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UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Nov 10, 1989

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Array the Ubyssey
Rememberance
Day
November 11
11
Founded in 1918
Vancouver, Friday, November 10,1989
Vol 72, No ty
Students shanty-slam UBC
Shell support protested
by Keith Leung
The pouring rain and November cold didn't dampen the determination of about 15 anti-apartheid students from camping out in
a make shift shantytown to protest UBC involvement with Shell
Canada.
UBC Students for a Free
South Africa erected a lean-to
shack and several tents across
from UBC president David
Strangway's office on Wednesday
afternoon, with plans to stay until
Friday, in order to dramatize the
effects of university transactions
with companies that invest in the
South African apartheid regime.
Strangway called the reason
for the protest groundless.
"The Canadian government
has issued a list of those companies invested in South Africa. The
Canadian government has determined that Shell is not one of those
companies," he said.
"Shell Canada is run and
managed out of Canada. There is
no connection (with apartheid)."
Warren Whyte, spokesperson
for Students for a Free South Africa, disagreed.
"UBC invests in Shell Canada
which is 79 per cent owned by
Royal Dutch Shell. Royal Dutch
Shell has over 500 million dollars
worth of investments in South
Africa," said Whyte.
"They are required by law to
be the sole supplier of fuel to the
South African military and police."
According to UBC's financial
statements, for the fiscal year ending March 31,1989, UBC is listed
as purchasing $117,114 worth of
Shell Canada products.
"If the protest is about anti-apart
heid I support it 100 percent," said
Strangway. "But to go after Shell
Canada as an anti-apartheid protest, I find it a most bizarre and
strange set of logic."
"It does not have South African connections. If people want to
use it as a whipping boy that's
their choice," said Strangway.
"There are more responsible
things they could do to fight apartheid."
But Whyte said, "if boycotting
Shell Canada is not relevant to the
anti-apartheid struggle then why
did Vancouver City Council stop
buying their products on Sept. 7th
of this year?"
"Royal Dutch Shell has subsidiaries in many different countries. Shell Canada is one of those
subsidiaries," he said. "The profits
go to one source."
"For Dr. Strangway to think
that Royal Dutch Shell does not
directly profit from Shell Canada
is foolish," said Whyte.
Strangway said, "The Canadian government, who did a great
amount of study into the issue,
explicitly left Shell Canada off the
list. We are conforming to government policy."
"We are absolutely clean with
respect to that issue."
"It's really very simple," said
Whyte. "UBC financially supports
Shell Canada. Shell Canada financially supports Royal Dutch
Shell. Royal Dutch Shell financially supports apartheid. Therefore UBC financially supports
apartheid."
"The shantytown will come
down Friday noon but the struggle
to get UBC to stop buying Shell
Canada products has only just
begun."
Shanty town built by students in front of Buchanan for protest.
REBECCA BISHOP PHOTO
Ads cause turmoil
by Joe Altwasser
Christian and student leaders
have condemned last weekend's
Christian-backed ads concerning
the Gay Games, calling them narrow minded and not representative ofthe Lower Mainland Christian community.
The ads "are awful" said
United Church campus chaplain
Brad Newcombe.
"They may fuel homophobia
and they also give religious backing to the persecution of a specific
group in society," he said.
"There is an absence of love in
these words and an oppressive
spirit in their goals. This denies
justice and all people of faith and
love need to speak out against
such material...These people are
preaching a Christianity without
Christ," he added.
Though Newcombe is not in
favour of any form of censorship,
he said ads which are discriminatory such as the 'Time is Running
Out' should be signed, "so there is
a degree of accountability and
responsibility for these type of
ideas."
The Anglican Archbishop
Hambidge also questioned the
values espoused in the advertisements and said they were not representative of Christian leaders in
the Lower Mainland.
"I believe we're called to deal
with any situation, whether or not
we agree with it, in the same spirit
of love and compassion that Jesus
would have used. That ad certainly was not offered in the spirit
of compassion and love," he said.
But Susan Cornwall of the
advertising department of Pacific
Nil-shows deaden debate
by Franka Cordua-von Specht
It could have been a lively
debate.
Except no one showed up to
defend the luxury apartment,
condominium and rental project
proposed for Wesbrook and 16th.
This left the 24 speakers—
faculty, students, and MLA's of
Point Grey—agreeing in their
condemnation of the Hampton
Place project last Tuesday at the
public meeting in SUB.
Grievances touched on the
lack of student and faculty housing that already afflicts Vancouver, the increase of commuters,
noise and garbage, and the seeming disregard for community concerns by the university administration.
New Democrat MLA Tom
Perry was angered by the absence ofthe UBC administration
and Board of Governors, which
he said marked "a profound contempt for the university."
"If they (UBC) are so certain
this proposal is representing the
best long-term concerns of com
munity, why are they so reluctant
to defend it in public?" said Perry.
But UBC president David
Strangway said students—the
Alma Mater Society—who organized the meeting should have consulted with him before setting a
date. He said he was occupied with
other things on Tuesday.
"It's really not too courteous
not to engage in consultation and
to be told to be at a meeting," said
Strangway. "They might have
asked instead of telling us."
Like Strangway, who said he
has attended 50-80 meetings on
the project, Mark Betteridge,
president of UBC Real Estate corporation, felt discussion on the
project was nearing exhaustion.
"There's not alot of purpose to
go when old issues are rehashed,"
said Betteridge.
Both Strangway and
Betteridge said the development—which Strangway estimates will earn $3 million annually in inflation-protected dollars—would go ahead as planned.
Against much protest.
"We don't want this project. It
does nothing to alleviate the affordable housing crisis in Vancouver," said Vanessa Geary, AMS
director of external affairs.
"I'm appalled that a small
number of people are controlling
this university. This university is
not the Board of Governors, it is
not Dr. Strangway. This is a public
university and that gets lost here,"
said Geary.
In a survey on Hampton Place
project by the Faculty Association,
in which 614 faculty members
responded, over half were "very
dissatisfied" with the university
administrations'level of consultation with the local and university
community.
"The university is here to
serve the community; the community is our strongest supporter.
But to serve the community, there
must be two-way communication—which there has not been
according to the majority of the
faculty association," said Margaret Csapo, president ofthe faculty
association.
Csapo also remarked on the
lack of faculty housing on campus.
"Faculty that sell their house
for $75,000 in Saskatchewan to
teach at UBC, cannot even afford
to make a down payment on a
smaller house in Vancouver," said
Csapo.
John Dennison, a professor of
Continued Education who also sits
on the UEL board of management,
said "a university that is committed to academic pursuits should
commit its land to academic pursuits."
Perry added that because of
the great housing problem, it was
difficult to recruit good faculty.
Green party president Valerie
Parker said the university's main
motivation for Hampton Place is
money. "When the last tree is
dropped, when the last river is
poisoned, we cannot eat our
money," she warned.
But both Strangway and
Betteridge said the income generated from the project will enable
the university to build faculty and
studenthousing-infive years time.
Press defended the ad placement,
saying it was a matter of freedom
ofthe press.
The ads, Cornwall said, were
sent to the Pacific Press lawyers
and were given the go-ahead to be
run.
"Potentially controversial ads
will always be sent through legal
channels to be checked."
According to Cornwall, standard practice was followed in the
placement of the ads. This requires only a box number and a
billing address, which were provided by the 'Time is Running Out'
ads. The ads also contained a
phone number at which only a prerecorded message could be heard.
Ian Haysom, Editor-in-Chief
of the Vancouver Province, also
defended Pacific Press and their
right to print the ads but said they
were not something the editors
could endorse from an editorial
standpoint.
Haysom was unaware of the
ad until printing and said in the
future there would be closer cooperation between the editors and
the advertising department.
Mark Keister, Arts representative for the Alma Mater Society,
said he was not shocked by the ads
because there has been a history of
both printed and physical attacks
on the gay community in Vancouver. Keister was shocked by the
size and expense ofthe ads which
were priced around $15,000.
The Vancouver Sun has several times refused to publish advertisements submitted by gay
groups.
"It shows an insensitivity. I
agree with Svend Robinson (MP
for Burnaby Kingsway) who
thought it was interesting the Sun
was firmly against Vander Zalm
and the Socreds for their anti-
Semitic and Chinese remarks yet
failed to see the prejudice in these
ads," he said.
Keister added that it is difficult to argue with people when the
debate reaches a certain level.
"People say God told them to hate
people and you can't argue with
that." CLASSIFIEDS 228-3977
Classified Advertising
TYPING UBC VILLAGE, 24 hr. service.
Tapes transcribed, essays, papers, resumes,
letters, editing/proofing. 224-2310.
ACCURATE REPORTS WORD PROCESSING, WordPerfect, laser printer, dictation. Student rates avail. #16-1490 W.
Broadway at Granville. 732-4426.
RATES: AMS Card Holders - 3 lines, $3.00, additional lines 60 cents,
commercial -3 lines, $5.00, additional lines 75 cents. (10% Discount on
25 issues or more) Classified ads payable in advance. Deadline 4:00
p.m,. two days before publication. Room 266, SUB, UBC, Van., B.C. V6T
2A7, 228-3977.
5 - COMING EVENTS
- PUBLIC MEETING -
The Crisis of the Revisionist
Soviet Union and its
Satellites and the Validity of
Marxism-Leninism
- speaker
Hardial Bains, National Leader
Communist Party of Canada
(Marxist-Leninist)
Tuesday, November 14th, 7:00
p.m.
Buchanan A204
- Everyone welcome -
THE VANCOUVER
INSTITUTE
Free Public Lecture
Saturday, Nov. 11
Professor Alexander Woodside
Department of History
UBC
on
EMPERORS AND
DEMOCRATS
IN CHINA
Lecture Hall 2, Woodward IRC
at 8:15 p.m.
WORKING HOLIDAYS
- SWAP TALK -
MON. NOV. 20TH
12:30
SUB Room 207/209
1990 countries include:
Britain, France, Australia
New Zealand, Japan and
USA
11 ■ FOR SALE - PRIVATE
1970 VW CAMPER VAN. Tree planter's
special. Pop top, radials, stereo, no rust,
looks good, runs good. $2,500. 222-8506.
KATHY WILSON HAS BOOKED A
TICKET to U.K. she can't use. Ifyou wish
to go and have $600, contact Kathy at 319,
6000, Iona Drive before Nov. 19.
1980 CHEVROLET MONZA, V6 Auto, reliable transportation, $950 OBO. 688-5191
after9 p.m. Mon. - Fri. Any time on wkends.
78 HONDA ACCORD, $800 OBO. Call
732-0490 Deb or Tom any time.
FOR SALE: COMPUTER PRINTER $70.
Star Gemini - lOx 120 cps
Call 734-5536
XT COMPATIBLE, 640K, 10MHZ, math
co-processor, 30 meg hard disk, 2400 bps modem, logitech mouse, must sell. Offer
around $1,400. ph. 228-9393 o/h.
APT. SALE, ALL GOES! Queen bed $175;
10-speed as new $160; Hitachi stereo $80,
Ans. mach. $30. Room heaters, desk lamps,
chairs, bedding, dishes, etc. Offers. Need
something, inq. 222-9312.
YOUR TICKET to India or Thailand one
way asking $500 OBO. Open ticket expires
Dec. 8. Call Regina 277-7233.
1974 MERCURY COMET. Exc. cond.
auto. P/S, 54,000 miles, $1,700. Call 327-
0714.
S.E.R.F. THE HOME OF LOW PRICES.
Wang AS & Micom Word Processing Equipment. Call 228-2582.
20 - HOUSING
THE DEPARTMENT OF STUDENT
HOUSING & CONFERENCES has vacancies for women in Totem Park & Place
Vanier residences. These residences offer
room & board accommodation in single or
double rooms. Pis. contact the Student
Housing Office during office hours (8:30 a.m.
- 4) weekdays or by calling228-2811 for more
information.
Between
Deadline for submissions:
for Tuesday's paper is Friday
at 3:30pm, for Friday's paper
is Wednesday at 3:30pm.
LATE SUBMISSIONS WILL
NOT BE ACCEPTED.
Note: "Noon" = 12:30 p.m.
FRIDAY, NOV. 10
Rim Society.. Films Nov. 9-12:
Ghostbusters, 7 p.m.; Field of
Dreams; 9:30 p.m., SUB Theatre.
Badminton Club, new members
and $3 Drop-ins welcome. 7-10
p.m., Lord Byng, 3933 W. 16th.
Graduate Student Society. Music
Quiz. 6 p.m., Graduate Student
Centre Fireside Lounge.
Graduate Student Society. Bzzr
Garden. 4:30 - 7:30 p.m., Graduate Student Centre Garden Room.
SATURDAY, NOV. 11
Sikh Students Association. Bowling. 5 p.m., Town & Country Ball,
beside the Blue-Boy Hotel.
SUNDAY, NOV. 12
Lutheran Student Movement.
Communion Service. 10 a.m.,
Lutheran Campus Centre.
FEMALE   ROOMMATE   NEEDED   to
share house at 41st/Oak, S240. W/D/, N'/S,
no pets, own bathroom, 261-6944, Tom.
WANTED TO RENT: Late Nov. to Dec. 31,
furnished room, Bach. Suite or 1 Bdrm. Apt.
Rob: 228-5654, day 224-1650, evenings.
25 - INSTRUCTION
PROFESSIONAL  SINGER/TEACHER.
Performer's diploma, 2 yrs. experience.
Accepting students. Teacher of 1989 ARCT
Gold Medalist for Canada, 263-7664.
CLARKE JAPANESE ACADEMY
Japanese conversation courses. Expert instruction in a language that will take you
further than any other. Opportunities for
study and employment in Japan also offered. Number of applicants that can be
accepted limited. 526-1830.
30 - JOBS
RUN YOUR OWN BUSINESS
Student Sprinklers is now hiring on campus!
We have 45 manager positions available
nationwide. In 1989ourtopmanager'sgross
profit was $45,000. Join a winning team -
apply now. 681-5755.
MUTUAL OF OMAHA INSURANCE CO.
has an opening for a P/T Sales
Rep. at the Van. Intl. Airport.
Only those who are sales oriented, are able
to work rotating shifts and have the desire
to work in the travel industry need apply.
On the job training provided.
CALL 270-2631 for appointment.
United Church Campus Ministry.
Informal study and discussion/
worship. All welcome. 7:30, Lutheran Campus Centre.
Sikh Students' Association. Kir-
tan and Bhangra Class. 10 a.m.,
SUB Room 211.
MONDAY, NOV. 13
UBC Debating Society. Club
meeting. Beginners and experienced debaters are welcome.
12:30 p.m., Buch B30.
Classic Subfilms. Film: the African Queen starring Humphrey
Bogart & Katharine Hepburn
(directed by John Huston). 7 &
9:30 p.m., Sub Theatre.
TUESDAY, NOV. 14
Lutheran Student Movement.
Bible Study. 10 a.m., Lutheran
Campus Centre.
LutheranStudent Movement a Coop supper. 6 p.m., Lutheran
Campus Centre.
AMS Art Gallery Committee.
Opening Party. Selected works
from the AMS Art Collection. 7-
11; p:m- AMS SUB Art Gallery,
Main Goricourse.
IVCF - Inter Varsity Christian
Fellowship. General Prayer Meet-
ing-everyone welcome! Join us for
cinnamon buns in the cafeteria
afterwards! 7:30 a.m., SUB 211.
PERMANENT P/T
HOUSEKEPER/BABYSITTER
a p/t single dad req. a babysitter/housekeeper for his (usually) good boys, ages 6 &
10. Hrs. are from 3:30 p.m. to 6 p.m. on
alternate weeks; location is near UBC,
wages are $20/day. For furtherinfo, pis. call
Wendy at 273-0982 during office hrs.
BABYSITTER NEEDED, Sunday mornings from 10:30 - 12 to watch over kids of
parents attending service at University Hill
United Church. Salaryis $25 per Sunday. If
interested or for more info., pis. call 872-
5710.
UBC Intramural Sports. Agronomy & Stadium Loop Run. 12:30
p.m., registration at SUB Plaza.
Pre-Medical Society. Lecture -
Neurosurgery. Noon, IRC Wood 1.
Classic Subfilms. Film: Paths of
Glory, directed by Stanley
Kubrick and starring Kirk
Douglas. 12:40,7&9:30p.m. SUB
Theatre.
Students for Forestry Awareness.
Lecture: Mr. Charles Widman -
forest Industry Analyst. Title:
The Looming Timber Shortage in
the 1990's - Global and Local
Implications. Noon, MacMillan,
Room 166.
AMS Student Environment
Centre. Office hours also Thurs,
Fri. & Mon. 12:30-1:30 p.m., SUB
063.
AMS Student Environment
Centre Recycling Group. Meeting,
12:30 p.m.; SUB 205.
STYROFOAM MONSTER
BUILDING BLITZ - please bring
used styrofoam. 12 noon - 5 p.m.,
SUB concourse. AMS Student
Environment Centre.
Booth explaining Vancouver' blue
box recycling program^ 12 - 1:30
p.m., SUB Concourse. Student
Environment Centre.
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 15
United Church Campus Ministry.
Movie Night - diner, movie, discussion. All welcome. 6 p.m., Lutheran Campus Centre.
UBC Dance Horizons. Learn all
the right moves - in our Jazz I
Dance Class. 3:30 - 5 p.m., SUB
200-Party Room.
BANK OF MONTREAL
UBC CAMPUS BRANCH SUB
P/T Tellers & Clerk Typist required
Exp. pref. but not necessary.
Hours flexible.
For appointment
call Shirley Macphail
665-7084
E_\RN CHRISTMAS $$$
The A.M.S. is now hiring
Prep, and Service Catering
Staff, for up-coming Christmas functions. If you're
motivated, organized and
energetic; this is
the job for you!
Apply in person with
resume between 3:00 p.m.
and 4:30 p.m. M. - Fri. to:
Nancy Toogood in Room
#230F S.U.B., U.B.C.
ON CAMPUS WORD PROCESSING
Type it yourself... simplified instructions
spell check, and laser printer make your
work look top quality. $7/hr. and 15c/page.
Friendly help always available. SUB lower
level, across from Tortellini's Restaurant;
228-5496.
ON CAMPUS WORD PROCESSING
Need the professional touch? ... have it
done foryou - you can even book ahead. $27/
hr., 6-8 double spaced pages of normal text
per hour, laser printer. SUB lower level,
across from Tortellini's Restaurant; 228-
5640.
75 - WANTED
FLYFISHING AND/OR BIRD-
HUNTING accompaniment sought for local
and farflung B.C. expeditions. Have own
car. Call eves. 736-9559.
RESEARCH PROJECT. Free stress management program for female graduate students. For more information, phone 228-
5345.
VOLUNTEERS. Healthy non-smoking
males (19 - 25 yrs.) are needed forstudy of an
antiarrhythmic drug, Mexileti ne. Blood,
saliva and urine samples will be collected
over 72 hrs. A $70 honorarium will be paid
on completion ofthe study. For info, call Dr.
McErlane (228-4451) or Mr. Kwok (228-
5838) in the Pharmacy faculty, UBC.
80 ■ TUTORING
SPANISH TUTOR AVAILABLE.
ALL LEVELS, REASONABLE RATES
CALL 737-1404.
85 ■ TYPING
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST, 30 years exp.,
word processing/typing. Student rates.
Dorothy Martinson 228-8346.
WORD-PROCESSING $2.50/dbl.sp. page.
APA, MLA, CMS. Computersmiths, 3726
West Broadway (at Alma) 224-5242.
TYPING QUICK right by UBC. All types
$1.50/pg. dbspc. Call Rob, 228-8989, any
time.
TYPING/WORD PROCESSING. Experienced/competent typist with computer,
available for typing reports, term papers,
thesis, etc. 943-1582.
TYPING TIGERS. Low, low rates, computerized. Word Perfect 5.0. 273-1420 or645-
6934 (24 hr. pager).
JB
WORD PROCESSING.
Fast, accurate, dependable. 224-2678.
A & Y MANUSCRIPT MASTERS.
Specialist in scientific fonts, graphs, grammar correction, & style polishing. Call 253-
0899.
U NEED OUR SERVICE, documents &
term papers, presentations and spreadsheets professionally prepared at reasonable rates. Call 272-4995.
WORD PROCESSING, laser quality, fast,
accurate & reliable. Kitsilano, Laura 733-
0268.
WORD PERFECT Exp. Computer typist/
editor, low rates. Deborah, 734-5020 or 734-
5404.	
WORD PROCESSING & TYPING. Essays, term papers, theses, reports, letters,
resumes. Bilingual. Clemy266-6641.
UBC Dance Horizons. Get in
shape now at our stretch and
strength exercise classes - then eat
all you want at Christmas!! 12:30
-1:30 p.m., SUB 200 - Party Room.
Women in Development. Becky
Elmhirst, Dept. of Geography
U.B.C, will be speaking on
"Women and Work in Indonesia.
12:30 -1:30 p.m., Rm. 101, Geography Building.
Tools for Peace - UBC Committee.
General meeting. Noon - 12:30 -
1:30. Ponderosa Annex D, Rm.
203.
UBC Libertarians. Videotape:
The New Enlightenment: Human
Capital (or: The Real Reasons
Behind Poverty of American
Blacks). 12:30, SUB 213.
STYROFOAM MONSTER
BUILDING BLITZ - please bring
used styrofoam. 10 a.m. - 12:30
p.m., SUB concourse. AMS Student Environment Centre.
Booth explaining Vancouver blue
box recycling program. 12:30 -
1:30 p.m., outside SUB Auditorium. Student Environment
Centre.
Speaker: Recycling Queen Andrea
Miller tells how to minimize garbage. 12:30 p.m., SUB Auditorium. Sponsored by the AMS and
the Student Environment Centre.
THURSDAY, NOV. 16
Chinese Christian Fellowship.
Come and find out why we rejoice
in the Lord. Noon, Scarfe 206.
Lutheran Student Movement.
Theological Discussion Group.
6:30 p.m., Lutheran Campus
Centre.
Campus Crusade for Christ.
"Prime Time for Fellowship".
Newcomers and question askers
welcome. Noon, Angus 215.
UBC Dance Horizons.
Barishnikov had to start somewhere! Beginners' Ballet class.
3:30 - 5 p.m., SUB 200 - Party
Room.
UBC Debating Society. Club
Meeting. Beginners and experienced debaters are welcome.
12:30 p.m., BUCH B330.
UBC Ski Club. Broomball. 6:15 -
7:45 p.m., Rink #2 at Winter
Sports Centre.
UBC Ski Club. New Year's Sign-
Up. 7 a.m., SUB 212.
AMS Student Environment
Centre Transportation Group.
Meeting. 12:30 p.m., SUB 215.
FRIDAY, NOV. 17
Chinese Collegiate Society.
"Dances and Songs of the Pacific
Rim." Asian Dance Demonstration & Participation. 7 - 10 p.m.,
SUB Party Room.
Science Undergraduate Society.
Big Big BZZR and Band Bash. 8
pm. -12 a.m., SUB Ballroom.
Graduate Student Society. Open
Stage Talent Night - Musicians,
singer, jugglers, comedians. Everyone welcome. 6 p.m., Graduate
Student Centre Fireside Lounge.
MONDAY, NOV. 20
AMS Student Environment
Centre Purchasing-Recycled-
Products-and-Definitely-Not-Sty-
rofoam Group. Meeting. 12:30
p.m., SUB 211.
2/THE UBYSSEY
November 10 1989 NEWS
Quorum debate continues
Rec centre back in court
by Martin Chester
SRC may still be defeated.
Then again it might not.
Student Court has made a
decision on the questions put forward by Alma Mater Society vice-
president Sarah Mair, but the final decision on the quorum count
is still up in the air.
The September referendum
on whether or not to continue a $30
student AMS fee to fund the Student Recreation Centre brought in
a majority of NO votes. But AMS
Council decided the results were
inconclusive because of uncertainty over what constitutes quorum (the minimum number of
votes needed to make the referendum legitimate).
The court decided quorum
should be calculated by the number of students attending regularly scheduled classes on the
"endowment lands" who are day
members.
The court decision states that
"day members" does not include
extension credit students, nor
students deemed not to be attending classes between 8:30 and 4:30.
"I asked Student Court to interpret the AMS constitution and
that is exactly what they did,"
Mair said.
AMS director of administration Andrew Hicks was more critical.
"I had anticipated that Student Court would, after due consideration, come up with an actual
quorum number not just an interpretation," Hicks said.
During Wednesday's evenings meeting the AMS Council
voted to accept the court's ruling,
but no quorum figure was presented or accepted.
The quorum figure is to be
decided through contacting each
department and requesting they
provide the Elections Committee
with the number of students in the
department who do not attend
classes on the Point Grey Campus
during the day.
Discretion is to be left up to
the departments rather than the
elections committee, and any failure to reply in a reasonable time
will be assumed to mean that
there are no students in this category.
"We recognize that it is within
the discretion of the Elections
Committee to determine quorum,"' the judgement explains.
The Student Recreational
Centre may still be rejected. If the
Elections Committee decides, in
conjunction with the departments
involved, to eliminate a substantial number of students from the
quorum count the latest referendum results may stand and SRC
stopped.
The formula has been presented by the Student Court and
accepted by the AMS. Now it is up
to the elections committee to decide the quorum numbers.
Eyelid stitched together: scientific use of animals a controversial situation between UBC and Life Force
PAT NAKAMURA PHOTO
Hamilton'begs for response
by Szilard Fricska
It is the deafening silence
coming from president Strangway's office that irks Peter Hamilton, director of The Lifeforce Foundation—an organization formed
to raise awareness of human, animal, and environmental problems.
The silence is the latest development in a long-standing feud
between the animal rights activist
who wants to "develop a better
health-care system in which humans and animals need not suffer," and U.B.C. departments
employing animals in their research programs.
Their inability to find common ground has led the University
to adopt a 'no response' position.
Now the University does not answer Hamilton's letters.
From the Community Rela
tions office to that of Dr. Robert C.
Miller, vice-president of research,
there is a stong feeling of exasperation associated with Hamilton's name.
"What more can we tell him.
He makes the same allegations
over and over again," says Miller.
Senior U.B.C. Ombuds officer
Dorothy Hayward upholds the
U.B.C. administration's decision.
"The University's decision not
to respond to (Hamilton's) letters
is reasonable in the circumstances... Many letters have been
exchanged, some including thorough investigation of and detailed
response to (his) questions...
(however he) has not been satisfied by a thorough and reasonable
response," she recently wrote in a
letter to Hamilton and Miller.
Hamilton calls this 'no response' tactic "ridiculous." As a
result, Lifeforce is seeking legal
advice to determine if they have
any legal recourse.
In the meantime he insists
that the "peer review process,
various in-house committees, and
groups such as the Society for the
Prevention of Cruelty to Animals
fail to adequetely protect animals."
"The S.P.C.A. is an animal
welfare organization that does not
necessarily oppose vivisection," he
says.
Both sides have doctors and
experts to support their respective
positions.
And so the feud continues,
except now Hamilton is shouting
into deaf ears. Strangway was
unavailable for comment.
Friday's Sports Calendar
T-Bird hatching remberance weekend
November 10-12
Men's and Women's Soccer
CIAU National Championships
featuring the number one ranked UBC Thunderbirds
men's squad
O.J.Todd Fields and Thunderbird Stadium (finals).
November 10-11
Men's and women's volleyball vs University of Calgary
War Memorial Gym, 6:00 p.m. (women), 7:45 p.m.
(men).
November 11-12
Men's ice hockey vs University of Lethbridge
Thunderbird Arena, 7:30 and 1:00 p.m.
November 12-13
Men's field hockey - B.C. Student Field Hockey Championships
Sandpiper Cup, UBC, UVIC, SFU, VCC
Eric Hamber (35th and Oak).
Lock out stand still
Theatres ruled in violation by IRC
by Greg Davis
The Industrial Relations
Council has ruled that Famous
Players and Cineplex were in
contravention of the B.C. Labour
Code in dealing with the theatre
projectionist lockout.
On October 11 unionized theatre projectionists working for
Famous Players and Cineplex
Odeon were locked out, with negotiations between the union and the
companies at a standstill.
The companies want to bargain jointly and reduce wages they
feel are too high relative to other
fields. The union wants to arrive at
separate agreements with the
companies and renew their expired contracts.
According to section 68 ofthe
Labour Code, an extra-provincial
company (one with its headquarters outside the province) must
designate a BC resident to negotiate on their behalf.
Famous Players and Cineplex
each named a spokesperson, but
because they decided to bargain
jointly, these two individuals
formed a committee. The IRC has
ruled that a committee is not a
person—the technicality the companies seek to appeal.
The IRC ruled that the theatre companies were given a two-
week period to name one person to
negotiate with the projectionist's
union in order to bargain jointly.
"The powers (to negotiate)
were given to a joint bargaining
committee, even though the two
individuals were members of the
committee," said John Nixon,
spokesperson for Famous Players
and Cineplex.
"We amended our agreement
on October 5, giving power to the
individuals who can act as a committee. The technical violation
(regarding the committee) was
seen as an oversight, and did not
constitute sufficient grounds to
overturn the lockout," he said.
But projectionists Doug Biggerstaff, Rod Frew, and Ken Ponton are unsatisfied with the IRC's
ruling, and have formed a committee to approach campus newspapers to inform them of their
stance.
"They (IRC) just wrapped the
companies across the knuckles
and gave them two weeks to name
a person. If we were on strike,
instead of being locked out, you
can be sure we wouldn't be given a
two week grace period, we would
have to comply immediately," they
said.
The union is suspect of the
companies' joint committee, and
attests that their offers to bargain
have been refused.
The union has since launched
a counter-appeal to the IRC to
refute the companies' appeal. "I
think the tactic of trying to divide
the companies is misguided. The
real issue is the wages, they're
grossly out of line," Nixon said.
Projectionist Ponton disagreed, "It's about our jobs, we
don't believe it's a wage issue. The
company has used extreme figures
in its statistics to convince the
public that we're overpaid."
"They're mixing apples and
oranges, comparing the wage of an
experienced triplex projectionist
with an air traffic controller in
training. We will take a reduction
in wages if they give us more
hours. You can't just cut someone's
paycheque in half," Frew said.
On October 23 the companies
also locked out their unionized
ushers, concession workers, and
other floor employees, who fall
under the jurisdiction of British
Columbia Government Employees Union. Seventeen of BC's 42
Famous Player and Cineplex theatres are unionized, and many of
these workers are students.
"We have our own issues, such
as wages and job security," said
John Langley, spokesperson for
BCGEU.
"Famous Players opened up a
non-union theatre and closed
down a union one. It is pretty
obvious they want to deunionize.
They're are mainly after the projectionists but they are dealing
with us indirectly," he said.
"We feel they are innocent
bystanders. We're confident we
could reach an agreement with
BCGEU if the projectionist problem wasn't going on," Nixon said.
Though negotiations remain
at a standstill, the unions have
lifted their pickets at Cineplex as a
conciliatory measure to the company, which is in the process of an
unresolved ownership battle. But
the unions still discourage attendance at Cineplex theatres.
November 10,1989
THE UBYSSEY/3 Open Letter to the UBC Board of Governors
Re: Proposed tuition increases
Once again President Strangway is asking the Board to approve tuition increases. The following
arguments will once again be used to justify this increase:
1. "A UNIVERSITY EDUCATION BENEFITS STUDENTS; THEREFORE, STUDENTS SHOULD BEAR PART OF
ITS COST."
Precisely because a university education provides such vital benefits to a person as good jobs and self-
development, access to it should not be influenced by private wealth.
2. "UBC STUDENTS COME LARGELY FROM WELL-OFF BACKGROUNDS. THE AVERAGE TAXPAYER
SHOULD NOT HAVE TO SUPPORT THEM."
Making a university education more expensive for students will decrease the proportion of students from
low-income backgrounds even further. It will certainly inflict additional hardship on many students whose
parents cannot support them. The emotional burden of financial worries often affects academic
performance.
3. "HOUSING COSTS AND OTHER LIVING EXPENSES ARE MUCH HIGHER THAN TUITION; THEREFORE,
TUITION IS NOT THE ISSUE."
This argument tries to draw attention away from one problem by pointing to an even bigger problem. It is
a red herring. From the fact that other costs in addition to tuition hurt many students badly it certainly does
not follow that further tuition increases won't also hurt badly.
4. "THE PROBLEM WITH STUDENTS FROM LOW-INCOME BACKGROUNDS IS THAT THEY TEND TO
LACK EDUCATIONAL MOTIVATION. SO TUITION IS NOT THE ISSUE."
Another red herring. Adding the problem of high tuition to the motivational problems of many students
from low-income backgrounds will only discourage them even more.
5. "ACCESS FOR THE POOR CAN BE ENSURED BY STUDENT AID."
In theory it could; in practice it never happens. Student aid is chronically insufficient to offset escalating
education costs. Economic underprivilege causes many young people to lack confidence in their abilities
to begin with. The kind of poverty required to qualify for student aid, as well as bureaucratic hurdles,
reinforce this lack of confidence and make many students too dejected even to apply.
6. "UBC SIMPLY NEEDS MORE MONEY."
The worthwhile projects a university could undertake with more money are always infinite. The ideal of
equal educational opportunity should never be sacrificed for the sake of such projects.
7. "TUITION IS GOING UP EVERYWHERE, SO WHY NOT AT UBC?"
Many countries, especially in Europe, have abolished tuition altogether. Tuition is going up rapidly in the
U.S. But the U.S. has a two-tiered education system - one for the rich, another for the poor. It is not clear that
Canada should emulate an education system that fosters educational elitism for the offspring of the wealthy
and perpetuates tremendous social inequality. UBC is already among Canada's most expensive universities.
8. "COUNTRIES THAT HAVE ABOLISHED TUITION DID NOT EXPERIENCE A DRAMATIC CHANGE IN
THE SOCIOECONOMIC MIX OF THEIR STUDENT BODY. THEREFORE, UBC TUITION COULD PROBABLY
DOUBLE WITHOUT ANY CHANGE IN THE MIX OF THE STUDENT BODY."
Where are the studies to back up this claim? How applicable are they to our situation here? The experience
of certain other countries can hardly imply that doubling or abolishing tuition would not affect the mix of
the UBC student body. Even if high tuition did not actually deter any children from low-income backgrounds
from studying at UBC, it certainly does make student poverty more acute and demoralizing.
It is deeply unjust to make a vital benefit like higher education dependent on ability to pay. We call
on members of the UBC Board of Governors to save President Strangway from making the serious
mistake of imposing further tuition increases on the students of UBC.
STUDENTS PLEASE SIGN THE PETITION
AGAINST HIGHER TUITION
in SUB Concourse, Nov. 14 to 17
FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT:
or
Kurt Preinsperg PffllSI AMS Task Force on Tuition
AMS Board of Governors Rep R_\Ij/| an£* Student Aid
at 228-6101/SUB 262 **&&> at 228-3972/SUB 256
4/THE UBYSSEY November 10,1989 NEWS
B.C. forestry debate: Taking from the earth
by John Duffy
B.C. forestry practices are
producing an "economically and
ecologically impoverished landscape," according to registered
professional forester Mark Wareing at SUB auditorium on
Wednesday at noon.
According to Wareing, big
changes in the rate and method of
cutting trees are necessary if future generations are to have forestry jobs and wilderness areas.
But UBC forestry professor
David Haley labelled Wareing's
comments as "misinformed eco-
tactics at their worst", and suggested they were more emotional
than intellectual.
Wareing who was a forester
with the Ministry of Forests for 21
years before quitting, is now a
director with the Western Canada
Wilderness Committee and has
begun a crusade against present
B.C. forest practices.
Wareing focussed the bulk of
his criticism on clearcut logging—
the dominant logging method in
B.C.—which can result in soil
degradation and the loss of biological diversity, he said.
The current allowable cut in
B.C. is, "hopelessly unsustainable," he said.
Wareing said he is promoting
the "simple concept of taking from
the earth what it is able to give".
He cited examples of successful selective tree harvesting in the
Interior and proposals to ban
clearcutting in Washington state
as examples of some changes currently underway.
Haley said some of Wareing's
statements were "blatantly un-
Indonesia week
ends at UBC
by Dale Fallon
It's Indonesia Week at UBC,
and unless federal funds are forthcoming the second annual event
will not make another appearance
The Canadian International
Development Agency (CIDA),
which co-funds UBC's Indonesia
Project along with the Institute of
Asian Research (IAR), seems unlikely to continue their sponsorship beyond next spring.
CIDA has committed to
$150,000 per year, and UBC about
$30,000.
"CIDAis bearing a heavy load
ofthe shrinking government allocation for development," said Peter Richards, director of the project.
Foreign aid shouldered 23 per
cent of this year's cuts to the federal budget—despite the fact that
the government only spends three
per cent in this area.
"The coordinating centre provides a valuable service in disseminating information. The project is helping to develop skills for
young Canadians in Indonesian
development, business and academic research," said Richards.
In addition to collecting and
spreading written information,
the Project organized Indonesia
Week which ends tonight. Over
thirty events were scheduled in
Vancouver, with seminars on a
variety of topics such as rural
development, human rights, urbanization, the role of women, as
well as four cultural performances.
The Project also ties in with
UBC's expanding Asian Studies
Department.
"Thirty-six students are now
studying Bahasa Indonesia (their
national language), up from zero
two years ago," said Richards.
"The program has been a useful
catalyst for this growth in that the
provincial funding has followed
the federal lead."
According to Terry McGee,
director of-the IAR, "There was
never any expectation that CIDA
would keep the Project rolling
along."
Peter Richards readily admits
that the Indonesia Project was set
up as an experiment, nevertheless, he worries about what will
happen when the Project is shut
down.
"Who will pick up the pieces of
this information brokerage? If this
is something worth doing, it
should be done."
"Canadians have to reinvolve
themselves in the debate about
what development is, and why
we're in the aid business. After
twenty years of (spending)
growth, it's now turning back the
other way."
true" and suggested his objective
was to "stop industrial forestry as
we know it."
He suggested there have been
incredible changes in B.C. forestry
practices but that "there will always be problems with such an
enormous resource and industry".
Despite their differences,
both foresters say they respect the
other side in the B.C. forestry
debate.
Wareing said he believes industry professionals are sincere
and not malicious in their promotion of current practices and Haley
suggested the "Faculty of Forestry
has sympathy for the Wilderness
Committee's message".
Both see needed change coming in the future and would like to
see the public play a greater role in
determining resource management decisions.
Indonesian light
LUIS PIEDMONT PHOTO
City turns to Point Grey suites
by Mark Nielsen
Students are urged to attend an upcoming public information meeting on secondary
suites in Point Grey, but they'll
still be caught in a no-win situation according to Alma Mater
Society director of external affairs Vanessa Geary.
In a series of neighbourhood polls, residents will
be asked if they favour enforcing existing single family zoning or legalizing secondary
suites subject to safety standards.
But regardless of which option residents take, Geary said
students will be faced with less-
affordable housing.
"The first option is to leave
the zoning as it is and close
down suites. The second option
is to change the goning to make
suites legal; for people who own
suites that means upgrading
them—which means an increase in rents," Geary said.
"We're damned if we do, and
damned if we don't."
Instead, Geary supports a third
option—to turn down both rezoning and a ten year phase-out program tied to it.
"There have been illegal
suites in this area for many years,
and there have been no problems,"
Geary said.
As well, Geary refuted Vancouver mayor Gordon Campbell's
claim made in a November 7 Vancouver Sun story that "with the
first student that gets burned in a
fire, the whole AMS at UBC is
going to come and say: "Campbell,
how can you let the city do this?'"
Geary said the AMS is concerned about safety in suites, but
doesn't perceive the chances of a
fire breaking out to be a crisis
situation.
"What I do perceive as being a
crisis situation is the shortage of
affordable housing, and I'm not
convinced that either alternatives
given to us by the city will do anything to solve the problem," she
said.
But Vancouver mayor Gordon
Campbell said there would be no
point in having zoning if such an
option were allowed and that ten
ant would not get the protection
they would have otherwise.
Campbell said tenants in
many secondary suites are
treated as second-class citizens
subject to a number of problems
related to a fear of revealing
that they live in illegal housing.
Among those problems
Campbell included those related to voting registration,
sexual harassment and insurance coverage.
"This third option is ignoring a whole series of issues a responsible government needs to
address," he said.
It's estimated that between 30 and 40 per cent of the
homes in Point Grey house at
least one secondary suite, according to city hall official
Margo Willocks.
The Tuesday (November
14) meeting is the first of a
series City Hall has planned for
eight neighbourhoods in Point
Grey in which officials will outline the process through which
residents decide the fate of secondary suites.
AMS President Mike Lee takes on all comers in SUB Concourse each
week. Feel free to be suggestive.
LUIS PIEDMONT PHOTO
UBC SKI TEAM VS SFU
IN RELAY RUN TO THE HILLS.
Run ends at whistler's longhorn pub at 5:00pm.
ay^ All pledges and contributions       egi
^\$&      will be greatly appreciated.  *\$&
November 11th 89.
November 10,1989
THE UBYSSEY/5 Open
7 Days
A Week
M-Th 8-9
F8-6
Sat-Sun
11-6
NOW AVAILABLE
LASER PRINTING
from
Macintosh
IBM Compatible
UNIVERSITY VILLAGE 2ND FLOOR 2174 W. PARKWAY, VANCOUVER, B.C. PHONE (604) 224-6225
MMHMMMMMMMMM_M«MMMMMMMMM(NI
Canadian Art from UBC Collections
Fine
Arts Gallery
(basement, Main Library)
Hours:
Tuesday - Friday, 10am - 5pm
Saturday 12pm - 5pm
Until November 18, 1989
MM-M-MM-MMMMM-MM-MMMMaMMMMMMM-N
Daily -2:30 4:45 Evenings - 7:30 9:15 Evenings - 7:00 9:05
All quiet on the front
ERIC EGGERTSON PHOTO
This
Week's
Pock
SATURDAY NOVEMBER 11:
MIWATT AND THE USHBAND WITH FM
AT THE COMMODORE BALLROOM
The fact that Rastafarianism is inherently patriarchal should not come
as a surprise, nor should the fact that because of this, there are so few
women reggae artists. (At least that's what Trouser Press says.) Between Marcia Griffiths, Rita Marley and Judy Mowatt, the latter has
been arguably the most prolific of the three women since they were
members of the l-Threes, the back-uptrio for the legendary Bob Marley
and The Wailers and the only prominent women in reggae for some
time. To date, Judy Mowatt has produced four albums on the Sha-
nachie label since the demise of this most important reggae superstar.
Opening for Ms Mowatt is Farafina, an eight-piece West African
percussion ensemble.
SATURDAY NOVEMBER 11:
THE GflAPES OF WRATH IND SUAH KCLACHLAN
AT THE ORPHEUM THEATRE
There are better ways to spend nineteen dollars than to watch two local
acts sink under the weight of Molson Canadian and Coke concert
sponsorships.
SUNDAY NOVEMBER 12:
FAITH NOLAN
AT THE VANCOUVER EAST CULTURAL CENTRE
(1895 VENABLES)
A Vancouver Folk Music Festival favourite, Faith Nolan returns for an
evening in the intimate surroundings of that venerable venue on
Venables. She comes with a brand new album under her belt; entitled
Freedom to Love, it has a definite Vancouver feeling, for not only was
it recorded at Mushroom Studios and distributed by Festival Records,
but it was produced by Roy "Bim" Forbes and features such local musicians as Themba Tana of African Heritage on percussion and Gaye
Delorme on guitar. (Gaye Delorme actually also appears on Connie
Kaldor's new album Gentle of Heart.) A magnetic on-stage presence.
SUNDAY NOVEMBER 12:
raiDS GEORGE AND ILTER NATIVES
AT CLUB SODA (1055 HOMER)
Need we say more of this local combo? No. But you should really be
going to Faith Nolan, you know, 'cause this is neither the first nor the
last time Curious George will be playing. So there.
MONDAY NOVEMBER 13:
SHIWC AT THE RALWAT CLUB (579 DUNSMUIH)
OK, it's the last week of the preliminary rounds of sorts, and the three
bands bashing it out to advance to the Round Two Semi-Finals are Small
Man Syndrome, Overtown, and Choirboys. Last Monday was a bit of a
surprise in some circles, as Black Earth beat out Mary and Planet of
Spiders. They will now play on the 20th with Sound Butchers and this
week's winner in that competition for recording time, fame and glory.
MONDAY NOVEMBER 13:
AT THE SCANDALOUS FOLK CLUB
(127 LONSDALE, NORTH VANCOUVER)
The Rogue Folk Club is not the only outlet for those stricken with the folk
bug. The Scandalous Folk Club on the north shore follows the same
general priniciples of being there for anyone interested in folk and roots
music, and on this night offers an evening with Lynn Miles from Ottawa.
MONDAY NOVEMBER 13 AND TUESDAY NOVEMBER 14:
RARE AH AND THE .ITERS
AT THE TOWN PUMP
Exactly one week after the appearance by popular Guelph roots
practitioners Celtic Blue at the Railway Club, another bunch of folkie
Ontarians makes its way to town. They're Toronto-based Rare Air and
they're not new to these parts.
TUESDAY NOVEMBER 14:
FEATHERED PENS
AT THE RAILWAY CLUB
Ifyou missed Lynn Miles on Monday night at the Scandalous Folk Club,
you've got a second chance to see her, as she's playing on this night with
Yanka Froncz, Gail Landau, Ann Leader and Karen Anderson.
WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 15:
THE QTSTO BAD
AT THE TOWN PUMP
Another Vancouver Folk Music Festival favourite, The Oyster Band
played before a packed Commodore Ballroom two years ago, sandwiching a performance by the inimitable Michelle Shocked. They rewarded
the punctual that night, by playing their popular rendition of "Rose of
England" first off, so you'd best get there on time. A rockin' UK beat will
turn a different dance floor into another steaming mass of dancing humanity as the Oyster Band plays stuff from their latest Cooking Vinyl
release, Ride. If you have the stamina, go, but if you just want to sit and
calmly watch a concert, then may we suggest...
WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 15:
EXENECERYEKA
AT THE TOWN PUMP
I suppose she will always be best known for her part in that seminal 80's
band X. But with this reference over and dealt with, inevitably what one
is left with when faced with yet another rocker turned folkie is the bad taste
left in the mouths of those who loved the Avengers after Penelope
Houston went the acoustic route. Which is not to say that Exene
Cervenka's folkish Old Wives Tales is all that bad, because it certainly is
not the worst thing released on Rhino this year—far from it. It's just the
suspiciously predictable direction.
6/THE UBYSSEY
November 10,1989 Ubyssey Film Picks...
By Michael Gazetas
RARE WAR SHORTS
PUT SPOTLIGHT ON
REMEMBERANCE
DAY
Propaganda movies offer insights into the reasons why humans fight. They give us the opportunity to partake in a real
history lesson which describes
the consequences of war.
On Friday and Saturday
PACIFIC CINEMATHEQUE
will be presenting war documentaries to commemorate the 50th
Rememb'erance Day since the
outbreak ofthe 2nd World War.
It is film in its most powerful mode, a unique tool for manipulating war time audiences
to react favorably to the war
effort. These filmic accounts of
actual combat relate not only
the horror intrinsic in war but
the knowledge of how lucky we
are not to have participated.
The drama begins at
7:30pm.
Battle ofthe Atlantic is a
morale booster about the
dangers merchant ships faced in
bringing war material to
Britain. In A Diary for Timothy,
Michael Redgrave narrates the
E.M. Forster account ofthe
Anglican priest recording the
effects of the Blitz over London
for his son. The triumph ofthe
allied daylight bombing campaign is encapsulated in
Memphis Belle, a story about a
bomber on its last mission
before rotation back to the
States. This film is currently
being remade in Britain as a full
feature.
The Academy Award-
winning short The Battle of
Midway, begins the second set
of three films is at 9:20 p.m. It is
a narration of the attack upon
Midway shot from foxholes by
director John Ford.
In John Huston's The
Battle of San Pietro—once
censored by the U.S. military for
its horrific nature which had an
effect opposite to the wartime
propaganda message—fight
sequences show the frightening
results of a direct frontal
assault on the German fortified
town of San Pietro, Italy. This
film is shown in its entirety,
which gives it an extremely
anti-war perspective.
Thunderbolt, the last film,
is a gripping demonstration of
what fire po wer really means,
especially behind the hands of
young men during combat. The
weapon is the P-47 Thunderbolt
fighter and the men are from
the 57th fighter group. Footage
from gun cameras offer an ex
ceptionally brutal perspective of
aerial combat.
On Sunday and Monday
nights at 7:30 p.m., Timothy
Findley's novel, The Wars, is
brought to the screen. This film
dealing with combat in World War
One brings out the absurdity and
futility in fighting. Glenn Gould
highlights the soundtrack with
Brahms and Strauss.
GHOSTBUSTING IS
PASSE BUT BASEBALL
IS COOL
SUB FILMS will show Ghost-
busters II and Field of Dreams
starting Thursday, November 9
and continuing through till Sunday, Nov. 12.
Billed as one of the heavy
summer pictures, Ghostbusters II
continues the saga ofthe ghost
blasting heroes. In a rehashed plot
from the first film, the team and
their romantic interests battle
once again forces of ectoplasmic
evil as New York is threatened
again with that everlasting fear of
being cast into the lowest level of
Hell. Without further ado, they
win.
Field of Dreams is the famous
W.P. Kinsella story about an Iowa
farmer building a baseball diamond in his corn field to satisfy
ominous words from some ethereal spirit. The film becomes a
very insightful study into the political culture of Americans and
their fears of losing the magic of
the sixties. Tied up in this smarting political jab at the establishment is the patronization of baseball and the grandeur of playing a
game for the sake of playing a
game and not for political motives,
a kind of Zen study into their national pastime.
SAMURAI WITH NO
NAME SLASHES WAY
TO FAME
CINEMA-16 is completing its
series of Akira Kurosawa Epics
with Sanjuro on the Nov. 15th.
This is the sequel to Yojimbo,
where a masterless Samurai was
introduced as a hero swordsman
and a clever troublemaker with a
penchant for justice in his own
style. Everything about this film
and its predecessor is a wonderful
take off, and a homage, to the
spaghetti westerns by Sergeo Leone and staring Clint Eastwood as
the gun-fighter with no name.
Sanjuro offers awesome sword
fighting and a marvelous satire at
the class system of the Samurai.
BOGEY AND
HEPBURN IN WILD
RIVER JAUNT
CLASSIC SUBFILMS will be
showing a terrific film on Monday
Nov 13. For those not familiar
with The African Queen, starring
Humphrey Bogart and Katherine
Hepburn, now is your chance. This
is without question one of the best
films Hollywood has ever produced with that perfect mix of
character, plot, tightly woven suspense and the Hollywood ending,
which in this case pleases as well
as relieves the entire audience.
Highly enjoyable because of the
performances between Bogart, a
swarmy riverboat skipper, and
Hepburn, the moralistic missionary.
All SUB FILM performances
are at 7:00 p.m. and 9:30 p.m.
NASTY MUSIC
TEACHER ABUSES
PUPILS
The RIDGE begins a new run
of the new Academy award
nominated film, The Music Master. This film sets up a very tense
romantic and jealous triangle between a tempestuous opera
teacher and his two students, a
spoiled woman from a rich family
and a rouge thief, both with stunning voices and talent yet without
wisdom or training. In short, the
Music Master is what Madame
Susatzka never was.
FRENCH SEXUALITY
DOUBLE BILL EXCITES FILMGOERS
The VANCOUVER EAST
CINEMA is presenting two films
of a lighter nature on Monday and
Tuesday, times are 7:30 p.m. and
9:30 p.m.
Eric Rohmer's newest film,
Boyfriends and Girlfriends is a
very French perspective on relationships between men and
women. It is about people who try
to achieve their romantic ideals
without hurting the friendships
between each other.
The second half to the French
relationship and sexuality double
bill is 36 Fillette. Lili, a 14 year
old with a woman's sexuality,
realizes her power when she
flaunts her body rather than
ignores it. The resulting comedy is
from the inability of older men to
resist her sexuality and who find
their world turned inside-out.
Me producer made me do it.
Gala gets going
by Carol Hui
"P;
raise the Lord, Brother,"
yelled the Bill Vander
Zalm look-alike as the performers of
the Benefit Gospel Gala '89 revved
up the conservative crowd at the
Vancouver Trade and Convention
Centre last Sunday.
GOSPEL
Benefit Gospel Gala
Vancouver Trade and Convention Centre
Gospel entertainers performed
to raise money for the KF Foundation, an organization headed by ex-
B.C. Lions Larry Watkins. Their
mission is to help find abducted
children and persons suffering from
disorientation, such as victims of
Alzeimer's disease.
Dee Daniels' rendition of Battle
Hymn of The Republic brought her
a standing ovation as her incredible
voice gave new spirit to the standard tune. Special guest R&B
singer, Jim Byrnes, was another
crowd favourite.
The Black and Gold Revue's
medley of their show, It's Time to
Sing, made those who missed the
original performance earlier this
year wish they had attended.
The musical sensation of the
Total Experience Choir from Seattle could make Atheists attend
church, just to indulge in the aural
beauty of their gospel music.
MLA Emery Barnes ofthe New
Democratic Party was the patron of
the evening. He attempted to relate
the black gospel tradition to the
racism that the black population in
the southern states face. But he
balked at continuing because the
audience of predominately white,
middle-class Christians seemed to
feel more comfortable dealing with
the less controversial notion of universal humanitarianism.
The gala performance was
close to four hours long. Ending at
midnight on a Sunday meant that
some had to leave early, when
clearly the audience was enjoying
the show. Some of the mediocre
performances should have been cut
to make the gala less than three
hours. For those who were at the
Soul Food Dinner prior to the show,
the evening was a bit too long.
The ubyssey needs
entertainment writers! Film,
theatre, music, art and impro-
vizational elephant dancing.
November 10,1989
THE UBYSSEY/7 CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
V    ON THE BOULEVARD
Complete Hair Service, Suntanning,
Electrolysis and Waxing
SUNTANNING SPECIAL
20 Sessions   3>D*_J
Expires Nov. 30/89
5784 University Boulevard    Phone 224-1922 or 224-9116
TO ALL
AMS CLUBS:
Ifyou have not yet received your invitation to
the Annual S.A.C. Wine and Cheese,
please come to SUB Room 246 no later
than Thursday Nov. 16, 1989, to pick
up your invitations. Oj
We hope to see you there!
k
2*
for I
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Combo 12" & 15" Feeds 6 lo 10 very hungry pizza lovers
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Ham
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DELUXE 12.60 16.95
VEGI 12.60 16.95
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that your pizza will arrive within 30 minutes
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that if you are not satisfied with your
pizza, we will re-make it at no extra charge.
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J
Black pride gets boost
LOCATED IN UBC VILLAGE
NOW HIRING DELIVERY DRIVERS
by Andy Riga
MONTREAL (CUP)
YOUNG black students are
being discouraged by the
school system and need the helping hand of older black students,
say organizers of a new, province-
wide black youth group.
The group, called Also Known
As...X (AKAX) will soon begin a
tutoring and counselling service
for black Montreal-area kids having problems in elementary and
high school
"A lot of black
students are
streamlined into non-
academic areas and
eventually drop out ..."
With about 90 members from
Concordia University, McGill
University and Dawson College,
the group wants to become the
voice of black youth in Quebec.
The tutors will instill a sense of
pride and provide positive role
models, according to Robert
Douglas, an AKAX coordinator.
"We're going to tutor subjects
like math and French, but we're
also going to be talking to them
about their past," said Douglas.
"They have to know that they
can be doctors or lawyers or engineers if they want to be. We're
going to be tutoring with a politically conscious background."
"A lot of black students are
streamlined into non-academic
areas and eventually drop out,"
said Douglas, a Concordia student.
"There's no reason why a black
child shouldn't be saying 'I want to
become a doctor because my
people have a history of administering medicine."'
AKAX is expanding a tutoring
project started last year by
McGiU's Black Student Network.
In that program, university students tutor twelve students a
week at the Shad Academy, a Cote
des Neiges-area high school with a
high proportion of black students.
AKAX will also be working
with elementary school children.
Garvin Taylor, another AKAX
organizer, said young black children have to be reached early before they are discouraged by the
school system.
"When I was in high school, a
lot of the black students were
being streamlined into auto mechanics, sheet metal work, and
woodworking," said Taylor, a
McGill student. "You can't really
get a job with those skills."
Taylor said black students
should be encouraged to pursue
careers in school. Instead, they are
forced into dead-end programs, he
said.
"If students — especially black
students — want to succeed in this
world, they're going to have to do
well in academic areas," said Taylor. "A different approach is
needed to help these kids. We're
going to have a student-student
approach."
Although AKAX will be focusing most of its energy on education, it also wants to form a province-wide network to unite all
black students. The group will be
visiting colleges and universities
to recruit more members.
Douglas said the group saw a
need to bring together black students who were being ignored by
the province's other black groups.
"There's not that much respect
for youth in black community
groups," he said. "They don't acknowledge us. And they're not
adequately dealing with issues
that we think are important."
The group's name was chosen
to acknowledge the fact that there
is no common identity within
black communities, Douglas said.
"The name can be understood
in many different ways," he
said. "The AKA part means that
we don't really have our own
names, we are still using names
given to us by slave masters.
"There's not that much
respect for youth in
black community
groups," he said. "They
don't acknowledge us
"The X symbolizes the fact that
we haven't found a common approach. A lot of politically-conscious blacks say we should be
known as Africans. But over the
years we've been known by different names — first it was negroes,
then coloureds, then blacks, and
now Afro-Canadians. What we're
saying is that not everyone agrees
on what we should be called."
AKAX is planning a Remembrance Day demonstration they
hope will attract black students
from across the province. They will
be commemorating the deaths of
three youths killed by police officers during the past two years.
Nov. 11 marks the second
anniversary of the killing of Anthony Griffin, an unarmed black
youth shot dead in a police station
parking lot by MUC officer Allan
Go sett.
Lester Donaldson and Michael
Wade Lawson, two Toronto teenagers, were killed by police officers
last year.
"We have to remember people
like Griffin, Donaldson and Wade
Lawson," Douglas said.
"Their deaths showed us how
ineffective we are in dealing with
the powers that be. We are subservient, we can't fight them off and
defend ourselves. But we only
realize that when it's too late."
"We're also going to remember other people we consider
heros, like Malcolm X and Martin
Luther King, who fought their
whole lives so that we could be."
Anti-semitic movie causes uproar
By Hilary Bain
TORONTO (CUP) — The University of Toronto Jewish students association wants the
Muslim students association
kicked off campus for showing an
anti-Semitic video that might be
against the law.
Canadian Jewish Congress
(CJC) official Bernie Farber said
the video "The Other Israel,"
shown by the Muslim students
organization has been condemned as "hard core racism,"
portraying Jews as conspirators
and satanic.
The video, screened at U of T
in October, comes from the National Prayer Network, based in
Oregon and is produced by Rever
end Theodore Pike, a Christian
fundamentalist.
Farber said this is the first
time he has heard of a showing in
Canada.
The Muslim students association (MSA) released a statement
to clarify the "misunderstandings" that arose over the video.
The MSA said the video was
not previewed before it was
shown, so they were unaware of
its "offensive" contents to "Muslims and non-Muslims alike."
"It's a racist movie and even
though they (MSA) are admitting
they're showing a racist film, they
should be kicked off campus,"
said U of T Jewish students association vice-president Steven
Murmelstein.
"Groups have to take responsibility for what they show. Ignorance is no excuse," said Murmelstein.
The Canadian Jewish Congress has condemned the Muslim
student group for showing the
film and asked that the university
revoke its status as a recognized
student group.
"The MSA's objective isn't to
show anti-Jewish films because
that would be anti-Islam," Sha-
hab Samad, a member of the
Muslim group said.
The CJC has also reported the
film to the anti-hate unit of the
Ontario Provincial Police to determine whether it contravenes
the Criminal Code of Canada concerning hate propaganda.
HILLEL HIGHLIGHTS
Wednesday. November 15
12:30 PM
Torah Discussion Group
Hillel House is located across from
SUB & behind Brock Hall,
Tel: 224-4748
HiLlEls
Famous Hot Luwch
TuEsd-vy, NovEMbcn 14,
1250 PM
Thursday. November 16
12:30 PM
Panel Discussion:
WAR OR UPRISING?
DIFFERENT PERSPECTIVES
ON THE INTIFADA
Hebrew Conversation Group
7 PM Israeli Dancing SUB 207/209
,5>ETER
■fURON
Jazz am? Slues
Original Compositions
Friday, November 24/89
7:00 pm,
Fireside Lounge,
Graduate Student Centre
8/THE UBYSSEY
November 10,1989 OPINION
China viewpoints erroneous
In response to Chung Wong's
article titled "In the Dark:
Guangzhou" which appeared September 26 and your own editorial
concerning the "Media and Tiananmen":
Perhaps this response is irrelevant as the city of Guangzhou
may well already have imploded
into its own blackness and by extension—as Mr. Chung so discreetly suggests—along with the
rest of China. For "black"
Guangzhou is a symbol ofthe entire country and, I suspect, the
only city Chung tiptoed into from
his beloved and civilized Hong
Kong. People are entitled to their
opinions but those who write feature articles should attempt to see
a broader picture, a less biased
view. But I object more strongly to
Chung's mixing of the cultural and
political in a confusing and misleading way which results in criticising Chinese culture.
Chung's morbid opening is as
follows: "Guangzhou—Black
smoke rises in the streets. Astam-
pede of black government bikes
hustle along the sides. A few men
and women can be seen spitting on
the sidewalk every now and then.
Taxi drivers seem to try their best
to get near pedestrians. People
are everywhere. Poverty is everywhere. But if you live here, you
forget, you live on."
Most everyone rides a bike in
China and thus "rush-hour" could
fairly be described as a stampede
of bikes. But Chung's description
of black "government" bikes confuses me. I take this to be a political statement in the context ofthe
article but am confused as to what
a "government" bike is. Does this
imply the government owns every
bike (which is not true) or that
these bikes are somehow controlled by government agents who
play remote control or does it
imply that people have no choice
Perspective
and can only purchase "black"
bikes made in State owned factories—oh how repressive. Is that
the poi nt? (By the way you can buy
red bikes). Anyways, I will take it
to make some brilliant political
comment; or maybe not so brilliant; regardless, it is political but
is followed by the sentence "a few
people can be seen spitting". Well,
many people spit and not a few,
quite unabashedly, squeeze one
side of their nose and exhale whatever needs to be exhaled; not a few
walk to where young puppy dogs
hang or yap from cages awaiting
strangulation in the market and
buy one for dinner; not a few slurp
their noodles. If belabored it is
only to follow Chung's line of description and thus reveal his
choice of images, chosen to represent China, are criticisms of cul-
NOTICE OF ELECTION
Student Representatives to serve on the Board of Governors and
the Senate.
This notice is a call for nominations for full-time students to run for
election for the following positions:
BOARD OF GOVERNORS - TWO students
SENATE - SEVENTEEN students (five at-large and one from each
faculty).
Nomination forms giving full details of the requirements of nominations
are available in the Registrar's Office, the A.M.S. Office (Room 266
S.U.B.) and in the offices of the Student Undergraduate Societies and
the Graduate Student Society.
Nominations must be in the hands of the Registrar no later than
4:00 p.m. on Friday, December 1,1989.
ture, all mixed up with some vague
idea of how to bash China for what
the government did in Tiananmen. And then follows the next
crazy statement: "Taxi drivers
seem to try their best to get near
pedestrians." If the emphasis is on
"seems" and thus facetiously
meant then this is hardly an appropriate article in which to be
facetious; but, it is not meant this
way. The statement becomes a
ridiculous lie as taxi drivers are
fined money if they hit people. Itis
totally illogical that they would
want to mow anybody down.
This is Mr. Chung's description of and argument for what a
rotten society is like. It is not a
criticism of political events in
China nor a description of problems which China as a developing
country has, but an ethnocentric
account of what one reporter sees
and chooses to illustrate as the
legacy of Tiananmen. This is insulting and simplistic. People can
see what they want to see or upon
reflection take them as Chung
Wong has done. These are people
who write propaganda and I
strongly believe propaganda does
not belong in a newspaper. If the
Ubyssey wishes to editorialize
about distortions by the media
surrounding China then they
should begin by editing their own
writers.
These examples are from the
very first paragraph. Suffice it to
say the entire piece is filled with
lies and misleading statements.
Peter Symonds
Arts 4
CAMPUS
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Haircutting for men & Women
s2.00 DISCOUNT with this AD
EXP. NOV20
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DRINKING TOO MUCH?
SKILLS is a self-management program for
people who are beginning to have alcohol-
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ATTENTION
AMS CLUBS
The following clubs must hand in copies of membership and/or
executive lists and/or constitutions by Friday November 10,
1989 or deconstitution will result. All documents to be
submitted to the SAC secretary SUB rm 252 by 5pm.
Accounting Club
Anthropology/Sociology Undergrad
Society
Architectural Studies Abroad
Artificial intelligence Group
Atmospheric Sciences Club
AMS Boxing Club
CAPSI
Committee for the Defense of Human
Rights in Peru
Ice Hockey Club
IRM Club
Korean Students Association
Marketing Club
Microbiology Club
Music Students Association
Naval/Marine Engineers
PDT Social
Phi Alpha Club
Pulp & Paper Engineering
Robson Dart Club
Rugby Social
17c. Society
Slipstick
Sororities of UBC
Theatre Department Association
Transportation Club
Vegetarian & Animal Rights CLub
AIESEC
AquaSoc
Ayn Rand
Computer Science Club
Environmental Interest Group
Geography Students
German Club
Hang Gliding Club
Ismali Students
Kappa Sig Social
LDS
Law School Glue Club
Law Soccer Club
Maranatha
Mineral Engineers
MUSSOC
Native Indian
Newman Club
Political Science Club
Pottery Club
Psychology Students Associaiton
Scottish Country Dance Club
Skydiving Club
Student Council For Exceptional Children
Students for a Free South Africa
Tae Kwon Do
Waterpolo Club
WUSC
Volunteer Connections
November
10th-25th
Publishers' remainders, "hurts", UBC Library book discards
... and much more.
_3ook I
BOOKSTORE
-ftj_^j 6200 University Boulevard, Vancouver • 228-4741
Hours Mon, Tues, Thurs, Fri 8:30 am-SflOpm
Wed 8:30 am-8:30pm • Sat 9:30 amS.OOpm
I*I 1 -1»»0
ANMVVMjUUr
November 10,1989
THE UBYSSEY/9 Do-it-yourself-
editorial
Due to the pressures of mid-terms and
essay deadlines, we are allowing you, the
reader, to write your own editorial. Just fill
in the blanks—or, ifyou need a good laugh,
ask some friends to fill in the blanks without
telling them anything other than the kind of
word you need. Then read the editorial out
loud.
 (name of student politician),
has done it again. His/her blatant disregard
for all (adjective) and
 (adjective)  (plural noun) astounds us all. Last week, when
she/he had the offensive (plural noun) removed from the	
(adjective)  	
_(noun),   we   ap
plauded. These oblong monstrosities made
 -ing (verb) and  -
ing       (verb)       a       nightmare       for
 (noun). But we are appalled at
his/her recent decision to withdraw the
funds meant to (verb) shiny,
new, (adjective)
_(noun). Instead, she/he is using
the student funds to bring in a speaker on
 (a possible speech topic) for
the student politician. What nerve!
 (same name of student
politician)  obviously  has  no  respect  for
 (plural   noun)   rights   to
 (verb). We wish upon him/her
eternal (name of sexually
transmitted disease) and
 (form of Inquisition torture).
all  (adjective) stu-
back!!!   Show   up   at
We call on        _
dents   to   fight
your pants, and.
.(place or event) pull down
 (verb). Make
 (the student politician) wallow in
the (noun) he/she has so happily ignored. If we (verb) in
solidarity, we will win!!!!!
the Ubyssey
November 10, 1989
The Ubyssey is published Tuesdays and Fridays
throughout the academic year by the Alma Mater Society
of the University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions
are those of the staff and not necessarily those of the
university administration, or of the sponsor. The Ubyssey is published with the proud support of the Alumni
Association. The Ubyssey is a member of Canadian
University Press. The editorial office is Rm. 241k ofthe
Student Union Building. Editorial Department, phone
228-2301; advertising, 228-3977;   FAX# 228-6093
Joe Altwasser was the Host, and Franka Cordua-von
Specht was to tell her tale first. Her parable was
interrupted by Effie Pow and Chung Wong who
wanted to hear raunchier stories about Keith Leung,
Hao Li, and Michael Booth's assorted trysts. May
Wong and Mark Nielsen protested, saying that they
would rather listen to Tonya Zadorozny talk about
Martin Chester's oh-so-rosy cheeks. Meanwhile,
Nadene Rehnby was eyeing Ricky E. Bear and Paul
Dayson as possible sixth and seventh husbands.
Mike Laanela was screaming for Rebecca Bishop to
stop blasting at Luis Piedmont and Ted Aussem with
her .357 magnum. Alexandra Johnson's cat was
stuck in Yukie Kurahashi's ear, and Dale Fallon was
trying to pull it out before Gi'eg Davis and Pat
Nakamura got hemorrages from laughing so hard.
John Duthie complacently looked on while Mike
Gazetas told Laura Busheikin about crushed fish
scales in lipstick, and Robyn Iwata took Carol Hui
and Szilard Fricska by their hands and teleported to
Canterbury.
EDITORS
Joe Altwasser •  Franka Cordua-von Specht
Keith Leung •  Nadene Rehnby  •  Chung Wong
' bOrv-'r KNOVJ HOW ^OV Dib Pt/\
BUT YOU'VE GOT THE STUDEf-JT       I
HOUSIM6 CRISIS   LICKED/ J
Letters
Littering is
obnoxious
Littering is a statement...it is a statement
about our attitude toward
our society, the environment, and therefore the societies of future generations.
Littering is an activity
that makes a statement
about our attitude. It is a
statement that simply
spells: I DONT CARE. I
don't care about the condition ofthe society I live in, I
don't care about the condition of future societies, I
don't care about the environment, and I don't care
about anything except
what's convenient for my
consumptive self.
Jane Henderson
Physical Education 3
Another wee
history lesson
"As a courtesy," Leith
Lockitch says he will "fill" us
"in" on German history. He
declares flatly that "the
Nazi party was voted into
power." No, not quite.
In Germany's second to
last election in November of
1932, the Nazis lost two
million votes. "This year,"
wrote Goebbels, "has
brought us eternal ill
luck...."
The Nazis came to
power, not by being "voted
into power," but by a stroke
of good fortune (for them).
In December 1932 Chancellor von Papen submitted his
resignation to the aging
President von Hindenburg.
Papen was replaced by Schleicher as Chancellor on
December 2. The next general elections were set for
March of 1933. Having seen
their Reichstag representation drop from 230 to 196,
the Nazis seemed destined
The Ubyssey welcomes letters on any issue. Letters which are not typed will not be accepted. Letters over 200 words
may be edited for brevity. Please be concise. Content which is libelous, slanderous, racist, sexist, homophobic or
otherwise unift for publication will not be published. Please bring letters, with identification, to our editorial office.
Room 241K. SUB. Letters must include name, faculty or department, year of study and signature.
for obscurity.
But Schleicher, like
Papen before him, could not
bring together warring factions. On January 28,1933,
Schleicher, too, resigned.
With great reluctance, Hindenburg turned to the only
man left to be Chancellor -
Hitler - and offered him the
position. Hitler was not
voted into power.
With Hitler as Chancellor and two Nazis in cabinet,
the Nazis intimidated their
opponents in Germany's
last election on March 5.
But even then, the Nazis
pulled only 44 percent ofthe
vote.
Greg Lanning
Law in
Strangway not
at fault
RE: Article "UBC PROGRAM TACKLES WASTE
PROBLEM"
We greatly appreciate
the attention given to our
efforts of recycling in the
article "UBC Program Tackles Waste Problem" Friday,
October 11, 1989 (VOL. 72,
NO. 11). However, there
was an implication in the
story which needs to be
clarified.
The story suggested
that President Strangway
knew of the pilot recycling
project, but was withholding his approval on the continuation and expansion of
the program for some reason. This is simply not true.
Plant Operations and
S.E.R.F. have been working
with the approval of their
respective Directors. A proposal is currently being prepared for the President and
Vice President to review.
This proposal incorporates
what has been learned over
the last year into a comprehensive and efficient waste
management program.
This proposal  will be
the first opportunity the
President has had to either
endorse or disapprove of our
proposed campus wide recycling program.
Vincent Grant
Surplus coordinator
Hot pretzels
and Ukranian
sausages
How about a little space
management? That ridiculous excuse for a fountain
outside of the Main Library
has got to be the most futile
structure on campus. Every
day I walk past that spluttering heap and wonder
what on earth could justify
its existence. Half the time
the water does not even hit
the pond and ends up making a nice little swamp on
the lawn. In a city that tries
to save any heritage it can
get its hands on, we should
have learned that some
things just have to go.
Rather than spending hundreds of dollars keeping the
thing pumping twenty-four
hours a day let us put up
something that can pay for
itself. How about a little
food stand selling hot pretzels and Ukranian sausages? Surely a food stand is
only one of many alternatives. Practically anything
would be better than that
pseudo-baptismal cess pool
that engineers are ritually
'thrown' in.
Hamish Purdy
Faculty of Arts 3rd Year
Racist graffiti
insensitive
I am both saddened and
frightened by the large
number of U.B.C. students
who boast racist attitudes
toward the recently immigrated Asian-Canadians,
and especially the so-called
"Hong   Kong   Chinese."
Many of these immigrants
are students who have chosen to attend UBC; it must
be very difficult for them to
have to deal everyday with
the graffiti on the walls and
the cold, suspicious stares of
prejudiced students and
staff.
Many people say that
these new Canadians encourage this prejudice
among their classmates by
associating only with other
Asian people and speaking
Cantonese. Others argue
that the recent immigrants
must recognize that they
are in Canada now and that
they must assimilate to our
society. I say give them
time; they have come into a
foreign country where they
do not speak the language,
and in which they have no
cultural or family ties. It is
easier and safer for them to
associate with others who
feel as "foreign" as they do;
most of us, if we suddenly
found ourselves in a completely alien environment
would do the same thing
-thatis, hold on to what was
familiar to us.
To those people who feel
it is their right to proclaim
their racist arguments on
the stall doors in the washroom, you offend everyone,
not just the people toward
whom you project your hate.
If you need a scapegoat for
your problems, why not condemn the people who are
destroying the Amazon, or
the politicians who are
wreaking havoc on our country, or the Chinese government for the slaughter of
thousands of students, like
you and me, in Tiananmen
Square. Do something constructive with your anger:
there is no excuse for punishing an innocent people
for crimes they did not commit.
Marya McVicar
Arts 2
10/THE UBYSSEY
November 10,1989 AUS Byzantine
intrigue continues
"Methinks she doth protest..."
Joanna Harrington's quick
response to Allison Whitlow's Perspective column sounds suspiciously like a squeal of the guilty.
Joanna, while your hands
may be bloodless on this one, of
three attempts to oust a committed and enthusiastic arts president, I do not think you can plead
innocence on the previous two
attempts (regardless of who
signed the actual challenges or
complaints). Further, given the
strong rumours concerning your
intention to run for AMS president, combined with your bothersome behavior (which I often witnessed first-hand) on arts council,
I cannot imagine which "female
AUS 'troublemaker*" would better
fit the description in Allison's article; actually, I can't think of any
other "female AUS 'troublemakers'".
Although Allison had the
courtesy not to mention any
names in her column, it seems she
still hit pretty close to home. By
the way, Joanna, the next time you
set pen to paper to try to 'cloud up
the facts', try to be a little less
transparent.
Bill Allman
Law 2
Former History Rep
AUS Council
Open season on
Ballroom Dancing
Instructors
The present "female individuality free from male domination"
touted and pursued by what are
labelled "feminists" is actually
being contested vehemently by
females from the most entrenched, powerful and popular
organization on UBC environs.
This organization dons the guise
of "friendship" and "social skills"
to blossom forth a conspiracy that
bequeaths to every male the responsibility for all destructiveness
occurring on Earth (and elsewhere) to this present date. The
organization is the UBC Ballroom
Dancing Club.
Initially Ballroom Dancing
Instructors (BDI's) state as being
irrefutable "..the man is the
boss..", "..he initiates, leads and
ceased all activity for the female,
plus his errors must be adapted to
and compensated for by the female.." With such authoritative
delegation to males, from females
within this Judeao Christian society, Ballroom Dancing females
place total guilt on men for nuclear
weapons proliferation, narcotics
proliferation, conceived children
being destroyed by abortion, all
Calling all musicians,
jugglers, trapeze artists   •
& other rare individuals   ^
•
tbe Graduate Student •
Society is Sponsoring its     •
2nd OPEN STAGE
TALENT NIGHT
Friday, •
November 17, 1989 *
6 pm • Fireside Lounge •
Graduate Student Centre .
Call the GSS office .
at 228-3202 •
for more details
forms of pollution and all STD
epidemics. The ultimate proof of
this conspiracy by females is the
fact there are only female BDI's,
nary a male instructor on campus.
So the maneuvers are progressing
to render to males DIVINE retribution for all evils. The only
solution....obliterate BDI's!!
Paul Oberski
Bronze Level
UBC Ballroom Dancing Club
May we suggest a
"cage match"?
This one's for Anthon. I just
thought I'd answer a few of the
questions you posed in your last
letter. Firstly, thank you, I know
my last letter was brilliant. Now,
allow me to DEAL with your queries in point form so that we don't
have to waste any more valuable
readers' space than necessary.
1. Ifyou don't have "the time
nor reason to familiarize" yourself
with the "bureaucratic mumbo-
jumbo" in the AMS Subsidiary
Handbook then you shoul dn't be in
a club. It's part of your RES-PON -
SI-BI-LI-TY here at U-NI-VER-
SI-TY. As Andrew Hicks said, "it
is a ...benefit of being an (AMS)
club that everything in the SUB is
free—if you screw up you pay the
penalty."
2. You implied "suspension
was deconstitution" when you said
that, and I quote, "SAC has orchestrated a timely and well executed
plot to kill student clubs," that we
are taking over club funds and
office space.
3. The Proctor of SUB and
other AMS employees work very
hard and have to deal with a lot of
petulant, demanding individuals
(no names mentioned to protect
the guilty.) If he or she locks a
room it is so someone won't wander in and mess it up. The Proctor
(whom we DO love) is in the building at all times when it is open and
it only takes approximately five
minutes to have him or her open a
door for you.
4. Your airline analogy has
the makings of alphabet soup.
Please see point number one.
5. All biting, brutal, caustic,
cutting, searing and scathing
remarks aside, (not that I've actually written any of them down) my
last point goes out to all students.
SAC is just here to help you get
your clubs and activities off the
ground. The AMS Subsidiary
Handbook is there to ensure that
everyone gets their fair share of
services offered by the AMS.
We're not perfect, the handbook's
not perfect, clubs aren't perfect,
nobody's perfect, (except maybe
Val Levens.) Our imperfections
make us all human, our common
Quality with Speed.
24 hour appointments
Word Processing/DTP
Kelvin Douglas International
owned and operated
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by UBC students
9am-6pm:
688-6151
RED LEAF RESTAURANT
LUNCHEON SMORGASBORD
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denominator. Can we talk?
Thrasso Petras
Student Administrative
Commission
P.S. If you'd like some cheese with
your whine, please attend the
AMS Clubs Executive wine and
cheese party on Thurs. Nov. 23rd.
Well even give you a glass.
Stones fan adores
editorial
So, your editorial writer (Nov.
3, 1989) doesn't like the Rolling
Stones! Dear, dear! Let me tell
you what I don't like—being called
"moronic", or being compared to a
"sheep" or "cow" by a writer (and I
use the term in the loosest sense)
who, reading between the lines of
the editorial, did not even go to the
concert! (Forgive me if I misread,
but phrases such as "it sounded
more like" and "according to most
accounts" gave me a teeny, weeny
clue!)
I also don't like writers who
have to use words like "fuck" in
otherwise perfectly normal sentences in some pathetic attempt to
add perceived legitimacy to a style
which is nothing more than sarcastic and uncritical (in a constructive sense.)
Forty people from my residence did go to the concert and
forty people had the time of their
lives (none had binoculars). Forty
people knew they were totally
hyped by media saturation and
not one of the forty cared less.
Forty people had fun (most did
dance) and that is the point. I
agree with your writer that rock
and roll can grab you and not let
go—the Rolling Stones grabbed
me for two and a half hours and I
won't forget it in a hurry.
What is more important is
that I didn't listen to all the losers
who told me that the Rolling
Stones are too old and out of it to be
able to grab anything anymore,
;-nd what is even more important
is that I went and decided for
myself—shame your writer didn't
see the wisdom in this before writing the editorial.
While I'm here I might as well
tell you what I think of The Ubyssey. I've been to three universities
in three different countries and
The Ubyssey is without a doubt
the most poorly edited, least insightful, and least interesting student newspaper I've ever seen. It's
a shame really...
Greg W. McManus
Arts PhD 1
Wickie clears the
air
To Artsies Everywhere...
Upon reading the Perspective
by Allison Whitlow and the response to it by Joanna Harrington
228-9114  **—
iii
11-
theAnthropolgy Shop
at the
Museum of Anthropology
presents
Christmas in    II
the Shop       II
Selection of Imported    II
Gift Items              II
20% discount for members II
November 14-19      II
6393 N.W. Marine Drive,
Vancouver
228-5087
___?•-• *^>':Vf.-<*n.V;V^
Js?';/.y.'•••?.•.•- •.•-*■• •'•••' 7.■••'.'..••.; "•• ••;•• ::v.-..- -
v-i.'c'.'■'7'■•■ .■■•'■■*• ■ •/•*.'•.'•"• *•• • • • •• **. "•'••••*••••■••
iFsmsmteRb* "DREAMS cooeb' come-vwe....
GRAPHIC: THE CAMPUS
I felt that it was important that
the status ofthe Arts Undergraduate Society be clarified. First of all,
no members of our Council have
left the AUS or been asked to leave
due to trouble associated with our
Council structure since September. Some members felt that the
roots ofthe AUS's problems laid in
their president, namely me. Unfortunately, the AUS is a team
effort and when that team does not
have a unified goal, scapegoats for
problems are an easy solution to
deeply rooted tensions. I accept
the responsibility for keeping the
AUS on track, this is why I ran for
election, but I will not accept the
blame for a situation where personal conflicts, which I have admittedly contributed to, ruin a
terrific organization, and the
people within it, like the Arts
Undergraduate Society.
Now for some good news.
Despite the fact that some members felt that testing the support I
had in the AUS was the way to
achieve unity on our Council, it did
bring problems which our Council
has into focus so we can deal with
them more effectively, which I am
trying to do. I am always available
to receive critisms or constructive
comments from any Arts student,
particularly those within the
AUS. All our problems have not
been solved and it is my hope that
despite this we are still fulfilling
our mandate. If you, as an Arts
student, feel we are not, please
come by our office in Buchanan
Vs
SILKSCREENING
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PRICE INCLUDES:  1 colour print, garments, set
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in price .... additional colour printing by qurtation.
Call: (Ask for Kenneth) 688-6879
Monday - Saturday    10 am - 6 pm
Open Saturdays/Sundays/Evenings by appointment
A107 and tell us so. Or better yet,
get involved and try to change
things from the inside out. We
have acouple of AMS Council positions open.
Thanks for reading this letter.
It made me feel better writing it.
And Joanna, I know you had nothing to do with it, so don't sweat the
small stuff!
Johanna Wickie
President, AUS
(still)
(cough, cough,
gasp)
It's 12 noon at Yum-Yum's
Cafe. A venomous haze fouls the
air in the non-smoker's section.
Apparently smoke can't read.
Thereoughtabealaw: nosmoking
in cafes.
Bev Schroeter
Arts 4
What's the name
of
that tune?
Music Quizz
Fireside Lounge,
Graduate Student Centre
Friday, November 10,
1989'6:00 pm.
m
32S
5  The University of British Columbia
Frederic Wood Theatre
• • • presents • • •
She Stoops to Conquer
by Oliver Goldsmith
A Comedy of Exceedingly
Bad Manners
Directed by Kevin Orr
November 15 -25
Special Wednesday
Preview - Nov 15
2 for the price
of 1 Regular Admission
Curtain : 8 pm
Matinees: Friday, Nov. 17
Thursday, Nov. 23   12:30 PM
Box Office
Theatre
Frederic Wood
Room 207
November 10,1989
THE UBYSSEY/11 A
L
G       U
R
L
7
c
8
©1
13
[3]
14
T
19
70
15.
21.
4..
10..
16.
_    MOLSON'
£OVNAI)IAN_
22..
o    u
T
/
s
11
12
17
III
18
*_
23.
74
SIGN OF THE TIMES:
Match these signs with their meaning:
Baggage Claim, Baggage Lockers, Bar, Car Rental, Coffee Shop,
Currency Exchange, Customs, Elevator, First Aid, Molson
Canadian sold here, Immigration, Information, Mail, No Entry;
No Parking, No Smoking, Parking, Restaurant, Shops,
Smoking, Telephone, Ticket Purchases, Toilets, Toilets Women.
MOLSON CANADIAN. WHAT BEER'S ALL ABOUT.
12/THE UBYSSEY
November 10 1989

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