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The Ubyssey Jan 12, 1971

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iT?isti3a^v
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—dirk visser photo
SNOW .. . CONCRETE . . . WIND ... AND PEOPLE. The elements descended on     journeyed to the citadel of education and in the end they were rewarded. With a cup
UBC and the SUB stone fortress Monday. But the students' unquenchable thirst for     of piping lukewarm SUB coffee,
knowledge won  out.  Through snow, traffic accidents and freezing weather, they
14 profs purged at U of Vic
VICTORIA (Staff) - Fourteen faculty members at
the University of Victoria are involved in a
tenure-promotion dispute that threatens to purge the
university of some of its finest teachers.
The dispute arose last month when nine professors
were denied tenure, promotion, or re-appointment after
receiving the support of their departments.
The' decisions of the English, philosophy, French and
Hispanic Italian studies departments and of the school of
studio visual arts were reversed either by arts and science
dean John Climenhaga or administration president Bruce
Partridge.
In five other cases, profs who were popular with the
students have been denied support from their departments
for tenure, promotion, or re-appointment.
In one case, that of chemistry prof Tikam Jain,
students feel the denial of tenure resulted from clashes
within the department.
In the past two years, the chemistry department has
had three heads and two acting heads. Students believe
that such turmoil has resulted in hard feelings among the
faculty and that Jain's denial of tenure has been one of
the results.
In two other cases, students will press for the
re-appointment of Robert Sward and Derk Wynand. Both
were denied re-appointment by the English department.
Informed sources say both men are poets of high
calibre in the creative writing division but they will "be
given the axe due to conflicts with the department head.
Part of the difficulty in the present purge is
Partridge's refusal to appoint four lecturers to the rank of
senior lecturer except under new terms of reference
defined by himself.
Under the terms of the present tenure document,
adopted by the faculty association in 1968, a person may
remain at the rank of lecturer for a period of four years
after which he or she must be considered for promotion
to the rank of senior lecturer or assistant professor. If at
that time promotion is not granted, a one year terminal
contract is offered.
Previous practice was to appoint lecturers to the rank
of senior lecturer in order to give them additional time to
gain the necessary academic qualifications for promotion
to assistant professor.
Partridge has re-defined the terms of appointment to
senior lecturer status without consulting the faculty
association and has since had them approved by the board
of governors.
Under the new terms, a- senior lecturer will teach a
one and one half course load (15 hours) instead of the
previous one course load (9 hours), and waives the right to
sabbitical leave.
When the faculty association refused to accept the
new terms, Partridge decided not to appoint faculty to
senior lectureships until the "dispute" was settled.
"There is no dispute as far as the faculty association
is concerned," said association president Donald Harvey.
Harvey said the association is trying to reach a new
agreement concerning the position and the executive has
been mandated to "state a position by Jan. 31 for
consideration" by the members.
The Representative Assembly (student council) at the
university met Sunday night to decide on student action
to counter the purge.
Demands for concrete action flew around the
assembly chambers as student representatives were given
the background information surrounding the purge by
Bob Higinbotham, editor of the Martlet, the student
newspaper here, and Alma Mater Society president Robert
McDougal.
Higinbotham has called for a general student meeting
at noon today so students can be brought up to date on
the current dispute.
Three motions will be introduced at the meeting.
The primary motion will demand the immediate
re-appointment, promotion, or granting of tenure to the
nine profs who previously had departmental support.
Subsequent motions will demand the immediate
re-appointment of Sward and Wynard on the basis of their
teaching ability and the quality of their creative writing.
The third motion will call for the granting of tenure
to Jain on the basis of his teaching ability.
(Two other profs, Illtyd Perkins of the English
department and Richard Martin of the philosophy
department, will not be included in the demands because
they have decided not to pursue the issue.)
The motions will be sent to the board of governors,
which will meet Jan. 18, with a demand for action before
the following morning.
A second general meeting will be held January 19 to
plan militant action if the board fails to act favorably on
the student demands.
Student unions in the departments involved have
begun circulating petitions to be sent to the board and the
Canadian Association of University Teachers, which is
currently investigating the cases of six of the professors.
CAUT hearings were held in secrecy at the Empress
Hotel Sunday and on the campus Monday. Any
recommendations will be sent to the national executive
before action is taken.
Although the members of the CAUT tribunal were to
leave late Monday afternoon, informed sources said the
committee members will remain in Victoria until this
afternoon to speak to Partridge, who was expected to
return from a cruise on his yacht immediately after the
departure of the tribunal.
Student leaders generally are preparing for a long
militant action to guarantee the security of good teaching
at UVic.
Abolition of prof rank seen
By JOHN ANDERSEN
Elitist ranks for professors will be abolished at UBC if
political science head Walter Young has his way.
He is proposing that the simple title of professor be
substituted for the three ranks of assistant professor,
associate professor and professor.
"Rank is irrelevant," he said Monday. "It has no role
or function."
The title of professor is simply a job designation, like
that of "lawyer", he said.
"Lawyers don't have ranks, why should professors?"
he asked.
Abolishing the ranks will have no effect on salary or
tenure, he said.
Its major effect will be to save time for department
heads and deans forced to go through the process of
evaluating profs for promotion, said Young.
Also, eliminating grading will remove a potential
source of "ill-will" between academics, he said.
Young said he had no idea why the rank stystem was
instituted at UBC in the first place.
"Presumably because it was done everywhere else,"
he said.
Young will bring his proposal to the faculty
association at its next meeting, which is still to be
scheduled. Page 2
THE       U B Y S S E Y
Tuesday, January 12, 1971
'Abortion punishes mother'
By MIKE SASGES
Abortion is one aspect of this
age of moral uncertainty we are
living in said a leading
anti-abortion spokesman Monday.
Dr. Norman St. John-Stevas, a
British Conservative MP told 150
students in the SUB ballroom that
abortion was a threat to the
essence of civilization, the respect
for life.
"Abortion is a question of two
sets of rights — the woman's and
the fetus'," he said.
"You can recognize a human
being in the fetus. It is a life,"
He then asked, "What is the
difference between a fetus at the
time of conception and a fetus at
the age of 70?"
"The only difference is
society's callous attitude to this
new life.
"The fetus is treated as a
problem — a threat to society and
abortion is society's shortcut in
treating this problem," he said.
"Society pressures the mother
to rid herself of an unwanted
child."
"In effect abortion punishes
the mother because it deprives the
mother of the pleasure of raising
her child."
He said that an abortion cost
150 pounds or $450 in London.
ST. JOHN-STEVAS . ..
fetus is problem
Some doctors are making absolute
fortunes.
"There is a revolt in the
nursing profession in Great
Britain. They are idealistic young
ladies — not butcher's assistants.
"They really don't enjoy
cleaning up after an abortion and
seeing remains of human limbs,"
he said.
St. John-Stevas would place
the emphasis on family planning
rather than abortion.
When asked at what point does
APPLICATION FOR
GRADUATION
"Application for Graduation" cards are now being mailed to
all students in Fourth Year Arts, Music, Science, Commerce
and Fourth Year Elementary and Fifth Year Secondary
Education, and will be available in departmental offices for
students in the graduating years of all other faculties. All
Students who expect to graduate this spring are requested to
complete and return both cards to the Registrar's Office (Mrs.
Kent) as soon as possible, but no later than February 15,
1971.
"Application for Graduation" cards are available in the
Registrar's Office and students in these graduating years who
do not receive cards in the mail should check their addresses in
the Registrar's Office.
PLEASE NOTE: It is the responsibility of the student to make
application for his degree. If the student does not make
application, his name will not be put forward to his Faculty or
the Senate for approval.
No Application - No Degree
The Engineer
and PHOTOGRAPHY
- Introduction to Creative Engineering
INSTRUCTOR: Mr. DENES DEVENYI, P.Eng., Special Lecturer
in   Creative   Photography,   Assistant   Director   Department   of
Physical Plant and Planning, Simon Fraser University.
TIME:   Commencing   Saturday,  January   16,  1971, 9:30-11:30
a.m., 10 sessions.
PLACE:  Room 308, Civil Engineering, The University of British
Columbia.
FEE: $40.00.
COURSE  OUTLINE: The course is designed  to help graduate
engineers and engineering students to improve their power to
communicate through the visual media. It will explore areas that
are normally beyond the engineering education and experience.
By doing this it will lead engineers to a more creative approach to
their profession as well as to teach a greater awareness of the
world around them.
Lectures, picture analysis and group discussions are part of the
program including a number of picture-taking assignments.
REGISTRATION: As enrolment is limited to 25 persons, advance
registration    is    advised.    To    register,    please   complete   the
registration form and mail, together with your remittance.
ENGINEERING PROGRAMS
Centre for Continuing Education U.B.C.
228-2181
a human life begin, he said, "It's
an arbitrary, difficult question to
answer. I fix it at the time of
fertilization."
"The state since Roman times
has protected the helpless fetus
from society. I cannot sanction
any restriction on the fetus' life.
"That fetus has the right to
live. Its whole potential has not
been realized, but it is there."
"The rights of the fetus and
the mother will always clash.
Abortion is a selfish right. Look at
woman's liberation — abortion is
the culmination of their
movement," he said.
Sharon Boylan, a member of
UBC's Women's Liberation
Movement said, "Abortion is a
part of the movement. We insist
on free abortion on demand. It is
not out of selfishness, but rather,
it's an attempt to make the child's
mother's life happier.
"Saying that there is human
potential in the fetus is like saying
there is human potential in sperm
and ova," she added.,
No accidents yet
Despite the heavy snowfall and icy roads there have been
no significant accidents or traffic tie-ups on campus, said the
RCMP Monday.
By 9 a.m. most of the sidewalks on campus were cleared
and seven vehicles from physical plant will continue to work
against the constant downfall of snow said a physical plant
spokesman.
The Vancouver weather office predicts that the snow will
continue for several days.
66
99
THE ORCHESTRA
by Jean Anouilh
and
"THE GWADIGES
FRAZJEEIN"       by Tennessee Williams
Directed By Irene Prothroe
January 13-16   -   8:30 p.m.
Student Tickets $1.00
Special Student Performance
Thurs., Jan. 14 - 12:30 p.m.
Reservations: Room 207 Frederic Wood Theatre
UBC SOMERSET STUDIO
FOR PREFERRED RISKS ONLY
It Pays to Shop for Car Insurance
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INSURANCE   COMPANY
HEAD OFFICE: 1927 WEST BROADWAY. VANCOUVER 9, BRITISH COLUMBIA
FAST CLAIM SERVICE
Fill in and return this coupQn or phone today. No obligation. No salesman wil
I call.
MAIL THIS COUPON FOR OUR LOW RATES ON YOUR AUTOMOBILE I
Residence
Address ...
City .
(Please Print)
Phone: Home  Office .
Occupation  	
Age Married □
Single □
Male i;
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Date first licensed to drive	
Give number and dates of all accidents in last 5 years,
(circle dates of those accidents which were not your
fault).
In the last five years has your
licence been suspended?  	
Are you now insured ? 	
Date current policy expires  	
This coupon  is designed solely to enable  non-policy
holders to obtain an application and rates for their cars.
Car No. 1
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Model
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work, train or bus depot,
Days
Davs
Miles
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(except to and from work)?
Yes □ No o
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Give number and dates
of traffic convictions
in last five years
LIST INFORMATION ON ALL ADDITIONAL DRIVERS
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to you
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■ FPRUBC23     _m Tuesday, January 12,  1971
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 3
Skagit: time runs low, B.C. stalls
By SANDY KASS
Slowly but surely Seattle City Light Company is
moving closer to the development of the Skagit Valley.
The hydro development, which would raise the level
of Ross Dam 122 feet, and extend the head of the present
reservoir 10 miles into Canada has been given the go-ahead
by Washington state ecology department.
Department spokesman Howard Big said the proposal
is still in process of examination, but declined to
comment on any further action.
"A development permit has been issued to Seattle,
and until our examination findings are released, there is
nothing I can say," Big said.
Federal fisheries minister Jack Davis will be in
Washington D.C. next week to investigate the situation at
an international environmental conference.
A spokesmen for his office indicated Monday Davis
would do everything in his power to stop the development
should the findings prove the site ecologically detrimental
to the area.
B.C.'s agreement to develop the site, signed in 1967
by lands and forests minster Ray Williston, could be
nullified by provincial repudiation of the agreement, but
premier W. A. C. Bennett recently indicated he feels the
matter should be in Ottawa's hands.
He was unavailable for comment at press time.
A spokesman for Seattle mayor Wes Uhlman said the
mayor hopes Canada will reap as much benefit as possible
from the site.
However, Uhlman has declined to authorize a Seattle
Light application for a Canadian River Improvement
permit.
"We're not certain that a Canadian permit is needed,"
the spokesman said.
Society for Pollution and Environmental Control
secretary Sue Vanlaar said the power development must
be halted immediately for more then ecological reasons.
"The project can only meet Seattle's needs for at
most 18 months," she said.
"Exploitation of Canadian land to keep Seattle's
hydro rates down for less than two years when they are
—dave enns photo
I KNOW I left that VW around here somewhere. Damn, I didn't drive through miles of ice and traffic accidents to lose
the bloody car. And then my classes were cancelled and I have a hole in my new Christmas gumboots. Why am I here?
What is reality anyway? And where's my car?
'Students don't give a damn'
McDiarmid said, "The report will probably be shelved
by the AMS and forgotten. I don't think it's very
important."
The chairman of a new AMS committee examining
UBC tenure practices seems to agree that everything is
rosy in the tenure field and students don't know enough
to say much about it anyway.
The committee, chaired by Rob McDiarmid, arts 3,
has sent a questionnaire to all department heads asking
their opinions on the present tenure methods and on ways
to improve them.
"Most of the persons have been non critical,"
McDiarmid said. "Department heads do not seem to feel
that there is much wrong with present tenure practices."
"I don't think it's a question of their being scared,"
McDiarmid said. "They simply don't think it's that
important, they're satisfied."
"We are going to be talking to some of the professors
personally, both tenured and non-tenured.
"We don't expect to talk to the T.A.s, because most
of them won't be employed here after they graduate."
The five or six students on the committee will present
the only student opinions.
"Students don't care about tenure. Besides, they
can't judge good teaching, they aren't aware of a prof's
overall knowledge," McDiarmid said.
The report should be ready to present to the AMS
near the end of February, he said.
"We hope to present any recommendations made to
senate, possibly through the student senators,"
McDiarmid said.
"However, we don't expect too many or that they
will be very radical.
"Basically tenure seems to be handled very well. The
recent crises have been minor exceptions, rather than the
rule."
Riot cop threatens
AMS arts rep Sproule
Riot police have long memories.
Student council arts rep Brian Sproule discovered this
when he was stopped and questioned by a policeman
Thursday.
Sproule had noticed the policeman smiling and
clutching his riot stick during the eviction of transients
from the Jericho Hostel in October.
He told the policeman he looked like he was
masturbating with the stick.
The cop remembered and recognized Sproule while
he was hitch-hiking Thursday.
After running through the "what's your name? where
do you live?" routine, the cop told Sproule: The only
reason you're not in jail now is that I couldn't leave the
formation."
"If we ever see you at anything again, you'll be
arrested," he said.
When questioned about the incident, a spokesman for
tactical force (riot squad), head instructor Victor Lake
said it appeared to be a "normal routine check on those
kind of people."
Asked about the threat, he said: "I don't think that's
necessarily a threat, it's more like a fair warning of what
might happen if he gets involved again."
already less than half of ours, is just unthinkable," she
said.
At present, Seattle citizens pay $8.15 per 1000
kilowatt hours.
Vancouver residents pay $16.50.
"Before they would even get this site completed, they
would have to start looking for another site," Vanlaar
said.
Under the present agreement, Seattle Light would
pay 15 dollars per acre per month renumeration to B.C.
Seattle Light information officer Joe DeLeon said the
' company is considering several other sites for future
development, but feels the Skagit development will not be
outdated in 18 months.
"A power site of this magnitude would provide an
infinite source of power to this community," he said.
He said the company plans to develop any type of
recreational facilities B.C. officials want at the north end
of Ross Lake, even though he feels such a move is not
necessary.
"So few tourists visited this area before, I don't see
any reason for an increase once the power project goes
through," he said.
He added that he feels it will be at least two years
before the project can get under way.
The University of Washington is presently doing
research into ecological effects the project woud have on
the American sector of the site, but has not been
authorized to examine the Canadian side.
To call attention to the potentialities of the area, arts
4 student Dick Betts hopes to hold a free rock festival at
the site in late spring.
Students interested in helping with the festival are
asked to call him at 873-2153.
Alma Mater Society president Tony Hodge said any
student action would have to come through the office of
external affairs, but he has not seen officer Peter Hlookoff
in over a month.
"To my knowledge, nothing has been planned,"
Hodge said.
U.S. campuses
censored
NEW YORK (CUP-CPS) - Twenty-five campus
newspapers and two campus radio stations have been
either censored or shut down in the United States since
September, the U.S. Student Press Association reports.
The repression being faced by the college papers has
taken the form of editors being fired, evictions or
lock-outs from offices, freezing of funds, suppression of
individual articles and prohibition of publication.
The USSPA survey of its membership said 40 per cent
of the papers replying report they have been censored or
harassed because they express radical politics.
The student governments of Dillard University in
South Carolina and Norfolk State College in Virginia have
both had their presses shut down by the respective
administrations.
Dillard's newspaper staff refused to submit copy to
an advisor for censorship while Norfold's paper supported
student actions against the invasion of Cambodia last
spring.
When a "God Is Dead" editorial appeared in The
Reflector of Mississippi State University the state
government set up censors for. all campus papers and
yearbooks.
The staffs of the Purdue Exponent in Indiana and the
University of Illinois campus in Chicago have been locked
out of their offices because they didn't adhere to
conservative guidelines for publication.
And at the University of Southern Colorado in
Pueblo the managing editor of The Arrow was fired when
she refused to change an editorial about student parking.
Ads for abortion referrals and articles about the myth
of the vaginal orgasm have been banned by school
admininistrations and state governments at Concordia
College in Minnesota, Metropolitan State College in
Pueblo, Colorado, the state university of New York at
Buffalo, University of Connecticut and colleges in
Massachusetts, Ohio, South Dakota and Georgia.
Grand Moot this Saturday
The Grand Moot, an annual mock court program, will
be held at 2 p.m. Saturday Jan. 30 at the UBC Law
School.
Two outstanding law students are chosen from this
program to argue a case of current interest before three
B.C. court judges, in addition to this they will share the
Allan S. Gregory Memorial Prize of $200. Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 12, 1971
TH( UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C.
Editorial opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS or
the university administration. Member, Canadian University Press.
Founding member. Pacific Student Press. The Ubyssey publishes
Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's
editorial offices are located in room 241K of the Student Union
Building. Editor, 228-2301; city editor, 228-2305; news editor,
228-2307; Page Friday, 228-2309; sports, 228-2308; advertising,
228-3977.
JANUARY 12, 1971
Another purge
The ever-popular game of "purge the faculty" has
spread to another B.C. university.
With the Simon Fraser University political science,
sociology and anthropology department hassle still
unresolved, the University of Victoria has decided to
fire no less than 14 faculty members.
The official reasons for the firings remain a
mystery, but there is little doubt the real reason is the
fact that all the profs involved are in some way radical
or non-conformist.
The fact that all 14 are considered by students to
be excellent teachers has no bearing on the situation —
the profs simply didn't fit into the standard,
government-approved mold.
One could be charitable toward the UVic
administration and suggest that people there are running
scared from a provincial government that has made its
intention to step on dissenting teachers all too clear.
But it is more likely that the UVic administrators
are performing the hatchet job quite happily and of
their own free will.
As the purge at SFU and a number of lesser events
at UBC have shown, those who run this province's
universities do so only as servants of the corporate elite.
They view their job as turning out capable (read
"unquestioning") managers and good (read "silent")
citizens.
Students are not to be encouraged to think for
themselves beyond the established guidelines. Any prof
who violates that commandment is a menace and must
be removed as quickly as possible. That was the sin of
eight profs at SFU last year and, apparently, is the sin of
Mat UVic now.
At UVic the issue is even more clear-cut. The
administration is acting arbitrarily, in total opposition
to the expressed wishes of the students and the majority
of the faculty.
Next week, the UVic board of governors will
rubber stamp the decisions of administration president
Bruce Partridge and the students will take concrete
action.
The whole scene has been played at SFU, it's
happening now at UVic and guess who's next.
Another fraud
While we're on the subject of arrogant
administrations, the UBC crew is putting on its own
show over a somewhat more trivial matter.
They have decided to charge ahead with
presentation of the master teacher award although the
students, who the award is supposed to benefit, have
said they want no part of it.
So a bunch of senior faculty members who
probably haven't seen the inside of a classroom since
Walter Gage was sitting in the front row will now sit
around a conference table and decide which of their
colleagues should be honored for his teaching ability.
The announcement will be made far and wide and
the public will once again be given the impression that
UBC really cares about good teaching.
Oh well, it certainly won't be the first fraud this
university has perpetrated on the people of B.C.
".. . And the winner of the master teacher award is ,
McCUNE'S MUSINGS
By SHANE McCUNE
Splendor in the snow
The Winter Wonderland has arrived. As the
myriad flakes enshroud the landscape in a downy
blanket of pristine pulchritude, the world takes on
the semblance of a subdued study in silk and satin.
Sweeping silence stills the scene. In short, it's
snowing out.
I went out to Horseshoe Bay to visit
Oglethorpe, whom I found in his back yard making
a snowcreep. I asked him why.
"I got tired of making snow-women," he
replied.
I asked him what a snowcreep was supposed to
do.
"I've got it trained. At my command, it'll
snowball the snow-women. Sometimes, anyway. It
doesn't always work. A lot of snow-women are
frigid."
Oglethorpe is like that. I met him about five
years ago in a thunderstorm. He was talking to it.
In fact, he was drowning out the thunder. He
can belch louder than anyone I know. Every year he
sings Christmas carols while belching. He gets jobs as
a starting gun at track meets, You just can't find
another man of Oglethorpe's calibre.
I once asked him why he belched so much.
"Because it's a gas," he said, quite seriously.
It's not easy to talk to Oglethorpe, much less
argue with him, but I wasn't going to let him off the
hook this time.
I asked him how he could tell whether a
snow-woman was frigid or not. I wanted to trap him
into a logical answer, like "because they're made of
snow." No such luck.
"When they're frigid, they won't give the
snowmen a snowjob," he said.
Obscenity, grossness and boorishness are alien
to Oglethorpe's moral code, if not to his nature. I
decided to broach the subject from a different tack.
I pointed out to him that snow is traditionally
associated with purity, as witness phrases like
"virgin snow", hence his imposition of sexual
qualities upon the snow was unjustified from a
mythical viewpoint as well as the logical.
"Bullshit," said Oglethorpe, "I've seen the snow
get ploughed often enough."
"That'll be the frosty Friday," I said, before I
could catch myself. I was beginning to crack.
"You see?" said Oglethorpe, "Once you've
started the ball rolling, there's no stopping it."
He could keep a straight face no longer. He
started cackling loudly, and his snowcreep joined in.
I lost my temper completely. I kicked the
snowcreep in the icicle, told Oglethorpe to flake off,
and gumbooted home.
LETTERS
Pollution
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
Here's a chance for action.
Texada Mines (on Texada
Island) have an application in the
pollution control board requesting
permission to dump tens of
millions of gallons of effluent into
the Georgia Strait each day. The
pollution   control   board   hasn't
given the go ahead on the
dumping yet, but it likely will
unless it starts receiving more
negative feedback from the
public.
This issue is really a cause for
concern! Are you prepared to
make a small trip outside
Vancouver, say to Qualicum on
Vancouver Island, and find the
ocean there just as dead, just as
poisoned and poisoning as it is
here in Vancouver - our
delightful metropolitan cesspool?
Don't take the typical moron
track and start clamoring after the
damage has already been done.
Have a little foresight and social
conscience and write right now!
All letters received by the
pollution control board are given
due consideration; "all properly
registered objections are brought
to the attention of the director
when an application is being
received." (Quoted from the reply
I received from the board last
month.)
Just write two lines stating the
issue and your concern over it.
Address this to director of
pollution control, Parliament
Buildings, Victoria, B.C. It's a
little bit of effort which could
result in a giant step forward for
pollution control.
ALISON INGLIS
Science I
Editor: Nate Smith
News Maurice Bridge
City     Ginny Gait
Jan O'Brien
Wire     John Andersen
Managing Bruce Curtis
Sports Keith Dunbar
Ass't News     Jennifer Jordan
Leslie Plommer
Photo    David Enns
David Bowerman
Page Friday Tim Wilson
That white stuff couldn't stop us.
Resplendent in red surplices, Thorn
Wescott,     Judy     McCloud,     Shane
Culture
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
What has happened to culture
at UBC? There used to be all sorts
of concerts, plays, poetry,
readings and sundry presentations
at UBC — where have they gone?
It doesn't matter whether
they're professional entertainers
like Gordon Lightfoot or student
amateurs. A little art, or fun or
both is always welcome around
this campus.
The best things we've had this
year were free: Subspace and a
concert by Sundance. But they
were poorly publicized.
CARL LaFONG
Arts 4
McCune, Jinny Ladner and John
Gibbs sung various sequences of
heavenly Gregorian Chants. Beating its
rhythm on their typewriters were Ken
Lassesen, Phil Barkworth, and Chris
Krawczyk. Jim Davies beat his own
Tantum Ergo. John Kula and Wayne
Burns were busy all day creating saints,
goats and what not on the stain glass.
Bruce Curtis and Nettie Wild were
good the whole time. Sandy Kass
couldn't join us goyim. The jocks,
Keith Dunbar, Bill Ruby and Steve
Millard offered up their day for the
losing TBirds. David Enns, Maureen
Gans and Dirk Visser prayed for the
repose of the soul of David Bowerman. Tuesday, January 12, 1971
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 5
Page  Tuesday
Othello at the Playhouse
By NETTIE WILD
The play Othello is alive and well and living
in the Queen Elizabeth Playhouse Theatre.
As theatre goers will attest this is not
always the case in many productions of Othello
but happily it was a truism of Friday's opening
night performance.
Director David Gardner's casting choice for
Othello paid off although his search for the
right man sent him across the continent to New
York to find him. Arthur Burghardt provided
the physical impressiveness of the Moor which
added the needed air of plausibility to make the
story of the enraged warrior/lover come
together.
Annie Scarfe effectively offset Burghardt
in her petiteness, a point Gardiner used to full
advantage which added a lighter air to the play.
However Miss Scarfe failed to be fully
convincing in her part leaving the impression
that actress and character were fighting one
another instead of working as one.
Alan Scarfe on the other hand stole the
show with his larger than life Iago. Vancouver
audiences have been enjoying Scarfe's acting
ability a great deal this season as a lead in
Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead, as Sir
Toby in Twelfth Night at the Freddy Wood and
now in Othello. He seems to thoroughly enjoy
his character and plays Iago to the hilt, almost
to the point of being a ham, delighting the
audiences with his rich full portrayal of the
villain. Anne Butler supported Alan Scarfe well
as Iago's wife who equalled her husband in his
worldly manners and speech.
Between the two they carried the majority
of what little humour there is in the play, by
way of their constant bantering. Miss Butler
accentuates her love for her husband in her
warm portrayal thus making the discovery of
his crimes all the more tragic.
Gardner interjected an unusual touch by
adding a new interpretation of the role of
Othello's manservant taken from the James
Earl Jones (of Great White Hope fame)
production in the east.
As the Ethiopian, Edward Lawson, though
without any lines throughout, becomes a focal
point in the play. Costumed in a simple flowing
robe along with his strange long African hair, he
represents a world far apart from that of the
lavish court into which he has been interjected.
Because of the mysterious feeling enveloping
the character, the members of the court visibly
show their fear of him in their lack of
willingness to confront him.
Between the Ethiopian and Othello there is
a deep understanding which tends to include
Othello as part of this dark world from which
his servant came. The Ethiopian announces the
Moor's presence in a high eerie birdlike call
which accentuates their foreign heritage even
more.
The bond between the two is exemplified
when the Ethiopian sensing Othello's dilemma,
appears out of nowhere to produce the dagger
with which Othello kills himself.
Othello thus becomes a play not only of
the jealousies and the maliciousness betwen
fellow men but the problems that are created
when two different worlds meet.
Maybe this would all be news to
Shakespeare but it makes for good theatre and
that's what it is all about after all, isn't it?
KEEP SUB.
(remember the $15 you paid)
MORE TO COME
The Galleries
SFU Opens With Eskimo Art Exhibition
SFU opens its new gallery with an inaugural exhibition of 125
prints and drawings by Eskimo artists from Cape Dorset,
Povungnituk, Port Harrison, Repulse Bay, Eskimo Point, Baker
Lake and Belcher Island. The exhibition started yesterday and
runs through to February 12.
Toys for Girls and Boys in UBC Gallery
"Toys", an exhibition of friendly toys made by northern
California artists will be shown in the UBC Gallery located under
the main library. Also in this exhibition is a display of posters by
Walter Diethelm, a Swiss graphic designer. The show starts
Thursday, January 13, through to the 30.
An Eskimo oruBelcher Island.
UBCMUSSOC   presents
Live on stage
February 3-8:30 P.M.
February 8 - 7:30 P.M.
February 9 & 10 - 8:30 P.M.
February 11 - 12:30 P.M.
ONLY $1.00
UBC AUDITORIUM
TICKETS $1.00 - AMS BUSINESS OFFICE
228-4300 - 228-3073
MM
«*
mmmem/mmmmmmf
WMMMIMM
CHRISTMAS RESULTS DISAPPOINTING ?
NEED HELP WITH A COURSE ?
Come to the:
UBC TUTORING CENTRE
We have qualified
tutors in over 50 subjects
SUB 100 B (main foyer)
12-2 p.m. daily
or call 228-4583
Alumni Association Project in Cooperation with the A.M.S. Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 12, 1971
Library closes early Mon.
Despite rain, sleet, and snow
the hallowed halls of learning of
UBC will remain open for classes.
UBC information officer Jim
Banham said Monday all
university facilities except the
library will remain open until
regular closing time.
Head     librarian    Basil
Stuart-Stubbs said the library
closed at five p.m. rather than 10
p.m. Monday. This was because
the taxi companies would not
guarantee service for employees
working on late shifts.
Decisions to close the library
will  be  made  on  a  day to day
basis, according to the weather he
said.
He said students should check
for announcements on UBC radio
for the closing times.
SUB cafeteria also closed at 6
p.m. Monday night to enable
employees to get an early start
home.
PIMPLES
Ugly skin blemishes on face or body,
Eczema, Pimples, Red Scaly Itching
Skin and Athlete's Foot are quickly
relieved by NIXODERM. Antiseptic
action heals, helps make skin softer,
smoother, clearer. Ask your druggist
for NIXODERM ointment and soap.
Help clean, clear and revitalize your
skin. Look better fast.
PATIO.
EAT IN .TAKEOUT- DELIVERY
3261 W. Broadway   736-7788
Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. & Sat. 3 a.m.
Change constitution-make AMS efficient
There will be an Alma Mater
Society general meeting Jan. 27 to
discuss a new constitution.
AMS president Tony Hodge
said the most controversial items
will be the decrease in the size of
the students' council and the
executive and a change in council
elegibility requirements.
"We are proposing to make
both the executive and the
council smaller in the hope that
council will become more
efficient," said Hodge.
Under the new constitution
each executive member would
have a specific area of
responsibility.
The new executive would
consist of a vice-president of
academics, a vice-president of
services, a vice-president of
community affairs, a
vice-president of finance and a
president.
KEEP SUB
CLEAN
(for heaven's and YOUR own sake)
MORfE TO COME
"The executive changes are
based on a student survey
conducted by the AMS last year,
said Hodge.
The new council would consist
of 12 people to be elected by
constituencies.
Eligibility will be changed to
allow anyone who has completed
one year at UBC to hold an
executive position.
qOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOq
,|/f»»»HII«Wl
s@£ an
Tfaufk.M/ater'Beid
7Z08 Byrrarct
■free, dour/mind
your ufc on /metal
sprmot j'cotton
Stuffvrw-?
7ry our 3t<wo 0/upi
2u-&:  durable:    „
Cpttd&JOyears)
■peaceM.
Venite AAangiate E Bevete
at the
Casa Ponderosa
ON THE WEST MALL
SPAGHETTI OUR SPECIALTY
MON.-THURS.
4:30-6:30 P.M.
REFRESHMENTS
ON TUES. & THURS.
'OOOO'OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO00 0 0 0000000000°
ALMA MATER SOCIETY
OFFICIAL
NOTICE
GENERAL
MEETING
Wed. - Jan. 27 - 12:30
MEMORIAL GYM
Meeting of whole student body to vote on
CONSTITUTION CHANGES
* Major Changes—Re-orientation of AMS Council
—Changes in make-up of Executive
—Changes in eligibility regulations
* Minor Changes—Membership
—Meetings
—Elections
COmIJVG FILMS:
JAN. 15-17- This Week!
MIDNIGHT COWBOl
JAN. 22-24
THE PRESIDENT'S ANALYST
JAN. 29-31
ROSEMARY'S RARY
FEB. 5-7
POINT BLANK
FEB. 12-14
IF...
FEB. 26-28
PRIME OF MISS JEAN RRODIE
MAR. 12-14
THE PINK PANTHER
MAR. 19-21
PERSONA
MAR. 26-28
DR. STRANGELOVE
AMS Students 50°
General Public 75
SUB FILMSOC PRESENTATIONS
SLR ALDITORILM
Fridays & Saturdays
7:00 & 9:30
Sundays 7:00 Tuesday, January 12, 1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
fixin«   to
By THOM WESCOTT
PART TEN
Our first excursion out into the "real" Viet
Nam was nothing like what we had imagined.
For six months we had been told that all of
South Viet Nam was the front line. Here we were,
lurching through it on the back of a five-ton truck
with nothing but our record books to protect
ourselves.
We were headed for Hill 55, headquarters of
the Seventh Marine Regiment, about ten miles south
of Da Nang.
The first part of the road ran through the
"suburbs" of the city. The houses were put together
from anything available, clay brick, bamboo, and
wood. The richer houses, from before the war, were
made of concrete and decorated in a sort of dragon-
rococo.
None of them, however, had been painted in
the past ten years.
The part of the city out past the suburbs can
only be called a slum. Here again the houses are
made from anything available, but what is available-
is more likely to be cardboard and tarpaper,
ammunition cannisters, and if the family was lucky,
wood from packing crates.
The slums end at a river, which is crossed by a
one-way bridge. Vietnamese kids walk up and down
the lines of waiting vehicles calling out "Soda,
bee-ah, twenny-five sens."
Having to pay 25 cents for a hot Coke, or worse
yet a hot Budweiser, is bad enough, but across the
bridge the price doubles.
Across the bridge the land is typical Vietnamese
country, rice paddies dotted with islands of trees
which shelter hamlets of anywhere from two to 20
houses.
Anywhere in Viet Nam where there's open
country you'll notice countless small round mounds
of earth, often right out in the middle of a rice
paddy. These mounds are Vietnamese burial
mounds.
They are often grouped together in land that is
unfit for cultivation, and we would soon learn that
they make great places to sleep at night.
As Hill 55 climbed up on the horizon we passed
through a mile and a half of sand and barbed wire
which was part of the protective ring set up around
Da Nang.
In the middle of this desert is a cluster of paper
shacks ringed by rows of coiled barbwire. This is
one of America's great gifts to the Vietnamese
people, a refugee village.
When the truck finally stopped in front of the
headquarters building the driver went inside to
announce our arrival. He came back out with a
lance-corporal who had only one question.
"Can anybody play a trumpet?"
When it became evident that nobody could play
the trumpet he frowned for a while and then
decided to send us all to the Second Battalion. The
ones who had thrown their seabags off the truck
hoping to stay at Hill 55 climbed down and threw
them back in and we were off again.
We retraced our steps exactly right up to the
entrance to the airport, then turned away towards
the ring of surrounding hills. We followed the base
of the hills for three miles and slipped through a gap
in the hills.
Right beside the pass, called Deo Dia La, was a
canyon, and tucked into the mouth of the canyon
was the camp of the Second Battalion, Seventh
Marines.
We only had to hitchhike through half a mile of
"front lines" to get into Da Nang and the USO!
SAVE UP TO 50%
over '1000   New   and    Used
Standard Portable and Electric
Adders, Calculators, etc. at the
World's 1st Office
Equipment Supermarket
Absolutely the largest selection
and lowest prices in Canada
Expert Repairs
Trades Welcome
New bookstore maybe?
There may be a new bookstore
on campus. That is, if the two
committees studying the situation
find it feasible.
One committee, under deputy
president William Armstrong, is
studying possible sites at the
Ponderosa and between SUB and
Brock. This committee is also
looking into the financial end of
the proposal.
Byron Hender who chairs the
other committee estimates the
cost of the new bookstore at
upwards of  $1.5 million.
Hender, a business consultant
for ancillary services said he's
looking into "improving the
operation and acute shortage of
space" in the present bookstore.
A plan to extend the front of
the present bookstore to the edge
of   the   coffee ,shop   is   under
consideration said Hender.
Bookstore manager John
Hunter admits conditions are bad.
Relocation or expansion of the
present bookstore depends on the
findings of the first committee
said Hunter.
HONG KONG
CHINESE FOODS
Just One Block from Campus
in the Village
WE SERVE AUTHENTIC
CHINESE FOOD
AT REASONABLE PRICES
Eat in — Take Out
Open Every Day
4:30-11:00 p.m.
5732 University Blvd.        2244121
In the Village
KEEP SUB
CLEAN
FROM...
(well, now - you can say
a lot here, eh!)
MORE TO COME
MATHEMATICS OR
COMMERCE AND FINANCE
STUDENTS
TORONTO HEAD OFFICE OFFERS
FULL-TIME AND SUMMER OPPORTUNITIES
FOR ACTUARIAL STUDENTS
CONTACT THE
OFFICE OF STUDENT SERVICES
REGARDING INTERVIEWS
TO BE CONDUCTED ON JANUARY 18
^ EXCELSIOR LIFE
CATHOLIC PENTECOSTALS
THE REV. DENNIS BENNETT
OF ST. LUKE'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
SEATTLE
HEAR THEM
TUES. WED. THURS.
FRI.  NOON
SUB 205
Rev. Marlin Connole
St. Pattrick's Roman
Catholic Church,
Seattle
Tues. - Fri. — 8:00 p.m.
Peretz Auditorium
6184 Ash
(Oakridge)
For information
Phone 263-8219
Chaplain
Bernice Gerard
*&*&**&*&*.0*i<&<t<&*^™'&*-&*&*&*-&*&*&iiL&ii>^*&*0*^ Page 8
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 12,  1971
Quebec teachers criticize
provincial investigation
QUEBEC (CUP) - The Quebec
Teachers Corporation criticized
the provincial education
department Friday for its
handling of an investigation into
alleged political indoctrination in
classrooms.
A statement by the
70,000-members teachers' union
called the issue a "leaking political
football," and said: "an
administration which is not even
capable of dealing with a few
complaints in an organization of
100,000 teachers without
resorting to publicity tricks is
obviously in an alarming
situation."
Quebec education minister
Guy St. Pierre was quoted
Thursday,  as  saying  50  teachers
New York
COSTUME SALON
RENTALS
Single and  Double-Breasted
Tiixedos and  Dinner Jackets
Black and Colored
Flare  01   Straight  Pants
Up-to-Date Accessories
SPECIAL   STUDENT  RATES
224-0034     4397 W. 10th
would be brought before a special
committee investigating the
political activity of teachers in
classrooms.
The education department said
Friday only about ten complaints
of teachers allegedly using the
classroom as a forum for political
indoctrination would be
investigated further by the
committee.
The department said the figure
of 50 teachers was a rough one
based on a misunderstanding.
The QTC is demanding that
teachers involved be fully
informed about the complaints,
that they be allowed recourse to
the civil courts and that they be
accompanied by a person of their
own choice in any interview with
the investigating committee.
YOU ARE EXTREMELY SATISFIED
WITH YOUR HAIRSTYLE!!!
 OR ARE YOU ? ? ?
GERMAN AND FRENCH MASTER STYLISTS
UPPER TENTH BARBER
4574 West 10th Avenue
Phone 224-6622
HELP WANTED
Canada Centennial Celebrations
NEEDS YOU
The Alma Mater Society is presently forming a committee to consider worthwhile proposals
for a University of British Columbia project commemorating the British Columbia Centennial.
The B.C. Centennial Committee has agreed to match funds raised by the Alma Mater Society
WE NEED YOUR IDEAS!
This University should be recognized in these centennial celebrations. We
are certain that with your assistance many ideas will be forthcoming from
students, faculty, and staff.   All proposals will be carefully considered,   the
most suitable forewarded to Victoria.
TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE!
Please submit your ideas on this form or a reasonable facsimile and submit NO LATER THAN
MONDAY, JANUARY 18th, 1971.
NAME   PHONE
I
I
ADDRESS CONTACT TIME  J
• CLIP OUT AND RETURN TO:
B.C. CENTENNIAL CELEBRATIONS
c/o John Scott Mitchell
Vice-president (Academics), Alma Mater Society
Box 152, SUB, U.B.C. (Campus Mall)
Or, bring to ROOM 258, 2nd floor Student Union Building
British Columbia Centennial Celebrations Tuesday, January 12, 1971
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 9
'ME AND MY keep-fit New Year's resolutions
—dirk visser photo
Poor finger cold politicos
TORONTO (CUP) - Charging
Jhat the federal government has
created unemployment and
poverty in a "cold and heartless
manner", 500 delegates to the
National Poor People's
Conference held here have made
plans for a country-wide
demonstration Jan. 25.
Welfare recipients and working
"poor people will demonstrate
against "the total failure of the
federal and provincial
governments to deal with the real
cause of unemployment and
poverty - the totally unjust
distribution of Canada's wealth
and power."
Job action
" Action  is needed if students
expect to work this summer.
"Unemployment was high last
summer and students were the
first ones to feel it," Sharon
Boylan, a member of the UBC
Left Caucus, said Monday.
With this in mind the caucus is
holding a meeting Friday noon to
get things going. The place of the
meeting will be announced in
'Tween Classes in Friday's
Ubyssey.
The federal government's
grants to the provinces are not
enough to improve the situation,"
said Boylan.
"Although B.C. with Quebec
was given the highest grant, we
need  to  pressure the provincial
„ government    into    constructive
action."
Part of the preamble to the
resolution approved by the
conference delegates said:
"The people of this rich nation
must never allow government to
deliberately create unemployment
and   poverty   in   the cold   and
heartless manner of Trudeau and
Benson."
The delegates will seek the
support of .organized labour for
the protest.
"We're not talking about the
trade union bureaucrats, but the
masses of people who are being
laid off their jobs all across this
Come to the experts and
specialists at Henneken Auto —
Because we specialize (we don't
have to stock parts for all makes
of cars) and when you repair
only a few cars you can repair
them faster, hence we can save
you money on VW,
Mercedes, Porsche
and Volvo car repairs.
No repair too big or
small. All work fully
guaranteed.
country," a conference
spokesman said.
"Meanwhile, the real causes of
inflation - exorbitant profits
and rents - remain untouched,"
the resolution said.
"Foreign corporations,
particularly American-owned, are
allowed to continue to exploit the
resources of this country, serving
foreign rather than Canadian
interests.
Delegates also agreed to
establish a national co-ordinating
committee of poor people's
groups and to start a national
newspaper to link poor people's
groups.
"TRANSCENDENTAL
MEDITATION has been
reported to have practical
therapeutic value in
relieving mental and
physical tension."
(Science—Mar. 27th, 1970)
Transcendental
Meditation
Not a philosophy, but a
systematic technique for
expansion of CONSCIOUSNESS.
Introductory Talk
PAMELA REEVE &
RAY HARRIS,
two of several thousand teachers
of Transcendental Meditation
will speak:
12:30
Thurs., Jan.
14th
Bu. 204
Further Info. 266-0862
KEEP SUB CLEAN
FROM CRAP
— remember the $15 you paid?
— for your own sake!
— well, revolutions have never been
successful without cleanliness
NO MORE — NO MORE MESS
FORESTRY U.S.
FEE REFERENDUM
JANUARY 8, 1971
Results: 61% of
Eligible Voters Voted
87% of those Voting
Approved a $4.00
Undergraduate Society Fee
EAT IN .TAKEOUT* DELIVERY
3261 W. Broadway   736-7788
Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. & Sat. 3 a.m.
NOTICE
Re-Late Payment of Fees
A late payment fee of $25 additional to all other fees will be
assessed after JANUARY 15, 1971. Refund of this fee will be
considered only on the basis of a medical certificate covering
illness or on evidence of domestic affliction. Students who are
unable to pay their fees on time owing to new Canada Loan or
Bursary arrangements not having been finalized should see the
Finance Department prior to January 15,1971.
If a student whose registration has been cancelled for
non-payment of fees applies for reinstatement and his application
is approved by the Registrar, he will be required to pay a
reinstatement fee of $25, the late fee of $25, and all other
outstanding fees before he is permitted to resume classes.
Mani Singh Family and
Ashok Fokir presents
ENTERTAINMENT -
71
DO NOT MISS
MUSIC
OF
INDIA
Exotic Sitar, Drums, Songs, Dances
QUEEN ELIZABETH PLAYHOUSE
ON JANUARY 17, SUNDAY at 8 P.M.
CAST: Jaswant Kaur, Mani Singh, Satwant Singh, Sukdev Luddu, Ashok
Fokir, Sarabjit, Babli
TICKETS: $2.00, $3.00 at Vancouver Ticket Center & all EATON'S
STORES and all other outlets including INDIA EMPORIUM at 2202 Main
and 6th East.
12 HOURS
OF RELIEF IS
NOTHING TO
SNEEZE AT.
1CONTACC1
12
HOUR RELIEF
Contac-C cold capsules Page  10
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 12, 1971
TUESDAY
SAILING  CLUB
Meeting and film in Buch. 104 at 12:30
p.m. New members welcome.
SCIENCE   FICTION   SOCIETY
Meeting to elect executive and to discuss financial and location problems
in SUB 211 at noon.
PRE-MED  SOC
Dean   McCreary   speaks   in   Wesbrook
201 at 12:30 p.m.
'tween
classes
NEWMAN  CLUB
Meeting in SUB 213  at 12:30 p.m.
YOUNG   SOCIALISTS
Meeting of  Women's Lib  Alliance   at
1776 Alberni St., 7:30 p.m.
PSYCHOLOGY  CLUB '71
Laurel   Willows   speaks   about   reaching emotionally disturbed children in
Angus 24 at 12:30 p.m.
UBC   NDP   CLUB
W.W. II propaganda film "Nazi Strike"
in Buch.   106 at noon. $.25 admission.
Conquer" in Buch.   106 at noon.  $.25
admission.
ARCHEOLOGY SOC
General meeting in SUB 213 at 12:30
p.m.
ONTOLOGICAL   SOC
'Coming to  Know Yourself in Buch.
232  at  12:30.
HILLEL
Rabbi Marvin  Hier speaks   on  "Relation   of   Origin   to   Cause"   in   Hillel
House at  12:30 p.m.
EDUCATION   STAGE   BAND
Meeting in Ed. 1317 at 12:30 p.m. New
members    needed.    Any    instrument,
any  experience.
THURSDAY
WEDNESDAY
UBC   NDP  CLUB
W.W. II propaganda film
'Divide and
UBC  NDP CLUB
W.W. n propaganda film "Battle of
Russia" in Buch. 106 at noon. $.25
admission.
SIMS
Introductory talk on transcendental
meditation in Buch. 204 at 12:30 p.m.
ANGLICAN   UNITED  CAMPUS
MINISTRY
Supper discussion "Communities" at
Lutheran   Campus   Centre,   5:30   p.m.
PRE-MED SOC
Field trip to Pathology. Meet in front
of Wesbrook 100, 12:30 p.m.
CAMPUS  CAVALIERS
Meeting SUB 207-209 from 12:30-2:30
p.m.
THUNDERBIRD WARGAMERS
Meeting in SUB 119, 12:30 p.m.
YOUNG  SOCIALISTS
Women's  Lib   Alliance   abortion  campaign   work   night.   1776   Alberni   St.:
8 p.m.
UBC   LIBERAL   CLUB
Meet in SUB clubs lounge at noon.
PAYMENT OF FEES
Second Installment Mow Pwe
Payment   should   be   made   at   Department   of   Finance,
General Services Administration Bldg. on or before
Friday, Jan. 15, 1971
Pr«enMn9 fjN CAMPUS
PAT
P
A
U
L
S
O
N
U.S. Presidential
Candidate, 1968
y
Hear this noted sex enthusiast give his lecture
"PAT PAULSEN LOOKS AT
THE 70's"
Friday, January 22 at 7:30 p.m.
SUB BALLROOM
Tickets $2.00 at AMS Busines Office & SUB Information Desk
SPECIAL EVENTS WILL ALSO PRESENT:
PHILLIP OE FREMERY
Classical Guitarist
Friday, Jan. 15-12:30
SUB AUDITOR I UM-25c
MIGUEL ANGEL ESTRELLA
Argentine Classical Pianist
Thursday, Jan. 21-12:30
SUB AUDITORIUM-25c
FRIDAY
WOMEN'S   INTRAMURALS
P.E. and university manager's meeting in SUB 213 at 12:30.
CRAFTS  CLUB
General meeting in SUB 251 at 12:30
p.m.
LEFT   CAUCUS
Meeting to organize students about
summer unemployment in Buch. 202
at 12:30.
VCF
Film and discussion in SUB 207-209
at 12:30. Hand in application for ski
weekend.
UBC  NDP CLUB
W.W.  II propaganda  film  "Battle   of
Britain" in Buch. 106 at 12:30 p.m.
$.25 admission.
PRE-SOCIAL  WORK  CLUB
General meeting for all members in
SUB 105B at 12:3 p.m.
MISCELLANEOUS
LEGAL   AID
Every   Mon.,   Wed.   and   Fri.
228 and 232 at 12:30 p.m.
In   SUB
SPAGHETTI HOUSE LTD.
Hot Delicious Tasty Pizzas
- 22 DIFFERENT FLAVORS -
FREE DELIVERY - Right to Your Door
L
Phone 224-1720 - 224-63361
HOURS: 4 p.m. to 3 a.m. - Weekends 4 p.m. to 4 a.m.
4450 West 10th Ave. - Just outside the Gates
CLASSIFIED
Rota*; Students, Faculty & Club-3 lines, 1 day $1.00; 2 days $1.75.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.25; additional lines 30c; 4 days price of 3.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and ate payable in advance.
Publications OHiee, STUDENT UNION BLDCL, Unto, ot B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C
Clomg Deadline u tl:30, the day baton publication.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
Greetings
12
Lost & Found
13
LOST    KEYS     IN     BLACK     KEY
case   initialed   J'AB   on   Campus.
Keward.  Phone  684-8984.
Rides & Car Pools
14
STUDENT AND KID DESPER-
ately need ride to campus: 10:00
(9:00 Wed.) from 7th and Larch.
Remuneration. Phone 738 - 3917
eves, if you could help even one
morning.
Special Notices
15
THE TAURUS SPA, 1233 HORNBY
St. 687-1915. Guys only. Special
student rates. Best facilities.
TAXI LICENCE FOR SALE.
North Shore Business expanding.
$10,500. Accept. 1/3 down. Mr. Day
874-8667   or   926-3223.
DON'T MISS THE PUN. EVERY-
one's going to the AMS General
Meeting. Wed. Jan. 27. Memorial
Gym,   12:30.
IP YOU GET A LAUGH OUT OF
Politics Pat Paulsen is Your Bag.
Friday, Jan. 22 at 7:30. SUB Ballroom. Tickets $2.00 at Information
Desk.
"MARAT / SADE", AN ENGLISH
Department Course Film featuring
tha Royal Shakepspeare Company
directed by Peter Brook Thursday 14th in the Old Auditorium,
12:30  &  7:00.   50c.
"MIDNIGHT COWBOY". DON'T
miss this award - winning film
starring Dustin Hoffman and Jon
Voight. SUB Auditorium. Friday
and Saturday, 7:00 & 9:30. Sunday,  7:00.  AMS  card-holders 50c.
16
Travel Opportunities
CHARTERS U.K., CONTINENT,
Africa, other destinations, 1-ways'.
Mick, 687-2856 or 224-0087. 106-709
Dunsmuir St. Mon. - Sat.,  9-».
EUROPE FROM $185 ROUND TRIP.
Employment opportunities (U.K.)
Discounts, travel service, low car
hire rentals for members. Anglo
America Assn. 60A Pyle St., Newport,  I.W.,  England.
"MIDNIGHT COWBOY". TRAVEL-
ogue from New York to Florida,
starring Dustin Hoffman and Jon
Voight. SUB Auditorium. Friday
and Saturday, 7:00 & 9:30. Sunday,
7:00.  AMS card-holders 50c.
Wanted—Information
17
Automobiles—Parts
23
1967 - 71 HARD - TOP FOR A MG
Midget or Sprite. $100. Call Al,
731-8036.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Day Care & Baby Sitting    32A
Photography
34
NIKKORMAT FTN F/1.4, CHROME
body, never used. Case and warranty. $220 Firm. 733-8976 even-
ings, Larry.
INSTRUCTION & SCHOOLS
Music Instruction
62
Special Classes
63
Scandali
37
THE PANTS FROM LAST YEAR
are still around so if you lose
yours at Farmers Frolic we have
a spare,  sizes 45 & 48.
POTTERY CLASSES at
THE POTTER'S CENTRE
12 Week Course Starting Jan. 11
Classes for
Beginners,   Intermediates,
Advanced Workshop" Facilities
One Wheel Per Person
Phone: Gabriele Alfred, 261-4764
Tutoring
64
HOMOSEXUAL COUNSELLING
service: Intended for persons who
are unsure about themselves,
want to know the facts, want to
save years of deprivation, Free,
non-medical, confidential, no obligation. Send details to grad student, 23, Box 6572, Station G, Vancouver 8, B.C.
PAT PAULSEN LOOKS AT THE
70's Friday, Jan. 22, 7:30 SUB
to the ways of the world. Tickets
Ballroom. Let him open your eyes
$2.00  at Information Desk.
AQUA SOC SCUBA SCHOOL:
Starts 7:30 p.m. Jan. 14, Room 211.
War Memorial Gym. Heated Indoor Pool. All equipment provided.
Sign up in Outdoors Club Lounge
any  noon  hour.
CAN YOU IMAGINE THOUSANDS
of excited bodies all in one room?
Don't miss the AMS General
Meeting. Wed. Jan. 27. Memorial
Gym,   12.30.
"PERSECUTION AND ASSASSIN-
ation of Jean - Paul Marat as performed by the inmates of the
Charenton Prison under the direction of the Marquis de Sade" Film
50c Thurs. 14. Old Aud. 12:30 &
7:00.
Typing
40
FAST ACCURATE TYPING. EDEC-
tric typewriter. Shorthand. Phone
325-2934.
FAST     ACCURATE     ELECTRIC
typing.   Theses,   essays,   etc.    350
,   per  page.   Mrs.   Duncan,   228-9597.
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING,
my home, essays, thesis, etc. Neat,
accurate work. Reasonable rates.
Ph.   263-5317.
IBM SEDECTRIC TYPING SERVICE. Theses, essays, etc. Near
accurate work, reasonable rates.
Mrs.   Troche,  437-1355.
Wanted—Miscellaneous 18
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale 21
'62 ALFA ROMEO, NEW ENGINE,
new clutch, Michelin X, $850. Ph.
224-0486 after 6 p.m.
'59 VOLVjO; REBUILT ENGINE-
reliable. $200 firm. 731-7101 anytime.
BARGAIN — 1966 V.W. RADIO,
Low mileage, needs some body
work,   offers!- 254-2258.  Must  Sell.
Automobiles—Wanted
22
BUS OR VAN WITH SLEEPING
facilities for cross-country travel.
Phone 263-7274.
HOME TYPING, ELECTRIC. Experienced. Reas. rates. 738-7881.
TEDIOUS TASKS, PROFESSIONAL
typing service. IBM Selectric —
days, evenings, weekends. Phone
228-9304. 30c per page.
TYPING DONE AT MY HOME.
Neat and careful work. Essays,
Thesis. Reasonable rates. North
Van.  985-0154.
ESSAY & THESIS TYPING. IBM
electric. 35c page. Call after noon:
733-4708.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
UBC TUTORING CENTRE NEEDS
tutors: Specifically in Economics,
Organic Chemistry, and Computer
Science. Register at SUB 100B.
$3 an hour.
WILL TUTOR MATH 100 & 101,
day, evening, or Sat. Reasonable
rates. Phone 733-3(44—10 a.m. to
3   p.m.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
BIRD CALLS
Your Student Telephone Directory
NOW HALF PRICE - 50c
at the Bookstore,  Thunderbird  Shop
and AMS Publications Office
RIEKER GIRLS' SKI BOOTS. SIZE
six. Five buckle, like new. $45.
Phone 266-4656,  Terry.
GOOD DEALS — FUR COATS,
jackets, capes, etc., $5 and up.
Pappas Bros. Sell, 459 Hamilton
Street at Victory Square. 681-6840.
Note: We are open only Friday
nights 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. and Saturdays 10 a.m.  to 6 p.m.
QUALITY TRIO STEREO EQUIP-
mcnt. Powerful 80 watt amplifier
and AM/FM tuner. $125.00. Phone
228-9871.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
SLEEPING ROOM. GIRL. PRIV-
ate entrance and bath. Near gates
and beach. $45.00 month. 224-4165.
ROOM FOR RENT, MALE, PRIV.
ent., priv. bath, 1% blocks from
campus. Prefer third or fourth
year.  $40.00. 224-6389.
4th YEAR ENGINEERING STU-
dent requires roommate to share
apartment on 2500 Block W. 4th.
$55 mo. 732-6965 after 6.
ROOM FOR 1 MALE STUDENT,
sharing kitchen privileges. $40.
5529 University Blvd. 224-1772.
Room & Board
82
LARGE CLEAN ROOMS — BEST
food on campus. Deke House, 5765
Agronomy, 224-9691.
MEN ONLY. LARGE CARPETED
rooms. Good food. Color TV. Large
social areas. 5725 Agronomy Rd.
Manager, 224-9620.
Furnished Apts.
83
Unfurnished Apts.
84
Halls For Rent
85
Houses—Furn. & Unfurn.
86
FURNISHED HOUSE TILL APRIL
$175 per month; 10 minutes from
UBC. Phone 263-7274. Tuesday, January 12, 1971
THE       UBYSSEY
Page  11
Burr and Bisons
end Birds' streak
By BILL RUBY
Angus Burr and the Manitoba Bisons came to War Memorial Gym
Saturday night with something to prove. The Bisons were playing a
team with a 32 game winning streak, with a few of those wins at the
expense of Manitoba. The streak ended Saturday night in overtime with
the favored UBC Thunderbirds losing 78-76.
The defeat was due mainly through the efforts of Burr, who
scored 36 points, passed well, effectively broke the man to man press,
and who provided the leadership, confidence, and poise necessary to
win the close games. Asked about Burr, UBC coach Peter Mullins said,
"He played over his head but he played a hell of a ball game, and you
can't take that away from him."
But Burr didn't do it all. The physically strong Bisons controlled
the boards, especially on defence, thanks to the help of a successful
• 2-1-2 zone.
According to his coach, Manitoba's Ross Wedlake, the game's
high rebounder with 18, "did a very good job considering he had four
fouls since the eight minute mark of the second half." When coach Jack
Lewis was also asked why the Bisons kept switching from a man to man
defence to a zone defence in the first half, he said,"The zone was there
mainly to stop Thorsen, while the switching to man to man was done to
keep the Birds off balance." Half-time score was 33-32 for Manitoba.
The win by Manitoba can also be attributed to the Thunderbirds
inability or desire to 'play their game'. The Birds didn't rebound, fast
break, hit the open man, make the easy shot, or, play good defense. As
Mullins said after the game, "We haven't been playing well all year and
it finally caught up with us." He also made specific reference to the
Birds refusal to run, and the fact that four consecutive lay ups were
missed by four different Birds.
Good defence couldn't have prevented Burr from having a good
night, but it might have stopped him from scoring some of his 28 points
_.in regulation time plus all the Bisons' eight overtime points.
Bright spots for the Birds were Thorsen with 28 points and
MacKay with 17 points. Sankey, who scored 14 points, led the Birds in
rebounds and assists with four. Defensively, Bob Dickson looked the
best of those who tried to check Burr.
Friday night the superior Birds defeated the weak University of
Winnipeg Wesman 97-62. Half-time score of 49-32 was accomplished by
a good man to man press causing numerous turn overs, and a good
. running game which saw, at times, the Birds fast break as only the Birds
can do.
Ron Thorsen, noted more for his offensive ability, did a good job
defensing Barry King, whom Mullins thinks "is as good a guard as there
is in this league". Bob Allan scored 17 points for the Wesmen, with
King getting 14 points, mainly on long jumpers.
All the Birds played well with Thorsen gaining 25 points and
MacKay 14. If the Wesman had any thoughts of coming back in the
-second half, it was throttled by Stan Callegari, who got 10 of his 14
points early in the second half, mainly on long jump shots. Stan also led
the team in assists with five. Mullins was pleased with all his ball
players, but picked out Darryl Gjernes, who started off the game really
well, and Peter Herd, whom Mullins said "played quite well."
One observation. Where is the fan support when the cheerleaders
do their thing? Only once during the Manitoba game did the fans
respond. Maybe if we support them the 'Cartwheel' might come back.
... and in Victoria Monday
Yesterday afternoon the Thunderbirds left a snowclad campus for
Vancouver Island and were never behind in an evening game as they
trounced the University of Victoria 92-72.
High scorer for the Birds was forward Jack Hoy with 24 points
followed by Thorsen with 19, MacKay with 15, and Sankey with 14.
A complete contrast to Saturday night's game is provided in the
shooting percentages. The Thunderbirds shot 48% from the floor last
night compared to 40% against Manitoba. But it was on the free throw
line that the measure becomes greatest. Against the Bisons, the Birds
shot only 48% while last night they scored 85% of their free throws.
—keith dunbar photo
"I JUST CAN'T BEAR TO LOOK" says UBC's Ron Thorsen (23)
as he drives for the hoop in Saturday night's basketball game
against the Manitoba Bisons. Attempting to stop Thorsen are
Ross Wedlake (24) and Bob Town (31) of the Bisons while UBC's
Darryl Gjernes (11) does look on.
Please help us out
The sports department definitely needs writers, so if your sport is
being neglected or you would like to do some sports reporting features
etc.„ come on in and see Keith Dunbar any noon at 12:30. If he is not
there, please leave your name and a phone number where you can be
contacted. Anyone who applied last term and heard no more noise is
ialso very welcome.
Intramurals
CO-REC.  VOLLEYBALL
This starts on Tuesday at 12:30 p.m.
in War Memorial Gym. Everyone is
welcome. The volleyball nets will be
set up.
BASKETBALL
Monday night basketball games have
been cancelled. Check with the Intramural office regarding rescheduling.
%
CURLING   BONSPIEL   RESULTS
A Division B Division Consolation
1 — Forestry I Dekes Totem I
2 — Aggies II P.E. MBA
3 — Union  II Dentistry       Aggies I
4 — Fort Camp Dentistry
OTHERS
If you are interested in participating
in Bowling, Snooker, and Skiing, come
to the Intramural office to sign up before January 14th.
Live action!!
See your great AMS Council in person
-Tell them what you think of what
they're doing!
Sub Conversation
Pit
Thurs., Jan. 14
12:30
Topic: CONSTITUTION
CHANGES
AMS Special Meeting
Fencers jab
Thirty-two of the best fencers
in B.C. met over the weekend to
determine who would be on the
fencing team that will represent
B.C. in the Canadian Winter
Games next month.
The UBC team, consisting of
six contestants in the men's foil
tournament and one contestant in
the women's, fared relatively well,
although none made it on the B.C.
team. Linton Von Beroldingen
and Norm Price made it to the
semi-finals and Chris Joy placed
fifth in the finals.
Chris and Norm also fenced
with epee on Sunday. Chris
advanced to the finals and
finished eighth.
Susan Joeck, a UBC grad
student and member of the
Vancouver Blades, won first place
in the women's competition.
Soccer team
ties and loses
The UBC Birds, off to a slow
start this season, played inspired
soccer this weekend at Empire
Stadium. Spurred on by 15 fans
Saturday, they settled for a 1-1 tie
with Firefighters. Rick Gunn,
tripped-up on a breakaway,
retaliated by setting up Robin
Elliott from a free kick.
Sunday, the Birds outplayed
New Westminster Blues but
dropped the game 2-1. The Birds
missed their super star, Gary
Thompson, who was out with a
bad ankle. John Hibberson,
replacing Thompson at left wing,
scored the goal Sunday. The Birds
were also aided in the nets by Jim
Kitsul, who made some
sensational saves.
Although coach Joe Johnson
was disappointed over the missed
opportunities in the weekend
games, he hopes that the team will
capitalize on their slim chances
left for the playoffs.
ESCAPE
into the
UNDERWATER WORLD
of
Scuba Diving
Greg Kocher—Underwater Sports
Private
& Group Lessons
Phone 733-5809
All Equipment Supplied
6-Wk. Course-$40.00
Naui & Navy Certification
Next Course Starts:
Tues., Jan. 12th at 7:30
SORE FEET?
Now your ski boot miseries can be
ended. Have the boot specialist
transform your old plastic boots
into something warm and
comfortable with a perfect fit and
better edge control.
We use a new patented method of
foaming from the originators of this
modern concept.
We stock DOLOMITE foam boots.
CUSTOM
FOAM FIT
73 Alexander — Gastown
Phone 687-5228
Manager: Byron Gracie Page 12
THE      U-BYSS E Y
Tuesday, January 12, 1971
A/- Burns.
Dreaming
about a future
Or, when is a transient not a transient?
By JOHN GREBBS
It's a brand new year and the grey old world of
1970 has been obscured in a gentle blanket of soft,
virgin-white snow.
But underneath it's the same old, grey world.
Just a little colder.
Especially if you happen to be a transient youth
— that almost mythical anti-hero who tramped
through the media for most of 1970 and managed to
end up in Vancouver.
It's 1971 and there are still transient young
people in Vancouver, drifting from feed-in to crash
pad and back. Through the snow now.
If you're not a transient youth (and who is?),
you're probably sick of hearing about hungry
15-year-olds from Nova Scotia.
But there are still young people in Vancouver
without housing, without employment, ineligible for
welfare or unemployment insurance, without a
regular source of food but fixing to stay here.
And Joshua — an ambitious young organization
born last fall during the Jericho residents' occupation
of SUB — is working towards making them citizens of
Vancouver in the more traditional sense.
Joshua is working on a scheme that will, it hopes,
provide at least some of the young people with a
permanent address, source of income, and marginal
employment.
The organization - armed with a $250 grant
from Inner City Services — will rent a house in East
Vancouver in the next two weeks for 10 young
people, spokesman Chris Krawczyk, arts 3, said
Monday in an interview.
This will give them a permanent address and
make some eligible for welfare — the legal limit is
four welfare recipients per address.
"As soon as the people are in the house they will
become responsible for their own food and the rent,"
said Krawczyk.
"We will then get the money back from them
over the month and we can use it to open another
house."
JJJM.rawczyk said small crafts workshops will be set
up in the houses to provide the young people with a
means of earning pocket money through the sale of
candles and simple leather work.
"Joshua will take them down and help them get
welfare, try and help them get jobs but the idea is to
make them self-sufficient — if they don't mention the
rent they'll just be evicted because we're not going to
pay any more after the first month's rent," Krawczyk
said.
About 20 young people who have heard about
the plan are waiting for the house to open. They are
from all over the country and now they are in
Vancouver.
At the moment, they are living/'in and around"
Cool Aid (which handles the feed-ins) and the Innter
City Service hostel (which has 50, usually occupied,
beds).
Krawczyk said a similar, co-operative house is
already operating in Kitsilano with 12 people. It was
established at the end of November with private
funds from the people, who Joshua brought together,
and a $100 loan from Cool Aid, which has been
repaid.
Some of the young people in the Kits house —
one of them is 35 years old — are on welfare and
others "just exist" on the overflow.
"Most of them are legal," said Krawczyk, when
asked how old most of them are.
The entire housing scheme is only semi-legal —
with various zoning transgressions, real and projected
— and admittedly ambitious (maybe naively so).
But Krawczyk and her Joshua contemporaries
feel it can work.
"We figured it out and in a communal house of
10 people it should take only about $40 a head per
month for food and rent. Between the incomes in the
house there should be enough."
Unemployment is restrictively high, and rising —
especially among the young, unskilled — and paying
jobs in industry will be hard to come across,
permanent address or not.
J)Ci,nter phase two of the Joshua plan — equally
ambitious. And maybe not feasible, but worth trying.
"Our dream for employment is to have a regular
re-cycling collection business — collecting old papers,
bottles, cans and rags and selling them to the depots
that handle them.
"We figure it's feasible, once we get going, to
make up to $1,500 a month with a minimum of
effort," said Krawczyk.
The plan calls for the young people working in
teams of three, under supervision of the eight Joshua
workers, to do the collection and split the profits.
"We've already made about $200 in the past
week and a half with the one VW van we have. "But
most of it went to repairs and we've bought a
cardboard baler — I don't know what it looks like,
but it bales cardboard and they are supposed to
deliver it today.
"And we already have routes set up in the West
End. The apartment managers and some of the office
managers have been very good about it."
Joshua needs trucks for the operation and is
appealing to people with such vehicles to donate,
loan, or rent or sell cheaply.
"We've already had one truck donated. I haven't
seen it yet but a guy phoned the other night and said
we could have it."
And with an eye to the future — when, hopefully
the schemes will be working — some of the Joshua
workers are taking lessons in Gestalt therapy.
"Hopefully we might be able to set up groups in
the houses and give the kids the option of joining in.
"Most of them are really mixed up, dis-oriented.
And Gestalt ultimately makes people aware they are
responsible for their own shit," Krawczyk said.
Joshua at the moment is mostly a group of
people with plans.
The hard-core of eight organizers, some of them
former workers at the Jericho hostel, are living on
welfare and working full time on Joshua.
They are backed by a board of directors -"there
are about 10 of them, I think, including some really
straight people," said. Krawczyk, who is also on the
board — that includes social workers, clergy, Simon
Fraser University professors and a representative of
the Children's Aid Society.
The organization has sent the appropriate papers
to Victoria and expects to be registered under the
Societies Act withing the next two weeks.
Joshua started as a feed-in and housing
committee during the SUB occupation by Jericho
transients in October.
"We did that then because it had to be done. But
we are out of that now — those are just band-aid
solutions. We want to try and solve part of the
problem.
"We got going under the realization that all three
levels of government were just buck-passing about the
transient situation and weren't serious about doing
anything to help," said Krawczyk.
She said that Joshua is attempting to perform a
unique function as the other local agencies dealing
with the same young population — Cool Aid and the
Inner City Service — are involved with temporary,
stop-gap measures.
"But we are attempting some long term solutions
for getting the kids off the street."
Joshua can use any help or donations they can
get. Any donations of furniture, food, money or
other goods will be accepted at 1952 West Fourth. Or
phone Bill at 733-6511, or Gordie or Ted at
876-7860.

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