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The Ubyssey Oct 12, 1978

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 Board taken for a test drive
By HEATHER CONN
The Social Credit government
has appointed a used car dealer
with sizeable business connections
as the newest member of UBC's
board of governors.
Alan Eyre, president of Vancouver's Dueck automotive firm on
Broadway, said Wednesday he has
always been interested in the
university despite his heavy
interests and has no political affiliations.
He added that the association of
the Socred government with used
car dealerships is a myth.
"I've never been politically
involved. I was a car dealer years
before they (the Socreds) became
car dealers," he said. "The
university needs the support of the
business world. I'd like to try and
do something."
Eyre said he does not have a
working knowledge of student
issues on campus but said he would
like to get involved.
"I have not looked at issues in
the eyes of students until now. I've
never looked at the bus fare increases from the point of view of
the student rather than anybody
else," he said.
Eyre said he was aware of student
issues until 1970 and has been
"mixed up" in university financial
support. He learns of university
issues through the newpaper or
financing, he added.
In 1974, Eyre held hefty business
connections with West End real
estate mogul Alexander DiCim-
briani. He was second vice-
president   of   DiCimbriani's   two
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXI, No. 13     VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, OCTOBER 12, 1978
228-2301
companies, Erkindale Apartments
Limited and Elizabeth Apartments
Limited and was a stockholder and
member of the board of directors of
both companies.
"I have nothing to do with them
now," he said.
In 1976 Eyre was appointed
director of Charterhouse Properties
Ltd., which advertise as developers
of income-producing properties in
western Canada.
Six years ago Eyre was the victim
of a $10,000 extortion attempt by a
19-year-old UBC student who
threatened physical violence to Eyre
and his family if the amount was
not paid. The second year commerce student was arrested and
received a one year prison term.
Eyre, the former vice-president
of UBC's alumni association, was
active in raising money for construction at UBC, the University of
Victoria    and    Simon    Fraser
UBC THUNDERBIRD PLAYER performs unspeakable act on unfortunate University of Puget Sound player in eshibition action at Thunderbird
Stadium Saturday. 1,000 cheering fans pushed 'Birds to 28 to 7 victory
— peter menyasz photo
over UPS Loggers. Game was played under American college rules. Loggers currently have 3-1 record in NCAA standings down south of the
border, where inflation has added extra down to games.
Will won'f with history grad students
By HEATHER CONN
Arts dean Robert Will is
displaying the petty politics of a
feudal overlord with history
graduate students, an irate history
student said Wednesday.
"There's a feudal attitude of
Will's that's arrogant and totally
anti-student," said history graduate
student representative Elaine
Bernard. "He feels we have no
rights and that we are not equal
members of the community like
everybody else."
Bernard said last April Will
invited history graduate students to
meet with a history department
review committee to discuss topics
like the quality of reading courses,
professor/graduate student
working relationships and funding.
But recently, Will circulated the
review committee's report listing
the meetings issues and discussions
only among the faculty and
withheld it from the graduate
student representatives.
"Dean Will said 'no' without any
explanation. How can we discuss
issues if we  can't  even  see  the
report? It's at the level of rumors.
We don't know what the report
says."
Bernard said the history
department is getting "third person
views of the graduate students'
criticisms. She said it appears the
committee's interpretation or the
report itself is distorted judging by
what she is hearing.
Another representative, Anna
Green, said Will is showing
complete disregard for the intelligence and rights of graduate
students in his refusal to show them
the report.
"He seems to feel we can discuss
the report with the committee
without reading the report. That's
obviously untenable. It's like tying
someone's hands behind their
back."
She said the history department
head, upon the recommendation of
the department faculty, sent Will a
memo asking him to release the
report to student representatives.
She received no written reply.
"Will has the right of circulation
and he behaved extremely badly,"
said Green. "He asked us if we
intended to show the report to other
history graduate students. We said
'yes' and he said in that case 'we
can't give it to you."
Green said Will told her if the
three student representatives agreed
not to show the report to others and
to use it only within their capacity,
he would "consider" giving it to
them.
"God   knows   how   his   mind
works.   That's   his   theory   of
democracy. He said he'd require
several days to think about it and
See page 11: WILL
v   '^.'«,i
EYRE
.once around  block?
University in 1964-65 as part of the
Universities Capital Fund.
"I   have  worked  for  years   on
fund-raising," he said.
See page 11: CAR
Banks head
for record
profit year
OTTAWA (CUP) — While bank
workers are complaining of being
underpaid, Canada's nine major
chartered banks have made record
profits this year.
According to company
statements, the banks' after-tax
profits for the third fiscal quarter
ending July 31 are $235.9 million,
up 32.7 per cent from the same
period last year.
For the entire year, a profit
increase of 25 to 30 per cent is
expected.
The Bank of Montreal had the
highest increase — 63.2 per cent. Its
profit was $50.6 million, a rate of
7.5 per cent.
The banks had registered large
profit gains in the first and second
quarters of this year as well. In the
previous year, however, most gains
or declines had been small.
The increase in profits was attributed to strong growth in bank
assets and improved spreads in
domestic interest rates.
However, bank workers have
complained they are being underpaid and have cited this as one
of the main reasons many are now
considering unionization.
The average salary for bank
tellers is $8,000 a year, according to
the executive vice-president of the
Bank of Nova S :otia. The average
Canadian salary last year was
nearly $5,000 higher at $13,406.
According to teller Val Kennie,
tellers are underpaid compared to
other workers. One of the reasons
she and other Bank of Nova Scotia
employees in the Lake Erie district
helped create the Canadian Union
of Bank Employees was
dissatisfaction with wages.
Student unemployment jumps
OTTAWA (CUP) — While the general unemployment rate stayed constant in September, the
student unemployment rate jumped dramatically.
According to figures released Tuesday by Statistics
Canada, the unemployment rate for returning
students last month was 12.6 per cent, up from 9.7
per cent in August.
In September, 1977, the rate was 10.8 per cent.
However, since many students went back to
school, the number of students unemployed dropped
to 66,000 from 98,000.
Women students had a much harder time finding
jobs, according to the figures — their unemployment
rate was 14 per cent, compared to 11.4 per cent for
men. In August, the rates were 10 per cent for
women and 9.6 per cent for men.
The unemployment rate for non-returning
students was 19.6 per cent in September, compared
to 20.3 per cent in August.
Provincial statistics were only available for
Quebec, Ontario, Alberta, and B.C. Of those four,
Quebec had the highest unemployment rate, at 18.3
per cent, followed by Ontario with 12.5 per cent, and
Alberta with 10.3 per cent. B.C. had the lowest rate
— 8.8 per cent.
In August, B.C. had the highest rate — 12.1 per
cent — and Alberta the lowest — 7.1 per cent.
The general unemployment rate, seasonally adjusted, remained constant in September at 8.5 per
cent. However, the number of Canadians out of
work dropped from 892,000 in August to 854,000. Pag* 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 12, 1978
NO BALLOONS!!
UTTERLY NO PRIZES
OR REFRESHMENTS!!
NO INTRO SPECIALS, EITHER!!
A low-key announcement that you can now get more sound for your dollar-
Speakerlab of the USA Speaker Kits are now available here in Vancouver.
Most stereo stores make a pretty
big whoop-de-do about opening with a
brand new line of products. (We've
even indulged in a bit of tasteful
hoopla in the past.)
But when you have a line of 11
speaker kits from the enormously
concise K's to the highly accurate Point
Ones as good as Speakerlab USA's,
you really don't have to resort to live
radio remotes, free drawings and
search lights.
So we thought we'd just start
selling them.
Period.
By opening the door and turning
on the lights Saturday, October 14.
The reason you should come down
and visit isn't because we're giving
away a lot of free stuff. It's because of
what we sell every day: high quality
speaker kits that beat the grille cloths
right off their competition in side-by-
side comparisons.
Good value electronics by JVC,
L & G, Audio Control, Optonica and
Shure. And super-knowledgeable
people behind the counter to help you.
So come on in and say 'hi' to the
astonishing Seven, the uncanny
Thirty, and all their younger brothers
down to the "small wonder", the Point
One. You can also meet our staff, grab
a free catalog (the same 40-page fact-
pact catalog you could get at our
Seattle or Tacoma stores) and hear for
yourself exactly why Speakerlab USA
has the reputation for designing great
kits so you can afford great speakers.
Speakerlab speaker kits, famous
name components and helpful people.
Products available at:
2077 West Fourth (at Arbutus)
Phone 734-5142
Mon-Wed 10 AM—6 PM
Thurs-FrilOAM—9 PM
Sat 10 AM—6 PM Thursday, October  12,  1978
THE      U BYSSEY
Pag* 3
Chance of life on Mars Jfar out'
By KERRY REGIER
There might be life on Mars, but
not as we know it, an American
space program scientist said
Tuesday.
Conway Snyder, a National
Aeronautics and Space Administration scientist and administrator, told about 250 people
in Hennings 200 that there is
nothing on Mars which eats,
breathes or dies.
"The possibility of life on Mars
is very low, but just because we
don't find life we already understand, there may be some life we
don't understand," he said.
Snyder administrated the
scientific teams" involved with the
unmanned Viking program, which
made the first successful soft
landing on Mars on July 20, 1976.
When the first photographs of
the surface were radioed by the
Viking spacecraft, NASA scientists
were excited by a distant object
bearing a resemblance to a large
turtle.
But Snyder said it is unlikely the
object is alive, because "it has not
moved a centimeter in two years."
He said the Viking project also
determined that Mars has 200 m.p.h.
winds, a red sky at noon and a blue
one at sunset, a complete absence
of Marsquakes, and volcanoes
which are five times the height of
Mount Everest.
"Everywhere there are the
organic remains of life on earth.
Wherever you go, there are shells,
skeletons, detritus, or decomposed
organic chemicals traceable to
life," said Snyder.
But only faint traces of organic
chemicals exist on Mars, though
organic chemicals are found in
greater abundance in the rest of the
universe, he said.
"We should not conclude,
however, that there is some great
animal running about eating the
chemicals."
Some scientists speculate the lack
of chemicals resulted because of
strong ultraviolet radiation on
Mars, said Snyder.
The Viking orbiter was also
engaged in meteorology and map
making,  and  produced the  most
detailed  maps   of  Mars   to   date
showing   immense   geophysical ■
features, he said.
Mount Olympus is a Martian
volcano more than five times the
size of earth's largest mountain,
while the Grand Canyon would be
barely a scratch in the walls of the
Mariner Valley, said Snyder.
He also said water on Mars is
scarce, although large and complex
dry river bed systems rival earth's
Amazon waterway. If all the water
on Mars was frozen it would be less
than a cubic kilometer in size.
Snyder said it was important for
scientists to determine what
happened to the Martian water
system before the same disappearance occurs on earth.
MEMORIAL SERVICE TUESDAY FOR WALTER GAGE
'Gage was interested in uniting UBC
"To many of us, he was the best
teacher of mathematics we encountered. He was president at a
time of turmoil and transition when
the presidency was especially
difficult. Administration for him
was not a matter of securing a
power base, but rather of uniting
the faculties."
UBC administration president
Doug Kenny made this tribute to
Walter Gage at a memorial service
Tuesday attended by 3,000 friends,
faculty and students at War
Memorial Gymnasium.
Dean Gage lost a long bout with
cancer and died Oct. 3 at the age of
73.
"During a long and painful final
illness, he never complained.
Almost to the end he spoke
cheerfully of continuing his
teaching next year," Kenny said.
Rev. James Martin, Vancouver
School of Theology principal,
opened and closed the 50-minute
service with prayers about the fine
example Dean Gage set. He noted
Dean Gage's love for students, his
wholehearted dedication to
teaching, and the "innumerable
services that have enriched the lives
of us all."
Dean Gage's mother, Ann Gage,
103, and an older sister, Elsie
Harvey, attended the service. They
are his only survivors as Dean Gage
never married.
University chancellor J.V. Clyne,
Third AMS constitution joins fray
By KEVIN McGEE
A third student proposal has joined two others in
the Alma Mater Society constitutional sweepstakes
race.
Student senator Dave Coulson and law senator
Eric Warren propose the terminology of the current
AMS constitution be cleaned up, the bureaucracy
reduced, and the amending process be made simpler.
"The recent proposals involve violent change on
both sides, like a drunk lurching about. We feel that
through amendment the present constitution can
evolve," Coulson said.
"Our proposals do three things. First they clean
up problems of terminology and definitions," he
said.
"The second change involves electing the people
from student council for the positions of director of
finance and director of services, instead of the
V
present method of appointment. This makes the
positions less bureaucratic and more politically
responsible. And the third major thing our proposals
do is to make amending the constitution less difficult
so that problems can be dealt with quickly and efficiently."
The current constitution has two clauses providing
for amendments. The new proposal adds a third
clause allowing for amendments by a simple
resolution of student council with ratification by a
sufficient number of constituency groups.
"Our proposals are different from the others in
what they don't do," said Warren. "We believe that
at-large elections are retrograde, but if in the future
there is a groundswell of opinion in favor of at-large
election of executives then the machinery is available
for that change in our proposed amendments."
SNYDER
man   on   mars
who read the 23rd Psalm, Chief
Justice Nathan Nemetz, Lt.-Gov.
Henry Bell-Irving and former UBC
professor William Robbins also
attended the service.
Robbins recalled how well Dean
Gage played the piano, and noted
how Walter Gage supported the
Vancouver Symphony by buying
large amounts of tickets and
distributing them among students.
Dean Gage also hoped to introduce his engineering students to
culture, he said. Besides piano
music, he also had a passion for
modern poetry.
Most of all, Robbins recollected,
Dean Gage had a love for students.
He often loaned money to needy
students and was always concerned
with scholarships and bursaries,
Robbins said.
Walter Gage, who won the first
Master Teacher award in 1968,
"inspired the brilliant few who had
a natural aptitude for the subject
(math), and encouraged the
average," he said.
Music by Bach was played and
sung by the UBC department of
music brass quintet and the
University Singers between the
addresses.
Professor Pawel Checinski
played Chopin's Etude in C-sharp
Minor in honor of Dean Gage.
Student reps
upset with
senate vote
The senate voted Wednesday to
leave a student position on the
nominating committee vacant,
despite strong student opposition to
the move.
Although student senator and
law student Dave Coulson
volunteered for the position, senate
did not accept him. Some senators
said Coulson's placement on the
committee would give the law
faculty too  much   representation.
Law senator Eric Warren and law
professor D.J. MacDougall already
sit on the committee.
Warren attacked the motion to
leave the student position vacant.
In other senate business, the
controversial Math 111 proposal
was sent back to the curriculum
committee after lengthy debate on
See page 11: SENATE
UBC program
gets $100,000
By KEVIN GRIFFIN
An extra $100,000 in scholarships
will be available to UBC students
this year, thanks to a generous
university grant.
Awards office director Byron
Hender said Wednesday the budget
for the University Scholarship
Program has been increased by
$100,000.
But to be eligible for the financial
goldmine a student has to be
enrolled in a full course load and
must have placed in the top seven
per cent of the faculty in the
previous winter  session,  he said.
The top five per cent in every
faculty will receive a $500
scholarship, while the remaining
two per cent will get $250.
The University Scholarships are
taken from the university budget
and are different than private
bursaries and scholarships offered
by the awards office.
The awards office does not
receive information on qualifying
students until August, which makes
it impossible to distribute the
scholarships and bursaries until
November, said Hender.
He also warned students not to
storm the awards office if a student
loan has failed to arrive, because
the loans are being authorized in
Victoria and are being processed
slowly due to bureaucratic
bungling.
"We have been let down by the
provincial government this year,
but we hope that the point has been
made that students desperately
require the funds much earlier in
the term," he said. Pag* 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 12, 1978
Business sense needed
In a radical break with tradition the
provincial government has appointed a
businessman to the university's board of
governors.
The appointment of Alan Eyre, president of the new and used car dealership,
Dueck on Broadway, shows the government is seriously committed to providing
a voice for business on the board.
His presence is sorely needed to
bolster the ailing corporate contingent at
UBC. Incredible as it may seem, only six
of the board's 15 members can honestly
say they have earned their credentials in
the business world.
Chancellor J.V. Clyne can hardly be
expected to hold up the business end of
things with only his experience as chairman of the penny ante logging firm
MacMillan-Bloedel to fall back on.
Current board chairman Ian Greenwood, another light-weight, is only a
token gesture towards giving UBC the
strong business voice it needs to sell
education in today's tight marketplace.
He is general manager of B.C. Tree
Fruits and Sun-Rype Products Ltd.
But now the government has blessed
us with a businessman versed in the
rough and tumble business practices of
the main street used car lot.
Money is tight and the university has
to compete with other institutions for
precious education bucks. With the recent appointment of a car-dealer
businessman we have the inside track
on a car-dealer government.
Left-wing critics of the board have
been arguing for a wider cross-section
of B.C. society to be represented on the
board.
Alma Mater Society president Paul
Sandhu whines on that the board should
be more representative of B.C. society.
Other groups, such as labor, community
groups and people connected with the
education industry should have a greater
say in how the university is run, rants
Sandhu.
Fine sentiments, but representative
government has no place in the modern
market-place.
Universities have a tradition of being
bastions of liberal education. Fortunately that is changing and the board's composition reflects that. With the new emphasis on business domination of the
board, perhaps it will now be possible to
implement education minister Pat
McGeer's cherished dreams of strangling
liberal arts and sciences education and
encouraging programs and disciplines
more appropriate to the business world.
There is one small niggling thing,
however, which continues to perplex us
in our lonely little corner of the campus.
With such a stellar board of directors,
why doesn't the university incorporate
and officially declare what it has become
— an education firm managed by a collection of business, law and industry
representatives, for the sole purpose of
servicing the province's business sector.
Anyone for shares in UBC Co. Inc.?
Tory Cullver bucks Blakeney
Next Wednesday's provincial election in
Saskatchewan is going to be the acid test for
one of the most bizarre prairie politicians
since Bill Aberhart went to the great Bible
belt in the sky.
Allen Blakeney's New Democrats are
being given the stiffest challenge of their
seven years in office by Tory leader Dick'
Collver, who once told hecklers "your
ideas are as smelly as my shorts, and that is
pretty smelly."
In the past two years Collver has been
involved in a number of embarrassing and,
some would say, damaging lawsuits. One,
recently settled out of court, saw Collver and
his former business partners, the Baltzan
brothers suing each other. The court case
brought to light the existence of such oddities
as an $8,000 secret Swiss bank account,
which Collver claims was intended for his
daughter's French lessons. The lawyer for
the   Baltzans   claimed   that   Collver   was
laid a $1.1 million suit against Collver and
Management Associates regarding bonds on
a number of prairie construction projects.
It is not clear how this issue will affect the
election but it obviously has the Tories
worried. When a reporter from the Swift
Current Sun interviewed Collver, he asked
him what influence the legal battles might
have on the voters. Shortly afterwards the
local  Tory  incumbent  phoned  the   Sun's
CANADIAN ^
UNIVERSITY PRESS     I
C
By DOUG SMITH
D
drawing off the assets of the parent company, called Management Associates.
Shortly after that  case  was  settled  the
Saskatchewan government insurance office
office and asked that any reference to
Collver's court cases be dropped from the
article, a bit of pressure the Sun did not yield
to.
Despite these problems, many people feel
that if anyone can pick off Allen Blakeney,
Collver is the man. When he was elected
Tory leader they had no seats in the
legislature and had received only 2.1 per cent
of the vote in the 1971 provincial election. In
1975 the Conservatives won seven seats and
Collver has improved upon this with two
byelection wins and by enticing two Liberal
MLAs into the fold.
Collver, as is to be expected, is running on
the same Conservative restraint policy that
THE UBYSSEY
OCTOBER 12, 1978
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year by
the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are those
of the staff and not of the AMS or the university administration. Member,
Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly
commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial office is in room 241K of the
Student Union Building. Editorial departments, 228-2301; Advertising,
228-3977.
Editor: Mike Bocking
The Ubyssey Sodomy and Axe Murderers' club is again stalking the streets. Busily spreading lies about Matt King, Bill Tielman
brought his sheep to the meating. Heather Conn, Tom Hawthorne, and Mike Bocking brought their favorite goats, while Fran
Maclean brought a Komodo Dragon. Glen Schaefer squatted mumbling in the back room, eating his pictures of the last meating.
Suddenly, with a magnificent grunt, Kevin McGee leaped upon him, shreiking obscenities and swinging a leather euphonium.
Julie Wheelwright busily engaged herself in the sharpening of her Samurai sword, while Peter Mengasz amused himself in the
dark corners with his chainsaw collection. Richard Schreiner picked up three odd-looking things on Davie Street, and not one of
them were ever seen again, although rumor has it that they are living happily with a condor and three tree-frogs in Mongolia.
Kerry Regier was disgusted by the whole thing, and left, leaving a trail of stains behind as he fled. As Kevin Griffin demonstrated
his world-infamous flame-thrower enema to Verne MacDonald, who emulated Onan all over Heather Hawthorn, Peter Stockland
filled three empty beer cans. I'll bet you're guessing what with, eh? You pervert. Several million years passed. Thomas Chan
discovered that eveiyone had turned into shreiking used car salesmen, and were enjoying themselves as they gleefuly sank their
talons into local neophytes.
has proven so successful in Manitoba and
Nova Scotia in the past year.
He is promising to sell off a number of
crown corporations including the government investments in the potash industry,
reduce health and welfare progams and cut
what he sees as a civil service bloated with
political appointees. He may have trouble
living up to some of these promises since the
civil service has actually been shrinking in
recent years according to Canadian Business
Magazine.
The Liberals, in an attempt to avoid the
fate of their colleagues in Manitoba who
rode a middle of the road campaign into
oblivion, are running to the right of the
Tories on many issues. They are promising a
referendum, clearly patterned after
Proposition 13, that would call for a 15 per
cent cut in government spending.
Other referenda would deal with anti-
strike legislation and allow more citizen
participation in government, although the
mechanism has not been clearly spelled out.
The Liberal leader Ted Malone has also come
out in favour of such union busting ideas as
right to work legislation.
Despite their efforts the Liberals are being
ignored by the two other parties in a very
dirty campaign. The Tories hope to achieve
the same sort of polarization that was
responsible for dethroning the NDP in B.C.
and Manitoba while the NDP are waving
Collver's gory Tory locks at the voters.
One of the first NDP advertisements
charged that Collver's Conservatives "want
to tax the sick." The advertisement goes on
to say Collver would wreck the province's
health care program by reintroducing
medicare premiums and instituting a
deterrent fee for hospital users. Collver has
said this is a distortion of his party's
position.
However many PC MLAs have gone on
record in the past two years saying universal
medicare has failed and that many people in
Saskatchewan would be willing to pay $10 a
day to go to the hospital.
The NDP have had their own legal
problems with the Supreme Court, which
recently struck down a number of laws
dealing   with   resource   taxation   as   being
unconstitutional. Because of this the
government is being charged with legislative
ineptness by the opposition.
Their campaign is also similar to the
Manitoba campaign where voters were urged
to "Re-elect Ed Schreyer's New
Democrats". In Saskatchewan many of the
advertisements just urge voters to "Vote for
Allen Blakeney".
Blakeney, like Schreyer, is more popular
than any of his opponents but it is by no
means clear whether the cult of personality
will be more successful in Saskatchewan than
it was in Manitoba.
The election assumes particular importance when one considers the fact that
Saskatchewan stands on the threshold of
almost untold wealth after this summer's
decision to go ahead with uranium mining.
"Your ideas are as
smelly as my shorts
and that is
pretty smelly.
a
Saskatchewan has about 30 per cent of the
country's supply of uranium and could be
producing a billion dollars worth of uranium
a year by the mid-1980s. The NDP want to
use revenue from the mines to finance their
social programs while the Tories would much
rather see them operated with as little
taxation and interference as possible.
Another interesting footnote to this event
is the candidacy of Peter Prebble, a New
Democrat who is opposed to uranium
development.
Prebble, who is running against a Tory
incumbent, is calling for a moratorium on
uranium mining and the development of
alternate sources of energy. Thursday, October 12,  1978
THE      UBYSSEY
Pag* 5
Letters
Student government needs debate
An open letter to Mr. Jeff
Barnett re. "SRA Irrelevant"
(Ubyssey Oct. 5).
I note with some uneasiness your
lauding and applauding of the
constitutional reform proposal put
forward, indeed forced forward, by
the engineering undergraduate
society, to replace the constitution
enacted by the student electorate in
1976.
I can readily accept your
assertion that student representative assembly meetings are
"tedious," Mr. Barnett, and I
would suggest you severely rebuke
those persons who, prior to standing for election to senate, promised you fun and games. I do take
issue, however, with your assertion
that the SRA is a "forum for worn-
out hacks to listen to the sound of
their own voices." What you are
alluding to, Mr. Barnett, is loosely
referred to as "debate" and I have
yet to hear of a representative
democracy that can exist without
it. But I assume your views as to the
usefulness of debate explains why
you decline to participate at SRA
meetings.
Turning to your assertion that
student government under the
current constitution has accomplished little, I don't feel I am
overextending myself in saying that
more has been accomplished under
the current constitution, in terms of
cooperating with external bodies,
the administration and benefitting
the student body as a whole, than
was ever accomplished when the
"professional" faculties (i.e. the
EUS) dominated the Alma Mater
Society under the pre-1976 constitution. Perhaps you consider bus
passes and the tenure committee
representation issue "irrelevant."
My next point concerns an apparent misconception on your part,
being that the "cronies" are
pushing for increased student
representation of the larger
faculties. I must say that the first
time I heard that suggestion was in
your letter, because it certainly
hasn't been proposed in any of the
constitutional reform packages put
forward so far. But even so I fail to
see how it follows that increasing
the representation thusly will thrust
the faculty of law into the limelight
of the upper echelons of the AMS.
However this does lead me nicely
into my next point, and that is your
sorrowful regret that the AMS does
not operate in a "democratic"
fashion like the senate "where votes
are evenly distributed." Well, Mr.
Barnett, senate is about as
democratic as the Pentagon.
Perhaps you have never heard of a
concept known as "representation
by population." It is the ideal
behind the current constitution and
is notably lacking in the proposed
constitution vomitted upon us by
the EUS. Look it up, I'm sure
you'll find it intellectually
stimulating.
Lastly, I cannot resist commenting upon your analogy drawn
between the "professional"
faculties in the AMS and British
Columbia in confederation. I was
always under the impression that
B.C. had a higher rate of
representation than most other
provinces in Canada. But of course,
you are unacquainted with
representation by population. My
apologies. But even on your own
model, Canada would be run by a
"council of ten." Your analogy is
so weak it illustrates a fundamental
deficiency in political theory and
constitutional law.
The constitution proposed by the
EUS is an unmitigated disaster. It
has taken two years, but the EUS is
reacting to their loss of control of
the AMS to a representative
government in 1976. Their proposal
is so devoid of respect for the
fundamental principles of
democracy and natural justice that
it is almost laughable were it not for
the obvious seriousness with which
the EUS is going for the jugular.
Using those same democratic ideals
to force a general meeting of the
society, they are about to plunge
the AMS back into the abyss of
mediocrity so prevalent under the
former constitution, the very
situation, Mr. Barnett, which you
so loathe.
David Coulson
law 2
student senator
Onan's 'seedy art9 hit
Although The Ubyssey has in past sunk to sub-
simian levels in standards concerned with content,
reporting and below all, editing, the inclusion of
something called "Onan" signals what has to be an
earnest attempt at reaching an audience of insects.
Whether we as readers are expected to be amused
because of this product's campness, its satire, its
cuteness, or whatever else it is that Onan is trying to
get at wittily, it fails to arouse anything but anger since
Onan is neither campy, satirical, amusing, witty, or
entertaining in any way. In fact, aside from emergency
use as toilet paper, Onan has no socially redeeming
value from what anyone outside The Ubyssey offices
can grasp.
The "art" of Onan seems to be the author's private
joke, a joke rather akin to that attitude decipherably
prevalent among the producers of contemporary
"art." An artist is anyone who creates art. It is
therefore not necessarily up to the author to define his
work or even try to convey any clear message but us to
devise ways to appreciate it.
Such expressions of self-love may be fine in the halls
^>f university visual arts departments but are highly out
of place in a paper created for students. Why should
forced and meaningless obscurities intrude upon space
meant for informative, important (or even less
ridiculous) material to the exclusion of perhaps, a
women's news column, a consumer column, stock
market reports or even advertising which at the very
least would help to defray partially the cost of the
production of The Ubyssey? Why must it include the
inane?
Because other reported articles would certainly be
more relevant than Onan, it should obviously be
excised from The Ubyssey. After all, The Ubyssey,
despite persistant evidences to the contrary, was not
initially designed as a "funny paper."
The author and/or staff should in future put their
hands to something other than Onan but, if that is
asking too much, at least to confine themselves, their
joke, and their personal taste to their own private
places.
It is important that the staff of The Ubyssey draw
the distinction between taking care of their own
business and ours. Anton King
physics 4    J
///   K
TTTLive aM/777)
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UttftAMtJ^ulM&nMxttW Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 12, 1978
When people say the country's future lies in the West, they are usually
referring to Alberta with its enormously rich Heritage Fund and its growing base of petro-chemical industries.
However, people interested in glimpsing the real future of the country
are well advised to look at Manitoba and the government of Sterling
Lyon.
By defeating Ed Schreyer's New Democratic government last fall, Lyon
demonstrated his political astuteness by manipulating the anti-government
spending sentiment which recently swept through California. Even Pierre
Trudeau has become a born-again fiscal conservative with his plans to
slash federal spending on social service programs.
Manitoba's
savages pu
A Conservative recently boasted
that Joe Clark would make Sterling
Lyon look like a pussy-cat if he
became prime minister. Whether or
not Clark has the stomach for the
type of sustained attack on public
sector spending that Lyon has waged
is debatable, but it is clear that he
and politicians like him are setting
Canada's political agenda.
The prime thesis of the Lyon
philosophy is that the main cause of
inflation is government spending. In
last fall's Manitoba election, he
painted a picture of a government
bureaucracy grown out of control.
The Conservatives, he said, would
By DOUG SMITH
Canadian
University Press
not cut any programs but would
manage them more efficiently. Since
everyone knows someone who
knows someone who knows a civil
servant that does nothing but
sharpen pencils, Lyon's promise
looked attractive to many voters.
Even before he was sworn in as
premier, Lyon dismissed three deputy ministers, including Lionel
Orlikow, who, as deputy minister of
education, had on occasion
downplayed the importance of the
three R's. The next government
move was somewhat less expected —
they repealed the province's newly-
passed family law bill.
The bill, which guaranteed equal
sharing of assets after the breakdown
of a marriage, had been criticized in
spring hearings by Winnipeg lawyer
Ken Houston. He said many Winnipeg businessmen would leave the
province rather than let their wives
get a shot at their money.
Lyon then outraged many women
when he appointed Houston to the
two-man committee that was to
review the bill and make recommendations on how it should be changed.
Lyon managed to cool things
down a little by appointing a female
lawyer and advocate of family law
were "among the best breeders" in
the world.
At the same time, Lyon mounted
an attack against the civil service. A
task force on government
reorganization, headed by Winnipeg
businessman Conrad Riley, started
poking into all aspects of the civil
service.
A concurrent freeze was put on
civil service hiring that reduced the
government payroll by 15,000. Lyon
also broke a campaign promise not
The Conservatives see any government expense that does not lead
directly to profit as being essentially
should intrude as little as possible into the affairs of private enterprise. Ii
was   suggested  the  department  oi
The Conservatives see any government expense
which does not lead directly to profit
as being essentially unproductive.
unproductive. This attitude was
clearly reflected in the findings of the
task force.
consumer and corporate affairs only
handle complaints rather than going
out and initiating investigations on
STERLING LYON . . . accepting student and faculty protest letters
to fire any civil servants by laying off
370, most of whom worked in northern Manitoba.
The   Manitoba   government   has
People interested in taking a glimpse at the real
future of the country are well advised to look
at Manitoba and the government
of Sterling Lyon
reforms to the committee, only to
really heat up the controversy by saying no one could accuse Conservatives of being against women. It
was well known, he said, that they
decided that, in light of the present
economic crisis with rising
unemployment and inflation, the
solution lies in curtailing government
spending and wage increases.
The task force recommended the
provincial government be restructured to resemble the Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce, a not too
surprising suggestion since Riley is a
member of that bank's board of
directors.
In discussing the universities, the
task force felt the province, through
the Universities Grants Commission,
should exercise its right to cut programs which it did not feel to be worthwhile. The report also criticized
the number of tenured professors at
universities and called for a freeze on
the granting of tenure.
In the area of social services, the
attitude  was   that   the  government
its own. Likewise, the rentalsman
was advised to deal merely with cases
brought to him by tenants and avoid
investigating on his own.
These departments were also told
to reduce their publicity budgets —
Lyon said that no one co
of being against womei
that the PCs were "am
in the vt
presumably on the theory that the
less people know about them, the
fewer will use them, and the more
the government will be justified in Thursday, October 12,  1978
THE      UBYSSEY
Pag* 7
.yon gov't
tlic sector
per cent, the lowest in the country.
The University of Manitoba, the
province's   largest   university,   only
need the income. When the
employees objected to the low wage
increase and pointed to the fact the
The provincial universities were hit by the
restraint program when they received
an increase of 2.7 per cent, the lowest
in the country.
making further cuts.
Lyon said the Tories were going to
govern for all Manitobans, instead
of fomenting class war the way he
felt the NDP had done. But most of
the breaks he gave were to people in
upper income brackets, like when he
reduced estate taxes and death
duties.
At the same time, he hit low-
income tenants with a one-two
punch in January when he laid off a
;hird of the staff at the Rent Review
Board and announced the govern-
nent would be getting out of "the
ow-cost housing business".
Lyon has since announced the end
of a rent control program that goes
against the advice of a report
prepared by the Rent Review Board.
When the report was released to the
public, the government had edited
outl all those comments which indicated there was no present need to
remove rent controls.
Under the new program, apartments will be removed from controls
when tenants move out, giving
landlords an incentive to evict and
harrass their tenants.
When the estimates for this year's
Manitoba budget were announced
last spring, the only two areas of increase were for jails and highways,
causing some people to suggest that
the roads were for unemployed
Manitobans who could afford to
leave the province, while the jails
were likely to be the province's only
form of low-income housing.
The health sector-has also come
under heavy attack from Lyon's
government. Hospitals received a 2.9
per cent increase in their budgets,
when their inflation rate was close to
9 per cent. At several hospitals in
Winnipeg there were layoffs and
workers at one hospital were offered
an actual salary decrease during
negotiations.
"If we get some sort of wage increase, there will have to be a cut in
the quality of health care in the province," said health worker
negotiator Eugene Kostyra.
The health minister has said the
accuse the Conservatives
ten it was well known
I the best breeders"
d..
province may close regional health
care centres that had ben set up to
fight the lack of medical service in
rural and northern Manitoba and to
promote better community service
within Winnipeg. As well, the PCs
have been heard to mutter that
health care premiums, abolished by
the NDP in the early 1970s, might
have to be reintroduced unless health
received a 1 per cent increase. As a
result, the university has had to drop
a number of continuing education
programs and extension programs in
northern Manitoba.
The province has been particularly
harsh   in   dealing   with   its   own
province was giving doctors a 6.8 per
cent increase, labour minister Norma
Price said there was no comparing
the two and that Manitoba workers
were spoiled.
The provincial legal aid program
has had its budget savaged by almost
PROTESTORS
unemployed attack Tory policies
care spending is brought under control.
The provincial universities were hit
by the restraint program when they
received an average increase of 2.7
employees. In negotiations last spring they offered clerical workers a
zero per cent salary increase on the
principle that most of them were
married women and did not really
SCHREYER . . . watching cutbacks from sidelines
50 per cent. A $35 user fee was introduced and a legal aid clinic run by
volunteer law students had its funds
cut off.
"In Manitoba, the war on poverty
is becoming a war on the poor," said
former legal aid director Roland
Penner.
The minimum wage in Manitoba
has not been increased for nearly two
years and the government has indicated that it might not be increased
until the economy turns around.
The campaign slogan of the Conservatives was that they would "Free
Manitoba". They have certainly arranged it so Manitobans are free to
be charged limitless rent increases,
free to wait for admittance to
hospitals, free to make less than the
cost of living, and free to go to
university if they can afford it.
The Conservative message of
freedom is gaining popularity across
the country as all governments attempt to curtail spending. Soon,
maybe, we will all be free to sleep
under bridges. Pag* 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 12,  1978
'Tween classes
TODAY
MUSSOC
General   meeting   to   organize   Cabaret   night,
noon. SUB 212.
CCF
Talk on A Balanced Christian Life, noon,
125.
POTTERY
General meeting, noon, SUB 251.
MY JONG LAW HORN KUNG FU
Practice, 5 to 7 p.m., SUB party room.
CHS AUDIO-VISUAL LIBRARY
NOVA presents One small step, 8 p.m.,
room B-80.
UBC AIKIDO CLUB
Organizational meeting, noon, Buch. 316.
GAY PEOPLE
Rap session for women and men, noon, SUB
211.
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Women's get-together, 5 p.m.. Pit.
SUB
IRC
LIBERTARIAN SOCIETY
General meeting, noon, SUB 212A.
WOMEN STUDENTS' OFFICE
Job workshop for third and fourth year women
students, noon, Buch. penthouse.
UBC PROGRESSIVE CONSERVATIVE CLUB
Guest  speaker   Burnaby-Richmond-Delta   candidate Tom Siddon, noon, SUB 205.
INTER-VARSITY
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Speaker John Howitt from World Vision, noon,
Angus 104.
HILLEL HOUSE
Jack Swartz speaks about experience in Dutch
underground, noon, Hillel House.
MEDIEVAL SOCIETY
Discussion of medieval life, noon, SUB 113.
FRIDAY
UBC HANG GLIDING CLUB
Meeting and slide show, noon, SUB 205.
'>:
.^i-
Hot flashes
Prison's a riot
with law course
If an involuntary visit to a federal
prison is on your social calendar in
the near future, you should make
reservations with the Vancouver
People's Law School.
H.A.D. Oliver will be giving a
course   called    Arrest,    bail   and
sentencing. He will explain criminal
offences, the rights of a citizen arrested by the police and other
goodies to make your stay at
Oakalla more pleasant.
The free course will be held Monday to Wednesday from 7:30 to
9:30 p.m. at the Britannia Community Centre library. You can pre-
register by dialing 734-1126.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Free disco and light show, 8:30 p.m.. International House.
DEBATING SOCIETY
Organizational meeting, noon, SUB 211.
CENTRE FOR HUMAN SETTLEMENTS
Joseph   Blast  lectures  on   Israel's  kibbutz  experience, noon, IRC lecture hall 1.
PSYCH CLUB
Bzzr night, 4 p.m., Buch. lounge.
UBC SKYDIVING CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 212.
SATURDAY
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Car rally, 6 p.m., Oakridge parking lot.
PRE-DENTAL SOCIETY
Car rally and party for $2, 2 p.m., SUB bus loop.
SUNDAY
CVC
Gym night, 7:30 p.m., Thunderbird Sports Complex.
MUSSOC
Auditions for Cabaret night, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.,
SUB 207.
MONDAY
AMNESTY UBC
Form letters for prisoners of conscience, 10:30
a.m. to 2:30 p.m., SUB main lobby.
THEATRE DEPARTMENT
Auditions for non-paying dialogue parts, 3 p.m..
Brock Hall annex room 151.
STEREO
SERVICE CENTRE
A worn needle can ruin your records
"Free" Inspection
Most popular style in stock
1988 W. 4th Ave. 731-9813
WOMEN STUDENT'S
OFFICE
CAREER
ORIENTATION
( c
GO HIRE YOURSELF
AN EMPLOYER"
Career Counselling Workshops
I—For WOMEN (3rd & 4th year); 3 THURSDAYS,
Session 1, OCT. 12; Session 2, OCT. 19;
Session 3, OCT. 26; 12:30 - 2:20 p.m.
II—For WOMEN (Returning/Mature); 3 THURSDAYS,
Session 1, OCT. 26; Session 2, NOV. 2;
Session 3, NOV. 9; 12:30-2:20 p.m.
Ill—For WOMEN/MEN (3rd & 4th year); 3 THURSDAYS,
Session 1, NOV. 16; Session 2, NOV. 23;
Session 3, NOV. 30; 12:30-2:20 p.m.
Workshops will include evaluation of skills, career
and lifegoals, resume writing and interviewing
techniques.
Facilitators — Maryke Gilmore, Workshop II, Tel,:
228-3449.
Diane Waterman, Workshops I & III,
Tel.: 228-6271.
PRE-REGISTRATION REQUIRED
PLEASE SIGN UP ON
WOMEN STUDENTS' OFFICE DOOR
Buchanan Building, Room 456
or call: 228-2415
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
1978 FALL LECTURES
BY VISITING PROFESSORS
Owen Barfield
Owen Barfield has had a far-reaching impact on the humanities in our time, as both a
writer and a literary critic His Saving the Appearances, Worlds Apart and other books
have explored the relationships between science, religion, philosophy, history —
almost the breadth of human thought Owen Barfield, now 80, continues to explore
new patterns of thought after his careers as lawyer, writer and literary critic from his
home in Kent, fcngland
THE FORCE OF HABIT
Tuesday, October 17 In Room 106, Buchanan Building, at 12 W p m
HISTORY OF IDEAS: EVOLUTION OF CONSCIOUSNESS
Saturday, October 14 In Lecture Hall 2. Woodward Instructional Resources Centre, at 8:15 p m
[A Vancouver Institute let ture)
ALL LECTURES ARE FREE
PLEASE POST AND ANNOUNCED
sponsored by
The Cecil H. and Ida Green Visiting Professorship Fund
COLESinOtGS
400 Titles Available
LARGEST SELECTION OF REVIEW NOTES IN B.C.
BETTER BUY BOOKS
4393 W. 10th AVENUE
224-4144
GRADUATE
STUDENTS
ASSOCIATION
BY-ELECTIONS
Nominations are open for the following positions:
President Treasurer
Secretary Assembly Co-ordinator
Internal Affairs 1 A.M.S. Representative
External Affairs
Nomination forms available in the Grad Centre Office.
For more information call 228-3202.
NOMINATIONS CLOSE OCT. 20
(Following The Annual General Meeting)
ELECTIONS OCT. 25
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES:   Campus - 3 lines, 1 day $1.50; additional lines 35c
Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional lines
50c. Additional days $2.25 and 45c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m., the day before publication.
Publications Off ice. Room 241, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T 1W5
5 — Coming Events
THE   VANCOUVER   INSTITUTE
FREE   PUBLIC   LECTURE
DR. LEONARD KURLAND
MAYO CLINIC
Rochester/ Minnesota
Incidence/   trends   and   outcome   of
disease. Dr. Kurland has utilized the
unique   medical   records   system   of
the Mayo Clinic to conduct a series
of outstanding  studies on  the  epidemiology of disease. Saurday, Oct.
7th, 8:00 p.m..  Lecture  Hall  No.  2,
Woodward   I.R.C.
10 — For Sale — Commercial
COMMUNITY SPORTS. Excellent prieei
for ice skates, hockey, soccer, jogging
and racquet sports equipment. 733-
1612, 3815 West Broadway, Vancouver,
B.C.	
11 — For Sale — Private
FEMALE YMCA membership. 10 months
left. $50. 526-1281.
20 — Housing
AVAILABLE IMMEDIATELY. Double
rooms, $75 each per mo., singles $125-
$150 per mo.; kitchen facilities. Rent
discounts possible. 2280 Wesbrook,
ph. 224-9679, Mike or Greg.
30-Jobs
EARN EXTRA MONEY and help the
environment! Greenpeace needs canvassers. Good commission. Contact:
Linda Spong at 736-0321.	
35 - Lost
LOST — Man's gold watch, in the area
of B lot. Engraved on back. Reward.
278-1908.
LOST — HP-21 CALCULATOR, Oct. 4,
CPSC 201. Call Gord, 224-3475.
TAN WALLET left in Buch 100 on
Wed., Oct. 4th. Call Brigita at 738-
7544. ID.!
YELLOW pencil case containing gold
engraved pen, about three weeks ago.
Sentimental  value. Reward.   228-8866.
40 — Messages
CURLING    ANYONE?    Triumf curling
every Friday,  7:15  p.m., has several
openings.   Mixed   league.   No experience required. 224-0874.
65 — Scandals
CAY DISCO DANCE — All women and
men welcome. October 6, Grad Centre, Garden Room, 9:00 p.m.-1:00 a.m.
$1.50  with AMS  card,   $2.00   visitors.
U.B.C.'s   ANIMAL   HOUSE   SIGMA   PHI
DELTA (Engineers) "Road Trip" to
Los Angeles today. Hide your women
and   children,  we're   cummmming.
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED
70 — Services
THESIS AND
MAGAZINE BINDING
Permanent Hardcover Binding
Gold Lettering
Reasonable Cost
CENTENNIAL    BOOKBINDINO
224-3009 929-2706
Monday-Friday,   9:30-3:30
WE COPY IT
ALL FOR YOU
BOOKS-THESES-FLYERS
TIME
S4S Burrard
682-2919
Rm.100A
SUB
REPRODUCTION CENTKE       224-1011
80 — Tutoring
90-Wanted
85 — Typing
ON CAMPUS TYPIST. Fait, accurate.
Reasonable rates. Phone 732-3690 after
6:00 pan.
TYPING — 75c per page. Fait and accurate by experienced typist. Gordon,
685-4863.
TYPING: Essays, theses, manuscripts,
reports, resumes, etc. Fast and accurate service. Bilingual. Clemy, 324-9414.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING — Correcting
IBM Selectric.   254-8365.
REASONABLE RATES for fast, accurate typing. Phone Janet, 524r6253 after
6:00  p.m.  New  Westminster  area.
99 — Miscellaneous
TWO LOVEABLE KITTENS, one male,
one female to go to good homes.
Phone 731-2206 or 733-6805. Free.
INSTANT
PASSPORT!
PHOTOS
CAMERAS LTD.
4558 W 10th
.224-9112 or 224-5858. Thursday,  October 12,  1978
THE      UBYSSEY
Pag* 9
Public inquiry blasted
BURNABY (CUP) — The
recently announced public inquiry
into uranuim mining standards is
not quite the progressive step it
seems to be, according to two B.C.
conservation groups.
Environment minister Jim
Nielsen said Sept. 27 that until the
inquiry submits its report and new
standards are established, uranium
mining will be banned in the
province.
uranium mining in the province and
only safety standards need to be
established. SPEC wants a complete moratorium on all phases of
uranium exploration and mining,
he added.
John Moelaert, chairman of the
Kelowna branch of the Canadian
Coalition for Nuclear Responsibility said he agrees with Garrick.
"They've already decided mining
will be allowed and now its sort of
'We'll give you a fair trail before
you're hung' situation," he said.
Moelaert said the enquiry is a
sham because the commissioners
are all government appointees and
their decision is a foregone conclusion.
"Let's be realistic," he said.
"This government is very pro-
nuclear. (Premier Bill) Bennett said
in   Brussels   that   he   would   be
STOP URANIUM MINING
But proposals to ban uranium
mining are very misleading, said
Dave Garrick, Canadian Scientific
Pollution and Environmental
Control spokesman.
"At present there is no uranium
mining in B.C., but there is exploration. Nielsen will allow exploration to continue," he said.
The inquiry does not alleviate the
problem of radioactive contamination that occurs during
exploration, he said.
Garrick said the government has
already   assumed   there   will   be
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—Pat Collins, WCBS-TV
Thurs., Sun. 7:00 _ „
Fri., Sat. $1.00
7:00 & 9:30    SUB theatre
delighted to sell B.C. uranium to
Europe."
Moelaert said he thinks the entire
inquiry is a pre-election "snow
job" and a waste of taxpayers'
money.
Both SPEC and the CCNR are
concerned they will not be able to
adequately represent the environmentalist point of view at the
hearings, because they have neither
the money nor the resources to
write briefs, he said.
"We need access to the inquiry,"
said Garrick.
"The inquiry needs balanced
input," Moelaert said. "The environmentalists' companies could
spend a lot of money preparing
briefs.
"It should be a province-wide
decision."
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ON ALL IGNITION PARTS
including   points,   plugs,   condensers,   rotors,   and
distributor caps.
Offer good until Oct. 21, 1978
at HOLLYBURN AUTOMARINE only
2625 W 4th Ave. 736-2904
I
9
I
S
!
I
6.
Buy a Bus Pass ..
& Pocket The Change
A $56*    for only $46
* Based on 5 round trips per week
Pass Valid Oct. 15-Dec. 31
— Unlimited Travel, Good 7 Days a Wk —
— Good in Zone A & Common Zone —
Available now until Oct. 27 in the
AMS Business Office, SUB 266
Don't Delay! It takes time to process your bus pass application
— Cash or Certified Cheque —
(Bring your AAAS Card)
WE'RE YOUR AMS
!
I
i Page 10
THE      U B Y S S E Y
Thursday, October 12,  1978
In Kootenay community
Uranium hunt resumes
By CAM BECK
Canadian University Press
CASTLEGAR — Uranium
exploration has resumed at China
Creek, 400 miles east of Vancouver.
This exploration could cause,
"an increase in radiation of several
thousand times over the natural
background radiation" emitted by
uranium left in the ground, Dr.
Lyle Olsen told a Selkirk College
audience here Tuesday.
China Creek exploration had
halted in early August in the face of
stiff opposition from the people of
Genelle, a community of 500 people
that relies on China Creek for their
water supply.
"In this tiny West Kootenay
community of Genelle," one
Vancouver newspaper said, "a
groundswell of opposition to
uranium mining has mushroomed
into the beginnings of a national
inquiry into nuclear energy."
But an official national inquiry
has yet to be established and in
B.C. a recently announced
government inquiry has been called
a sham.
Uranium mining will be banned
in the province until the inquiry
submits its report and mining
standards are established, B.C.
environment minister Jim Neilsen
said Sept. 27.
That statement is very misleading
according to Dave Garrick,
spokesman for the Canadian
Scientific Pollution and Environmental Control (SPEC).
"At present there is no uranium
mining in B.C. but there is exploration," he said. "Neilsen will
allow mining exploration to
continue."
"The inquiry doesn't alleviate
the problem of radioactive contamination that occurs during
exploration," he said.
Radioactivity is a particularily
long lasting type of poison, Olsen
said Tuesday.
He said the radiation is spread
quickly by wind and water
throughout the country and
eventually the world.
Humans   are   very   sensitive   to
BLACK & LEE
TUX SHOP
NOW AT
1110 Seymour St.
688-2481
radiation, he said, and even small
doses are known to cause mutations
and thalidomide-like deformities in
newborns.
"It's not too late to save our
kids," he said, referring to the
recent defeat of the pro-nuclear
Swedish government by a coalition.
B.C. anti-uranium groups and
individuals meet this Saturday in
Rock Creek to discuss their
response to the government
inquiry.
Among the participants will be
people from Genelle, Granby River
valley and Beaverdell, east of
Kelowna.
Beaverdell is a few miles from the
most intensive uranium exploration
currently underway in B.C.
Also participating will be people
from Rock Creek, down the Kettle
River from Beaverdell and Grand
Forks, further down river and to
the east of Rock Creek. At Grand
Forks the Kettle River is joined by
the Granby, also called the North
Fork.
Participants are also expected
from the North Thompson valley,
north of Kamloops, where a
proposal for the first B.C. uranium
mine met with intense opposition
last December.
UBC
Graduation
Portraits
since 1969
Auumrayb   ^huMmi ICtii.
3343 West Broadway
732-7446
Phone now for your Free sitting
The community's main tool in
opposing the summer's exploration
work was a barricade across the
only access road to the exploration
site on the south side of China
Creek.
Now, however, drilling and
blasting is on the north side of the
creek and three access roads would
have to be barricaded and patrolled
24  hours   a   day.
The community is waiting, instead, for the outcome of the Oct.
24 trial of three Genelle men
charged with blocking a public
roadway.
Thery were charged July 10 after
refusing to let a uranium crew's
bulldozer move up China Creek.
PUBLIC
228-6121
skaFTnc
FRI. & SAT.
7:30 p.m. - 9:45   p.m.
SUNDAY
1 :00 — 3:00 p.m.
STUDENTS
& CHILDREN    .75
ADULTS $125
THUNDERBIRD
WINTER
SPORTS CENTRE
HILLEL HOUSE
announces
MODERN HEBREW LESSONS
FOR BEGINNERS
ULPAN METHOD with SHULAMIT MASS
Cost $1.00/session
12:30 p.m., 13 October at Hillel House
Hillel House is across from SUB and behind Brock Hall
SOFT
CONTACT
LENSES
Per pair
All Fees
Inclusive
$75
.00
&UP
EYEGLASSES
Student Discount
Available on Eyeglasses
Bausch & Lomb SOFLENS also available
Phone for appointment - Anwar Jessa
(Contact Lens Specialist - European Trained)
KAUFMANN & JESSA OPTICAL SHOP
L1535W. Broadway 731-811
Norcen
Energy Resources Limited
Geologists and Geological Assistants wanted for
Uranimum and Base Vletals Exploration. Two or
more years field expe .er.ce are desired. For further
information please contact the Canada Employment Centre on Campus.
ROOFTOP PARKING
224-4912
HAIRWORLD *
2620' SASAMAT (W lOlh AVE. & SASAMAT
VANCOUVER
OPTIC
ZONE
Student Discounts
ARBUTUS VILLAGE
733-1722
K0RRES
,_** MOVING AND T-
PO TRANSFER LTD
"STORAGE
Big or
Small Jobs
Reasonable
Rates
2060 W. 10th^
Vancouver
732-9898
ALSO GARAGES.
BASEMENTS & YARDS
CLEAN-UPS
George & Berny's
VOLKSWAGEN
REPAIRS
COMPLETE SERVICE BY
TRAINED
MECHANICS
FULLY GUARANTEED
AT REASONABLE RATES
731-8644
2125 W. 10th at Arbutus
'Decorate With Posters
X^Ky     grin
bin
THE Poster & Print
PLACE in B.C.
738-2311
3209 W. Broadway, Van
'Decorate With Posters
• We Cut All Materials For You
• Complete Instruction - You
Leave With A Finished,
Ready To Hang Picture
• Complete Shop Facilities
• Large Selection Of Frames
Available
• Stretching
• Non-Glare & Regular Glass
• Dry Mounting & Mat Board
• Custom Work
^^,3657
"For People With More Taste Than Money"
7341915 939-1931
W. Broadway Near Alma 568 Clarke Road, Coquitlam
Don MacKenzie
/
A trick
shot
When you're drinking
tequila, Sauza's the shot
that counts. That's why more
and more people are asking
for it by name.
TEQUILA SAUZA
Number One in Mexico.
Number One in Canada.
sfd Thursday, October 12,  1?78
THE      U B Y S S E Y
Page 11
Car dealer gets Socred nod /
I
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I
From page 1
Eyre was a founding member of
Simon Fraser University's board of
governors and was chairman of its
finance committee. He was member
of UBC's Perry Commission on
higher education during the
presidency of Walter Gage.
He succeeds Thomas Dohm, who
resigned aftering serving on the
board since 1972.
Alma Mater Society president
Paul   Sandhu   criticized   the   ap
pointment, saying people who are
involved with education or the
university on a daily basis should be
appointed to the board.
"I would have hoped a new
person on the board would have a
closer relation to education.
He (Eyre) shouldn't be on the
board in the first place if he's not
concerned with student issues."
Sandhu said education issues are
a major concern on campus but are
lacking on the board.
"Anybody appointed to the
board should have considerable
involvement in education and that's
not always so. It's a big
prerequisite. No one on the board
has an idea where post-secondary
education is going in this
province."
He said he would like to see a
cross-section of society on the
board with more than just big
business representatives.
VALUABLE COUPON ,
10% OFF   I
STYLING ONLY
ON
TUESDAYS & WEDNESDAYS
STUDENTS ONLY For
Good only on presentation     Appointment
224-1922
of this coupon.
'Will won't reply to grad students'
Expires Oct. 31st., 1978
224-9116
From page 1
he'd be consulting the president."
She said after a suggestion by
Will, she agreed to set up an Oct. 2
meeting with all three graduate
representatives to see if they would
accept his restrictions on the report.
But on Sept. 29 Green said she
received a message from Will's
secretary cancelling the  meeting.
"He's saying I got it wrong. I
talked to his secretary and she said
Will claims I misunderstood him.
She says he claims he told me we
cannot have the report. But I have
absolutely no doubt he said he'd
consider it."
Green said she then personally
wrote a letter asking Will to explain
in writing why he has not replied
and why the graduate students are
not getting the report. She received
no response.
"It's extremely rude. He obviously feels he doesn't have to
reply to grad students. He won't
take the trouble to reply. Why did
he encourage student participation?
Was it purely a bureaucratic
exercise?"
She said at the original April
meeting, the 15 graduate students
who attended were angry, very well-
organized and highly motivated to
outline problems within the history
department. Far more people attended than were expected but now
they have to start all over again, she
added.
"Will holds a totally inconsistent
position. We're going through the
whole procedure again. There are
problems in the department which
will adversely affect the history
grad student. The department is
already declining in enrolment.
She said the student representatives will submit a new written
report directly to the department as
a basis of their discussions with the
department.
"This will put the other report
right out of their minds. There's a
general problem between faculty
and grad students working
relationships which we're trying to
constructively criticize and rectify.
Will was unavailable for comment.
Senate spot left open
From page 3
the number of units of credit the
course would be worth.
The proposal calls for the
creation of a course combining
Math 12 with Math 100 to enable
students who have not completed
Math 12 to satisfy science faculty
admission requirements.
The proposal presented to senate
calls for a full-year course offering
1.5 credits.
Arts dean Robert Will said arts
students taking the course should
be given 3 units of credit for the
course because it constituted a full
year of work.
He added that the credit given a
course was previously determined
by the number of hours per week
spent in class so three hours of
credit represented three hours of
class.
He said it was inconsistent to give
1.5 credits for a course that had
four hours of lectures per week.
Administration president Doug
Kenny said he objected to the
nature of the course.	
HILLEL HOUSE
presents
JACK SWARTZ
Experiences in the 2nd World War,
Dutch Underground, Non-attachment.
THURSDAY 12, OCTOBER
12:30 at Hillel House
Modern Hebrew Lessons begin on 13 Oct. 12:30 at Hillel House
HILLEL HOUSE IS ACROSS FROM SUB AND BEHIND BROCK HALL
TORONTO CHRISTW|Hjt_,ri
$
199eo Return
DEC. 16-JAN. 2
DEC. 19 - JAN. 3
plus $8.00 tax
BOOK EARLY
CANADIAN UNIVERSITIES
TRAVEL SERVICE LTD.
MAIN FLOOR S.U.B.
224-0111
r       labro&se
., .       _     ol   .    Hair Studio Inc.
University Blvd.   Unisex Hajr Sty|es
5784
i
i
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Keep informed on what's new
and exciting in Stereo.
Get a FREE subscription to:
■ tf*
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| "Creative Sound" j
ANTHONY AND JOSEPH
PARATORE
DUO-PIANISTS
SAT. OCT. 14, 8 P.M.
There are few artists who have the ability to triumph ,
wherever they go. whatever they do.
Two such are Anthony and Joseph Paratore. In 1974
they won the First Prize at the Munich International
Competition, the first American duo-pianists to do
so. Since then, they have electrified international
audiences and enchanted critics.
Program: Sonata in C Major. D. 812. Op. 149
(Schubert). Petite Suite (Debussy). F.ight Waltzes
and Hungarian Dance No. 6 (Brahms)
¥1
SFU Theatre $4 Gen., $2 Student
Vancouver Ticket Centre (683-3255)
and all Eatons outlets
Presented by Centre for the Arts, SFU Pag. 12
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 12, 1978
The 1978-79 Alma Mater Society Budget
AMS BUDGET 78/79
REVENUE
1} A.M.S. Operating Fees
206,218
2) Investment Income
31,000
3) SUB Revenue (Sch 4.1 and 4.2)
73,535
310,753
TOTAL DISCRETIONARY REVENUE
310,753
EXPENPITURES
1) Constitutional:
- constitutional Margin
15,538
- SUB Art Fund
1,500
17,038
2) Registration Photographs
6,084
6,084
3) Student Government:
i
-SRA (Sch.1)                                                                     >
59,070
- SAC (Sch.2l
22,055
81,125
4) General Administration (Sch.3}
157,849
5) Publications Subsidy (Sch.5)
35,108
6) Subsidiary Organizations' and Programs' Direct Subsidies:
- CITR Support
1,000
- Speakeasy
2,250
- Art Gallery Programs
2,200
- Intramurals                  ~
Total Expenditures
17,015
22,465
319,669
TOTAL SURPLUS (DEFICIT)
(8,916)
SRA BUDGET
A. SRA GENERAL OPERATIONS:
SALARIES (summer hiring)
OTHER PAYROLL COSTS
TELEPHONE/TELEGRAMS
MATERIALS & SUPPLIES
POSTAGE
SUNDRY
HONORARIA,
TRAVEL (local)
PUBLICITY (ads, posters, etc.)
OMBUDSPERSON
GENERAL MEETINGS
OFFSET & PHOTOCOPIES
SPECIAL & PROFESSIONAL SERVICES
OUTSTANDING ACCOUNTS (NUS bill)
SUB-TOTAL
B. SRA STANDING COMMITTEES:
S.H.A.C.
T.A.S.C.
WOMEN'S
PROGRAMS
EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
SRA SPECIAL PROGRAMMES:
CONSTITUENCY AID PLAN
- communication
- elections
- fee referenda
DONATIONS
SPECIAL PROJECTS
SUB-TOTAL
TOTAL
SAC BUDGET
GENERAL OPERATIONS
•v
SAC ADMINISTERED FUNDS
.   Speakers Grants
TOTAL SAC BUDGET
GENERAL ADMINISTRATION BUDGET
SALARIES AND BENEFITS
Salaries
Benefits ^
Expense Allowance
Part-Time Et Overtinje
PROFESSIONAL SERVICES
Personnel
Audit
Legal
PRlNTSHOP
Revenue
Expenses:
Salaries
Benefits
Sundry
Supplies and Stationery
Equipment Maintenance
Telephone
Materials and Supplies
Postage
Photocopying and Printing
Insurance
Staff Relations
Staff Conferences and Training
EQUIPMENT
Maintenance
Office Purchase
Philips Software
Philips Amortization
TOTAL
STUDENT UNION BUILDING
SUB FILMS
, SUB FILMS EXTRANEOUS
GAMES ANNEX (pinballs, etc.)
GAMES AREA
CONFECTIONERY
LISTENING LOUNGE
RENTALS:
Conferences
Lessees
- Other (outside bookings)
TECHNICAL SERVICES
ADMINISTRATION
VENDING
BEER, LIQUOR, WINE
FOOD
CABARET
SUPPLIES
GOV. LICENCE FEE & TAX
PIT COFFEE HOUSE
SALARIES & WAGES    -
OTHER COSTS
REPAIR & REPLACEMENT
TOTALS
(11,550)
1,500
700
500
1,000
8,000
16,200
$59,870
Schedule 2
21,055
1,000
$22,055
Schedule 3
$109,840
10,556
1,800
1,100
123,296
600
5,900
6,000
-
12.500
12,125
630
250
4,000
1,600
6,955
2,800
740
718
800
542
250
1,000
6,850
2,350
500
,    500
4,398
7,748
500
500
$157,849
Schedule 4.1
REVENUE
EXPENSES
.     NET
$23,000
$21,000
$ 2,000
3,000
3,000
10,000
'      28,000
26,000
2,000
75,000
78,000
(3,000)
-
,600
(500)
18,000   .
50,000
'    2,000
70,000
70,000
_
—
3»
	
41,215
(41,215)
——
——  -
4,000
$43,535
THE PIT - 1978/79
Schedule 4.2
Revenue
Expenses
Profit (Lou)
$409,500
$280,000
$209,500
35,000
27,500
7,500
1
13,000
7,500
5,500
13,500
(13,500)
22,500
(22.500)
25,000
25.000
146.000
(145,000)
5,500
(5.500)
t ooo
(6,000)
482,500
$452,500
$30,000
REVENUE
1) Advertising (net)
2) Classified
3)Subscriptions ,
EXPENSES
Printing
Salaries and Honorarium
Telephone and Telex
Supplies and Photo
Postage
Promo and Distribution
C.U.P. Fees
„   Sundry (including Bad Debts)   „.
Publications Admin. Cost tfO*)1
PUBLICATIONS BUDGET
Schedule 5
$112,550
3,200
350
$116,100
$116,100
109,971
2,250
1,050
1,750
1,790
4,210
6,000
1,700
21,487
151,208
Surplus (Deficit)
Subsidy Granted
30% of Publications Administrative cost is shared with Insight. 5% General Administrative expense is excluded.
STATEMENT OF REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE
Year ended March 31.1978
with comparative figures for the ten months ended March 31, 1977
1978 1977
151,206
135,108)
$35,108
Schedule 1
$14,800
150
600
275
100
100
Student fees  .
Aquatic Centre levies
Grad class fees
Undergraduate Societies fee levies
Investment income
Sundries
600
120
1,800
Non-discretionary allocations:
500
Student Union Building:
200
Principal
1,600
Interest
500
2,825
Aquatic Centre Trust Fund (Note 2)
24,170
Grad class fees
Undergraduate Societies fee levies
including special levies
700
S.U.B. Management Fund,
4,000
Registration photos
5,000
S.U.B, Art Fund
8,500
5,000
Discretionary allocations:
' Interest - special purpose reserves and
provisfons (Schedule 8)
Expenditure (income):
Campus activities and events (Sc
Publications (Schedule 5)
Administrative and general expenses (Schedule 1)
Student Union Building Operations (Schedule 6)
Pit closure (Note 4)
Deficiency of revenue over expenditure
$514,468
106,500
26,599
31,002~
32,645
505
$515,878
106,463
24,285
28,000
44,678
144
711,719
719,438
78,363
$229,737
,   80,608
229,052
308,100
106,500
26,599
309,660
106,453
24,285
31,002
6,065
1,500
479,766
231,953
28,000
10,322
6,084
1,500
486,304
233,134
6,286
20,545
225,667
$10,949
38,682
212,589
238200
THE ALMA MATER SOCIETY OF THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
BALANCE SHEET
March 31.1978
with comparative figures at March 31, 1977
Assets
Current assets:
Cash
Accounts receivable:
'  Publications advertising
Sundry accounts arid advances (Schedule 2)
Accrued interest (Schedule 9)
Inventories
Prepaid, expenses
Total current assets
Investments, at cost (market value-$456,368; 1977-$462,887)
(Schedule 9) ,
Total current assets and investments
Loans to subsidiary organizations; non-currenrportion
(Schedule 7) '
Office computer, at cost less depreciation Of $17,600
(1977-$13,200J
Art      Collection
Total General funds assets
Aquatic Centre Trust Fund:
Aquatic Centre (Note 2)
Cash
1978
47,484
40.452
137,214
45,583
15,629
286,362
459,261
745,623
1977
4.696
41,389
54.505
117,335
36,379
5,876
260,190.
,464.623
724,813-
BuHdings, at cost less depreciation:
Student Union Building
Winter Sports Centre
Whistler cabin
Total student facilities assets
Cost
$3,619,626 '
1,507,247
234.480
$5,361,352
4,398
8,798"
104,663
103,389
921.488
900.588
985.258
'      798,438
25,656
2.900
1,010,914
801,330
Accumulated
Depreciation
810,000
2,809,625
2.890,625
796,000
"       712,247
787,247
54.900
179,580
198,480
1,659,900
3.701.452 •
3.876.352
4.712.366
4,677,690
$5,633,854
5.578.278
Liabilities and Surplus
Current liabilities:
Due to bank on current account
Accounts payable and accrued charges.
Due to dubs and societies (Schedule 3)
Total current liabilities
Special purpose reserves and provisions (Schedule 8)
Total current liabilities and reserves
Retained income
Contributed surplus - Art Collection ,
Total general funds liabilities and surplus
Aquatic Centre Trust Fund (Note 2)
Bank demand loan, secured by assignment of Aquatic Centre
fee levy, of $5 per student year
Liabilities on and equity in buildings: .
Long-term debt: University of British Columbia, secured by assignment
of student fees at $15 per student year:
6%% debentures
Accrued interest .
Sank loan (Note 3)
Less loan recoverable from The U.B.C. Thunderbird
Winter Sports Centre
Total long-term debt
Excess of equity in buildings over related debt thereon
Total student facilities liabilities and equity
1977
$     19,057
164,003
96.087
278,147
.426.192
149.680
75.223
224,903
446.886
703,339
113.486
' 104.663
670,789
126.410
103,389
921.488
900.588
532,838
426,338
478.076
1.010.914
375.000
801.338
794,227
* 25.812
1,023,964
33.780
830.039
1.057.744
227.964
294.464
227.964
294.464
820,039
2.881.413
3.701.482
4.712.366
1,057,744
2.818.608
3.876.352
4.677.690
$5.633,854
$6,578,278
NB: This budget does not reflect possible increases in cost of products, beer, wine, liquor, etc. or other external factors, outside of
our control.
Submitted by Glen Wong,
Director of Finance,
October 12,1978.
Ubyssey Is required by the Alma Meter Society constitution to prim its
budget each year. The budget will be presented to the student
representative aeaemWy next week tor first reading.

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