UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Oct 21, 1971

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0128698.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0128698.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0128698-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0128698-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0128698-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0128698-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0128698-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0128698-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0128698-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0128698.ris

Full Text

Array U.S.
finances research
By JOHN TWIGG
There are three U.S.
army-funded research projects
being done at UBC, The Ubyssey
learned Wednesday.
Medical microbiology professor
Donald McLean is receiving about
$20,000 per year for several years
from the U.S. army medical
services department to do a study
called Arborvirus Ecology in the
Northwestern Nearctic Region.
In other words, McLean is
getting money from the U.S. army
to study how bugs such as wood
ticks transmit diseases to other
animals and eventually to humans.
The other two research
projects receiving army financial
support are electrical engineering
professor Lawrence Young's;
research into thin-filmed
conductors financed by the U.S.
army and air force and a study
being completed by the institute
of oceanography into how
weather affects waves.
UBC  is  also  receiving  about
$1.6    million     from     such
'foundations    as     the     Ford
Foundation and the Rockefeller
Foundation.
The foundations are financing
research mostly in the field of
metallurgy, but the Ford
Foundation is spending $250,000
per year for four years towards
building a model of all the societal
variables in Greater Vancouver.
Another study, headed by
animal and resource ecology
professor CS. Holling, is
attempting to build a
mathematical model of all the
variables that affect growth and.
change of structure of Greater
Vancouver society.
The projects were described for
The Ubyssey by deputy president
William Armstrong in an interview
following a story in UBC
PReports Wednesday that
indicated UBC receives
$2,433,105 towards research from
private, industrial and foreign
sources.
UBC PReports did not break
down this source of funds even
though it is the second largest
source of research revenue, and
accounts for more than 18 per
cent of the $15.5 million research
money.
Armstrong said more than
two-thirds of the $2.5 million
from private, industrial and
foreign sources comes from
foundations such as Rockefeller
and Ford.
However, he said all research
projects are carefully screened
before approval by the office of
research administration.
He said the projects must pass
ethical standards (for example -
no connection with any wars) and
the researcher must be totally free
to publish his results regardless of
the outcome.
He said there are fewer
U.S.-financed projects being done
at UBC now than a few years ago.
because the U.S. congress recently
passed a resolution banning all
university research financed by
the army unless it has direct
military applications.
"There aren't many U.S.
army-funded research projects left
at UBC," said Armstrong.
"Anything that deals directly
with the military is usually not
offered to us because we (UBC)
insist that the results be
publishable."
Armstrong said that within two
or three years there would likely
be   no  more  U.S.  army-funded
projects as UBC.
"That source of money is
drying up anyway so there won't
be too much concern about the
ethical implications," said
Armstrong.
"Most research for the U.S.
army is a damn nuisance because
we have to send them 200 copies
of the published results."
He said the ethical aspects of
accepting U.S. military-funded
projects "has been discussed ad
nauseum"    by   the   university's
research committee. •
"Research aimed at the
progression or completion of war
won't be accepted by us," said
Armstrong.
The main source of research
funds at UBC is the federal
government, which this year is
providing $11,483,050, or 73.7
per cent of the total research
monies.
"Funding research projects is
the federal government's way of
supporting higher education," said
Armstrong. "The provincial
government support of research is
low, only one per cent, but they
support higher education in other
ways."
(Under the British North
America Act, provinces are
responsible for education, which
means they pay for most of the
universities' operating costs.)
Armstrong said the university's
contracts with the Canadian
defence department are similar to
the ones with the U.S. army.
"Most     of    the    restricted
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. Llll, No. 16       VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, OCTOBER 21, 1971
4s     228-2301
research is done in their own
labs," he said.
"The Canadian Defence
Research Board has never tried to
force any restricted research on
us."
The DRB is providing
$251,716 in research funds to
UBC this year for such projects as
oxygen depletion at high
atlitudes, other medical projects
and projects in metallurgy and
electrical engineering.
The largest chunk of federal
research money comes from the
National Research Council, which
this year is providing UBC with
$5,181,947.
"Most of the NRC money goes
toward the hard sciences such as
physics and chemistry," said
Armstrong, "though there is an
experimental psychology  project
See page 3: INDIAN
—dirk visser photo
AT THE BOTTOM of the great university machine, the view stinks, as usual.   On a bad day, it may even intimidate. Never mind: scissors cut
paper, paper wraps stone. And beer makes everything irreparably soggy.  And as night turns to day, a voice cries in the wilderness.
Athletics a priority in mini-budget
Intramural sports will receive first priority
in a $21,000 budget margin in January, Alma
Mater Society treasurer David Mole told
student council Wednesday.
The original $3,500 grant was an aid to get
the program started, Mole told The Ubyssey.
He said council decided to support the
program because the administration refused to
fund it.
Council voted unanimously Sept. 22 for
administration support to intramurals through
the $5 athletic fee.
"In the long run the AMS won't be able to
handle the program unless we have a fee
increase because it is increasing in size," he
said.
Council decided Wednesday not to put any
referendum on the athletic fee which now
goes entirely to extramural sports.
"The human government caucus doesn't
want to make an extramurals fee referendum
an issue on the campus this year," said Mole.
The fee can only be altered by a
referendum, he said, and the AMS executive
has no control over it.
Mole said the men's athletic committee
could ask the students to vote to increase the
athletic fee.
Last year was the first year the intramural
program had as much as $7,000.
This year, said Mole, one of the casualties
of the budget reduction has been the
intramural programs as well as other groups
such as special events speakers committee.
"An increased grant for the intramurals
program along with any other program would
depend on the students' response to a fee
referendum," he said.
2 positions acclaimed
Human government candidates have been
elected by acclamation to two vacant
positions on the executive.
The position of external affairs officer has
been filled by Gillies Malnarich, grad studies
sociology and the internal affairs post is now
held by Barb Coward, grad studies English.
Nominations closed at 4 p.m. Wednesday
for those positions and for four
senators-at-large.
Candidates for the 18-month senate term
are Leo Fox, science 4 and Lynn Smith, law
2.
Candidates for three three-year terms on
senate are Perry York, social work 1, Darrel
Anderson, grad studies, Svend Robinson,
applied science .2, John Sydor, applied science
3, Piers Bursill-Hall, science 2 and Jim Green,
grad studies.
There will be an all-candidates rally
Monday at 12:30 in SUB conversation pit. Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 21,  1971
Speakeasy
Housing seems to be a major problem this time of year, but "there
are several ways to find a place to stay.
Read the bulletin boards around campus, check the classifieds in
the daily newspapers, cycle around town looking at signs, or come to
the Speakeasy desk and pick up a housing list, which comes out every
two weeks.
Until the end of December, the Trailer will be open from 12 noon
until 10 p.m. at 1725 West Seventh Avenue, to help with housing
problems, or people can call 736-9871 for information on crash pads
and referrals to places like the YMCA or private homes.
At the YWCA, 850 Burrard Street, 683-2531, a person can get a
single room for $5 per night, bunks for $2, and more permanently for
$13 to $18 a week.
A rooms registry helps women find places to rent.
The YMCA, 955 Burrard Street, 681-0221, costs $5 per night, or
try the Kitsilano Information Center, 2741 West Fourth Avenue at
MacDonald Street, 738-9030, which is open Monday to Friday 10
a.m. to 8 p.rri. and Saturdays 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
There will be free fish and chips, heavy music and lots of freedom
at Capilano Stadium, Oct. 24, noon to midnight.
Bands from the U.S.A., maybe Jeremy Spencer, will be playing.
Children of God, come out and get it together.
"An overview of modern China" Oct. 21 and "Civilization"
starting Oct. 25, will be held in the SUB auditorium, admission free.
See Speakeasy for further details.
Free concerts Wednesday noons in the music building. Check
music building bulletin boards for programs.
Cheap food outside SUB cafeteria. Coffee — nine cents, cookies —
eight cents, sandwiches — 20 cents.
The Ubyssey will feature a Speakeasy column on a weekly basis.
Readers are asked to send their contributions to the Speakeasy office,
SUB 100A.
tk^flager
£f)Qt sfjoppes
SRBtraKXSFa&m
Bv     7orino     in
Tan  Antique and  Black
Garment Leather
Only - $50.00
542 Granville and 435 W. Hastings St.
776 Granville — Adams Apple Boutique
* "Design and word Trade marks in Canada of the
Villager Shoe Shoppes Ltd."
Open Thursday and Friday nites.
C.O.D. orders accepted. Credit and Chargex cards honored.
What did a Syntopicon
ever do for you?
It could do a lot. The Syntopicon is a unique index of the 163,000 ideas
contained in the Great Books. This means that instead of spending hours on
research for essays, you can spend your time on thinking and writing.
To learn more about how the Great Books and the Syntopicon can help you
budget your time and work more productively, write the Great Ideas
Programme, Box 1054, Stn. "A", Van. 2, B.C. Thursday, October 21,  1971
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 3
Budget gets 2nd reading at jammed meet
By LESLEY KRUEGER
The Alma Mater Society's controversial budget got its
second reading Wednesday and was tabled for a week.
During the debate an amendiment to the budget was
proposed by law rep Grant Burnyeat but was eventually
defeated.
The amendment would have cut The Ubyssey's
budget from $37,000 to $30,000, reducing its publication
to once weekly.
It would have also reduced the special events
committee budget from $10,000 to $7,000 on the
grounds that "the number of people benefiting from the
program was not sufficient to warrant the expenditure."
Special events committee co-chairwoman Gillies
Malnarich said she estimated this number as 8,000 people
in the five weeks the program has run.
Burnyeat also proposed the deletion of $200
allocated to the Union of Radical Social Scientists, $200
from the Union of Radicals in the Humanities and $100
from the non-faculty teachers' union budget.
He asked that $3,500 of this money be allocated to
intramural sports; raising its budget to $7,000, that the
university clubs committee receive $3,000 more to raise
its budget to $8,000, that the conference budget be
increased from $1,500 to $3,000, and that undergraduate
society allotments be increased from $3,500 to $5,500
and divided proportionally among the faculties.
"The opposition has tried to make political capital by
nit-picking at the human government budget," AMS
president Steve Garrod said at the end of the meeting.
"We have proposed a coherent program which the
opposition has never met head on.
"If they disagree with our programs, they should
state their opposition clearly and propose alternatives,"
Garrod said.
The meeting concluded with adoption of a motion by
microbiology teaching assistant Peter Nix asking the AMS
to officially condemn the use of money from any military
source for research at UBC.
Indian affairs dept. won't print research
From page 1
getting a significant amount of
money."
Another large source is the
medical research council which
this year is giving UBC
$1,945,567 towards research.
Armstrong said the medicine
faculty also gets $1,400,000 from
heart, cancer and arthritis
foundations. (This money appears
in UBC PReports under the $2.5
million from private, industrial
and foreign sources.)
The federal government
funding of the medical faculty's
research into the physical effects
of marijuana appears under the
$643,810    from    the    national
health grant but does not account
for the entire amount, said
Armstrong.
The only trouble the university
has had with federal government
research has been through the
department of Indian affairs and
northern development, which in
the past has not wanted its
research published.
"Maybe they think the
material is politically sensitive,"
said Armstrong.
"However, we won't take their
grants unless they remove the
no-publication clause of their
contracts.
"The university will probably
get into the more touchy areas of
politics such as pollution in the
—david bowerman photo
IT WAS STANDING room only Wednesday night as the AMS council shattered all recent box office records. About 150 people, most of
them involved in extramural sports, jammed the chambers. Noise levels reached unheardof highs as the jocks clapped, the press booed and
Steve Garrod cracked his knuckles, occasionally.
'Mutilating'fund-raising goes ahead
By SANDISHREVE
Chariot racers ride again - all for the love
of charity.
The annual chariot raee held in
conjunction with the Teacup football game,
which features female players, will go on as
scheduled this year despite uneasiness in the
ranks and the withdrawal of one of the teams.
Last year when two students were seriously
injured and several others in need of stitches
and tetanus shots, the forestry undergraduate
society voted not to participate in the event
again.
The race will be held between the
agriculture and engineering undergraduate
societies, today at 12:30 at the far end of the
Thunderbird stadium track.
All proceeds from the race will go to the
crippled children's fund.
"We couldn't condone the form the race
was taking — it was too violent. There must be
a better way for getting money for the fund,"
Doug Baker, FUS secretary, said Tuesday.
Kathleen Boyle, head nurse at Wesbrook
Hospital told The Ubyssey Wednesday that
serious and potentially serious injuries have
been treated as a-result of past races.
"We would prefer to see the money raised
in a less mutilating way," she said.
"I hope people will support the event,
because if they don't, the crippled children
will be the ones who will get hurt," said Ralph
Lloyd, organizer of the gear team.
A group of agriculture students are
attempting to organize a token demonstration
of the race by blocking the track for five
minutes.
The demonstration is dependent on at least
65 people from the faculty participating, an
organizer told The Ubyssey.
Gordon Blankstein, organizer of the aggie
team, claimed the teams are out to have a
good time, not to kill.
"If it doesn't work out this year there will
be no more races," he said.
Lloyd and Blankstein agreed they both
have their necks on the line. "If anything goes
wrong we have had it — our names will be
mud," said Blankstein.
Blankstein said he had the support of his
council to form a team.
Lloyd said there are several new rules for
this year's race, which include restricting the
size of the teams to 35 members each and
changing the design of the chariots.
Chariot wheels must have an 8%-inch
clearance from the ground and a protective
tape covering them.
"Thus no one can get hurt even if they,
bounce under the wheels," Lloyd claimed.
"There will be 50 people guarding the
stands so spectators cannot get onto the
field," he said.
"An ambulance will be standing on call at
the stadium."
Lloyd said there were no such regulations
in previous years.
"A limitation has been set on the arms to
be used — instead of throwing chickens and
harmful items, we will use shit and that sort
of thing," said Blankstein.
near future.
"The government and industry
may not like the results of some
of the research but we have to be
prepared to take a stand on what
we find.
"In cases where immediate
action by the government is
required on a certain problem we
will give them three months to
make the changes and then
publish our results.
"But one of the university's
responsibilities should be to the
community."
Armstrong said UBC gets about
as much research money per
capita as do other comprehensive
universities such as the
Universities of Alberta, Toronto
and McGill.
"We're recognized as a
competent group of researchers,"
said Armstrong.
Treatment
'shabby'
By KATHY CARNEY
Legal action will be taken
against UBC by the Office and
Technical Employees Union if
negotiations to have Jeanne Paul
reinstated to her job are not
successful.
Paul, who was effectively
dismissed from her position as
assistant to the dean of the
faculty of science September 30,
met Wednesday morning with
OTEU officials and Morley
Shortt, solicitor for the union.
Union spokesman Bill Lowe
told The Ubyssey Wednesday "the
decision has been made that
OTEU, through its legal counsel,
will make every effort to see that
Paul is reinstated to her former
position,
"Paul has been a dedicated
employee of the university for 17
years," he said, "and there can be
no doubt that she has been
treated shabbily and in a manner
that is in violation of the labor
laws of this province.
"We will endeavor to have Paul
reinstated without the necessity
of legal action, but if this is not
successful, OTEU will
immediately file a complaint
under Section 7 of the Labor
Relations Act," Lowe said.
He added the union is
confident the Labor Relations
Board would, if necessary:
• order the university to
cease doing acts prohibited by the
Labor Relations Act;
• order that Paul be
reinstated to her former position;
and
• rule that Paul should
suffer no financial loss as a result
of the university's improper
actions. Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 21,  1971
Nothing like a good denial
Whew!
There we were, thinking UBC was in for one
of those nasty disputes where the university tries
to screw workers who want to unionize.
So imagine our joy, our unparalleled delight
when we discovered Wednesday from the
administration rag that there is, in fact, no
university quarrel with unions.
First, there was the messy question of Jeanne
Paul, whose union alleges she was effectively fired
for attending a union organizational meeting.
Since Paul's case is still not settled, and since
her union (as we say on page three of today's
paper) plans to take the university to court if she
is not rehired, it's great to know that there's
really no university-versus-unions dispute.
After all, who can you believe if you can't
believe the administration of your good old alma
Then along
came promo
Whew!
Just when we thought Matt Speier and Ron
Silvers of the ill-starred anthrosoc department
were about to get the axe, along comes more
mind-bending data.
Speier and Silvers are now being considered
for promotion.
No doubt our faithful readers will recalf that
the promo and tenure committee narrowly
recommended Speier and Silvers for. tenure,
having faithfully toiled in the vineyards of the
Bwana five years. Then the department's head
Belshavick, Cyril himself, in one of his many
memos, said,, no, he's against granting them
tenure. Clear so far?
Well, the promo and tenure committee's
recommendations still stand as far as they're
concerned. So now the 18 (or is it 19?) senior
faculty will take off their tenure hats and put on
their promo hats, and consider some promotion
cases. Yes, you guessed it. Speier and Silvers are
up for promo.
This presents some interesting possibilities.
One could envisage Speier and Silvers going
right to the top. Let's see, maybe Silvers will
become a full prof and Speier could even get to
be department head. Of course, they wouldn't
have tenure and would get fired anyway. But at
least it would be something of a moral victory,
wouldn't it?
Of course, all of this might be sheer
innuendo. And that would be a shame and we
would be heartily sorry. Because, you see, we've fiJfififM
applied to the Canadian Anthropology Fund for a
grant to do an ethnography on the anthrosockers
as one of the weirdest societies now going.
mater when that administration denies there's a
hassle with workers.
Then we learned that not only is there no
union dispute, but that the university actually
likes'it's unions'.
The administration just has a rule that
prevents uncertified unions from holding
organizational meetings on campus. And if an
uncertified union can't hold the necessary
meetings, it will never get the support to become
a certified union and thus be able to hold
meetings. A nice circle.
In fact, the university likes 'it's unions' so
much that the university is really only acting on
behalf of it's unions when it upholds this rule, we
learned.
Nice to see the university behaving in such a
solicitous manner towards the tender sensibilities
of it's unions.
We suspect, however, that the certified
unions on campus would uphold the right of
uncertified unions, whose aim is to unionize
unorganized workers, to hold campus meetings.
And we don't suppose the university checked
with the other unions before recently deciding to
retract permission for an uncertified union to
hold a meeting on campus.
But why are we worried?
The administration has assured us there's no
union dispute.
Unless . . .the administration is lying.
LETTERS
k
THE UBYSSEY
OCTOBER 19, 1971
Published  Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the writer and not of the
AMS   or  the   university   administration.   Member,  Canadian
University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly
commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are
located in room 241K of the Student Union Building.
Editorial   departments,   228-2301,   228-2307;   Page   Friday,
Sports, 228-2305; advertising, 228-3977.
Editor: Leslie Plommer
Lesley Krueger and Mike Sasges sat awaiting the first
rays of sunshine, but were greeted by animal acts instead. It
didn't seem to bother Paul Knox or Tricia Moore however,
and they amused themselves by checkmating John's Twigg on
Berton's Woodward. Not to be outdone, Sandi Shreve struck
Jan O'Brien an ailing chariot carrying Vaughn Palmer and
Lawrence who Leadered them all into a round of the devil
spirits. Kathy Carney wasn't awaiting much when Mike
Goodman appeared, but soon became engrossed when Leslie
Plommer talked her into it. Nate Smith came in to give
consolation to Sandy Kass who finally learned just what
work is all about.
John Andersen consoled everyone else, but Gord Gibson
and Randy Frith bothered Dirk Visser and Kelly Booth, so it
all evened out in the end. David Bowerman may have done
'Tween Classes, but he still doesn't know much about
typewriters.
Re Nate Smith's Blood Money
article in The Ubyssey of Oct. 15:
I don't think you should have
been so quick to ridicule Mr. Volkoff
for suggesting that Robert
Oppenheimer be invited here as a
Cecil Green lecturer, even if he has
been dead for only four years. Why ^f/ltU^
some of our own professors... are
you going to ask them to leave just
because he made a mistake?
Well, that's not really the point I
wanted to make anyway. I've heard
that many people whose preferences
run to tsarist times still have great
difficulty in knowing what is living
and what is dying in the world, even
between dead and alive. So next time
don't be so fast with your radicalib
wisecracks. Sic transit memoria
mundi.
Bernie Djugashvilli,
Arts 2
these social institutions which
flourished for 1,000 years heavily
defended by both law and custom.
R.W.Finn
St. Mark's College
Strange
j
The Ubyssey welcomes letters
from all readers.
Letters should be signed and, if
possible, typed.
Although an effort is made to
publish all letters received, The
Ubyssey reserves the right to edit
letters for reasons of brevity,
legality, grammar or taste.
In view of recent, widely-scattered
but numerous instances of Some
people seeking refuge in churches
from monolithic- state-governments,
or fleeing to other nations to escape
governments, there may be numbers
of the UBC academic community
who are curious about the history
behind and the present status of Ius
Asyli (right of asylum) and Abjuratio
Regni (denial of rights by
government).
I will be giving a four-part series
of historical lectures (free,
non-credit) at St. Mark's College
beginning Wednesday, Nov. 10 at
8:00 p.m. on the origins, the period
of classic exercise and the decline of
Every morning at 8:00 the early
risers are treated to a horrible
clanging noise which emanates from
the over-modulated speakers in the
bell tower.
Seriously speaking .. . wouldn't it
make more sense to play (either at
8:00 or 8:30 a.m.) something more
symbolic of general early morn
mode?
Again seriously, how about the
theme from M.A.S.H.?
Somehow the strains of
Through the early morning fog I see.
visions of the thing to be. . .
and suddenly I realize
suicide is painless. .. etc.
would be far more appropriate and
even a little interesting.
John Martin
Science 2 Thursday, October 21, 1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
Letters
Shrink
I had noted in the booklet
issued by the university's student
health service that "all
consultations are held to be
entirely confidential and records
are handled and filed only by
authorized and responsible
members of the regular health
service staff.
With this in mind, I decided to
make an appointment last week to
discuss with a psychiatrist a
problem I had.
When I arrived at the health
services office, the people there
were unable at first to find a
record of my appointment, so I
left the office. However, when I
was" a considerable distance down
the hallway, the nurse came to the
doorway     and    shouted:     "Mr.
 ,   your   appointment   is
with a psychiatrist, have a seat in
the waiting room."
This, of course, provoked
smiles among the people in the
waiting room and in the hallway,
but surely it's not asking too
much to expect confidentiality
from the student health services
staff.
Any student, therefore, who is
thinking of discussing a problem
with a psychiatrist here, should
bear in mind that the health
service staff likes to spread a good
juicy gossip story the same as
anyone else.
Name withheld
We doubt that the health
services staff likes to spread
gossip. It's more likely that they
sometimes get a bit. sloppy and
forget that some people don't like
to advertise the fact they're seeing
a psychiatrist.
Gripe
A complaint!
Why isn't there a dancing floor
in the Pit?
The SUB partyroom is so
cramped my beer is sharing the
same space as myself. Why not
move the Pit to the ballroom
where seating is more spacious
and there is more than enough
room for a dance floor.
You may argue that the
ballroom is 'booked' occasionally.
Well if that be the case then move
the Pit back to the partyroom for
that particular evening.
Simon Fraser U. has a dance
floor and the students there can't
get enough of it. They have a
record player (obviously for
playing records) and microphones
set up so that any student or
group of students may play their
instruments and sing. This can be
arranged for UBC.
The idea behind the Pit, I think:
(besides making a profit on the
beer) is to let the student relax
and enjoy herself or himself after
studying.
I must admit I prefer the SFU
pub because of this dance floor.
I'm afraid my loyalty to UBC in
beer drinking has been transferred
to the cross-town mini-college.
Now let's get that dance floor
so we can do some stomping.
Neil H. Maclvor
Arts 3
The   system  you  describe  —
moving the Pit between the
ballroom and the partyroom -
was used to a certain extent last
year when the partyroom was
booked, but it proved to be a
nuisance for all concerned. Your
best bet is to write a letter of
support to your AMS arts reps on
the issue of the proposed Pit
expansion in the basement of
SUB.
Ribbing
Re Cecil H. and Ida Green
visiting professorships:
Stanford University is alive and
well in Palo Alto (near San
Francisco) and not in Los Angeles
where it was misplaced by Sandy
Kass and Sandi Shreve in their
article on the newly inaugurated
Cecil H. and Ida Green visiting
professorships in last Tuesday's
Ubyssey.
I was not intending to
comment on Nate Smith's
allegation last Friday that in my
ignorance I was planning to call
up the ghost of my late respected
and admired professor J. Robert
Oppenheimer from the grave to
address a UBC audience, but this
violation of geographical facts
prompts me to take pen in hand
and lay two ghosts with one
letter.
How was the poor boy to
know (without contacting me
before rushing into print) that I
took my Ph.D. with Oppenheimer
long before Nate was born, that I
was instrumental in bringing
Oppenheimer for a public lecture J
at UBC in 1955 when the1
University of Washington abruptly
cancelled his previously advertised
appearance there at the height of
the Joe McCarthy hysteria, or that
I wrote a review for Physics in
Canada of the volume of obituary
speeches on Oppenheimer by
other prominent physicists with
whom I deeply mourned the
passing of a great scientist and
humanitarian.
These are obscure facts of
personal history which Nate
Smith easily could (and did)
ignore and I was going to let it
pass. But placing Stanford in Los
Angeles — well! Even The
Ubyssey should know better!
However, all good-natured
ribbing (at least on my part) and
scoring of trivial debating points
aside, at least The Ubyssey did
give prominent billing (not in
what I would call the best of
taste, but who am I to complain
after all this free publicity) to the
inauguration of the Cecil H. and
Ida Green visiting professorships,
and I would like to repeat my call
to the readers of The Ubyssey (if
any) to send in to me for
consideration by my committee
names of persons "of the calibre
of (words omitted by Nate
Smith, either accidentally or with
malice aforethought, in quoting
my statement from the UBC
Reports).
Oppenheimer, Pauling (who in
his telephone interview reported
in The Ubyssey saw nothing
incongruous in the possibility of
visiting our campus under these
auspices), Margaret Mead, Olivier
and others, to whom invitations
could be issued.
Here is our chance to bring to
the UBC campus some of those
whom Stephen Spender exalted in
his poem "I think continually of
those who were truly great."
And if such thoughts do not
contribute more to education
than continual negative
opposition and petty bickering,
then I'd be willing to eat my hat
(if I wore one).
G.M. Volkoff
Professor and Head,
Department of Physics
Chairman, University Committee
on Cecil H. and Ida Green
Visiting Professorships
SUB film soc
presentation
Questions
Well, The Ubyssey has finally
got its head out of the clouds.
Your editorial Tuesday about
what's going on in the anthrosoc
department is the first thing I've
heard that makes any level-headed
sense out of this tenure mess. You
ask the right questions. And for a
change, you don't ask them
hysterically.
If anybody on that promotion
and tenure committee is the least
bit fair they'll be willing to state
the criteria they used in judging
Speier and Silvers. And the way
they applied the criteria.
It seems to me that if the
department can't satisfy its own
grad students that they've acted
fairly, then there must be
something wrong.
I'm waiting to see Dr.
Belshaw's or the committee's
reply to your questions.
A GRAD STUDENT
FRIDAY 22
SATURDAY 23
7:00 & 9:30
SUNDAY 24
7:00
SUB
THEATRE
BENEATrl TrIE pLANET OF TrIE ApES
Coke.
Trad© Mark Reg.
Bofh Coca-Cola and Coke are registered trade marks which identify only 1h© product of Coca-Cola U<J> Page 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 21,  1971
Two positions on tenure
"h
^,
c°^,
>*„
-ct
°v
^^&^&4i^
*»
•Of/'
^Z'/fr -N
°0<
.««'■
oy«
■t>ot.
^
iV>.>
i.VA
<*£
'"Iff *./*«- ^- ' «•-
We have here three documents
which give an indication of the
two positions grad students are
taking on the current tenure
controversy in the
anthropology-sociology
department.
The departmental grad
students' tenure committee is
taking the position that tenure
may or may not be a legitimate
thing in the university, but that
the cases of six anthrosoc profs
recetnly considered for hiring or
firing need to be reviewed before
any basic political discussion takes
place.
So the grad students have set
up a tenure committee to do that
review, vowing to use all the
procedures and guidelines
normally used by the faculty
tenure committee.
That's position one, contained
to some extent in document
number one.
Now for position two, in which
the Union of Radical Social
Scientists states that tenure
battles will continue unless
professors unionize to really
protect their jobs — since it is
clear that tenure procedures don't
do this.
The URSS perspective on the
tenure issue, contained in
document number two, has been
sent in an open letter to "all
concerned social science faculty."
The power flow-chart in
document number three — also
from the URSS — shows the
structure within which the
university and its tenure
procedures exist.
These are the two student
positions on tenure. One is short
term, and the other is long term;
one is moderate and the other is
radical.
*<<ioo» Ktt^ *
^■fJV"** _^o*-     «v
M*1      «ov»< 4o a ?
to ".#r^>^
POSTE.R5.3l9NB>
)  6} BANNERS
HAHOCKS
• *
DIAMONDS & ENGAGEMENT RINGS
BUY WHOLESALE
SAVE 50%
VISIT YOUR JEWELLER ON CAMPUS
DIAMOND ROOM JEWELLERS
UBC Village - Beside World Wide Travel
Easy Credit - We Listen Better
io speeds    $CQ>95
UNASSEMBLED   ™«
WHEELER DEALER
CYCLE CENTER LTD.
2320 W. 4th 731-5531 Thursday, October 21, 1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
What it's like for them
Wherein The Ubyssey asks
sociologists Matthew Speier and
Ron Silvers to talk about how it
feels when you don't get tenure
even though you know you
should.
MATTHEW SPEIER
.students "wonder about their university.
RONALD SILVERS . . . "any successful class has to be truthful.
UBYSSEY: How does it feel to be on the verge of
possibly losing your jobs? Do you want to start with that?
SPEIER: Yeah, sure. The feeling that I have at this
moment is of being devalued, of being told that I'm really
not worthy of staying within this faculty and teaching and
doing the research. So I think Ron and I both feel that
now we have this big interruption in our lives.
SILVERS: There's something else there too, this
thing of confusion. Because you have suddenly an
evaluation which stands against everything that has
happened in your career. At so many points, as you're
proceeding, first as a undergrad, then as a graduate ... for
any academic you're in a sense undergoing a series of
evaluations and there should be clues along the way.
You know, if your work is sort of beginning to slip or
there's some kind of doubt about you, somewhere along
the line you're going to begin to find out.
But this comes to me as a tremendous shock and
makes me very confused. Because nowhere in my work —
at least, I could say from outside this department - did I
ever receive any kind of negative evaluation to indicate
that this (the prospect of being denied tenure) would ever
come about.
Because it's not only a matter of being thrown into
your depths of doubt, but it's also, for myself, a matter of
being thrown into a tremendous state of confusion over
just what my work is.
SPEIER: Yeah. I don't know if I want to get into the
problem of being evaluated by our colleagues in this
department — or the problem of being evaluated by
anyone in the profession - because I think that will get us
into political discussions that will be better left for
another context. But I think as far as interruptions go, I
think we're trying to sort out how this affects us in all
sorts of daily things we have to go through.
Our relations with students, for example.
First let's take the graduate students. This has
affected their own careers in this department, having
worked with us or doing theses, with us, or having us on
their theses committees, doing course work with us and
having some kind of interest and tie to what we do.
Now we find that they're uncertain as to their own
careers being interrupted if we have to leave. And of
course there's this cutting off of the personal relationship
that intellectual work does also involve. The
student-teacher relationship.
As to the undergraduates, they represent the
university in the most basic sense. And they come up to
me and they want to know what's happening: "Are you
going to be around here, are you going to be fired, why
have they done this, what's the basis for it?' It sort of
makes them think about the way the whole university
works in terms of what's to be taught and what's not to
be taught.
It's already changed the atmosphere of the classes, for
that matter, to the extent that there's a tension. I feel it.
Every day at the beginning of a lecture I can sense
they're wondering: 'Is he going to say something, is he
going to make an announcement about what's obviously
going on?' And the longer you don't say anything - this is
really a very central point — the longer you do that, the
more they wonder about how much they understand
about their university and the v/hole issue of secrecy
about what goes on. If they're going to be part of the
university, they have to have an understanding of how it
works.
And yet, here's this guy who obviously may be fired
and he's not even saying anything to them.
SILVERS: Yes. Many of them have come up to me
and I've felt very constrained, really, to go into the details
of just what's going on because I've been told, you know,
'be careful about these things, cases are still being
reviewed.'
And so on one hand I have to go against the principle
of my own classroom, which is to be as candid and
truthful as possible. I think that any successful class in the
university has to be based on that. And on the other hand,
I have to respect whatever kinds of limitations the
procedures demand. And it's a very tight squeeze. What
you find, actually, is that you're always monitoring
yourself.
You're always wondering, how much can you say to
your colleague, to your peer;how much can you tell your
graduate student who asks, 'well, are we going to
complete this work, what are your chances, what's
happening?'
HAM «■«
BIKE COLD?
Drive the
MONTE CARLO
WINNER
CALL JIM CLELAND
873-2454
 .1234 KINGSWAY
Last Chance -
to purchase first term texts
All remaining first term texts will soon be returned to the publishers. BUY
NOW, while texts are still available.
LOOK FOR OUR OCTOBER the  bOOttStOfe
SALE AD IN TOMORROW'S ISSUE 228-4741
You always have to be very careful about what you
say. And that only really makes you half a person. It puts
a kind of constraint on me that I've really not known in a
university before.
SPEIER: It's a very powerful constraint.
SILVERS: Yeah, and I mean one day my colleagues
pop in to my office and they're talking and they're joking
or I go into their offices . . . suddenly a tenure decision is
made. At that point everything stops. I hardly see my
colleagues anymore. I certainly can't go into their offices,
that would be very embarrassing; I notice they don't come
into my office.
I notice in the hallways when we pass now it's
extremely delicate. Either people try to look away or they
try to read your face, there's sort of long stares to try and
figure out how you're feeling, or in some cases they give
you a look like 'there's been a death in the family and I'm
very sorry.'
So — I find that any kind of interaction now is
transformed. And it hurts. I think it hurts everybody.
SPEIER: Yeah, that's the point. It hurts everybody.
Because even though it's us who're coming under the axe,
they're also feeling the effect of it. Though there have
been one or two people who've continued to be warm and
friendly to me.
And so, any kind of on-going departmental
participation now has a special modification to it. And —
any commitments you might have to this department, or
that I might have to, say, the new building - I'm on that
committee — or to the Museum of Man — I'm on that
committee — to whatever it might be: all of that becomes
something we can't talk about very easily, or talk about at
all.
SILVERS: And yet business has to continue as usual.
It makes you wonder about commitment.
We're both in our fifth year here, and over that period
you work in the university.
You don't only do your teaching and research, you
also conduct non-credit extension courses, you work on
committees, you participate to some extent in those ways.
And through that, you gather a kind of commitment to
the university.
See page 8: THE TENURE
UPON PRESENTATION OF THIS AD
Gastown
Wax
Museum'
©
-o
o
>°
21 WATER STREET,    685-2751
OPEN DAILY 11 A.M. TO 11 P.M. Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 21,  1971
'The tenure joke is on us9
From page 7
I don't mean to the buildings and the physical aspect,
but to the students and some of the faculty. And, um,
suddenly you find that there's a decision made which
seriously questions whether your colleagues are as
committed to you as you may have been to them.
SPEIER: Right, very very good point.
SILVERS: And it makes me wonder about —
whatever happens in this episode, whether I get tenure or
not — just how committed can any junior faculy member
be to this university before he or she gets tenure. And I
think that sets up a really serious problem about what
relations are within the university. You know, when
faculty talk about how transient students are? What about
the problems of how transient faculty are? And I, for one,
don't feel that's a very healthy condition for a department
or a university.
SPEIER: With regard to this question of
commitment, I really feel I've been made a fool of in
some respects. Because I have had some dealings with
long-term commitments in this departments .. . and now
all of that seems to be up in the air.
And I feel bad about the film thing, because
somehow I feel responsible for getting the use of film
going in this department in a big way, and the department
has responded. I wouldn't want to say it's been in vain.
Somebody else can pick it up. But.. . well, that's one of
the funny things about organizations. You are
dispensable. But in this kind of organization, one would
like to feel that one has some more use than in corporate
industry.
But given the way persons can be fired under the
current regulations and rules regarding tenure, there is an
element of intellectual entrepreneurship. There is a kind
of marketplace in the academic world. And right now I'm
sure we both feel like commodities to some extent. That's
the demoralizing part about it.
SILVERS: Well, I think the ease with which one gets
tenure has changed in the last two years. Changed very
drastically, because of the market, because of the
employment situation.
SPEIER: So we're in a market squeeze?
SILVERS: Well, I think it's more than that. On the
outside it's a market squeeze. But from the inside
suddenly it's a matter of competition, where you're pitted
against your fellow faculty members. And then there's
always the call that there are other people who can be
employed to replace you very easily.
So in reference to the earlier notions of tenure, I
think that this situation would never have happened three
or four years ago.
SPEIER: Yeah, but you know, the joke is on us.
Because both of us come from universities where we
believed — and that was part of the whole thing; you
know, - that if you get a PhD from Princeton or at
Berkeley, as we have, that's a very strong passport into the
academic world. Those are credentials of a high order.
That doesn't stand up, does it?
SILVERS: Not in 1971.
PANGO-PANGO (UNS) - Dr.
Silly Gewgaw, provisional dictator
of this island demagoguecracy,
announced today that his previous
announcement concerning the
dismissal of two crimson blorgs
for incremental conflagration was
not to be interlocuted as an
infinitive fallacy statement, that
is, it was a tentacle incision
involving many diversified tractors
that, taken indivisibly,
would refract the pinochle of
anthropomorphic   reverberations.
On the other bland, he noted,
the announcement predecing the
announcement was irretractibly
maldeficient, inducing illusionary
innuendos of a rather
unethnomethodological nature.
for
beautiful
people
LE CHATEAU
"a step ahead"
776 Granville 687-2701
Campus Ministries
Chaplain's Office
SUB 234
Troubled
Come Rap
Problems * We
Are Open
Tues., Wed., Fri. - 10-4
Mon., Thurs. - 10-12:30
Ph. 228-3701
WHY WAIT
FOR SPRING?
the trouble could get worse
and more expensive. Repair
your V.W., Mercedes, Volvo or
Porsche Now.
Reasonable Rates at
WHERE TO GO
IF YOU HAVE A
DRUG PROBLEM.
All enquiries and discussions held in. strict confidence
HEROIN
Narcotic Addiction Foundation of B.C.
2524 Cypress Street, Vancouver
736-6746
Night calls
4:30p.m. to 8:30a.m. 738-4014
OTHER DRUGS
The House
1040 West 7thAvenue, Vancouver
24 hour phone
732-3301
*|s  GOVERNMENT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
jSK   COUNCIL ON DRUGS, ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO
*^E<2f** Hon. D.L. Brothers, Q.C, Minister of Education-Chairman Thursday, October 21, 1971
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 9
Advertisement
SERVICES
Their place in the university and society
By SUE KENNEDY
AMS Co-ordinator
Knowledge about student
services is more than just
knowledge about facilities for
aspects of university life other
than the attending of classes. This,
<* of course, is their prime function
(i.e. to serve people) but it is also
% important    to    understand    the
position of student- and
administration-run services in the
context of the structure of the
university.
The population of UBC is the
same as a medium-sized city, but
it is in no way a community. A
community is a place where
people live, work, and learn
collectively and the functioning
parts of such a community
complement each other. That is,
the members of a community
apply the knowledge gained from
their learning experiences to their
productive work and at the same
time they provide, for themselves,
the necessary service and
recreational facilities.
The structure of UBC is such
that the emergence of a sense of
community is discouraged.
Students are divided into
faculties, schools and
departments (read:
compartments) and no attempt is
made to show the relationship
between one faculty and another.
The structure of the learning
experience (five or six courses)
prohibits any meaningful
connection being made among
isolated packages of knowledge.
Worst of all, the physical
separateness of the campus and
the rest of the working, living
community and the lack of any
v facilities, or even encouragement,
for the integration of education
and life only serve to heighten the
atomization of the life of the
student.
The feeling of being .in
opposition to, rather than
participating with, the rest of the
university is made greater by the
minimal services that are provided
by the administration. Regardless
of the intent of those who
originally set up the services, they
are now only screwing the people
who are forced to use them.
The bookstore charges
exorbitant prices and often runs
out of required texts. Food
Services serves unappetizing food
in, for most cases, a sterile
atmosphere. Housing charges high
rentals for cold, dull cubbyholes
and the same dreary food. And
the government (board of
governors) is totalitarian in that it
does not even pretend to make
the student, whom it governs,
aware of what it is doing or why it
is doing those things.
So, we students are faced with
the situation in which we, as
members of a potential
community, have no control over
any of the aspects of that
community. In order to have
influence over those aspects of
our experience here that pertain
to study and its application and
relevance to other areas of work
and study, we must resort to
pleading and attempts to please
those in power (which is all that
can be done when there is no
parity on decision-mailing
committees) so that they might
listen to us and consider our
wishes. (Some of these problems
have been overcome to some
extent in a few faculties but this is
by no means widespread.)
Since the administration has
control over the processes that we
must go through in order to get
our precious degrees, we cannot
do much more than keep trying to
build student power both in
faculty committees and in
non-administration/faculty course
and department unions.
We can set up as many
alternate courses as we like (and
we must continue to do this) but
these can only augment our other
courses, they can never compete
until we have the power to place
them on the same level as credit
courses either by having them
accredited, or, more advisedly,
doing away with the present
credit system altogether.
The rationale for the existance
of this absurd situation is that the
administration know better about
what we should do than we do.
Besides, we do have
representation on committees and
the senate.
(Compare this argument with
the ones used against the feminists
of the early 1900s. They were
told that they did not need the
vote as their men were more
knowledgable about political
matters and had more sound
judgment. Besides, the women
could always influence their men
The following is a description of the services
already provided or soon to be set up that have
been initiated by the Human Government caucus
and carried out by the Alma Mater Society.
Co-op bookstore
The university bookstore perpetuates a system
in which students are forced to buy expensive
books with high mark-ups, are not able to get rid
of books no longer used, and often have to wait
weeks and even months in order to get required
texts.
We have set up an alternate bookstore that
takes in second-hand books on commission, thus
enabling students to get back some of what they
had to pay originally. Now that the bookstore is
running on a break-even basis we intend to expand
to new books and journals (mostly on commission
from the publishers), especially those that are not
available at the university bookstore. It will also be
possible to start providing stationery and supplies
at prices lower than elsewhere on campus.
The bookstore is located in the basement of
SUB (room 30) and is open from 9:30 to 4:30
daily. There are books available for almost all
subjects. Any and all second-hand books are
accepted and will be sold at 75% of the original
price. Of that, 80% goes to the seller and the other
20% to the store to cover operating expenses.
Community crafts store
In an attempt to begin to integrate work and
eduction, and to give students as well as
non-students a chance to sell crafts in SUB, we will
be opening a crafts store within a few weeks. This
will be located in the south alcove on the main
floor, just outside the cafeteria. The store will take
articles on consignment with a percentage of the
selling price to be put in a fund to be used to rent
or purchase equipment for a crafts workshop.
The reasons for development of crafts are
several. On the most obvious level, Gastown prices
for crafts are grossly inflated and a co-op
operation will be able to sell things at decent
prices. It is also becoming increasingly clear that
the present emphasis on working eight hours a
day, five days a week is unrealistic. In this
technological age, our standards of living and level
of production can most certainly be maintained
with much fewer individual woman/man hours.
Crafts is a labour-intensive occupation and also
one in which the worker is not detached from the
results of her/his labour. On this basis, it seems
important to encourage involvement in the field.
Main floor lounge renovations
UBC has an enrolment of 22,000 students, yet
there is fto central lounge or relaxation area that
can accommodate even five per cent of the
students comfortably. Small lounges are scattered
across the campus in various buildings, greatly
perpetuating the virtual isolation of individual
faculties and schools.
SUB is. supposed to be the answer to this
problem but obviously those people who approved
the plans for the building had other ideas in mind,
for the present lounge space is certainly not
adequate. Having to face crowded classrooms all
morning and afternoon is bad enough, but this is
made worse when it is not even possible to find a
space to sit down and regain any equilibrium.
We are presently working on plans to renovate
the existing lounge space on the main floor to
make it much more comfortable and to
accommodate more people. The actual space in
this area is quite large, the problem is the traffic
flow and the organization of the space.
, lounge and food services
On the basement floor of SUB there exists an
unused area of about 3,600 sq. ft. This is located
behind the Thunderbird Shop and the outdoor
clubs area. Two years ago plans were made to turn
this area into a beer lounge, provided a draft beer
licence could be obtained.
The B.C. government wouldn't give us a draft
licence. End of planning.
The present plan is to develop this area as an
alternate food service and lounge area during the
day and a bottle beer operation and lounge in the
evening. The maximum cost would be $200,000.
(The previous plan estimated the cost to be
$225,000 for a beer facility only.) The money will
come from the SUB Reserve Fund, which is
specifically designated for expansion of the
building.
The food service that is planned at the
moment is an organic food restaurant, but this
decision has no effect on the actual physical
renovation and facilities that will be installed. The
same kitchen equipment is used for both organic
and inorganic cooking. Therefore, if, in the future,
it was decided to change to another kind of
restaurant facility, this would be easily
accomplished.
The reasons for this renovation have been
largely outlined in the other section of this
discussion of services. The lounge and beer
facilities are self-explanatory. An alternate food
service will not only provide us with the choice of
much better food, it will also force the university
food service to pay closer attention to its
operation and, most important, to the wishes of
the students.
in their own ways and thus did
not need real power.)
However, we can compete with
the services (?) provided by the
administration. We do have a
building in which we can make
concrete attempts to provide real
services to the members of our
community and through these,
perhaps combat the increasing
alienation that has become a
fixture of this university.
There is, however, a conflict
here. First of all, although
students have paid $15 a year
each for nine years and will
continue to do so for some years
to come, the student union
building does not really belong to
us. We have a 45 year lease (with
an option for a 15 year extension)
after which time the building
becomes the property of the
administration. The
administration also owns the food
service in the building and
provides the maintenance and
janitorial services. It sounds very
kind of the administration to
provide all these things (until you
think about the fact that they
ought to be providing a place for
students and faculty to participate
in activities other than academics
— such as clubs, special events,
etc. But this only brings on more
problems.
All major building renovations
have to be approved by the board
of governors to ensure that the
work will be good quality and will
not detract from the aesthetic
beauty (?) of the rest of the
campus. This is not to say,
though, that we could not be
prevented from undertaking.
renovations that the university did
not want to see done. No
contractor will agree to do work
on a project that is not approved
by the university for it will never
get work on the campus again if it
does.
As well, the likelihood of
physical plant increasing the
number of janitorial staff if we
initiate a project that would
require it, is very small.
Consequently, every time a
proposal is brought forth
concerning changes or additions in
the building, the power of the
administration is felt and must in
some way influence the decisions
made about services.
There is a very basic paradox in
the status of SUB. On the one
hand, the university is relying on
student money and energy to
provide the basic service of a
meeting and relaxation centre for
students while at the same time
retaining ultimate control and
ownership of the building.
There is, however, a brighter
aspect of the situation. In setting
up services that compete with the
so-called services of the
administration we are learning
valuable skills as well as gaining
the knowledge that it is possible
to run a co-operative venture
more effectively (as far as the
majority of people are concerned)
than when we are forced to
operate as a capitalist venture.
Once we are assured that there is a
"better way", then we are in a
much more powerful position
from which to demand changes in
areas of our university and
non-university liveo. Page 10
THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 21,  1971
'Tween classes
THURSDAY
AYN RAND SOCIETY
General  meeting at   12:30  in SUB
130.
BAHA'I CLUB
Meeting at 12:30 in Bu. 230.
KARATE CLUB
Meeting at 12:30 In SUB 119.
VARSITY CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Meeting at 12:30 in Angus 110.
VARSITY OUTDOORS CLUB
General meeting in Hebb Theatre at
12:30.
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
Meeting   at   12:30   in   SUB   111  —
How bad is the Amchitka test? At
3:30   In   SUB   111   —   Karl   Burau
speaks on analysis.
CAMPUS  CRUSADE  FOR  CHRISTIANITY AND MOTHERHOOD
Meeting at 12:30 SUB 111.
FRIDAY
ABORTION ACTION COMMITTEE
Meeting at 12:30 in SUB 210;
COMPUTER SOCIETY
Organizational meeting at 12:30 in
Buchanan 3251.
BICYCLE CLUB
Meeting at 12:30 in SUB 125.
PRE-SOCIAL WORK CLUB
Dr.   Hamilton   speaks  at   12:30   in
SUB 105A.
UNIVERSITY   CLUBS   COMMITTEE
General   meeting   for   all   clubs   in
clubs lounge at 12:30.
SAVE SOVIET JEWS! 11
Meet   Kosygin  at Airport — 11:30
a.m. Friday.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Beer garden 4-8 p.m. every Friday
in IH upper lounge.
UBC CAVE CLUB
Meeting at 12:30 in SUB 211.
STUDENT LIBERALS
Meeting at 12:30 in SUB 205.
CLASSICS CLUB
Meeting at 3746 W. 13th Ave., 7:30
p.m.
SATURDAY
SAILING CLUB PARTY
See sailing club notice board for
details.
SAVE SOVIET JEWS!!!
General march for all minority
groups at 6 p.m. with midnight rally
at the courthouse.
SUNDAY
ALPHA OMEGA
Symposium    at
auditorium.
p.m.    in   SUB
Hot flashes
will    follow   the
Teach-in
postponed
A teach-in scheduled for today on
the anthropology-sociology tenure
dispute will be postponed to Oct.
29.
The teach-in, sponsored by the
Union of Radical Social Scientists,
arts undergraduate society, and
anthro-soc department
undergraduate union will explain
the structure of the tenure process
in reference to the current crisis in
the anthrosoc department.
Quebecois
Parti Quebecois vice president
Pierre Bourgault will speak in the
SUB ballroom today at noon as
part of the Quebec week program.
Bourgault, one of the first
separatist spokesmen in Quebec is
a journalist by profession and is
associated with a Montreal radio
station.
He was also a founder of the
R e a s s e m b I e m e n t pour
I'lndependence Nationale (RIN),
an independentist party which
was replaced by the PQ.
As   a    member   of   the   RIN
Bourgault was involved in such
events as the protesting of the
Queen's visit to Quebec City in
1964.
Equipment
The varsity outdoor club is
sponsoring a sporting equipment
co-op store Oct. 28   in SUB 205.
All equipment will be sold at
the owners' asking price, but the
club will keep 10 per cent for
operating costs.
Anyone wanting to sell any
outdoor equipment can leave it at
the club office, Room 14C in the
SUB basement, any noon before
the one-day sale.
Symposium
The Alpha-Omega and
Ukrainian clubs are sponsoring a
symposium on Soviet oppression
of non-Russian peoples Sunday at
2 p.m. in the SUB auditorium.
Speakers will include Sam
Kaplan, editor of the weekly
Jewish Western Bulletin, Dr. I.
Avakumovich, of UBC's history
department, and Dr. R. Krajina,
president of the Canadian
C zechosl ovakian National
Association.
Discussions
lectures.
Weirdos
The Ubyssey's as yet unnamed
entry in the Kozmic basketball
league needs uniforms.
The team, a sterling collection
of jockes (sic), plays its first game
Sunday at 8 p.m. in Grandview
Community Centre and the
players would like some markings
to distinguish themselves from all
the other weirdo teams.
Anyone knowing where the
team can get some uniforms
(cheap, of course) or anyone
willing to donate or loan some
uniforms should contact The
Ubyssey office, SUB 241 -K.
Oops!
The Ubyssey wishes to correct
a mistake made in the integration
story which appeared in Tuesday's
edition.
The story read 5.2 per cent of
Indian students in North
Vancouver dropped out of school
in 1969-70.
It should have read 5.2 per
cent of all students in North
Vancouver.
FOR PREFERRED RISKS ONLY
It Pays to Shop for Car Insurance
YOU CAN SAVE MONEY ON CAR INSURANCE AT WESTCO
O
□
tfl
a
en
INSURANCE   COMPANY
HEAD OFFICE: 1927 WEST BROADWAY, VANCOUVER 9, BRITISH COLUMBIA
FAST CLAIM SERVICE
FILL IN AND RETURN THIS COUPON TODAY OR PHONE IN THE DETAILS TODAY
FOR WRITTEN QUOTATION, NO OBLIGATION. NO SALESMAN WILL CALL.
MAIL THIS COUPON FOR OUR LOW RATES ON YOUR AUTOMOBILE
Name	
Residence
Address	
(Please Print)
City   Prov..
Phone: Home Office 	
Occupation         	
Age      Married D Divorced □      Male □
Separated □ Never Married n Female Q
Date first licensed to drive  	
Have you or any member of your household been involved
in any accident in the past five years?
Yes D No D (If "yes" provide details on a separate sheet).
In the last five years has your
license been suspended?   	
Are you now insured?
Date current policy expires .
This  coupon  is  designed  solely  to enable  non-policy
holders to obtain an application and rates for their cars.
Car No. 1
Car No. 2
)bile„.	
No. of cylinders
Horsepower
Model (Impala,
Dart, etc.
/w, h/t, c
driven to
us depot,
	
Days per week
work, train or b
or fringe parkin
 Da)
rs
Mile
...Miles
Is car used In business
(except to and from work)?
Yes D No D
Yes Q No D
Give number and dates
of traffic convictions
in last 5 years.
LIST INFORMATION ON ALL ADDITIONAL DRIVERS
Age
Male or
Female
Relation
To You
Years
Licensed
Married
or Single
% of Use
Car#1
Car #2
%
%
%
%
%
%
FPR UBC 38
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Campus — 3 lines, 1 day $1.00; 3 days $2.50
Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $1.25; additional
lines 30e; -4 days price of 3.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable
in advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m., the day before publication.
Publications Offcet Room 241 ^B-U-B., UBC, Van. 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost ft Found
13
LOST: STERLING SILVER CHARM
bracelet. Great sentimental value.
Reward offered. Contact Sharon,
263-4134.	
LOST IN VICINITY OF A-LOT
Education Building: An Abalone
hoop earring. Reward. Phone
Elaine. 685-3697.	
LOST: TRANSISTOR RADIO,
white with! grey case — Last Fri-
day.  Phone 224-0380.	
MEN'S WATCH: ENICAR. SWISS
made. Reward offered. Phone
Mike. 876-4684.	
LOST: DARK GREEN SCARF,
Monday, Oct. 18 at 3:30 on Main
Mall between Civil and Electrical
Engineering. 736-5197.	
FOUND: LADY'S VANDOR WRIST
Watch In Brock Hall Annex wash-
room. Ask in Sub Room 236.	
LOST: NEAR ADMINIST. BLDG.
Brown suede gloves, white fur lining. Please return, Maryanna, 224-
5487 after 6 p.m.
Special Notices
15
WIN SET OF GREAT BOOKS AND
earn 1123.00 week minimum doing
it. 687-8872.	
THE LUTHERAN CAMPUS CEN-
tre — A human place where there
are many questions and few
answers and much in between.
Come by and ask your questions
and share your answers.	
COMMUNITY WORSHIP — STU-
dents and community, Sunday
evening 7:00-7:45 p.m. 6050 Chancellor V.S.T. Chapel. Sponsored by
residents and   S.C.M.    All invited.
BAZIL REPORT BY COLIN JOHN-
stone, Sunday, Oct. 24, 8:00 p.m.,
6050 Chancellor V.S.T. Sponsored
by residents and S.C.M. all invited.
U.B.C. BARBER SHOP IS OPEN
Mon.-Sat. See Dino or Rick at
5736 University Boulevard (near
Campus).	
FEDERAL GOVERNMENT BRIEF-
ing Session for Economists and
Statisticians will be held at 12:30
noon, Wednesday, October 27, 1971
in Buchanan 217.	
THE  GRIN  BIN   HAS   THE   LAR-
gest selection in Canada of posters and, pop art.  Also Jokes, Gifts
and 24" x 36" photo blowups from
your   own   prints   and   negatives.
Enquiries   welcome   at   the   Grin
Bin, 3209 W. Broadway across from'
the Liquor Store. Call 738-2311.
GESTALT AWARENESS
WEEKEND
Oct. 29-31 or Nov. 5-7. $15.00
Phone Jean Graham. 736-7980. 	
SKI   WHISTLER
OR
MOUNT  BAKER
Six week ski course at above areas.
only     132.00     includes     return     bus
transportation  and  1%  hour lesson.
Further information from:
Canadian Youth Hostels Association,
1406  West   Broadway,  Vancouver  9.
738-3128.	
BLACK MAN SEEKS CANADIAN
girl for matrimony. Call 228-9595
between 10 a.m.  and 7 p.m.	
CYPRESS LODGE! YOUTH
HOSTEL
WHISTLER   MOUNTAIN
Open Dec. 1st until Apr. 30th.  1972.
Special Midweek  Package:   5  nights
accommodation with  3 meals a day
$22.00
'Further information from: Canadian
Youth    Hostels    Assn..     1406    West
Broadway, Vancouver 9. 738-3128.
Travel  Opportunities
16
P. J. Brown. BEWARE OF GREEKS
bearing gifts — Deke Pledges 1971.
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
ARTISTS — PAINTINGS NEEDED
to be sold in a new, attractive
gallery. Phone 853-2400. House of
Fine Art. Abbotsford. B.C.	
PAIR OF HALF-DECENT USED
tires 600x13. Summer or winter.
732-3295. Ask for Brian.
AUTOMOTIVE
Autos For Sale
21
'63 GALAXIE 500 H.T.. V8. RADIO,
auto, trans., excel, cond. $350 or
best offer. Must sell. 879-1084.
Automobiles—Repairs
24
CAR REPAIRS TO
VOLVO,MEPCEDES
PORSCHE, VOLKSWAGEN
* Factory trained mechanics
* Fully Guaranteed Work
* Reasonable Rates
P.S. We also now repair
Datsun, Toyota, & Mazda Cars
SALES AND SERVICE
8914 Oak St. 263-8121
Automobiles—Repairs Cont'd
VW SPECIAL—REBUILT MOTORS
and trans, exchange service, also
repairs. Brakes relining, $25. King
and link pins. $30. 683-8078 — 760
Penman St. (rear).
25
Motorcycles
1970   TRIUMPH   MOTORCYCLE
Model  250   Near  new.   Best  offer. •►
Phone 873-2572 or 253-1639.
Art Services
31
ALIVE AND WELL GRAPHICS BY
Steambubble. John Kula and Nick
Watkins. 3rd floor Lasserre Build -
ing.   Silk screen and  photos.
Dance Bands
32
BABYSITTER WANTED. FOR 2
small children. Occasional evenings, vie. 7th and Blenheim.
Phone  736-4858.
Photography
35
?!
tjje Utrul anb gutter
Vi,'?       Cameras!
3010 W. BDWY. 736-7833
also  at Denman  Place
HIKING TRIPODS
$6.67 with case
other  sturdy   tripods   to  $18.10
PHOTOSOC   MEMBERS
Tired   of  a   dirty  drier?
Get your  own  Premier  Drier
starting   from   $15.15
Rip-offs   NOT   our  Specialty!
BUSINESS SERVICES
Typing
40
FAST & ACCURATE TYPING IN
my home on IBM Exec. Reason-
able.  685-1982.	
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING —
my home. Essays, thesis, etc. Neat.
accurate work. Reasonable rates.
Phone 263-5317.	
ESSAYS AND THESES TYPED
neatly, accurately. 25c a page. Call
Carol, 732-9007 (after 6 p.m., Mon.-
Friday).	
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING.
My home. Essays, Thesis, etc.
Neat, accurate work. Reasonable
Rates. Phone 263-5317.	
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
PART-TIME RESEACHER (Biological/ Anthropological literature)
$3 hr. write Doran 2716 West 10th
Ave., Vancouver 8.	
GIVE HELP, GET DOLLARS! UBC
Tutoring centre needs tutors. All
courses. Register SUB 228, 12:30-
2:30. Open to grad students,
honour students, or.	
WANTED ORGANIST AND Guitarist, funky sound, straight-type,
no experience required. Steve 738-
8628.	
PHOTOGRAPHER REQUIRES
nude models. Amateur or professional. Phone George. 687-4171
after 7:30 p.m.	
INSTRUCTION  8e  SCHOOLS
Tutoring Service 63
BIG CLASSES CONFUSING? GET
individual help with a tutor. Reasonable rates — all courses. UBC
Tutoring Centre, SUB 228. 12:30-
2:30.	
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE 71
CUTE BLACK LABRADOR PUPPY
3 months old. Female, reg. Phone
Pat,  985-0707 after 5 p.m.	
HEAD 260 SKIS, 190 CM. TYROLIA
bindings $100. At Varsity Sporting
Goods or Phone Mike,  738-7082.
DYNASTAR S430 215 CM. USED
only a few times, $110. Al, 733-8267
after 5:30.	
LIGHT BEIGE NYLON BROAD-
loom rug, practically new, 7'10"
by 12, with rubber underlay, $30.
261-7046.	
RENTALS ft REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
ROOM WITH SHOWER & TOILET.
Private entrance. Light cooking.
$50.00 iper month.   Phone   261-0771.
Furn. Apts.
83
"MATURE" MALE STUDENT
wanted to share bsmt. suite with
Van. Art School student, if musical, great. $55 month. 1705 W. 10th,
No. 5. After 5 p.m.	
Unf. Apts.
84
STUDENT SPECIAL
3 Rooms of Furniture
From $199.95
HOUSE OF GROUPS
1278 Granville
Day 687-5043 Eve. 277-9247
Houses—Furn. & Unfurn.
86
RESPONSIBLE COUPLE FOR 3-
bedroom furnished home. $250
month, UBC area. Nov. 1st to
July 31st 1972. Ring 224-6918, lease.
BUY —SELL— INFORM
with UBYSSEY Classified Ads. Thursday, October 21, 1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 11
RESTAURANT
Acropol
1
Specializing in
Greek Dishes
Mon. to Thurs.
10 a.m. to 12
Fri. and Sat.
10 a.m. to 12
Sunday 10 a.m. to 10 p.m
FULL FACILITIES
2946 W. Broadway 733-2412
*******
—daryl tan photo
'BIRDS AND HAWKS battle for possession of a little white ball during a Vancouver Men's Field Hockey League game at UBC. The
Thunderbirds easily won the game 4-1 to put them at the top of the standings.
Field hockey 'Birds suffer loss
Saturday, the UBC Men's Field
Hockey Team lost its first game of
the season to the Tsawwassen
Falcons 2-1.
It was the poorest game of the
season for the Birds who were
trying for their fifth straight
victory in as many games.
But Saturday everything was
against them from the start of the
game. The field was in extremely
bad condition, very rough and
hard, and UBC players,
unaccustomed to the field, were
continually sliding and falling.
Despite the poor field
conditions the Birds were the first
to score when Stu Bailey put one
by the Falcon goaltender midway
through the first half.
This put the Birds ahead 1-0 at
the end of first half.
The second half was a
completely different contest as
the Falcons stormed back against
the UBC side. The Falcons scored
early in the second half on a long
corner that whistled into the UBC
goal, tying the score 1-1.
With the scoring of the Falcon
goal the UBC Thunderbirds fell
completely apart and no longer
played effectively as a team.
Later in the second half the
Tsawwessen team scored again
making the score 2-1 and giving
the Birds their first loss.
The   week   before   the   Birds
easily defeated the Hawks 4-1. In
the standing UBC has 4 wins and
1 loss, still a good record so far
this season.
More players are still needed
for the teams. Any persons
interested should call Rich Miller
at 987-3817 for information.
Judo team victorious
Saturday, before a full house at
the PNE auditorium, the
Thunderbird judo team was
victorious in the Vancouver Judo
Tournament.
Inspired by coach Doug Rogers
who won a gold medal at the
Canadian Winter Games, the UBC
team managed a first and second
in the Black Belt and Brown Belt
competitions.
The Black Belt winners were C.
Maingon (first, lightweight), and
A. Adams (second,
light/heavyweight). The Brown
Belt winners were R. Timmis
(first, lightweight) and J. Laing
(second, heavyweight).
Next weekend the judo team
travels to Kent, Washington for
the AUU Judo Championships.
C. MAINGON (right), UBC judo team member squares off against the
Japan Airlines team in the finals of the lightweight division. Maingon
emerged the winner.
EIGHT GRUNTING STUMPS strain at the end of one little rope in an
attempt to out-pull eight other immovable objects at the other end.
Rain failed to put the damper on one of the men's intramural classics,
the tug of war. After much sweating in the preliminary rounds, Fort
Camp easily took the Engineers to win the event. The Fort Camp team
consisted of R. Guenther, S, Savard, K. Taylor, R. Folkmann, T.
Rabbit, S. Brogan, D. Hendry, D. Metcalf, and M. Mark.
•&
.-;+*■ .-.*
game today
The annual battle between      caws the result ot a home
the nurses and the home
economics girls on the
gridiron takes place at noon
today at Thunderbird
Stadium.
In past confrontations the
nurses have usually managed
to squeak out a win, in most
economics iniscue
Not this veai says the
"home wreckers'.
Under the competent
guidance of coach Ian Jukes,
the home economics gnls
have been practicing two or
three times a week for the
past month.
HAIR IS BEAUTIFUL
AT
Mitt
SPECIALIZING IN:
SHAG CUTS SHAPING
For appointments phone:
BERNARD 224-5540
UNIVERSITY SQUARE
ANNOUNCING
THE OPENING
OF
INTERNATIONAL
BICYCLE CORP.
LTD.
AT
4425 W. 10th Ave.
Phone 224-3433
AND
INTRODUCING
TO CANADA
THE NEW
MARK IX
10-SPEED BICYCLE
(The world's finest precision
mechanism)
5-and 10-SPEED
SPECIALISTS
SALES &
SERVICE
THE
TOWN
L   PUMP
THE BEST DINING
AND
ENTERTAINMENT
DEAL IN GASTOWN
Full facilities
7 days a week
Dancing to the 'Now
Sound' of the Town
Pumpers — Mon. thru
Sat. from 9 p.m.
Old-Time Piano from 5
p.m. Daily (4 p.m. to 10
p.m. Sundays)
8 of 9 Entree Items
$2.50 or Less
GROUP PARTIES CAN BE
ARRANGED SUN.-THUR.
CALL 683-6695 Page 12
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 21,  1971
What is feminine?
There is not a 'healthy'
alternative for women in our
society — either you chose to do
what is considered feminine, then
you're just a housewife; or else
you chose to compete in the male
world and you're masculine and
aggressive.
This was the premise put
forward by UBC psychologist
Meredith Kimball at the women
studies program Tuesday.
In a psychological test used to
determine sex stereotypes it was
discovered that the clinically
healthy adult male and the
clinically healthy person were
identical and totally different
from the clinically healthy female,
said Kimball, who discussed the
socialization of children.
"From mental health
professionals we get the picture
of femininity as a 'normal
pathology'," said Kimball to the
600 Canadian Woman: Our Story
participants.
'The double bind of the whole
situation of course is that if a
woman changes to become more
like a healthy adult this is seen as
unfeminine and therefore sick,"
she said.
In'discussing the socialization
of children Kimball talked about
Freud's thesis of sexuality.
Freud described Victorian
women as passive, masochistic and
narcissistic.
Kimball said, "These
observations were true of
Victorian women and to some
extent of women today but it has
nothing to do with diffuse
Oedipal crises or even with super
egos but rather with how women
are taught to think of
themselves."
She said psychologists have
noted that the personality
characteristics described by Freud
as feminine are relatively common
in oppressed peoples in other
societies.
"What happened was Freud
took these observations and gave
them a completely anatomical
basis ignoring all possible
psychological and cultural
explanations," said Kimball.
"I would hypothesize that he
came up with the explanations he
did because of a very strong need
to see men as innately superior to
women and thereby justify the
patriarchial structure of society."
She developed two areas in
looking at the socialization of
children: the notions and
attitudes children and adults have
about sex differences and the
actual behavorial differences of
young children.
Using information received by
giving children aged 10-16 a sex
role differentiation questionnaire
for the Royal Commission on the
Status of Women's report Kimball
looked at the attitudes of children
in Canada towards sex differences.
"One of the most significant
results is that boys at all ages and
in both language groups (English
and French) described the sexes as
being very different whereas girls
saw the sexes as more similar.
Kimball discussed two typical
sex-role stereotyped behavior:
aggression and dependency.
"Aggression is assumed to be a
male character trait.
"Up to two-year-olds the
incidence of physical aggression
are equal in the sexes but after
this there seems to be considerably
more pressure put on girls
to give up expression of aggression
in physical terms," said Kimball.
"Women may be as aggressive
as men but because they are more
anxious and guilty about
expressing it they may use more
subtle means of expressing it."
She said dependency in
addition to being a feminine
stereotype was also a natural state
of infancy — both physical and
emotional dependency.
"It is natural for children to
become less dependent as they
grow older, but sex differences in
the expression of dependency do
not consistently appear until
children are of school age.
"It    may    be    that   because
dependency is seen as bad in boys
that they resort to more subtle
and hard-to-measure expression of
dependency, having just as much
dependency need as girls but
expressing it less directly."
Kimball said no one seems to
know what it means to be
feminine.
"We have to allow women to
become whatever they want and
need to then perhaps we will
know what 'feminine' is.
"Perhaps there is no such thing
as 'masculinity' and 'femininity'
but only 'humanity' with each
person expressing his or her own
variations of a range of human
traits."
COURSES CONFUSING?
We can find you a
TUTOR
any subject, any course
UBC TUTORING CENTRE
NOW OPEN
SUB 228 12:30-2:30
JngTtiarBet^mAu5
^,
TSfW^lk&V
E5li
GENERAL PANTS CO. PRESENTS I
KENIFOGERS
AND THE
FiPST EDiTiON
[Tuesday, November 2nd, 8:30 p.m
QUEEN ELIZABETH AUDITORIUM
Tickets at Vancouver Ticket Centre,
all Eaton's Stores, The Butcher Shoppe,
and General Pants in Gastown
"*\
f/**
£
bird calls NOW AVAILABLE
-^    »*■ *
-'CAMftft
HUMCfeeH1* llt»0f Vftnro^ffa
m w«i iffewiU* „_ __^__^
rscuUuu il JW MIH1M49 mi 1 1 XI&b»«<h£'' *
TOCs XX 'sc .kit nffv  jiOm-r i hola aiul  ■*
KIWiMUl V-Afk IB *VK> IAdB> IkU Uf lUuflW *_
Wdudfap UE hmMBBIKI fc-Mf KKS|I ■dfrBMfc Zf
euvrKrfDfl, PjruArv Imt aid ibf tuUi
lEtE ibdk Tie '--ik-myi (fiMr fur
{o*"rMint tVitt.iw'i prov-'ir hmlf ird
nwrtt11 u..r>*» 'in uv-e mi- * 'XT
prnuw Mih yv nitmr ur -j** ■pa *0
parnaan-l uuilunp *mT aim * 51-lfl
-cJIipn an l-x a iien 1 IK % «Jsnu hi**
Jftr*.lfciilfi! ion itun 1 Puilair luVJiadiiig
ec mil jclhrL
-5r"'   ■*?£ -.4
* \%^"\Jff**iSsNSP't'v
,*. /* .0
' ,   ''■'mmtim^J^^MmmK.'
75c
UBC Bookstore
AMS Publications &
G*       Business Office
Thunderbird shop
The University of
British Columbia
STUDENT TELEPHONE DIRECTORY 1971-72

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0128698/manifest

Comment

Related Items