.
MELHEM FOR VP
ACADEMIC
We endorse Adam Melhem for the
AMS VP academic position.
Melhem will be an effective
voice for students. He has clear
goals and he seems like he won't
let university administrators
push him around. He gave strong
answers at the debate and wasn't
afraid to challenge his opponent.
Melhem chose to make flexible
learning the most important part
of his platform. While this can be
a vague topic, it is an important
one, and one that he has realistic
goals for.
At first blush, Anne Kessler may
appear to be a better candidate,
at least on paper. She's served on
Council and the Senate. Her platform points such as better student
"mental health" and more rights
for students in housing sound
nice. But without concrete plans
for implementing them don't have
much meaning.
We weren't impressed by
Kessler's debate answers. She didn't
sound like a candidate who had the
level of experience that she has.
Many of her answers were just repeating or agreeing with Melhem.
Kessler also said she wasn't sure
if she would run for office again
for a full term as VP Academic.
Goals like rewriting the housing
contract will take far more than
three months to accomplish, and
ambivalence about running again
calls into question her seriousness.
We do have some reservations
about Melhem. He has experience
dealing with students as SAC vice
chair, but he doesn't have much
experience dealing with UBC
administrators. While we liked
his answer that he would "ab-
so-fucking-lutely" run again for a
full term as VP academic, we hope
he will have a more professional
manner when dealing with the
university administration. XI
University of Ottawa     I
Study Law in the National Capital
Obtain a uOttawa JD degree
in either English or French.
Rigorous and stimulating training
Diverse internship and practicum opportunities
Concentrations and specializations available
Take advantage of our many combined programs,* including,
• JD/LLL [National Program) with uOttawa's Civil Law Section
• JD/LLL [Programme de droit canadien) with uOttawa's Civil Law Section
• JD-BSocSc [Specialization in Political Science) with uOttawa's Faculty of Social Sciences
• JD/MBA with uOttawa's Telfer School of Management
• Canadian & American Dual JD with Michigan State University College of Law or with
American University Washington College of Law
• JD/MA with Carleton University's Norman Paterson School of International Affairs
We also offer LLM and PhD programs.
*You may be eligible for a scholarship through the Jay S. Hennick Business and Community
Leadership Program.
Application deadline: November 1,2013
For more information:
www.commonlaw.uOttawa.ca
nm
u Ottawa 12    I    GAMES    I    THURSDAY, OCTOBER 10,2013
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10-Wise
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15-Bedeck
16- Bator, Mongolia
17-Weaponry
18-Merry-go-round
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25- River in central Switzerland
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35- Challenge to complete a task
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38-Moving vehicle
39-You can't catch fish
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41-Rich cake
43-Sardine containers
44-Merriment
45-Hail, to Caesar
46-Sullage
48-Identical
50-Clothes
51-Black Sea port
54-Build
55-Forgivable
57-Baby powder
61-Pianist Gilels
62-Seraglio
63-Perpetually
64-Traditional
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65-At for words
66-Tirade
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2-Broadcast
3-PIN requester
4-Teachings
5-Umbrella
6-Go gaga over
7-Womanizer
8-Eastender?
9-Makes beloved
10-Occur beneath
11-Drug-yielding plant
12-Massive wild ox
13- Tolkien tree creatures
19-Swiss river
21-Sever
23-Large beer mug
24-Resembling a foot
25-Ready to hit
26-Jargon
27-Campfire treat
29-Roe of sturgeon
30-Citrus fruit
31-Have a feeling
34-Overhead
40- Permanently attached, to
a zoologist
41-Old entertainment
42-Values highly
43-Chatter
47-Catchall abbr.
49-Pompous sort
50-City on the Rhone
51-Pitcher Hershiser
52-Floor model
53-Bahrain bigwig
54-Spanish river
56-Proverb ending?
58-Actress Gardner
59-Author Deighton
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Yes, devoted Ubyssey crossword
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This week at the Norm
Wednesday Oct. 9-Sunday Oct. 13
This Is the End: 7 p.m., 9:15 p.m.
While attending a party at James Franco's house, Seth Rogen, Jay Baruchel
and many other celebrities are faced with the apocalypse.
Tickets are $5 tor students, $4 tofFilrnSoc members.
Learn more at UBCfilmsociety.com.
DON'T LET YOUR
ASSIGNMENTS FLATLINE.
www.essay-rescue.com
BiintiB

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