UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Sep 19, 1968

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0128687.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0128687.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0128687-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0128687-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0128687-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0128687-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0128687-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0128687-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0128687-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0128687.ris

Full Text

Array AMS-SENATE MEET DRAWS MIXED REACTION
The student-senate discussion of the Alma Mater
-Society brief on academic reform will now move
into joint committee discussions, says AMS president
Dave Zirnhelt.
In an interview Wednesday, Zirnhelt said a series
_ of meetings between an AMS committee and a senate
_ committee will follow Tuesday night's student-senate
discussion.
"The committees will be equal in number and I
will specify in my proposal to senate that all discussions be open to everyone," he said.
_ COMMITTEE MEMBERS NEEDED
"The student committee could possibly be chosen
at the council meeting Monday, but I think it might
. take longer: We would like to advertise for applicants."
Zirnhelt said he expects UBC president Kenneth
Hare will appoint members to the senate committee
if the proposal is accepted.
"There already exists an ad hoc senate committee
appointed at the last senate meeting to examine the
'student brief," he said. "I expect this will serve as
the basis for the discussion body."
"We are going to have to get down and hammer
jout the more specific problems, and I think this type
- of conference is the way to do it."
Zirnhelt said if senate does not accept the proposal, the two committees will have to work separately to solve the brief problem.
Of Tuesday's meeting, Zirnhelt said he thought
it was the uninvited students at the discussion who
benefitted the most.
"The one to one discussion that resulted was the
best form of discussion that we could have had at
that point," he said.
About 130 uninvited students attended the Tuesday meeting at International House and entered into
discussions with individual senators.
FACULTY ABSENCE 'REGRETTABLE'
Some 20 of the 26 invited councillors were at the
meeting, and about 50 of the 84 senators attended.
Hare could not be present due to an illness.
"I think it was a microcosm of the way we should
be solving all our problems," said Zirnhelt.
"It is regrettable that no faculty members decided to come to the meeting. We would like to see
them involved in these discussions with everyone
else."
Said AMS vice-president Carey Linde: "The
senate will not change because of that meeting.
Hopefully, it enlightened some students as to how
strong tradition is at this university."
Linde said he felt many of the senators did not
take the students and their requests seriously.
"What we have to do is stop dealing with the
senate and the faculty and start dealing with the
students," he said.
GAGE NON-COMMITTAL ON MEET
Deputy UBC president and dean of interfaculty
affairs Walter Gage said Wednesday he considered
the meeting neither a full success nor a complete
failure.
"I think it was a worthwhile meeting, although I
do not think it was a real success," he said in an
interview.
"I do not think it helped student council or the
senate to have all the uninvited students there, but
I do believe it was those students who got the most
out of the meeting."
Zirnhelt said he believes all the requests of the
student brief will eventually be met, buf it will take
some time.
"I think we will have students sitting on curriculum committees this year and a pass-fail system in
many faculties by next," he said.
"I do not expect miracles, but I do expect some
concrete results to come of our discussions with the
senate."
What's
Mora I man got
that Ac id man
hasn't?
Vol. L No. 5
VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY,  SEPTEMBER  19, 1968
224-3916
— dick button photo
JAMES CLUFF, arts 2, being taken away by a   Vancouver ambulance unit, after the motorcycle he was riding was struck by a car. Guff    spent  40  minutes  on   the  main   mall   before
being taken to Vancouver General Hospital.
Frosh retreat
has poor turnout
By ULF OTTHO
Only four first-year students have signed up for the AMS-
sponsored frosh retreat.
Buzz Knott, frosh retreat organizer, blamed the poor response on lack of communication between the AMS and first-year
students. He also said first-year student apathy was also a cause.
Knott said the retreat is being well advertised, with radio
.announcements, posters and notices.
The retreat will be held this year at Camp Potlatch, on Howe
Sound, from Sept. 20-22, on a weekend.
Attending will be dean of inter-faculty and student affairs
_ Walter Gage, acting dean of arts John Young, chemistry department head Dr. Charles McDowell, and psychology prof. Dr. E. I.
Signori. Signori is on the committee questioning the need for
exams.
Also attending will be AMS president Dave Zirnhelt, and
some members of the AMS council.
UBC president Dr. Kenneth Hare will not attend because
he has the flu.
Knott said that unless at least 120 first-year students sign
up to go, the retreat will be cancelled.
He said the AMS is prepared to take a loss of roughly $500
if only 120 students go.
The AMS will pay $2,000 to cover accommodation expenses.
The $10 per student charge is not expected to cover the ejdpenses,
he said.
"Any first-year student who is interested in going should
come to a general meeting in Bu. 203 at noon today," Knott
-said. "If the turnout to this meeting is poor, frosh retreat will
be cancelled."
v~,v*-  >/&*& ,■■-,$&«>■■ .<*$mj>%^<& -
Man bleeds ,
40 minutes !
on street
A motorcyclist lay bleed-
! ing Wednesday for forty
! minutes while waiting for an
I ambulance.
James Cluff was struck
I by a car at approximately 2
j p.m. on the main mall near
! the electrical engineering
: building.
Cluff, who suffered a
| gashed leg ,was attended by
| tbe university patrol, the
JROMP, and the fire depart-
| ment while he waited for the
i ambulance.
He was taken to Vancou-
I ver General Hospital for
\ treatment.
A traffic office spokesman
[said the injuries sustained
! were minor.
The administration has
| claimed in the past that it
| is not practical to maintain
| an ambulance on campus.
| Students must wait for an
I ambulance to drive from
! Vancouver.
Comic sparks
Straight bust
Police morality squad officers Wednesday raided the offices
of the Georgia Straight newspaper and seized six copies of the
current issue.
Straight editor Dan McLeod said in an interview Wednesday that three detectives questioned him and cartoonist Zip
Almasy regarding the publishing of an Acidman cartoon strip.
"They came in here about noon with a search warrant and
made reference to our publishing an obscene item," McLeod said.
"They questioned us about the Acidman strip and about the
general operation of the paper. They wanted to know who the
editor was, who was responsible and so on.
"We refused to answer."
McLeod said the decision not to answer was based upon
advice given him by lawyer John Laxton, who is currently
defending McLeod, Straight writer
Bob Cummings and the newspaper
on charges of criminally libeling
city magistrate Lawrence Eckardt.
Magistrate James Bartman was
expected to render a decision Friday morning on whether or not the
libel case should go to high court
trial.
"The officers also spoke to Zip,
who did the Acidman strip, but he
also refused to answer," McLeod
said. ACIDMAN
He said the officers then seized six copies of the paper and
left.
"After they had gone, Zip found a plastic bag full of tobacco  was  also missing,"   McLeod  said.
He said police then questioned Len Horton, assistant manager of College Printers, 2015 West Twelfth. College has been
printing the  Straight since  February.
McLeod said he did not know what Horton told the detectives, but officers seized the Acidman photographic negatives
from the print shop.
"We also got a call from the post office telling us police
had sent them a letter requesting mailing of the paper be
halted," he said.
"But the papers had already gone out."
McLeod said some 1,000 copies of the issue were sent out
as subscriptions and another thousand were mailed to bookstores.
"One of the officers told me that in his opinion the comic
strip was obscene," he said.
"The decision is not up to him, but it looks to me as if
charges will be laid.
McLeod indicated that another legal battle will be crippling
to the Straight.
"The only money we have for the hassle we're in now is
$200 in the defence fund," he said." And that's nothing but
peanuts. Page 2
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, September 19, 1968
* .   - *• Ji -IM-- .-
***. 'jfikfttttti   'j^JnjfM   * *
«r*V ?w^42*** **- *****^
DEFUNCT GHOST TOWN? Nope, just temporary huts housing oceanography and other faculties behind education building. Drafty, cold, uncomfortable shacks were put up in 1945
as  short-term  facilities.   Ask   local   slum   landlord, Cece Bennett, why they're still  here.
Unstructured task force
to study AMS reform brief
An Alma Mater Society commission is being
organized to study topics brought into concern
by the AMS brief, The Future of University
Education — Fair Weather or Foul.
An AMS official notice says the study group
has been organized to analyse and report on
problematic areas in student-university relations.
"Through public discussion the commission
hopes to promote greater student participation
in and knowledgeable comment on the politics
of education."
Areas under study will be academic curriculum, student participation in governing
bodies at the university, student and faculty
attitudes, financing of education, training, research, and promotion, student housing and
university physical planning, and dropping out
of university.
Boycott set
to protest
expulsion
BRANDON, Man. (CUP) —
Brandon University students
held a mass meeting Wednesday night to ratify a boycott of
classes starting Thursday.
A meeting of the university's
senate earlier Wednesday turned down student demands for
full representation on two senate committees—the discipline
committee and the adult admissions committee.
The flareup follows the Sept.
12 expulsion of a student for
threatening to throw a fake ex-
plosivte at guest speaker Laurier
Lapierre Sept. 11.
Since last Thursday about 60
students at this 850-student
university have picketed daily
around the administration
building protesting the expulsion and demanding a greater
role in making academic decisions.
On Tuesday, an African
scholarship student, Harko
Bhagat, was warned by letter
that he may lose his scholarship if he continues his active
participation in the protests.
The students are dependent
on the scholarships for their
stay at Brandon.
AMS president Dave Zirnhelt said Wednesday the commission will be a continuing assembly of people doing concrete research so
that the AMS can be more specific in its demands.
"I see it as a task force to bring people
together to study the problems," he said.
He has appointed Fred Grauer, arts 4, to
organize the task force.
"The terms of reference will be presented
to council next week," said Zirnhelt, "but I
don't want to structure it too much."
He said the task force will provide a forum,
providing information for people to focus on.
"The committee will present a paper to
council including the information it has collected.
"The AMS will take political action on the
committee's recommendations."
drj'.^i
French   students   revolt
PARIS (CUP) — The French student revolution flared
briefly again Tuesday when police were called in to evict
rebel students from the occupied Paris School of Fine
Arts.
About 20 students had taken over the building and
raised a red flag in protest against its continued closure
following last spring's action.
Meanwhile, at the new faculty of medicine, fighting
erupted after about 100 fine arts students disrupted examinations there. At least 15 were injured.
wmmmMMMmmMm»m
Melons introduce
Bissell's address
TORONTO (CUP)—University of Toronto students attending
president Claude Bissell's opening address Monday were greeted
first with a copy of Jerry Farber's "Student as Nigger", and then
a juicy piece of watermelon to bring the point home.
The handouts were provided by the Ontario Union of
Students.
Bissell was shaken by the display, but managed to continue
with his prepared speech. All the while, he kept his eye on
student president Steve Langdon perched on a balcony.
In his speech, Bissell stressed his definition of democracy
and openness.
Concluding, Bissell said, "From the ferment of today will
come a finer sense of community. There can be no community
in a university unless it is based on ideas. What we are looking
for is a diminution of routine and a release of intellectual energies. In short, we are seeking to establish an ideal society, and
that is a task which, in the nature of things, is never finished."
After the meeting, students clustered about Langdon to talk
about the speech. Langdon disagreed with Bissell's remarks on
knowledge.
"Knowledge is only important when it is applied," he commented.
engineers
& sciencemen!
get 10% discount on Clarke & Stuart's complete
line of engineering instruments, drafting
supplies and drawing materials. We have one
of the most complete lines available In
Vancouver, including Dietzgen and Staedtler.
We're open Saturdays, too. AMS cards must be
shown to obtain discount.
CLARKE & STUART, Div. of
WILLSON STATIONERS
550 Seymour Street 682-6688
PAUL   BOUTELLEJ^H
n
SOCIALIST WORKERS PARTY
CANDIDATE   Ur
VICE-PRESIDENT   of
th* UNITED STATES
Baioa
1230 FW.SeoUO
UBC Youn/Social
Coribct 6«P3M7
THE RUSH IS ON
CP
sF
<&
cC*
SIGN  UP
NOW
First Year Girls Welcome
Rushee's General Meeting
Thursday — Bu 106 — 12:30 p.m.
OFFICIAL NOTICES
Alma  Mater  Society
Student Assembly on the University
This Study Group has been organized to analyze and report on certain problematic areas in student-university relations. Through public discussion the Commission hopes to
promote greater student participation in and knowledgeable
comment on the politics of education.
The areas under most intensive study on which separate
reports will be written are:
1) academic curriculum;
2) student participation in governing bodies at the
university;
3) student and faculty attitudes (surveys);
4) financing of education (for the student and for
the university);
5) teaching, research and promotion;
6) student housing and university physical planning;
7) dropping-out.
Anyone interested contact:
Fred Grauer, Chairman, 266-2133
or
AMS Office, 224-3242 Thursday, September 19, 1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
IT'S EMPTY NOW but the central foyer of the new   $5,000,000 SUB will be packed on opening day Sept. 23.
■ dick button photo
Nigger of the Weak
•2&---SS. *.-:••
*<*$■*****$     ,.\K«J.S*U
Writer Fred Cawsey visited Monday's AMS
meeting with the aim of examining its democratic
processes. This column expresses his opinions.
By FRED CAWSEY
There was a country fair smell in upper
South Brock on Monday night. That's where
*  they hold the AMS students' council meetings.
* (You know, where they make all those dynamic,
progressive decisions that make UBC such a
nice place for students.)
The smell was not, of course, from pump-
- kins and watermelons, but from the brownies
gushing out of the mouths of the intelligentsia
who represent the trade schools on council.
.   For instance,  you'll be  delighted by  the
- antics of Greedy Petey (affectionately known
. for his floor hogging and eating habits) who
plays power broker and slyly winks policy
directions to the simpletons from the trade
schools. He's also well known and loved for his
active leadership in support of worthy causes
* (capitalism, censorship), and for his invaluable
legal advice to Chairman Uncle Dave.
And there's that camp-looking fellow in red
whose name seems to have got lost somewhere
Jn the hodge-podge.
This one's a real live wire. He brought his
fellow neanderthals to their knees with laughter
several times Monday night. Such sparkling
wit. One wildly funny example was a reference
* to some young ladies who were part of a delegation to council. "Dese broads are sure bet-
te* lookin' dan duh usual class we get around
here," he quipped. It really broke the place up.
Your council is really forging ahead on the
^social issues of the day too. They have now decreed that free speech and support of it is a
bad legal bag to be in. Monday night, as you
probably already know, they reversed their
earlier decision supporting the Georgia Straight
in its fight against the censors.
"Support of the Straight would make the
council legally liable in my opinion," pontificated Petey.
"And our responsibility is to the students of
this university," beamed Uncle Dave. (Table
thumping from the extreme right in the room.)
One frankly neanderthal councillor said:
"The Attorney-General's department has seen
fit to take action against the Straight and I
fully agree with their move." Charming fellow
that one. Cute too, for a bush baby.
When those rascally radicals tried to argue
that the principle of free speech was at stake,
they were put down with a chorus of boos and
hoots of "paranoia" from the goons across the
table. (The radicals, silly things, are fighting
a losing battle to preserve the STUDENT in
students' council.)
This was eminently apparent when council
awarded the SUB College Shop franchise to a
slick young capitalist lackey of an American
retail company. The only opposition came from
the handful who thought it might be a lark to
give students a chance to run it.
Of course there are also the lesser entertainments such as watching the kiddies try to
make a decision—such as accepting the minutes
of the last meeting. "I object to the fourth
comma, third paragraph, first sentence of the
amendment to the amendment in minute 21-A,"
declares one eagle eye. "This is clearly an attempt by those there particularly paranoid
pinkos to cloud the issue."
"Point of personal privilege," shrieks another, jumping on the table. "I have to leave
the room."
Just getting a vote to take place is an adventure. At one point the meeting chairman
gets so confused he asks for support of the
chair (legs?). Then they vote to have a vote
whether or not they should accept the result
of the last vote. Then, after it is all over, one
of them invariably remembers that he forgot
what the vote was about, and demands a rereading of the motion and a re-vote because
he voted wrong.
Thus goes the merry-go-round. No substance
and nothing more serious than incompetence,
but the admission is free and the show is terrifically avant-garde. (Stark realism with a
dash of the absurd.)
And, if you get a chance, ask Uncle Dave:
"Is there really a STUDENT'S council?"
Tokyo and London
via SUBmarine?
The Canadian Union of Students travel department
will occupy one office in the student union building.
High commanders of the SUBmarine ratified Sept. 18
an Alma Mater Society motion passed Monday night to
establish a western CUS travel office at UBC.
"I feel the new office will provide better service for
students," said external affairs officer Tobin Robbins.
A proposed fight from Toronto to Moscow and possible one way CUS rate flights from Toronto to London are
being planned.
A CUS man will be stationed in the SUBmarine to
provide travel counselling for students. CUS will pay all
office operational costs. <
The SUB management committee allocated the office
to CUS free of charge subject to review on or before Sept.
1, 1969.
Okulitch grants
B&B approval
Science Dean Vladimir Okulitch expressed cautious approval
Wednesday of the science anticalendar, the Black and Blue Review.
"The student evaluation always has a profound effect upon
the faculty," Okulitch said.
"After the last one a number of professors • who received
poor reviews went immediately to the heads of their departments
for discussions on how they might improve their teaching. They
did not wait to be asked to appear for consultation."
But Okulitch indicated that the evaluations in the review
might not all be valid and correct.
"Some may consider this a negative approach. Perhaps our
purpose should be to reward the good as well as to criticize the
poor."
Okulitch also commented on the statistical validity of the
review. "As before we are gaining experience in doing this and
are hoping to improve our methods of sampling and statistical
evaluation." Page 4
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, September 19, 1968
THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university years
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the editor and not of the AMS or the university. Member,
Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey subscribes to the press services
of Pacific Student Press, of which it is founding member, and Underground
Press Syndicate. Authorized second class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash. The Ubyssey publishes Page
Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City editor, 224-3916. Other
calls, 224-3242 editor, local 25; photo, Page Friday, local 24; sports, local
23;  advertising,  local  26.  Telex  04-5224.
SEPTEMBER 19, 1968
Canadaghetto
Tuesday's editorial drew an analogy between the
oppressive environmental conditions of ghetto blacks
and students.
Letter-writers since then have attempted to disprove
this analogy by pointing out that students are perfectly
free to leave the ghetto at any time and go out into the
great and free Canadian society.
A strong argument can be made, however, that in
doing so Canadian students are merely leaving one
ghetto environment for another.
Many American blacks have realized they are
oppressed colonial citizens of imperialist American society—in fighting for self-determination they are attempting to wrest the economic, social, and political control
of their society from corporate capitalist interests.
It seems clear that in Canada as well the social
political, and economic institution are either wholly
owned by American institutions or staffed by 'Uncle
Tom' Canadians who owe primary allegiance to America.
Economically, most Canadian basic industry is owned wholly by American interests, and the remainder
owned by Canadians who see themselves as a class of
international capitalists looking to America as the highly-
developed model on which to base the future.
Socially, the projected image of what the Canadian
citizen should think, wear, eat, and use is identical to
that of the American.
Politically, the Canadian nation is governed by a
political party which is admittedly dedicated to even
closer interaction with the American industrial complex,
Canada playing a resource-producing and branch-plant
role to America, the producer of finished goods.
B.C.'s government has a remarkably simliar attitude
when defining this province's economic role.
What are the implications, given this situation, of
Canada's role vis-a-vis current manifestations of American society.
Canada undoubtedly supplies a large part of the
raw materials of the American war economy.
Canada's PET was quite explicit when questioned
by Martin Loney before the last election that it would
make no difference to the American war effort if we
stopped exporting arms to that country — the only way
we would have anv serious effect on the war economy
he said, was to stop shipping all raw materials.
But clearly the government has no serious intentions
of following that path.
The social conditions and treatment of a Canadian
racial minority, the Indians, is remarkably similar to
those of American blacks, although their numbers are
small and their ghettos are mainly outside the big
cities.
American upholders of 'law and order' are savagely
beating those members of society who are in the streets
demanding tbpt their economy stop its war production
and. draftin*-** of youth for the war machine — Canadian
defenders have shown thev are equally prepared to do
the same if Canadians become as active in demanding
a stoD to Canadian -war oroduction.
The atmosphere of the ghetto, a society existing
for and controlled from the outside, is to be found,
therefore, throughout the Canadian nation.
If Canada is to escape the cataclysmic collapse
American society is heading for, it will only be through
the efforts of the activists who see the end of the corridor
down which we are heading and say that a new and
different basis of society must be developed.
The university is as meaningful a place as any in
which to agitate, as it is an industry, supplying Jcey
technicians and personnel to allow other institutions
to function. It also provides the training-ground for
politicians who will deote themselves to upholding the
present structure of society when they leave.
Seizing and holding buildings in the university stops
the institution briefly, and relaxes the overwhelming
pressure to keep the production line going ,so that students may be forced to question, during and after the
stoppage, why they are continuing in their pre-deter-
mined direction.
It gives the activists a chance to carry out some
of their plans for restructuring and re-directing, and
shows when suppression comes that the governing
forces in the society won't allow a serious change to
take place.
WOMEN:
Why are they inferior?
By RUTH DWORKIN
I go to classes; I sit; I'm a good girl! But if
I want to get into medicine, or law, or architecture, then I've got to be more than good; I
must be better: better than the men who are
applying for the same space. It's only fair. After
all, they'll have to make a living !
By now I've probably got half of you agreeing with me (How sensible, how sane she Is,
to recognize the way things should be). What
I'd like to know is why things should be this
way.
Is it biological that men and women have
different roles ? Are men biologically or otherwise superior to women ?
There was a time when the superior physical
ability of men made them dominant over
women because they were more capable to
perform physical labor. Strength was necessary
for survival; now, however, physical strength
is not essential and yet, woman is still dependent upon man. I could pass it off by saying that
once in bondage it is very difficult to break
away, but it is not that simple.
The roles assigned to men and women are,
primarily culture-determined. We expect men
to be aggressive, active, intellectual and impatient, whereas women are 'by nature' passive,
submissive, emotional and patient. Women are
'suited' for the home, so the story goes. What
garbage ! That little piece of Y chromosome that
differentiates male from female is just one of
46. It's utter nonsense to think that it could
.cause such biological differences as are attributed to it!
There is no natural inborn instinct for certain roles and personality traits. Women are
reared to be suited for the home. We are
taught to be dependent on men and we are
brought up to behave differently from men. It
is all right for girls to play with dolls, to cry
or to bake cakes, but not for our brothers; it Is
all right for boys to climb trees, play with chemistry sets, bring home frogs, toads and tadpoles,
but girls must be 'ladies.' We are to be submissive and patient and we must cater to the
egos of 'our' men. Heaven forbid that we should
want to enter into business and hence competition with men, or to be doctors or lawyers, dentists or pharmacists! There are acceptable behavior  patterns  and   unacceptable  ones.   But
why can we not do what we want ?
I'm not disputing the fact that a lot of
women are happy with their defined roles and
play them beautifully; it's easier to accept the
way things are than to try to change them. Besides, we were brought up to believe that we
had 'the role' to fulfill. But there are some
women who are not satisfied with a predefined
role — or any role, for that matter.
As some of us women become more aware
of our intellectual and political powers, we experience a loss of emotional identity in our
personal lives. Men seem to find it difficult to
relate to a person who combines both roles and
they insist that we be one or the other. But why
should we have to be either-or? Why can we
not pursue our own route of happiness ? Why is
'woman' an assumed unconditional love symbol,
and why should we be expected to raise
children ? Physiologically we carry them, and
initially we nurse them, but there is no particular biological reason why women should act
as the socializers of children. The inability until
recently of women to control their own reproductive capacities has made it convenient to
accord to women the position that they have
been given. Now, with the pill, there is no
reason for a woman to bear a child she doesn't
want, and thereby assume a role she doesn't
want.
This female fight for liberation creates a
dilemma for men as well as 'women. Men are
brought up to believe that they are smarter,
more rational and generally more talented than
women. So when a woman plays better tennis,
is a better pianist, a better painter, or can out-
think the man, the poor male is threatened because he does not seem to be living up to the
masculine image. The masculine image ! All the
magazines lay it down for us, all the media
remind us, and now you're supposed to live up
to it! A woman who is smarter than the man devalues him in his own eyes and unfortunately
in the eyes of others who think in this fashion.
So the male and female roles can confuse
men as much as women. Before we can be truly
liberated human beings we have to stop label- .
ling behavior patterns as being either 'male
or female', and allow ourselves to just be ourselves. For neither men nor women can be
free until both are free.
* \',. *    <■* ■"""! f*** - ■>"*■■;*•.'! ***'**■ '*••!■* *   * *
LETTERS TO  THE EDITOR
^^         ■ to make a communal affair of ghtered by bombs? Why don't
*wGff£?C706 •**- * say y°u can  keeP 7°^T y°u compare yourselves to star-
~ mononucleosis and your social ving children? You are full of
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir; diseases. End of sermon. shit.
I am (writing this letter to Anyway, to make my point No one in history has been
protest the amount of garbage dear I'll just say that I'm sick more privileged and free than
that I have detected in the and tired of all the fucking and you are. If the university lea-
issues of the Ubyssey this year. the   fuck-you's   and   the   free ves   much   to   be   desired;   if
Re   Tuesday,   I   think   that lovers.  Please  clean  up  your stupid people push on you, this
there   are   enough   important crude articles. is bad, and it can be hard, But
issues at present that such dirt TIM   HICKS don't you dare draw such i.g-
as   Jill  Cameron's (to   quote Science 3 norant, smug analogies,
part of her sentence) "fucking _ We must work with what we
Sn   the   classrooms,"   or  Stan FfifllC are' and iileTe's no way around
Persky's desire  to sleep  with Wld our class origins and the limit-
the looser members of the mui- Editor. The Ubyssey, Sir; ations of our experience,
titudes,     or     Carey     Linde's So white UBC fancy them- BERNARD WASOW,
arousal   over   everyday   activ- selves    an    opressed    people? Instructor,   Economics
ities or his insinuated activities You are fools if you think so. mmmffifflmmmmmmmmmmmmm
in 'C-fLot, can be left out. You do not know what it is editor: ai Birnie
I am not going to be so prud- to be hated and neglected from     city Desk  Paul Knox, Mike Fimay
ish as to say that tthis is not the day you are born. You do     New* John Twigs
a part of life. But is it not a hot  know what it is to have     **••*■■'"■   Mike Jessen
private or personal part of that no words. Why don't you com- ^1..^
life? Pare yourselves to the mothers       Page Friday   Andrew Horvat
For those of you who want whose children are being slau- r . ^_4ts < , *   ^ „    , .         ^„ Thursday, September 19, 1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 5
LETTERS ON
MEREDITH
'An Insult'
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
It would be presumptuous of
the undersigned to "defend"
Dr. Thompson against the irresponsible charges made in
the anti-calendar. No defense Is
possible against students who
r ej e c t intellectual diversity
with an attitude towards literature so one-sided that they are
unreceptive to a critical view
divergent from their own.
There is certainly a marked
contrast between what is called an "authoritarian" approach
in Dr. Thompson and the emotional effusions passing for
criticism among so many liter
ary "types". Dr. Thompson, it
is true, remains essentially firm
in his own position. On the
other hand, three critical collections which reflect the variety of modern approaches to
Chaucer are required as texts,
and students are well guided
towards works which contain
fuller developments of them.
This so-called authoritarianism
is not invalidated because one
literary ingenue indicts It to
slander an instructor.
Apart from the fact that it is
an exaggeration to summarize
Dr. Thompson's methods as
"historical biographical", it is
questionable that such a presentation is "outmoded" for the
material at hand. Few, if any,
students encountering medieval
literature for the first time are
sufficiently versed in the artistic and allegorical techniques
of the age to produce relevant
criticism without the background of information which
Dr. Thompson provides in his
inimitable, amusing, and perceptive way.
If the characterization of Dr.
Thompson as "unreceptive to
student opinion" is intended to
suggest either that he is unwilling to entertain critical opinions counter to his own or that
he is not co-operative with and
sympathetic to student projects, it is a simple prevarication and nothing less.
Dr. Meredith Thompson is
one of the best qualified and
Jmost learned members of the
UBC English department. He is
a recognized scholar in his
field and has many years of
teaching experience in Canada
and the United States. To have
his genuine competence challenged on the grounds of personal idiosyncrasy, which to
the serious and aware student
is part of the pedagogical method by which he reveals his
love of his material and part
of his personal charm, by immature and petulant students
is an affront. That such an indictment should emerge from a
class of honors and graduate
students adds a dimension of
puzzlement to the revulsion
which the report stimulates. If
Dr. Thompson is an "insult to
the students of UBC", English
studies here are in serious
, trouble. It is certain, however,
that this report is an insult to
one of the department's outstanding teachers against which
the undersigned, all of whom
are at present, or have recently been, graduate students in
the department of English,
vehemently protest.
JANE FREDEMAN
HENRY J. MYERS
LILITA RODMAN
MARYA HARDMAN
BARRY PEGG
AUDREY THOMAS
'Erroneous
Editor, The Ubyssey:
We, the undersigned, disagree
with this year's anti-calendar
review of Dr. Meredith Thompson's Chaucer class, <English
355). We have all studied under
Dr. Thompson and many of us
were in the class which was
reviewed. We find the criticisms of his class to be erroneous, and the tone wholly
unwarranted and in bad taste.
We found him open to suggestions, entertaining and instructive.
(SIGNED BY 23 PERSONS)
Artsl apologize on review,
blast English department
By NATE SMITH
The arts undergraduate society has apologized for statements made in the arts anti-
calendar.
The anti-calendar review of Dr. Meredith
Thompson's English 355 class quoted students
who referred to the class as "a number of
senile orgasms" and "a complete waste of
time".
"We apologize for the wording and bias of
the original review, formulated as it was only
upon the 27 questionnaires returned," AUS
president Ralph Stanton and student-faculty
committee representative Michel Lalain said
in a statement Wednesday.
Stanton and Lalain said they had seen
letters signed by 19 students in sympathy
with Thompson's teaching methods.
Stanton said his apology is not a retraction.
"The fact remains that a large percentage
of Dr. Thompson's students did not like the
way he taught," he said in an interview.
The anti-calendar also said Thompson was
consistently 10 to 15 minutes late for class.
"Dr. Thompson was in the position of having
to teach two classes back to back," Stanton said.
"Because of his age and poor health he was
unable to do this without taking a short break
between classes," Stanton added.
Stanton condemned the English department
for allowing such a situation to exist.
English department head Geoffrey Durrant
said the situation was unavoidable due to the
death of another English prof at the beginning
of the year.
"Dr. Thompson was the only person with
enough experience in the field to take over the
class," he said.
Lalain said the department must bear the
blame for not having another qualified instructor available.
THE TRUTH ABOUT TINY TIM!
LIFE June, 1968:
WASHINGTON
POST July, 1968:
TIME May, 1968:
VARIETY
August, 1968:
NEWSWEEK
May, 1968:
CASHBOX
August, 1968:
LIFE June, 1968:
LOS ANGELES
TIMES July, 1968:
RAMPARTS
August, 1968:
THE HOLLYWOOD
REPORTER:
July,   1968:
When he rode through New York in a taxicab, parents sitting with their children in cafeterias would
stand and wave at him through storefront windows. Tiny Tim fever in America is reaching a pitch
as high as his voice.
Rowan and Martin's prima donna had no trouble in enchanting his eager listeners. His stage presence
is all-embracing.
Tiny Tim is a gentle soul who happens to be the most bizarre entertainer this side of Barnum and
Bailey's sideshow. The purity of his madness cloaks him in an impervious aura of innocence. In the
audience, as at San Francisco's Fillmore Auditorium last week, his listeners are rapt, incredulous,
amused, everything but indifferent.
At Caesar's Palace Tiny Tim is the hottest ticket in Vegas and this huge (1,100 capacity, $7.50 minimum) showroom is sold out the entire week.
"I love to keep continually clean because when I'm with girls, they are always the essence of
purity," says this spectre of Victorianism who can only mention the words sex and kiss by spelling
them.
As the top billing act, and one of the anticipated high points of the Newport Pop Festival, Tiny Tim
was brought on with tremendous fanfare. He was the only performer that weekend requiring a
police escort to hold back the mobs of fans.
"Wind him up and he's an old 78 r.p.m. talking machine, conjuring up the lacquered, scratchy voices
of Russ Columbo, Arthur Fields, Gene Austin, Ruth Etting, Irving Kaufman, Rudy Vallee, Billy
Murray and Al Jolson.
How real is Tiny Tim? He is real enough to sell out his first concert in the Santa Monica Civic
Auditorium and real enough to receive a warm standing ovation for his performance, Which ranks
as the most successful concert debut I have seen.
Beatle George Harrison sent him a telegram that said simply "You are a gas." And then John
Lennon invited him to appear at Albert Hall in September. The shy star of Tiny Tim is rising at last.
The audience was doubled over in laughter . . . what Tiny Tim does is present himself as a showman
and he delivers an extraordinary evening. You'll never see anything like Tiny Tim in concert.
Tiny Tim will appear in person with Country Joe and the Fish, and the Collectors
SATURDAY AT 8 P.M. AT THE COLISEUM
Tickets at the Vancouver Ticket Centre, all Eaton's stores, and Townhouse Electronics. Page 6
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, September 19, 1968
SFU PLAQUE GLEAMS GANGRENE GREEN
By  GARR
Canadian University Press
Simon Fraser, primarily a
Bethlehem of Canadian student
revolt, reached another golden
milestone in the revolution
when it unveiled a plaque
to commemorate the reinstatement of five teaching assistants
fired in March, 1967.
The young radicals did not
wait all this time to order the
Freedom Square plaque; indeed, it was ordered in March,
1967. But the battle to install
the piece of metal which cost
the students the equivalent of
150 copies of The Quotations of
Chairman Mao took more man
hours than the actual revolt
it celebrates.
When the students announced they were going to order a
plaque to be placed in Freedom Square dedicated to those
"who gave of themselves in
the cause of academic freedom", the administration balked.
Simon Fraser primarily a
Social Credit government tourist attraction which, on free
days, is used by students. To
mar the landscape of that memorial to free enterprise with
gibberish would be, you must
admit, somehow wrong. A reply was sent to the students.
"Dear students: We have
checked the plans of SFU and
can nowhere find an area
designated Freedom Square. If,
however, you do insist on making this plaque a gift to the
university, it must be approved
by the aesthetics committee.
Your servants, The Boys in
the Front Office."
The student council saw this
as a right-wing ploy. But, just
as they were about to act,
someone noted that the plaque
had been misplaced:
Arguments were presented
by the left wing fringe that 150
copies of The Quotations of
Chairman Mao would not have
been as easily misplaced and,
besides, they would give the
students something to read until the plaque was located.
Faculty for
student
voice
Education faculty members
have voted unanimously to accept the principle of student
participation in decisions which
affect students.
A faculty meeting Tuesday
approved a motion to set up a
committee of faculty and students to decide which education
faculty decisions affect students.
A report released Wednesday and signed by education
undergrad society president
Jerry Olund and acting education dean C. E. Smith said the
committee of five students and
five faculty members would be
set up by Oct. 1.
"The committee will study
the areas where we may participate — probably things like
curriculum, registration and
evaluation of teaching," Olund
said in an interview.
He said the student members
will be appointed by the EdUS
as the lack of time prevents a
vote.
Some months later a young
frosh, while busily looking for
poster material to make up
some welcome signs for the
Canadian Legion Pincher
Creek Ladies' Auxilliary who
were about to visit SFU, stubbed his toe on what he thought
was a very hip door jam.
His burning investigative
fervor, given to him at registration, drove him onward. He
flipped the jam over and there,
for God and everyone to see,
was the plaque.
But what to do with the
plaque now re-discovered ? The
administration . . . they must
have a safe. And so, before
another student could lift a
beer glass in the name of freedom, the plaque was dropped
into the bottomless pit of the
bursar's safe.
Student newsmen immediately picked up the trail and went,
camera in hand, to snap a pic
of the plaque. The administration balked: "If the students
want a picture, the plaque must
be important."
The newspaper received a
communication via the dean of
student affairs. "Dear students:
We have noted your request
and shall look into the matter.
A brief call to the aesthetic's
committee, however, indicates
that no plaque has ever been
approved. Further, we have
checked the plans of the university and can find no space
allocation for freedom. Bearing in mind that students are
our most important product, we
remain yours, The Dean etc."
The newspaper students saw
this as a right wing ploy. But
just as they were about to act,
someone noted that the camera
had been misplaced.
Since then the level of student unrest has, like the moon,
gone through many phases and
were it not for the bursar's
annual spring cleaning program, the plaque and all it
symbolized would have been
lost in a dusty vault.
And now, gleaming on an
otherwise dull cement wall, is
a plaque which has found its
final resting place. Misplaced
and unwanted by many it will,
no doubt, come to share the
same gangrene hue of the government upon whose building
it is mounted.
ROTP
REGULAR OFFICER
TRAINING PLAN
IN THE
CANADIAN ARMED FORCES
EDUCATION FOR LEADERSHIP:
The Department of National Defence, through the
Regular Officer Training Plan (ROTP), sponsors a
programme of university education and leadership
training for selected numbers of young men who
have the potential to become officers in the Canadian Armed Forces.
Candidates with senior matriculation, junior ma-
iriculation, or who are university undergraduates
taking suitable courses, are eligible to apply for
enrolment as officer cadets in the Canadian Armed
Forces. The admission standards are high, but for
those who qualify, the way is open to a challenging
and rewarding career.
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS:
An applicant must have the following qualifications:
CITIZENSHIP: be a Canadian citizen.
MARITAL STATUS: be single and remain so until
commissioned.
They are either high school graduates or university
students in any undergraduate year. Undergraduates enrolled in the Armed Forces while they are
attending university continue at their university
until graduation.
Applications for general or honours courses in
Arts, Science, Engineering and several other courses
are considered. Applicants for university training,
and undergraduates, may obtain a complete list of
acceptable courses for ROTP subsidization from
Canadian Forces Recruiting Centres. You may apply
during the academic term but not later than 1 st April.
While attending university, cadets wear civilian
clothes and receive monthly pay at ROTP rates.
Uniforms are supplied by the Canadian Armed
Forces for summer training.
PAY AND ALLOWANCES—
REGULAR OFFICER CADETS:
Tuition and other essential fees are paid by the
Department of National Defence. Officer cadets
entering the Canadian Military Colleges are provided with necessary books and instruments; those
attending university receive an allowance each year
of $125.00 to purchase books and instruments.
Pay rates are as outlined in the attached Pay Rate
card. In addition, full medical and dental care, clothing and other benefits are provided without charge.
Annual leave (30 days plus travelling time) with pay,
maybe granted each year, usually after the summer
training period. Christmas leave is also granted.
MEDICAL AND DENTAL STUDIES:
ROTP does not apply to students entering the medical and dental faculties for whom separate subsidization plans are available. Details may be obtained at
a Canadian Forces Recruiting Centre or through the
Director of Recruiting, Canadian Forces Headquarters. Ottawa 4, Ontario.
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS:
An applicant must have the following qualifications:
CITIZENSHIP: be a Canadian citizen.
MARITAL STATUS: be single and remain so until
commissioned.
MEDICAL: be physically fit for enrolment.
AGE: have reached his 16th birthday, but not his 21st
birthday on the first of January of the year of entrance
if applying with senior matriculation, or his 20th
birthday if applying with junior matriculation. Consent of a parent or guardian is required if he is under
18 years of age.
The maximum age is increased by one year for
each academic year completed beyond senior matriculation.
HOW AND WHERE TO APPLY:
Applications and further information can be obtained   at
CANADIAN  ARMED FORCES
RECRUITING CENTRE
547 SEYMOUR ST.
VANCOUVER, B.C. 684-7341 Thursday, September 19, 1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 7
'.. MM':"'
• * *'" " f*"5'"«' id.'. .
'* d<;mMi"
— dick button photo
WHEN IT STOPS RAINING, beautiful girls come out of hiding.
Glendon head says   no'
to student class program
TORONTO (CUP)—The principal of Glendon College Monday rejected an unstructured
education program proposed by
the student council during
Liber-action week.
Scott Reid said revolutionaries at the college needed
more than "fire in their bellies"
to make successful revolution.
In his third annual speech to
Glendon freshman, Reid told
600 students to undertake the
changes needed in Canadian
society with "determination,
with warm, compassionate
hearts, and with cool calculating heads.
"Otherwise, your revolution
will betray you and you will
betray your revolution," he
said.
Debate raged at Glendon last
week over the quality of educa
tion. Student councillors asked
students not to register for
classes but rather to participate
in "people-generated classes".
Most students are now trying out both the unstructured
and regular classes.
Reid also announced that the
student union manifesto, the
document of reform prepared
by dissident students, would be
discussed by all members of the
college community at an open
meeting Thursday.
He said that various sections
of the document had been sent
off to committees of the faculty
council for study.
Reid expressed his hope that
three or four years of education at Glendon would produce
people who would have "more
fire in their bellies, warmer
and more compassionate heart"
and minds trained to be cooly
analytical in investigating problems.
He made it quite explicit,
however, that this would only
occur in an educational environment of "sustained disciplined intellectual activity".
Students forcefully
kept from registering
x NEW YORK (CUPI-UNS)—About 30 Columbia University
students suspended for their participation in campus demonstrations last spring, clashed Wednesday with police barring them
from registering for the new term.
Earlier in the week the university reinstated 42 students
suspended during last spring's revolt.
The reinstatements cover only those students not accused
of any other disciplinary offence or of a crime more serious
than criminal trespass.
About 30 other students, including Mark Rudd, leader of
Students for a Democratic Society, who will speak at UBC in
October, remained suspended.
The reversal follows a request Sept. 11 that charges against
400 students be dropped by New York courts. In both recent
moves, moderates were separated from radicals by the administration action.
"The president is hoping through these half measures to
divide the movement at Columbia," said John Thomas, leader
of Students for a Restructured University. "I think the president
is going to find that he will not be able to do that with these
measures."
Dr. Andrew W. Cordier, acting Columbia president, exercised what he termed his "right of executive clemency" to lift
the suspensions.
"There was general agreement," he said, "that this was a
wise and just decision and a widely-shared hope that, together
with the trustees' recent request to the courts for maximum
leniency regarding the handling of the criminal trespass charges,
it would contribute to an atmosphere of reconciliation and reconstruction on the campus this fall."
Rentals and Sales
TUXEDOS   -  DINNER   JACKETS
MORNING COATS - TAILS
ACCESSORIES
Complete Size Range
Latest Styles
10%  UBC Discount
JIM ABERNETHY, MANAGER
2046 W. 41st 263-3610
Youth bill
to give
new voice
WASHINGTON (UNS) — A
"youth participation" bill has
been proposed by a U.S. senator to give young people a
more responsible voice in local
and national affairs.
The bill, proposed by Sen.
Fred Harris (Dem.) of Oklahoma, calls for a federal office
of youth participation. It is to
be manned in part by young
people aged 16 to 24.
The office would administer
grants in aid to public and private organizations seeking to
recruit young volunteers for
public service programs.
Observers say prospects are
bright for passage next year.
SCIENTIFIC GRAPHICS
for   Theses   &   Publications
Graphs   -   Illustrations   -   Formulation
Drawings 8- Reproductions
Phone 733-4506 evenings
BUSY"B"
BOOKS
Used  University Texts
Bought and Sold
146 W HASTINGS
Opposite Woodwards
681-4931
Film-Maker's Workshop at INTERMEDIA, 575 Beatty
Fri., Sat., Sun. (Sept. 20-22) 8 & 10 p.m.
"HOMAGE TO THE SAN FRANCISCO
UNDERGROUND"
7 FILMS BY LEADING S.F. FILM-MAKERS
(Hindle,  Lipton, Abrams,  Bailie .  . .  ) and the soul of S.F.
Featuring the cine-poetry of Bruce Bailie
info: 874-6501
Contact   $4Q.50
Lenses       "* *r
Any Color - ALL FITTINGS - ONE PRICE ONLY I
Bring Your Optical Prescription
to Us . . . AND REALLY SAVE !
OPTICAL DEPT.
SINGLE VISION GLASSES —
Complete from $9.95 Includes Lenses, Frame & Case
At These Locations Only
VANCOUVER
677 Granville        -        Opp. The Bay        -        681-6174
NEW WESTMINSTER
657 Columbia      —      Opp. Army & Navy      —      521-0751
NORTH VANCOUVER
1825 Lonsdale - 987-2264
68 INVITATION 69
AN ENTERTAINMENT BQQK FOR STUDENTS ONLY!
Includes.
TWELVE OOEON THEATRES
SKIING (WHISTLER MTN.)
SKIING (MT. BAKER)
FREE GOLF-FREE SKATING-FREE BOWLING
KING OF CLUBS
THE REEF
VILLAGE BISTRO
RIVERQUEEN
MAISON LAWRENCE
2 GROUSE MTN. SKYRIDE TICKETS, 2 PIZZA- $4.50
TWENTY OTHER SPECTACULAR  OFFERS
2 tickets for price of 1
2 tickets for price of 1
2 tickets for price of 1
$2.00 FREE food
$2.00 FREE admission
2 tickets for price of I
2 tickets for price of 1
25% off everything
• at THE BOOKSTORE
• at HE «& SHE CLOTHING, ihevmage
Cost only $2.50 Page 8 (Advertisement)
THE     UBYSSEY
(Advertisement)
The Greek Way
^-TBie Greek system has existed at the UBC since 1924 when Phi Kappa
Pi came into existence.
Since then 14 other fraternities have joined forces to make it a
large and representative force on campus. The aims and policies of the
various local chapters are as numerous as is their membership.
The fraternity does have much to offer.
It gives the member a chance to experience and accept responsibility.
It enables the individual to express himself among equals. Most important, it attempts to prepare men for effectual living and for use to
the community.
Ideally, the Greek chapters place stress on scholastic achievement.
There are powerful movements among the International Organizations
themselves to place less emphasis on social activity and more on the
intellectual personality with the hope of securing the best all-round
education possible.
More than a place to go on campus, fraternities provide fellowship
through participation in intramural athletics, university work, and
social activities. Chapters throughout North America provide a wide area
of association and alumni contracts can prove beneficial in many ways.
Events such as Mardi Gras which donated $20,000 to charity last year and
Songfest provide an enjoyable university year for those interested in
participating.
Most fraternities are steeped in tradition and ritual. The formal
pledging and initiation ceremonies are patterns of acceptance that have
evolved from the middle nineteenth century when many fraternities
were formed. These procedures are as demanding as they are impressive,
but they reflect a nobility and beauty that is not easily forgotten.
The Greek chapters open their doors to students with at least 12
units credit every fall through the formal 'Rush' period when an aspiring
candidate gets the opportunity to attend social functions conducted by the
Greek chapters of his choice. He then decides which organization fits his
needs and best satisfies his interests. Upon acceptance he experiences a
pledge period of varying duration during which he prepares for initiation
and membership. The Greek way has much to offer to those who feel
do feel inclined don't miss the opportunity!
DEAR RUSHEE:
You are about to begin an interesting and sometimes hectic
experience,, and the purpose of this letter is to explain some
of the rules and practices of Rush.  First of all rushing places
you under no cost or obligation.  All expenses, including transportation to and from the various functions, are borne by the
various fraternities.  Upon completion, the decision whether to
accept fraternity membership rests with you and you alone.
The fraternities on our campus feel that for a rushee,
rushing is not only a time to decide which fraternity to join,
but initially to decide whether fraternity life would be at all
suitable to the specific individual.
INVITATIONS:
A few days before the function, one or two members of
the particular fraternity will call on you to deliver the invitation.  At this time, transportation can be arranged.  It also
gives you the opportunity to become acquainted with at least
one member of the fraternity before the function and to ask
questions about the fraternity or about rushing generally.
FINAL FUNCTIONS:
These are on Tuesday, October 8 and are divided into two
parts, one from 6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. and the other from 9:00 p.m.
to 12:00 midnight, in order that you may have a final look at
the two fraternities most attractive to you. You will want to
attend the late function of the fraternity toward which you are
leaning.
BIDS DAY:
Wednesday, October 9th is a day of silence until you
sign your bid at noon in the auditorium.  By this, it is meant
that you are not to speak to any fraternity member.
Please remember that you are not to attend any fraternity
functions during rush except those that are a part of formal rush.
Rushing by fraternity members is confined to functions and delivering invitations.  If this rule is violated, the fraternity concerned may be fined or prevented from pledging the particular
rushee involved.
If you have any questions or problems concerning rush
please don't hesitate to see myself or any member of the Inter
Fraternity Council executive during registration hours upstairs
in Brock Hall. As well there will be Inter Fraternity Council
representatives at every rush function to answer any general questions you may have about rush.
I hope you enjoy Fall Rush and wish you the best of luck.
Yours very truly,
Dave Dale-Johnson,
Vice-President,
Inter Fraternity Council.
"V     ' *}f*tft\<     vVW- 'fto*,-Vf.
The Inter-Fraternity
Council Executive
1968-69
President
John Simson
Vice-President
Dave Dale-Johnson
Treasurer
Bruce Stevenson
P.R.O.
Tom Gove
Secretary
Hugh Maddin
AN INVITATION
THE INTER-FRATERNITY COUNCIL
of
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
cordially invites you to participate in the
FRATERNITY FALL RUSH
Registration: September  16th to 20th,  1968 —  12:30-2:30
in the TV Room in North Brock
Open to students in second year and above
Rushing places you under NO cost or obligation
UBC Fraternities
Alpha Delta Phi
Alpha Tau Omega
Beta Theta Pi
Delta Kappa Epsilon
Delta Upsilon
Kappa Sigma
Phi Delta Theta
Phi Gamma Delta
Phi  Kappa  Pi
Phi Kappa Sigma
Psi Upsilon
Sigma Chi
Zeta Beta Tau
Zeta Psi
FRATERNITIES Thursday, September  19,  1968
THE     UBYSSEY
PSAs students,faculty
challenge old relations
Page 9
By GEORGE REAMSBOTTOM
BURNABY (Staff) — The
PSA department is where it's
happening, say Simon Fraser
University students.
PSA stands for the combined
disciplines of political science,
sociology and anthropology.
Most faculty and student rebels have come from this department, where courses are as
unstructured as possible.
At this instant university
where only the new is traditional, the PSA department's
faculty and students have
struck an agreement which
radically challenges old, tried
and increasingly shaky faculty-
student relations.
The agreement is expected to
be overwhelmingly ratified by
PSA intended majors during
next Friday's second slate student elections.
It will give PSA students
equal representation on all 10
faculty committees—grievances
library, salary (and promotion),
budget, appointments (new
faculty), teaching methods and
grading, Igraduate admission,
graduate program, staff relat
ions and curriculum.
A PSA student union was
formed during the s ummer
semester and union members
have been sitting on these committees for two months on an
ad hoc basis.
Once the new agreement is
ratified, their membership on
the committees will be official.
Student members are elected by the PSA student union
which includes some 1,300 of
SFU's 5,400 students.
The PSA faculty will put no
decision into effect until the
whole motion or part of it is
also passed by the PSA student union.
Any new or special committees will also have an equal number of faculty and
students.
Further, in cases where committee recommendations are
not made jointly or are not
accepted by one of the two
groups, a process of bargaining
between the two bodies will
be initiated until agreement is
reached.
PSA student union leaders
describe the agreement as an
other step toward democratizing the university.
And they hope other departments and schools will strike
similar agreements with students.
But the move is not without its critics among faculty
members. Students and faculty still have to demonstrate
that they can make the joint
committees work over a full
school year.
■^0 t    .$■(■-■,
*:
BRUNET
'Quebec collaboration
necessary' - Brunet
Early Canadian government policies were aimed at nothing
more than the deliberate extermination of the Canadien, a Quebec historian said Wednesday.
Michel Brunet, of the University of Montreal history department, was speaking at a noon-lecture on the history of
French-Canadian nationalism.
Brunet said English-Canadian extremist nationalism was the
main cause of French-English problems.
"The new generation of Quebecois will not accept the excuses that were given to their forefathers.
They know that bilingualism across Canada is
an empty illusion," he said.
"I want no special status for Quebec,"
Brunet said. "We must radically modify the
former patterns between the privileged Engish
minority and the French majority in Quebec.
Brunet suggested, in answer to a question
from a listener, that non-French speaking
groups in Quebec schools must be assimilated
into the French system.
"Of course, this transition must be done
slowly, we would establish bilingual schools
in Montreal and other large centres in order to handle new arrivals," he said.
Brunet said he did not advocate separatism.
"We want a new federalism in Canada," he said. "Quebec
must collaborate with English Canada. We must put aside the
wishful thinking, the slogans of past generations, the baloney
like that.
«- "We must build a new Quebec and a new Canada, and it
will be a long hard process."
Brunet said in an interview later that if Quebec cannot
obtain justice without separation, he would support separatism.
"Quebec is quite capable of surviving as an independent
political and economic entity," he said.
UBC professor awarded
$5,000 for speech work
A UBC pediatrics prof has been awarded a salary scholarship and $5,000 research grant from the Medical Research
Council.
Dr. John Gilbert says he will use the award to study speech
signals in children.
He said Wednesday he is interested in studying the way in
which children acquire a linguistic structure.
This will include how and when they learn to produce
sounds.
"I will study the development of deaf children and how
their development relates to the development of speech in normal children," Gilbert said.
It is hoped that the results can be used to help children
with communication disorders, he said.
PIZZA
mm
' EAT IN • TAKE OUT. DELIVERY*
Flowers & Gifts
• A COMPLETE FLORAL SERVICE
• WEDDINGS) & CORSAGES A
SPECIALTY
• GREETING CARDS & GIFTS
TELEFIQRA
"Flowers B*** Wire"
10% STUDENT DISCOUNT ON
PRESENTATION  OF A.M.S. CARD
Three  Short   Blocks   From   UBC   Gates
4427 W. 1 Oth Ave.   224-1341
Under New Management
Weekends are Wild at . . .
The Palttti
Birch Bay, Wash. — 6 mi. So. ot Blaine
featuring the soul music of
Chuck Stanford and Roger Laybourn
for your listening and dancing pleasure
Friday, Saturday and Sunday
Licensed premises . . . bring your I.D.
MAX DEXAIL
OFFERS
10% Discount
to UBC Students
2609 Granville at 10th
A complete stock of all the popular makes
of shoes for the college student, as well as
hosiery, handbags, slippers, rubbers.
Whatever your need in footwear you'll find it at
Dexall's. Pay them a visit —• see the exciting new
styles — and ask for the 10% discount.
Better Shoes for less
DEXALL'S - GRANVILLE AT 10th - 738-9833
SERVICE
CENTRE
Need banking service? We've got it . . . plus over a hundred years of
experience, and branches right across Canada. For the sort of service you
want, see the service centre—the Commerce.
Personal Chequing Accounts
Savings Accounts
Chequing Savings Accounts
(Full chequing privileges)
Current Accounts
Canada Student Loans
Financial Counselling
Other Sundry Services
CANADIAN IMPERIAL
<l>,
BANK OF COMMERCE
CAMPUS BRANCH: 5796 UNIVERSITY BLVD.
GORDON A. MYLET
MANAGER Page  10
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, September 19, 1968
■ .*•*"   .^33¥*4_-.'*. »»"■ ..t'-V* •■* ■  ■"■■",
— dick button photo
AFTER MANY days of rain and overcast skies UBC students welcomed a beautiful late-summer
day. Green, dry grass and the warm sun beckoned many students to just sit down and
enjoy precious time between classes.
WUS takes radical steps
This year's World University
Service conference took a step
toward radicalization of the
world student organization,
says local WUS public relations
officer Lloyd Pliska.
Delegates passed motions
providing for the phasing out
of Treasure Van, a travelling
international marketplace, and
Share Week, a fund-raising program for underdeveloped countries.
"Treasure Van and Share
Week took up so much of the
organizational time of WUS
committee members that it
could not play an active role
in campus life," Pliska said in
an interview Wednesday.
"The changes enacted at this
year's conference were provided for by last year's. WUS is
forced to take a radical departure from the old ways of doing things, it must evolve to
meet the needs of the changing
university scene."
UBC delegates attending the
Edmonton conference earlier
this month were math prof Dr.
R. A. Restrepo, Alma Mater
Society president Dave Zirnhelt, local WUS Education
chairman Michael Doyle, B.C.
representative Manuel Neira,
and Brian Burke, this year's
committee chairman.
"We didn't just talk about
problems on our own campuses,
but were told about campus
conditions in other parts of the
world — Paris, Tokyo, as well
as at Columbia University,"
said Burke.
"We realized that it's time
for WUS to abandon its tin-
shaking image."
Delegates passed a resolution
giving priority to developing
an international political consciousness in the university
community. The same resolution demanded the end of Treasure Van and the national
Share campaign within 24
months.
The WUS seminars are going to be abandoned now, and
in their place, a symposium
will be held in Canada to which
people   from   other   countries
will be invited. English   element.   They're   at
Said   Burke:   "The   Quebec     least two years ahead of us in
delegation gave a spur to the     thinking."
TODAY
IN  THE AUDITORIUM
** FREE SHOW**
LA PEAU DOUCE'
1:00 p.m.
Displays of Cinema-16
& Film Society in Lobby
11:30- 1:00
Today
SERIES TICKETS AVAILABLE
r**---*
YOU ARE
tye/come
TO BE OUR GUEST AT
A PREVIEW MEETING
of the
DALE CARNEGIE COURSE
SEE
• The amazing power of a trained memory
• How to quickly develop more poise and self-confidence
• How to get along even better with people
• How to communicate more effectively when speaking to
individuals, groups, using the telephone or writing letters
BOTH MEN AND  WOMEN INVITED
NO COST OR OBLIGATION
WED., SEPT 25th - 7:30 p.m.
HOLIDAY INN k^'ISw
Presented by "Thorfie" Thorfinnson
LEADERSHIP TRAINING COURSE
DALE CARNEGIE
No. 212-535 W. Georgia St. Ph. 685-1945 (24 hrs.) FOUNDER (R)
Help
wanted
The Ubyssey is in desperate
need of a copy runner. All you
need is a car and a few hours
three days a week.
The job consists of taking
stories and pictures from The
Ubyssey office to College Printers, 2015 West 12th, three
nights a week from 4 p.m. to 7
p.m.
Apply at the Publications office, Brock Hall, for further
details.
VARSITY
AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE LTD.
€ssoj
A Complete
Automotive Service
All  Models  -  All  Makes
"32 Years at this Location*
10 Ave W& Bianca 224-7424
AT INTERMEDIA
575-Beatty
FRI., SAT., SUN. (SEPT. 20-22)
8 t JO p.m.
"HOMAGE TO THE SAN
FRANCISCO UNDERGROUND''
7 FILMS by leading S.F. film-makers
OFFICIAL NOTICES
Alma  Mater  Society
Election for office of AMS Secretary
This office is open to a student who has completed his
or her first year or equivalent and is a fully registered
student for the 1968-69 academic year. Candidates must
have attained in the previous sessional examinations an
average of no less than 60% for 15 units or more, and
65% for less than 15 units.
Nominations will open at 9:00 a.m. Wed., Sept. 25, 1968
and will close at 12 noon Thursday, Oct. 3, 1968. Voting
will take place Wed., Oct. 9, 1968.
Elections for the positions of
Student Senator
The following are eligible to be elected to the office of
Student Senator:
Three students from the student body at large (including
The Faculty of Graduate Studies) to be elected by the
student body at large. To be eligible for election to one
of these positions, a student in the academic year most
recently taken prior to the election shall have taken a
full winter session programme of studies at this University and attained at least a second class standing; he
shall also be registered as a full time student at this
University.
Terms of Office: Of the students elected by the student
body at large, the candidates receiving the highest and
second highest number of votes shall hold office for 2
years, the candidate receiving the third highest number
of votes shall hold office for one year.
Nominations are open immediately. Nominations will
close on Oct. 3, 1968. Voting will take place on Wednesday, Oct. 9, 1968.
Nomination forms are available at the AMS office in
Brock Hall. Completed nomination forms should be deposited in AMS mailbox number 55. For further information contact Jennifer Johnston, Acting Secretary,
AMS mailbox number 55.
Returning Officer
Applications are now being accepted for the position of
AMS Returning Officer. The successful applicant will
assume responsibility for running all referenda and AMS
elections until the General Meeting in March. Applications and questions should be addressed to Jennifer
Johnston, Acting Secretary, AMS mailbox number 55.
Elections Committee
Applications are now being accepted for the Elections
Committee. Four members-at-large will be appointed by
the Student Council. The Elections Committee helps
govern the running of the Alma Mater Society elections
including drawing up rules and checking eligibility.
Applications and questions should be sent to Jennifer
Johnston, Acting Secretary, AMS mailbox number 55.
Public  Relations Clan
All those presently involved in AMS Public Relations
or those wishing to be, please contact Ruth Dworkin,
Vice President (Internal Affairs) or leave name and
phone number in AMS Box 51, Brock Hall. Thursday, September  19,  1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page  11
Swimming team prospects     tween classes
dulled by loss of star
According to coach Jack Pomfret, this year's
UBC swim team will have to work extra hard
if they are to keep up the pace set by teams
of years gone by.
In previous years the UBC
swim team has never finished
lower than second place at the
National Collegiate Swimming
and Diving Championships, but
they may heve to settle for less
this year.
Pomfret has lost two irreplaceable men in the form of
Ken Campbell, Olympic swim
team member and Phil Winch,
Canadian intercollegiate all-
star, who will swim with the
team but is ineligible for this
year's national finals.
Winch was just starting to come into his
own toward the end of last season and much
greater things had been expected from him.
Tom Dinsley, former Pan-American diving
winner and last year's winner in both the one
and three metre events at the National Inter
collegiate Championships will be diving for
UBC as well as coaching the other divers.
At the present time the diving team is working out on the trampoline every noon hour in
the Memorial Gym. Here is an excellent opportunity to get some expert coaching advice if you
are interested in diving.
Returnees Phil Dockerill, Frank and Ted
Dorchester, Terry Lyons and Jim Maddin will
have to work that much harder if the Birds are
to make substantial showings at their meets.
Frank Nordquist and Chris Hanna, who both
excel in freestyle and the butterfly, are two of
the better freshmen swimmers that Pomfret has
at the moment.
With a little bit of extra effort and a lot of
hard, strenuous training some of the other
freshmen are capable of upgrading the potential
calibre of this year's swim team.
There are approximately 2*5-30' swimmers
working out every Monday, Wednesday and
Friday from 4:20 to 5:45 p.m. at Empire Pool.
Coach Pomfret will welcome any new faces,
especially if they have the ability to move
through the water. Jack may be contacted at
the Memorial Gym office.
From page 12
p.m. to decide bookings for
all meeting rooms in  SUB.
Please  come prepared with
the bookings you want.
VARSITY ROD AND GUN
Meeting at noon today in Bu.
212.
SCIENCE UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY
Science jackets and sweaters
on sale all this week at noon
in Hennings lobby.
FILM SOC
Come to the Auditorium,
11:30 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. today
and meet the UBC Film
Society.
EL CIRCULO
Everyone interested in participating in the Spanish club
please come to this first meeting in rooms 400-402 at International House, Monday
at noon. Very importantL
PANHELLENIC
ASSOCIATION
Sign up now for sorority
rush. Frosh welcome—meeting Thursday at noon in Bu.
106.
YOUNG SOCIALISTS
Paul Boutelle, a black militant from the U.S. — Friday,
Bu. 102.
Olympic medallist Rogers
to coach UBC judo team
The UBC judo club has pepped up Its program this year in the expectation of recruiting
a larger membership, thereby producing a much
stronger competitive team.
Doug Rogers, one of Canada's best known
athletes, medalist at the Pan-American Games
and silver medalist at the Tokyo Olympics, will
be coaching the senior belts in the evenings.
Beginning members will work out Monday,
Wednesday and Friday at 4:30 p.m. in the
apparatus room in the Memorial Gym.
Senior members will attend these practices
to give the lower belts instruction, experience
and better competition.
Black belts Bruce Harwood, Charles Maig-
non, and others will instruct the afternoon
sessions.
Serious workouts have started already as
the UBC club prepares for its own tournament
and others throughout B.C. and Washington
State.
By dividing the club, instructors hope that
both seniors and the lower belts will receive the
best possible training at the pace they need.
The stimulation of competitive sprit between the two UBC clubs and the added practice time should place the UBC team high in
the numbers of winners at the different tournaments this fall.
Rugby coach optimistic
UBC rugby fans can look
forward to a very successful
season from the UBC rugby
Thunderbirds this year, according to head-coach Donn Spence.
Despite injuries to several
key players, Spence expressed
a great deal of optimism for
the upcoming season.
All four
UBC rugby
teams will be
in action this
Saturday and
all four are
expected to
be victorious.
This is especially optimistic considering that the
Thunderbirds
SPENCE will be play
ing last year's champions in an
exhibition match.
Missing from the line-up this
weekend will be Tony Hodge
and Eric Macavitti, both of
whom sustained injuries in last
week's intra-squad game. Rick
Hobson, a regular two years
ago, will see only limited action
this week, but is expected to
be in the line-up for the season's opener one week from
this Saturday.
In this year's starting lineup, 13 of the 15 players are
returning from last year's team.
Spence believes the experience
gained by the players from
playing together for a full season will be of great benefit,
and the team should be better
as a result of it.
Said Spence: "Last year we
had a very young squad, and it
takes a while for the team to
get used to each other and play
well together.
EDUCATION
Z
EDUCATION IN  SOCIETY:  EDUCATION  IN   SOCIETY:
1 hirecticnA Jw Change \
Z Introductory Film  Showings -
2 Thursday Sept.  19th    An  110 - 12:30, 1:30
ft Friday      Sept. 20th    Ed 100 - 12:30
o
c
o
>
"SUMMERHILL" has been run by A. S. Neill for almost Z
forty years. This radical free school  in  England  runs =
under  a  true  children's  government.   See  this  filmed
account, 25c. O
o
" SUNDAY, SYMPOSIUM, SEPTEMBER 22nd - At the Lutheran 3
Z Campus Centre, University Blvd. and Wesbrook Cresc, '_
Fireside  lounge.  Presentations and   open  discussion   .
11:30-12:30-"EDUCATION AND THE CHURCH?",
following the  10:30 Service
Mr. Eugene Baade, Vicar
2:00- 3:15-"CRITICS, CHANGE, CONTENT"
Dr. Charles Brauner, Z
Professor of Philosophy, Education </>
3:30 - 4:45-"FREEDOM AND AUTHORITY IN °i
EDUCATION" m
Dr. Robert Rowan, <
Assoc. Professor, Philosophy m
4:45-Fi!m, "SUMMERHILL" reshown g
5:30—Supper, to  be ordered in Q
6:30-VANCOUVER FREE SCHOOLS,  presentation and =J
discussion 2
8:00-"THE UNIVERSITY: CORPORATION OR _
COMMUNITY?" z
Mr. Jim Harding,
Simon Fraser University
Sponsored by the UBC Lutheran Students
ai.idos ni NouvDnaa *ajl3dos ni NouvDnag
<
u
3
a
III
>-
s
u
o
z
NOiiVDnaa
o
c
o
>
■H
5
z
</**
O
r>
-<
27
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
11
m
THEATRE EXCITEMENT
The  Homecoming
By HAROLD PINTER
A BIZARRE COMEDY
Winner of New York Critics' Award
With Robert Clothier, Al Kozlik, Lillian Carlson,
Lee Taylor, Edward Greenhalgh, Graeme Campbell
SEPTEMBER 20-28
Directed by John Brockington
Designed by Richard Kent Wilcox
STUDENT SEASON'S TICKETS (4 Plays for $3.00)
AVAILABLE FOR ALL PERFORMANCES
Sept. 20-28 "The Homecoming" by Harold Pinter
Nov. 8-16 "Man is Man" by Bertolt Brecht
Jan. 17-25 "Loot" by Joe Orton
Mar. 7-15 "The Miser" by Moliere
BOX OFFICE-FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE-ROOM 207
Support Your Campus Theatre — It Is For You
rr
a Page  12
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, September 19, 1968
TWEEN CLASSES . . .
Karate Club
to meet tonight
KARATE CLUB
Members please meet in
Brock lounge on Thursday at
7:30 p.m.
THE UBYSSEY
The Ubyssey is in desperate
need of a copy runner to
make one or two press runs
a day, three days a week, to
College Printers at 2200 W.
12th. All you need is a car.
Apply at The Ubyssey office
for further details and pay
agreements.
SPECIAL EVENTS
SPEAKERS
Panel discussion, 'Where Is
It At?', on the direction of
the student movement, to be
held on Sept. 19 at noon in
Angus 104. Hear: Martin
Loney, Stan Persky, Carey
Linde, Dave Zirnheld, Gabor
Mate.
DEPARTMENT OF
THEATRE
Dr. Dorothy Somerset will
be giving the first of a series
of Thursday noon hour lectures today in Rm. 112 of the
Frederic Wood Theatre.
These lectures, under the
title of "In Search of Ancient
Theatres — Greece, Turkey,
and the Middle East", will
commetn on slides illustrating the ruins of theatres.
FROSH RETREAT
All students interested in going on the retreat Sept. 20-
22 meet in Bu. 203 Thursday at noon.
WOMEN'S ATHLETICS
Girls interested in a girls'
golf team please phone Lau-
ries Innes (278-1115) or
Heather Munro (263-6677).
SDU
SDU (Students who Dig Unrest) meets Thursday at 7:30
p.m. in Carey Linde's office
in Brock hall. Open meeting.
VOLUNTEER SWIM
PROGRAM
Meeting Friday at noon in
room 211 of the War Memorial Gym for swimmers interested in attending a Red
Cross Royal Life Saving Instructor School (maximum
duration 30 hours). Prere-
qusiites are Leaders and
Bronze medallion levels.
INTER-FRATERNITY
COUNCIL
Rush fraternities, registration
in the TV room, North Brock,
daily from noon to 2:30 p.m.
CINEMA 16
Free show, La Peua Douce,
today at 1 p.m. in Auditorium. Tickets for 1968-69 season available at the door.
Avoid disappointment; get
series tickets now!
PRE-DENTAL SOC
Organizational meeting of
the Pre-Dental Soc, Thursday noon in Bu. 204, new
members welcome.
JUDO CLUB
Meeting today in Hennings
200, at noon. Films will be
shown. Everyone welcome.
VARSITY GOLF
Organizational meeting Friday noon in Law hut 9, all
interested please attend.
EDUCATION U.S.
Free dance Thusday noon in
Educ.   lounge,  with   Tomorrow's Eyes. Also Miss Educ.
candidates.
NEWMAN CENTRE
Joachim Foikis and his bag
of tricks invade St. Mark's
lounge noon today. Refreshments afterwards.
SKYDIVING CLUB
Meeting in Angus 213, Friday noon. Everyone interested welcome.
TOTEM PARK DANCE
Dance at Virginal Aorta with
Tomorrow's Eeyes, Sept. 21
at 9 p.m. Maids 75 cents,
makers $1.
FLYING CLUB
Flying Club meeting Friday
at noon in Bu. 212 for anyone having a pilot's licence
or interested in a flying
course. Reduced rental rates
possible.
CURLING CLUB
Important meeting Tuesday,
Sept. 24, 2:30 p.m., Bu. 106.
Sign up for curling.
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
Meeting Friday noon in upper  lounge of International
House, everyone welcome.
JUDO CLUB
Judo workouts Mondays,
Wednesdays, and Fridays in
apparatus gym at 4:30 p.m.
PRE-LIBRARIANSHIP
SOCIETY
Organizational meeting tomorrow, Bu. 225 at noon.
Everyone welcome.
ALMA MATER SOCIETY
Informal discussion between
foreign students and student
councillors on "Student Government and the student in
the academic community",
7:30 p.m, Mildred Brock.
AQUA SOC
General meeting and by-
election today at noon in Bu.
202. Everybody turn out.
VARSITY DEMOLAY CLUB
First   general   meeting   and
elections Oct. 3, all Demolays
welcome.  Room to be  announced.
VARSITY CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Everybody welcome to a corn
roast Friday evening. Meet
in front of Brock at 6:30 p.m.
STUDENT CHRISTIAN
MOVEMENT
Second evening in "Flights
of Fancy" series, four NFB
films and discussion on
"What is a Fairy Tale?", today, 7 p.m., International
House.
VARSITY CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Everyone welcome to come
and hear Rev. H. Butcher
speak on "What is VFC-
UBC?" in Angus 110, Friday
noon.
FILM SOC
Come to the Auditorium
11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. today
—meet the UBC Film Society
and see our equipment on
display in the foyer. Come
and join; we need projectionists and people interested in
films, production, or just
helping out.
SCIENCE UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY
The science anti-calendar —
"The Black and Blue Review" — is now available
daily at our common house
— Math Annex 1119.
AMS COORDINATOR
Meeting   in   Brock    council
chambers, on Friday at 1:30
Continued page 11
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students, Faculty & Clubs—3 lines, 1 day 75*, 3 days $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00, 3 days $2.50.
Rales for larger ads on request.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and
are payable in advance.
Closing Deadline is 11:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications Office, BROCK HALL, UNIV. OF B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
WHEN PLANNING YOUR NEXT
dance or party, book through our
agency. Exclusive agents tor the
Boston Teaparty, Blue Crusade,
Witness, Exotics & many more, Dan
987-67E1.
MEDDY'S PEOPLE AT PLACE
Vanier, Friday, September 20th. 9:00-
1:00. Residents $1.00. Non-residents
$1.35.
DANCE DANCE DANCE AT THE
Virginal Aorta featuring Tomorrow's
Eyes, Sept. 21, 9:00 p.m. Totem
Park Maids 75c. Makers $1.00.
Greetings
12
ALPHA TAU OMEGA PARTIES ARE
beautiful. (So are you, Fred). Thanks.
Michelle and Suzanne.
Lost & Found 13
PAIR OF GLASSES IN HUNGARIAN
engineer's car Monday, 1 p.m. Cal]
Jane  685-3606.
LOST: SMALL MULTICOLORED
change purse. Please notify Sheila
MacLean, Isabel Maclnnes Hall,
Fort Camp.  224-9047.
WOULD THE PERSON WHO FOUNIJ
books in B-lot please phone AM 1-
6430 and leave message. Urgently
needed!
LOST: KEY CHAIN WITH THIR-
teen keys. Finder please call Mike
at 684-2771 or leave at Physics office.
FOUND SLIDE RULE IN BUCHAN-
an 324. Inquire Publication Office,
Brock   Hall.
LOST IN FORESHORE PARK TEUS,
Clipboard and French 223 Text.
Finder please phone Norm 736-4965.
FOUND. ONE LOVELY BLACK SIZE
34 slip at Alpha Tau Omega House
after Saturday's bash. Phone 736-
4421. Ask for Hormone. No questions asked.
Rides & Car Pools
14
RIDE   NEEDED   FROM   CAPIDANO-
Highland area. Call Bob at 985-1708.
NORTH VANCOUVER RIDE WANT-
ed, to/from. Desperate, call any
time  at   985-2743.
HAVE CAR — WANT PASSENGERS,
from Coquitlam or Burnaby (Lougheed Hwy.). Phone 936-5643 after 6
p.m.
RIDE   NEEDED,   No.   5   ROAD   AND
Cambie,   Richmond.  278-8274.
SOUTH BURNABY. RIDE OR RID-
ers needed from Royal Oak Ave.
south of Kingsway for 8:30 classes.
433-6256.
RIDE WANTED FOR 8:30's 1st AND
Commercial, Larry, 253-0042 even-
'ngs.  Vancouver   12.
RIDERS WANTED ALONG ROAD
from Marine at Victoria at 8:30 de-
parts at 5:30. Phone 325-1036
RIDE WANTED FROM 21st AND
Dunbar for 8:30 classes, T.W.F.
Phono   224-0401   Ted.
WANTED RIDERS: CHEAP TRANS-
portation. City Hall area, Cambie &
16th.   For  9:30*s.   Call  Pat:   874-9619
RIDE URGENTLY NEEDED FROM
N. West - Burnaby area. 9:30's,
M.T.W.F. Please call Lorraine, 521-
4189.
DRIVER NEEDED. WEST VAN.
carpool. Park Royal and British
Properties area for 8:30's, phone 926-
1805.
EARLY   BIRDS   —   RIDE   NEEDED.
Must be on campus 6:30 a.m. Phone
224-0572.
NORTH VAN. CARPOOL DELBROOK
Highland area needs 2 more drivers.
Phone  Al,  985-5085.
Special Notices
15
UBC BARBER SHOP (IN THE VIL-
lage) now with 4 barbers to serve
you better. Open 8 a.m.-6 p.m.. 6736
University Boulevard.
FRENCH ENGLISH BILINGUALS
desperately needed for psychology
experiment. Phone 688-5002 after 5
p.m.
68 — INVITATION — 69
A students' directory to entertainment at student rates. At the Bookstore: at HE and She Clothing Shop
(tho Village): at Fort Camp, Totem,
Acadia canteen  shops.  $2.50.
HELP! FILM SOC NEEDS PROJEC-
tionists. Pay $1.80 per hour. If you
can run a projector or want to
learn, come to Brock 357 and announce  yourself.
"OWNER OF CREAM PURSE
wishes to thank student who kindly
turned  it  in to French Room".
Travel Opportunities
16
Wanted Information
17
ANYONE SEEING FRONT CHROME
wheels being taken off red '57 Chev.
in D lot on Thursday, Sept. 12.
Phone   321-1662   after   6:00  p.m.
URGENT: CATHERINE McNAUGH-
ton of Montreal, please contact
Krysia Mercer—office hours: 522-
3911 or at 1110 Cardero, Apt. 503.
Eves and weekends or call home.
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
FEMALE '68 GRAD ALREADY
misses campus life. Would like to
attend UBC functions escorted. Call
942-7768  after  5 p.m.
WANTED    FRENCH     TEN     SPEED
bicycle. Call any time, 688-7466.
Wanted—Misc. (con't)
18
TEXTBOOK WANTED. PRINCIPLES
of Biochemistry, Handler & Smith.
Please phone 255-9833. After 7 p.m.
Ask for Tony.	
2ND HAND "ANTHOLOGIE DE LA
litterature Francaise", Clouard Legr-
gewie, Phone Patsy, 261-1455, the
two volumes.
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale
21
1965 FIAT 1500 SPORTS CAR. BLACK,
red interior. Excellent condition.
$1,450. Phone 985-3734.
'60 VW FACTORY EQUIPPED CAMP-
er. Rebuilt engine. Custom tent extension. '60 sedan de Ville Cadillac,
power, air-conditioned. Call 228-2803,
after 6 p.m.  277-0647.	
'66 SUNBEAM ALPINE, 1 OWNER,
31,000 ml.; convertible, green, excellent condition, radio, new tires. $1980.
291-2039.
'62 SPRITE; NEW TRANS.*, CLUTCH
and  paint.  $850.  Call  732-8032.	
"ONE    OF    A    KIND."    1953    XK120
Jaguar.  Immaculate.  926-3163.	
1957 RENAULT, NEW CLUTCH, RE-
built motor, transmission. Must sell.
$250. Phone George after 6; 263-0337.
'62 METEOR STD. V8, RADIO,
w.w.'s, new clutch and starter. Top
shape,  224-3510.        	
1961 TR3A — NEW PAINT, MOTOR,
excellent top and Toneau cover.
Phone   926-2539.
'64 MG MIDGET EXC. COND. MECH.
sound and extras. See on campus.
Phone M.W.  at  224-9769.
1959 VOLVO. GOOD CONDITION.
$350 or best offer. Phone 876-7916
after  6  p.m.	
'59 CHEV. BISCAYNE, 6 CYL., 4
door, radio, 2 new tires, completely
reconditioned engine, brakes and
clutch assembly. $500.00 or nearest
offer.   Guido,   922-7578. 	
'65  AUSTIN A60. EXCELLENT CON-
dltion.   Call   738-8131.   _
1963 MERCURY COMET. BXC1?L-
lent condition. Six cylinder, two door
sedan, standard transmission, radio.
New tires, -{850.00. Phone 224-1772
after six. 	
T D E A L COMMUTERS CAR UBC
traffic—Mercedes 220S, good condition, semi automatic. 1959. Recently
overhauled. Well under $1000. Phone
733-6827   after   6   p.m.   daily.
Automobiles—Wanted
22
WANTED:    VESPA    SCOOTER,    291-
2039.
Automobile—Parts
23
Automobile—Repairs
24
Boats & Supplies
25
Motorcycles
26
'68   HONDA   175,    HELMET,   WIND-
shield. $540. 731-2270.	
YAMAHA 100, 6000 MILES, TWO
helmets, new back tire, $300. Phone
John,  Room 550.  224-9713.
HONDA 175, DIKE NEW, UNDER
3500 miles, $550, Phone 435-9958,
after  6.  Ask  for  Bob.
'67 SUZUKI 120 CC. TRAIL, 2900
mi., (Street tires, fender). 733-6219
evenings  before  10 p.m.  $350.00.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Dance Bands
31
Duplicating  8e  Copying
32
Miscelleous
33
NOW WITH APPOINTMENT SER-
vice. Upper Tenth Barber — Hair
Stylists, 4574 West 10th Avenue.
224-6623
Photography
34
Repairing—All Kinds
35
Rentals—Miscelleous
36
DUNBAR COSTUME RENTALS.
Children & adults. Reserve early for
Halloween. Also Scottish kilts. 5620
Dunbar. Ph. 263-9011.
Scandals
37
SCANDALS: ALL OVER THE PLACE
in SUB on Clubs Day, 12:30-2:30,
Sept.  26.	
HELP! FILM SOC NEEDS PROJEC-
tionists. Pay $1.80 per hour. If you
can run a projector or want to
learn, come to Brock 357 and an-
nounce yourself.  	
UNIVERSITY  CAB  COMPANY  LTD.
Serving Point Grey area for over a
week.  224-5025.
WE LOVE YOU, BRIGITTE. COME
again. The boys from Alpha Tau
Omega.	
INSTRUCTION
Sewing & Alterations
38
Typewriters & Repairs
39
Typing
40
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Female
51
GIRLS REQUIRED BY VAN. FIRM.
Sales dept., part-time, free training.
Echelon   Enterprises,   736-6223.
YOUNG MOTHER TO BABYSIT —
weekdays, my home, outdoor walks.
732-7002.
help Wanted—Male 52
WE NEED AN ENERGETIC YOUNG
man with Managerial experience to
build and maintain a sales force.
Only those who desire something
better,   need  apply.   Phone   321-2786.
Male or Female 53
PART TIME EXPERIENCED SHOE
sales — young man or woman —
Hughes Fine Shoes, 4516 W. 10th
Ave.  Ph.  228-8115.	
HELP! FILMSOC NEEDS PROJEC-
tionists. Pay $1.80 per hour. If you
can run a projector or want to learn,
come to Brock 357 and announce
yourself.
Work Wanted 54
Instruction Wanted 61
Music 62
ELECTRIC BASSIST — ANY BAG —
can gig two nights a week.  Phone
988-4564.
Special Classes 63
WILL YOU OR WILL YOU NOT
survive   your  own   cooking?   Insure
now! Attend Adult Night Course.
"Cooking for Bachelors". Carson
Graham Senior Secondary School,
2145 Jones Ave., N.V. 10 classes,
$20.00. Thursday, Oct. 3, 7:30-9:30
p.m.
Tutoring 64
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE     71
BIRD CALLS
YOUR    STUDENT    TELEPHONE
directory.   Buy   pre-sale   tickets   for
75 cents from Bookstore or Publica-
tions Office, Brock Hall.	
VARSITY  SPECIALS
Students'  desks   — from 14.95
New bunk beds    pair 29.50
Book cases   from 8.95
New   252   coil   Hollywood   bed
complete    -    49.50
We carry a full line of precision-cut
unpainted furniture at lowest prices
ever.
KLASSEN'S
3207 West Broadway RE 6-0712
(Beer bottle drive-in at rear of store)
FOR   SALE:   1965   YAMAHA   250   CC.
Good condition. Phone Don, 876-1587.
YAMAHA    AMP.:    TREM.,    REVERB
plus   Ace-Tone   organ.   Together   or
separate.   Offers!   Ph.   Pete,   738-3644
after  5:00.	
SLR CAMERA PENTINA, TESSAR
2.8 plus telelens, utility bag (leather),
lightmeter, filters, proxi lenses, bat-
tery flash, 2 years old, $95. 291-2039.
SIX FOOT FRIDGE FOR SALE.
Only $30. It works great if defrosted
every    three    weeks.    Call    874-7468.
Ask for Ken, or leave message.	
THE WORLD'S LARGEST SELLING
35 S.L.R. $40. Others $34, $25. Fac-
tory prices. Ph. SID 298-9110.
FORCED TO SELL: NORDMENDE
AM/FM transistor radio. Had 3
wks. Cost new $90. $70 or highest
offer.   Call  Rae   874-8903.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms 81
BASEMENT ROOM, PHONE, PRIV-
ate entrance $45. per month — 732-
7002.	
SLEEPING ROOMS, SHOWER,
cooking facilities near UBC for two
responsible students. Phone 261-4978.
HOUSEKEEPING ROOM A VAIL-
able. One girl can get ride with
3rd year student. Ph. 435-2708. Priv-
ata  entrance.	
APPRECIATE BLUES? HOMELESS?
Share our house, room for 2 or more'
males. 2177 W. 7th Ave. Any hours.
QUIET ROOM FOR QUIET MALE
student, non-smoker, non-drinker,
near  gates.   Phone   224-3096.
Room & Board 82
ROOM AND BOARD AT PHI DELTA
Theta   House.   2120   Wesbrook   Cres.
224-9073.	
ROOM   —   BREAKFAST   AND   SUP-
per.   $90   mo.   733-0984,   2466   W.   6th
Ave.
Furn. Houses & Apts. 83
HOUSE. FOUR BEDROOM. SINGLE
rooms or whole house. Share facili-
ties.   Ph.   738-0784  or 736-7128.	
GRAD STUDENT TO SHARE HOUSE
with three of same. Phone Bob or
Ken, 228-3089, 263-9603.
Unfurn. Houses & Apts. 84
Halls For Rent
85
Houses For Sale
86
Other Cities
87
BUY - SELL - RENT
WITH
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0128687/manifest

Comment

Related Items