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The Ubyssey Mar 10, 1987

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Array UBC Open House attracts 150,000 people -see photos and story p. 6-7.
THE
•^   Vol. LXIX, No.M
Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday, Ma
Gage emptied
By PATTI FLATHER
Students in twelve-month programs are being kicked out of Gage
Apartments during the summer
months in favor of conference-
goers, a group of residents charge.
Students living in the two-year
old apartments must move from
their furnished suites by May 31,
and year-round students are upset
by what they call unnecessary
hassles of moving and buying furniture for only three months.
Gage Apartments committee,
members sent a letter Monday to
UBC president David Strangway,
and met with UBC's housing director in February.
"We are being kicked out of here
for conferences over the summer.
They (housing) are running a
hotel," said John Hole, a masters
student in geophysics.
Tenants estimate that only 23
couples and 13 single students have
studies year-round and want to
stay, out of a total of 21S units.
The students say housing could
still operate a viable conference
business, and that housing's first
priority should be with students.
Barry Lizmore, a masters student
in urgan land economics, said he
and his wife Carol are very upset at
the prospect of moving and having
to buy furniture only for the summer.
But Mary Flores, UBC director
of student housing and conferences,
said in a letter to the committee
dated March 4 that the apartments
have already been offered to other
groups during the summer.
In the letter she said single
students can move to "excellent
furnished accommodation" in Fair-
view Crescent Townhouses, while
married couples can apply for year-
round housing in Acadia Park or
sub-let from Acadia tenants.
"I realize that this year not many
of the married couples from the
Apartments will be able to transfer
to Acadia Park before May 31st,"
wrote Flores, who met with tenants
Feb. 17.
"The University simply cannot
guarantee on campus accommodation to all students who choose to
live at the university, and many
students must live off campus."
Flores could not be reached for
comment Monday.
The students say Fairview Crescent only offers group living, with
shared kitchens and bathrooms,
and the other options do not include furnishing. And they say married couples must compete with
families on waiting lists for Acadia
suites.
Barry Lizmore said when Flores
met with the tenants Feb. 17, she
tried to minimize the costs of moving by saying students could buy used beds for $35. He said he needs
other furniture such as a desk and
chairs as well.
Lizmore added, "Would Mary
Flores want to sleep on a bed that
cost $35?"
Suites in Gage Apartments cost
$480 a month for a one bedroom,
and $330 for a bachelor. The apartments were built two years ago, and
were used exclusively for Expo accommodation last summer.
Peterson elected
By DAVID FERMAN
Leslie Peterson, a former Social
Credit cabinet minister is the new
chancellor of UBC.
Peterson easily defeated his only
competitor Stan Persky with 11,787
votes to 5,425 in Friday's final
ballot count.
The chancellorship is the university's highest honourary post and
carries with it an ex-officio
membership to the senate.
Persky, a Capilano College professor, and now a four time loser in
the chancellorship race, was far
from disappointed by his latest loss.
He says he still has his eye on the
chancellorship.
"I feel great. Of course I'll run
again, my campaign has just
begun."
Peterson, who has sat on UBC's
Board of Governors since 1978 and
served in three different cabinet
posts between 1956 and 1972, has
met with premier Bill Vander Zalm
and told him that his first priority
will be the university.
UBC president David Strangway
was pleased with Peterson's victory.
"I've already enjoyed working
with him (on the Board) for the past
16 months. He's just a grand man."
When asked if he thought Peterson's previous affiliations with
Social Credit governments would
help or harm his role in dealing with
Victoria, Strangway said: "In principle it could go either way, but
knowing Les I think he will be a
great asset to the university.
"I was very pleased that he has
already met with the premier and
the minister responsible," said
Strangway.
But Persky was sharply critical of
Peterson and the 20 per cent of _ maicoim pearson photo
alumni who voted. SPRINGTIME LOVE BLOSSOMS for happy heterosexual couple enjoying sunny weather last Friday. "My nose
"It proves that you can endow a     is longer," coos woman, right. "But I have bushier eyebrows," retorts man, left. "And neither of us has a single
university   with   anything  but   in-     pimple," they exalt in unison. UBC's very succesful Open House provided fertile ground for young lovers to frolic
telligence. Once again the alumni of    without a care in the world. It's a pity they both had massive mid-terms Monday.
UBC have voted to maintain the
education  policies of the  Socred
government. This time they've actually elected the man who sat as
Factory waste dumping condemned
chair of the Board of Governors
during the restraint program. And
as far as we know he didn't utter a
peep (in protest against government
uts to the university)," he said.
Leslie Peterson was out of town
Monday and unavailable for comment.
By SVETOZAR KONTIC
Factories should treat toxic
wastes before they dump them into
Vancouver's sewage system, said a
UBC engineering professor Monday.
Ken   Hall  of  civil  engineering,
/I
Studonts help refugees
VICTORIA (CUP) — Student groups at the University of Victoria
are raising money to help Guatemalan refugees living in southern
Mexico.
Local groups of both World University Services of Canada and
Oxfam are sponsoring the Guatemalan Refugee support program,
which has already sent over $600 to a group living outside of San
Cristobal in the Chiapas region.
John Lydon, a member of WUSC, said student response to fund-
raising bake sales has been good and the group hopes to meet its goal
of about $1,400.
"Students have a lot of energy and they are not as apathetic as
they look," he said.
Lydon's sister Maeve, a member of the Central American Support
Committee, met the group of ,85 refugees while travelling in Mexico
in 1985. This particular group of Mayan Indians was chosen because
they are easy to contact and "their needs are clear," she said.
Lydon said the group is comprised mostly of widows of men killed
by the Guatemalan army, children and the elderly. She added the
money raised at UVic will be used to buy things like a corn grinder to
make tortillas, a pump to irrigate their fields and school supplies.
John Lydon said the refugees fled the Guatemalan army which is
attacking native villages, razing crops and burning houses, and causing about 150,000 people to flee their homes, he said.
Maeve Lydon said she was worried the Canadian government
might renew aid to the Guatemalan government later this year. ,
who is also assistant director of
West Water research centre on campus, said toxic materials should be
removed at the source rather than
spilled into the sewage system to
then be removed and diluted in the
water.
Hall said source control and
secondary treatment of raw sewage
which is not done in Vancouver are
necessary steps needed to protect
our marine environment.
He said the new Iona sewage
treatment plant currently under
construction is not a compete solution to waste treatment because
many persistent materials don't
degrade immediately and stay
around for several years.
"We may have problems for
quite a few years — the outfall is
simply putting problems out to the
future," said Hall.
Currently Iona and other sewage
treatment plants around Vancouver
such as the Annacis Island plant use
only primary treatment which
allows many harmful chemicals into
the water system.
Ian Birtwell, head of the pollution and toxicology research branch
of the federal fisheries department
said the outfall was constructed to
alleviate the problems around
Sturgeon Bank where thousands of
fish are killed directly by toxic outfall.
"It is so unacceptable to see fish
dying directly because of waste,"
said Birtwell.
Birtwell said recommendation
were made to the provincial government to intall secondary treatment
facilities for wastes in 1980, but that
nothing has been done. But the
benefits of the new outfall far
outweigh the disadvantages and it
does solve the Sturgeon Bank's problem he said.
Although he agrees Iona needs
both the outfall and secondary
treatment, Birtwell said Annacis
Island, which produces more industrial pollutants, is in greater
need.
Hall said bio-assays conducted at
Annacis showed that discharges exceeded acceptable levels of toxicity
50 per cent of the time. Governments complain that the costs of
secondary treatment are high, but
Hall said cleaning up wastes afterwards also costs a lot of money.
"Sinking money into secondary
treatment facilities is like insurance
money for politicians," said Hall.
Birtwell said ecology was very
much in its infancy in the early
seventies. The sewage treatment
plants were built in the early sixties
long before environmentalists were
fully aware of the dangers toxins
pose to sea life. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 10, 1987
MISS
IT!
All Ubyssey staff members wanting to see next year's prospec-
DON^T     ^ve ec^tors squirm in their seats
over extremely difficult, complex, profound, revealing, soul-
baring questions which will
determine their fate, come to
The Ubyssey office in SUB room
241k today at 2:00 p.m. and
Wednesday at 1:30 p.m.
Voting for the
new collective
Thursday, March 12th,
until 2:00 p.m.,
on
Wednesday, March 18th
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Brochures regarding
eligibility, etc. are
available at the office of
the Vancouver Rotary
Club — 685-0481.
Deadline for receipt
of applications is July
15, 1987.	
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THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Reforestation program criticized
By ROSS McLAREN
The government should concentrate on growing quality trees
before quantity in B.C.'s reforestation program, said the head of UBC
Forest Sciences.
Denis Lavender said, "there are
numerous examples of reforestation practices where the goal was of
the number of trees planted when
the goal should have been the
number of vigorously growing
seedlings and saplings."
"If we place our emphasis on a
worker planting 3,000 trees a day
then the quality of trees will reflect
that," he said. Reforestation,
"must be done in an intelligent
manner," he added.
The B.C. government is presently
reviewing its reforestation policy.
The first part of the
government's review, was finished
in January. The report called, the
Forest Management Review,
recommends that section 88 of the
Forest Act be abolished. Under Section 88, logging companies
deducted tree planting and road-
building costs from stumpage fees
paid to the government.
The government proposed to
contract out road-building and
bridgebuilding and pay tree planting contractors directly instead of
paying forest companies.
NDP Forestry Critic, Bob
Williams, however, labelled the
Forest Management Review
"lightweight fluff delivered in one
paragraph solutions that give the
report the depth of a mud puddle".
Williams argued the report ignored the "need for a competitive
pricing   system   to   establish   an
FOREST CREATURE SWINGS from the trees of Witty's lagoon. This species is peculiar to the lagoon only on
sunny Saturdays. Greenpeace workers fear that the species may become extinct if long school terms are not
eliminated. Fortunately as the weather improves, similar species have also been spotted at Willow's beach. This
is the only genus of animal that is known to use a tool to aid migration — such species have often been sighted
traversing the country side in silver hare powered carts.
honest stumpage system for tree
pricing." He said the NDP would
spend $300 million on reforestation
in one year which would create
20,000 new jobs for the
unemployed in B.C.
Most of that money would come
from the 15 per cent surtax on softwood lumber exports to the U.S.
But Lavender said he was optimistic at former forests minister
Jack Kemp's promise to improve
quality of B.C.'s silvaculture programs.
Lavender said "we are desperately short of well trained
silviculturists in this province
because of restraint. If the province
adopts a reasonable attitude
towards reforestation than more
students could be employed," he
said, adding that a government
committment to excellence in
reforestation will lead to more jobs
for UBC forestry students.
Rally fails to spur
divestment vote
TORONTO (CUP) — A 27-hour
sit-in, a rally and a near-riot in the
chambers of the University of
Toronto's Governing Council did
not convince council members to
put a divestment motion on the
agenda of a March 5 meeting.
About 28 members of the U of
T's Anti-Apartheid Network took
over president George Connell's office shortly after noon on March 4.
Students held the sit-in to protest
an earlier decision by a Governing
Council executive committee not to
propose a divestment vote for the
March 5 meeting.
U of T has $4 million and
$280,000, respectively, invested in
American and Canadian companies
with South African ties. In Sept.
1985, the Governing Council voted
to divest of all companies that did
not comply with the federal government's criteria outlined in a Code of
Conduct.
Connell was not in his office
when the students entered, but arrived shortly after 6 p.m., and met
privately with Anti-Apartheid Network leaders Tom Parkin and
Akwatu Khenti.
"The sit-in is a way to show our
disgust with the watered-down
divestment policy U of T came up
with, and as a way of getting media
attention to the issue," said Khenti.
Campus police were called to the
scene, but did not remove the protestors, who spent a night in the
president's office. Protestors left
the office the next afternoon to attend a pro-divestment rally outside.
About 300 students attended the
rally, where sit-in organizers
distributed lyrics to a song called
"Come On, George", typed on official Office of the President note
paper.
When Khenti told demonstrators
he had been permitted a five-minute
address at the Governing Council
McGill University's plan received with caution
MONTREAL (CUP) — Reaction to the McGill
University plan to place time limits on the completion of undergraduate degrees ranges from
nonchalance to alarm.
The proposal, which goes into effect next fall,
will restrict arts and science students to a maximum of eight terms to complete their programs.
"Even though students can apply for an extension, I can't see anything good about the
plan," said McGill student council arts representative Peter Nixon.
"It seems like a little bit of Social Darwinism,
in that it will put a lot of pressure on people to
finish and it will cut down on the quality of
education by making the experience totally
academic," he said.
Council club representative Carlene Gardiner
said she thought the time limit was a bad idea
from the beginning.
"I'm quite surprised by the decision, and I
don't understand their rationale for wanting to
impose the limits," she said.
Associate dean of science Roger Rigelhos said
it won't be that difficult for students to satisfy
the requirements of the time limit.
"All we're asking is for students to maintain
reasonable progress towards a degree," he said,
adding that the plan will help ensure general
standards.
"This will allow programs to be updated and
course requirements changed. If you get a
bachelors of science degree in physics in 1987,
you expect two people graduating to have taken
the same program."
Rigelhos denied that the policy change will
create assembly line graduates because many
students can maintain full course loads. He also
said that extensions for cases of illness or other
extenuating circumstances will be fairly easy to
obtain.
Gilles Cote of the Concordia University admissions department said no such time limits are
in effect at Concordia, although the engineering
and commerce departments both have grade
point average requirements.
"Actually, I think it's a good idea and I agree
with the general standards arguement," he said.
"Unfortunately, these decisions are often made
quickly and students are told after the fact. 1
think they should be given plenty of warning."
meeting, the crowd followed him
into the council chamber. However,
campus police would allow only 150
of the students into the chamber,
and barred entry to television
cameras.
Before Khenti's address, Connell
told the meeting he had sent a letter
to External Affairs Minister Joe
Clark, asking that the Code of Conduct be revised. He said U of T administrators were not satisfied with
the code.
"I believe the university policy on
divestment should be reviewed in
October 1987," said Connell, evoking boos and hisses from the crowd.
"The U of T policy on divestment has racist and paternalistic
connotations," said Khenti. "It implies a few white people in North
America can decide what is right for
the black people of South Africa.
"Avoiding the issue through nonaction will not make us go away,"
Khenti said. "Bring this motion to
the floor. Divest now."
After Khenti's address, which
was peppered by chants and cheers
from supporters in the crowd,
Claire Johnson, a part-time
students' representative on council,
introduced a motion to add a
divestment motion to the meeting's
agenda.
"We should consider this motion
(to divest) now," Johnson said.
"No reconsideration or review of
the policy will address the concerns
of the students here today. The
Code is utterly inappropriate."
When Johnson's motion was
defeated 16 to 13, the crowd
erupted into chants of "Racist
scum" and "Freedom yes, apartheid no." Protestors weaved their
way through the meeting room, and
some climbed onto table, pointing
and yelling at council members who
had voted against Johnson's motion.
"It gives me no pleasure in
disrupting a meeting," said Khenti
into the chair's microphone. "But
the time for debate, for talk is over.
You leave us no choice — there is
blood on your hands."
Campus police escorted council
members out of the building, while
protestors occupied the chambers
for more than 30 minutes. The
meeting was informally adjourned.
Governing council chair St. Clair
Balfour said he expected some trouble at the meeting, but "did "not expect them to make so much noise
for so long." Balfour said this was
the second time in his eight years as
chair that a meeting had ended
because of a disruption. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 10, 1987
AL-TH006U. \\<e brp
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SAt-0 itJ HfS f/K£.TeP HAt>
To APfilT TtWH€V\0*>\
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a
d
Letters
The great society
That's Entertainment
(sung to the tune of, not coincidentally, That's Entertainment)
The Zalm, inane assertions at hand,
UBC, lacking needed money.
The public yawns, unsure what's going on
In education.
UBC, needs a better lobby.
More support, of the mass public sort. . .
Stage a show, and hope thousands go.
That's innovation.
A show, like Expo, a big campus event,
T.V., Earle Birney, physics experiments,
Make us appear relevent,
So the next time they're voting,
It's that magical day they're noting.
It was grand, 150 thousand
People came, to see Strangway's domain,
And to learn, and develop concern
For education.
A big gold star, to Margaret Nevin's P.R.,
And a cheer, for all the great volunteers.
Hip hooray, we got two grand for John Gray.
We hosted B.C.,
And B.C. got a world of education.
Looking at the current world
situation, both at home and
abroad, no one can deny the grave
injustices that permeate life on this
planet. The Earth is convulsing with
rage, anger, hunger, and war.
As the human race approaches
adulthood, a new world order is
needed to bring in the new century.
We must do away with the destructive "everyman for himself" mentality. We must share, support,
help, and love each other.
As the community prospers, so
will each individual find fulfillment
and self-worth. Everyone has a
responsibility to make the world an
environment where we can live and
raise children in peace and harmony.
This is not empty rhetoric. We
have the means to accomplish this
condition, we only need to open our
hearts and minds. Prosperity will
not be measured by material
wealth, but by spiritual development and gratification.
Everyone will enjoy the wealth of
the land. Everyone in the new society will have the right to comfort,
food, and a fulfilling livelihood. No
one should be allowed to horde property for profit and exploit less
privileged people.
A complete change of consciousness must occur if we are to
avoid destruction and become truly
civilized. Radical reforms must be
made.
To some people, the term
"radical" carries the connotation
of being irresponsible. This is not
the case.
At present, all leaders and
followers are shirking their responsibility of improving the Earth. The
leaders are too busy in their power
games, and the followers are too
docile to think for themselves. The
whole system has to be
reconstructed from the ground up.
Revising the old order will not provide solutions.
I am not propagating turning the
world upside down — because it
already is! We must work collectively to put it back to rights. This is
not a Utopian vision; people create
their own realities.
University students have a duty
to use their knowledge and deeply
search their consciousness in order
to better the whole community.
Everyone has the power to shape
the world, why leave it up to
others?
We must defeat the neo-colonial
powers of greed and the Babylonian
forces of spiritual repression. We
must liberate the people struggling
for sexual and racial equality. Our
weapons will be education and love.
Reason and logic will be our armour.
Who are "we"? We are anyone
who is part of the cause to eliminate
all injustices in society and begin an
enlightened global community. (I
do not represent any organization
or institution. I am simply a person
concerned with our current situation.) One day we, the entire human
race, will stand together.
Unity through individuality!
Greg Davis
450-5959 Student Union Mall
Straight facts on AIDS
Letters
I am writing in response to Don
Hutchinson's letter on Tuesday,
Mar. 3, in which he states,
"monogamy beats condomns."
Well no kidding Don, of course
monogamy is going to reduce the
spread of AIDS but not everyone is
Arts student questions Engineer's definition of sexism
I feel that a response to your article of Fri., March 6, on Mary
DesBrisay, an Engineering student,
is necessary.
Ms. DesBrisay says that she's
"never been discriminated
against", yet "in the past . . . pro
fessors have made (sexist) comments in class." I hate to break it to
her, but this is discrimination. She
goes on to state that she is annoyed
by the Committee Against Sexism
and feels that "a guy sticking up for
women's   rights   seems   a   double
Noo! Don't forget Horizons
Last week The Ubyssey ran a story
about on-campus venues for student fiction writers. Not only did
you fail to include ARC, the excellent Arts Undergraduate Society
Magazine, but you also neglected
the UBC Science Fiction Society's
biannual magazine, HORIZONS
SF. This magazine has been
published for the past ten years and
has provided students at UBC with
a forum to publish their own works
of science fiction and fantasy.
HORIZONS is a magazine that is
always ready to receive submissions, but we really prefer stories
from UBC students. So if you think
that you have some talent for
writing, whip up a story and send it
to Box 75, SUB or drop by our office in Room 249A, SUB. But, if
the attraction of seeing your stories
in print isn't enough incentive, we
do pay authors for stories of excellent quality. Get writing, get
published, get paid!
If you don't think that you can
write that well, we still have
something for you. We are announcing the "It Was A Dark and Stormy Robot" competition. Write the
worst paragraph of horrible science
fiction and win prizes! Robot sea-
monsters . . . assistants named Igor
. . . death rays from Andromeda . .
. Ronald Reagan becoming president . . . anything weird and
wonderful. The best (worst) submission will win a dinner for two at
Vancouver's best Vietnamese
restaurant — Ona's. Deadline is
April 1, 1987, so hurry up and send
us your stuff, good or bad.
Duncan Stewart
publicity editor
standard." Besides not making
much sense, this statement contradicts her approval of the fact
that when the above-mentioned
professors make the above-
mentioned comments, both "the
girls and the guys have hissed at"
them.
It also is difficult to accept her
argument that she is not
discriminated against when she admits that she is worried she may not
get a summer job because the
"companies would take a guy over
a girl."
But Ms. DesBrisay is not satisfied
yet.
In addition to her confused
perspectives on discrimination, she
feels compelled to insult Arts
students by saying that they "sell
themselves short" (whatever that is
supposed to mean), and that she
wants "to come out of here a professional."
I am not sure if Ms. DesBrisay is
aware of the fact that Arts students
can be professionals too, but I suppose that she has been so deeply immersed in the wonderful world of
Electrical Engineering that she has
never met a Lawyer, or a Teacher,
or an Editor.
The most enjoyable part of this
story; however, was reading that
Ms. DesBrisay is Public Relations
Officer for her class. She is doing a
fine job of promoting the image of
Engineers as sexist and narrow-
minded, even the "girls."
Julia Denholm
arts 1
fortunate enough to be in a
monogamous relationship at al)
times.
What are these people supposed
to do? If they are smart they will
use condoms. In the meantime I
think you should get your facts
straight before you lash out against
condoms.
Yes, AIDS is spread through the
exchange of body fluids like you
say, but AIDS is mostly spread
through blood and semen, not
saliva.
You would have to literally drink
quarts of saliva before you ever got
AIDS from it and even then it is
unlikely. Thus, you cannot get
AIDS from kissing someone, even
heavy kissing.
If you don't believe me, ask the
AIDS Foundation (Ph. 688-7294).
It is uninformed people like you
that create a scared and ignorant
society.
AIDS is too serious a disease for
us to not have our facts straight
about it.
Rosetta Cannata
arts 3
Give me lights, not campus police
I find the UBC campus to be a
dark and frightening place at night.
On many occasions I have offered
to accompany fellow students to
their car. In my opinion, this is a
necessary precaution.
On Saturday evening at 8
o'clock, I was driving a woman to
the computer terminals. In order to
get as close as possible, I entered the
service road beside the bookstore.
Immediately, I was surrounded by
two campus police vans.
A man jumped out of his car and
called me a "twit" in his best Bronson voice — I couldn't believe it!
The other man quietly wrote out a
$25.00 ticket.
This is not a letter to gripe over a
parking ticket. I only wish to submit the following suggestion: The
University administration would be
well advised to release the most
"macho" campus police officers
and apply their hourly wage to the
cost of providing decent lighting to
what has become an unfriendly and
forboding nightime venue.
David Paterson
graduate studies
P.S. I sincerely hope that the campus police do not mar the upcoming
UBC open house by attempting to
strip-search members of the general
public.
THE UBYSSEY
March 10, 1987
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Friday
throughout the academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and are not necessarily those
of the administration or the AMS. Member Canadian
University Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is SUB
241k.  Editorial   228-2301/2305.  Advertising  228-3977
Michael Groberman went for an uncharacteristically long walk. David Ferman threatened to provide
two, two, two news stories (2 news stories!). Bleached Svetozar Kontic decided to add Open House to
the story list, which Stephen Wisenthal thought was a fine idea. Evelyn Jacob, the president's
favourite, requested the unedited lede be here published: "Balloons. Joy. Open House is now a
memory. But the magic is ours always."
Ross McLaren continued to take an obvious interest in Students for Accessible Education, and Dan
Andrews and Jenni Mott enjoyed some idle banter. Malcolm Pearson chose not to join Jennifer Lyall
(on the collective, Jen), and James "War Monger" Young indicated there was an opening in his bed.
Muriel Draaisma escaped from her ivory tower to condemn the unworthy, and Neil Lucente finally
loosened up and told some dirty jokes. Chew Wong addressed the question of layout. Robert Beynon
and Patti Rather were quietly smug, recalling year-long collective bliss. And the Four faded further:
sewage, photo essays, tomes, Peterson's in Arizona, and fine editorials. Tuesday, March 10, 1987
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Non-existent or potential being has no rights
There is only one fundamental
alternative in the universe: existence
or non-existence. The choice inherent in this alternative is possible
only to one entity: the conscious being — i.e. man.
We possess only one means of
cognition and thus action: reason.
Because life is preserved by self-
sustaining action, man has to act to
generate the physical requirements
(fuel) for life, and by our nature
must think before we act. In order
to exist, we must be allowed to
choose between life and death; we
need the right to life.
The important point to be
remembered is that rights are not
arbitrary social conventions. The
right to life cannot exist by permission, or else it can be revoked at any
time, which makes the entire concept invalid. The notion of rights
presupposes an objective evaluation
of the essence of life and humanity.
Once the fundamental right to
life is recognized, all other rights are
derived from this basic one, and
their purpose is to specify the
necessary requirements for preserving the right to life.
For example, the right to life
necessitates that people be allowed
to pursue those actions which support life, and that they be allowed
to keep and use the fruits of their
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actions. The right to private property, for instance, is a necessary corollary of the right to life; the denial
of the former implies the denial of
the latter.
The essential sanction of the notion of rights is in fact this:
freedom. The role of rights in
preserving this freedom is to protect
people from the fundamental threat
to life: physical force (and its
derivative, fraud.)
In this respect, the proper role of
a government is to apply the notion
of rights in protecting individuals
from one another by repudiating
the initiation of physical force in
human affairs. The government is
the socially legalized institution
with the monopoly on the use of
physical force to protect human
rights.
To further specify the notion of
rights, consider the issue of abortion. Firstly, one person's rights
cannot make any claims on the
rights of another person. To deny
one's right by using the equivalent
right of another person is to make a
wholesale assault on the notion of
rights itself.
Secondly, rights cannot apply to
non-existent or potential beings.
They apply only to individuals, to
their entity of physical form and
mind.
Thus to deny one's right over any
aspect of one's body or external
property is to deny the right to
one's life.
Rights apply to actual, discrete
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human beings. A human fetus has
no rights precisely because it is not
born. The fact that the fetus may
survive outside the womb before its
natural birthtime does not give it
rights when it is in the womb.
To assign rights to the unborn
fetus is in fact meaningless, inasmuch as it must require the denial
of all rights of the mother and
because there is no social relationship between the mother and the
fetus to be protected.
All of the details regarding the
fetus, the abortion process, or contraceptives are appropriate in the
realm of exposing the mother to the
possible psychological, emotional,
or physical impacts of terminating a
potential human being, but they do
not apply in the realm of rights.
It is a tragedy that the pro-
abortion groups use the words
"pro-choice" to symbolize their
position. Their stand should be in
fact "pro-life", because morality is
on their side.
This proper view of rights wa
first fully specified by Ayn Pand
and is now a central point, but certainly not a starting point, of her
philosophy of Objectivism. For
more detailed literature on this or
any aspect of the philsophy of Objectivism, please leave a message in
our club's mail #218, upstairs in
SUB.
Stephen Weaver
applied science 3
President, Ayn Rand Club
UBC
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THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 10, 1987
150,000 people witnes
greatness at. . . Page 7
UBC OPEN HOUSE
By EVELYN JACOB
More than 150,000 people visited
UBC last weekend for the first full-
campus Open House in 10 years.
"We wanted to open the university to
the community and show what we do. It
was phenomenally successful in that
respect," said Community Relations
senior writer Elaine Stevens who helped
organize the three-day celebration.
Planning for Open House began in
May of last year.
Stevens said she was overwhelmed by
the enthusiastic response from faculty,
staff, and students who put thousands
of hours into organizing the event.
About 200 students from all over campus volunteered as information officers
said Margaret Copping, Open House
volunteer coordinator.
By early Saturday morning, buses
travelling to UBC were packed solid
with visitors of all ages, said Stevens.
"You couldn't get on a bus west of Macdonald Street."
The last time UBC opened its doors to
the public was three years ago on a
much smaller scale.
UBC president David Strangway said
the total cost of Open House has not yet
been determined, but that $150,000 was
set aside for the event.
Strangway said Monday Open House
(publicity) was not aimed directly at the
provincial government, but he hopes the
government pays attention to the importance of the university.
But if the government failed to notice
the fair the public did not.
High school and elementary students
from all over the province attended
Open House, some from as far away as
Stewart, said Stevens.
Visitors had a choice of over 400
events, including a chemistry magic
show, an earthquake room where people
re-enacted the San Francisco earthquake, a children's garden which
parents, faculty and staff helped build,
and an open forum on AIDS.
Stevens said Open House was more
than just a series of shows and displays
of what the university has to offer. "We
tried to reach the schools to come out so
students could be persuaded to come to
UBC."
And UBC students showed their sup
port for the event.
"It's a good idea in a time of restraint
and government attacks on education
that we show the community how useful
a university is," said Lincoln Bodner,
Arts 1, who attended Open House.
But not all UBC students approved of
Open House's message that the university is open to everyone.
A member of the campus group, The
Coalition for Accessible Education, said
while it is important to get community
support for post-secondary education,
B.C. universities are not open to lower-
income people.
"We tried to make that apparent to
people this weekend," said Vanessa
Geary, who, along with group members
collected about 500 signatures from
parents and students in a petition for
better access to university education.
But Strangway defended Open House,
saying UBC is wide-open to everyone.
"One hundred and fifty thousand people came out — that's pretty open," he
said.
Thursday night's celebrity alumni
auction, which kicked off the event,
drew alumni from all over North
America, and featured poet Earle Birney
and t.v. talk show host Jack Webster.
The night raised over $20,000 for The
Rick Hansen Special Needs Bursary,
which will be matched by the provincial
government, Stevens said.
On Friday night, a debate on the value
of a liberal arts education in the 80's
with scientist David Suzuki, Birney, and
arts critic Mavor Moore, filled SUB
auditorium.
Stevens said the university has not
decided when the next Open House will
be, but hinted another one may be held
in 1990, in celebration of UBC's 75th
anniversary. Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 10, 1987
pirns
CTms
ATTENTION!
ALL GRADUATING STUDENTS
THE ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING OF THE GRAD CLASS IS:
THURSDAY, MARCH 12th, 1987
12:30 p.m.
at
HEBB THEATRE
THE FOLLOWING SUBMISSIONS FOR GRADUATION CLASS GIFTS WILL BE VOTED ON:
(MAXIMUM REQUEST PER GIFT IS $3,000)
Annual Student Christmas Decorative
Light Display
Science Undergraduate Society.
Amount:
$2800
Anyone who has been on campus during Christmas
exams, particularly those living in residence, have
experienced the depressing atmosphere that pervades the university during that time. The Annual
Student Christmas Light Display is a gift to the
university community aimed at raising spirits and
creating  a  focus for  Christmas  events  involving
students, faculty, administration, alumni, and the
public in general. On December 1st lights would be
placed  on  trees  situated  on  the  grassy  mound
southwest of the Student Union Building, remaining there until  the end of the month.  Students
would  be encouraged to add  their own tasteful
decorations to the trees. Funds are allotted to installation of underground servicing electrical cables,
and the light strings {including bulbs) be placed on
the trees.  Upkeep would be the responsibility of
future Grad Class Councils and/or the A.M.S. and
Undergraduate Societies.
David Lam Research Library
Commerce Undergraduate Society.
Amount:
$3000
The  Commerce  Undergraduate  Society  requests
funds to build a collection of annual reports of
Canadian and American companies. This collection
is intended for use by researchers, faculty, and
students for investigative research, and by students
of all faculties to tailor their resumes and application
letters to specific employers. It is believed that this
collection will help the Library to provide the highest
possible level of professional and business services
to students, faculty, and members of the community.
Infrared Assistive Listening System:
Disabled Students Association.
Amount:
$3000.
As hearing  aids are inadequate for discernable
transmissions of signals in classroom discussions
and lectures, the Disabled Students Association
proposed the investment by the Grad Class of 1987
of $3,000 to cover the cost of purchase and installation   of   an   Audex   Infrared   Assistive   Listening
System in one university lecture hall, for the use of
hearing impaired students. This system enables the
removal of background noise by directly transmitting the lecturer's voice to the listener's ear.
Interactive Language Library
International Relations Students Association.
Amount:
$3000.
Funds to initiate the drive for installation of a state-
of-the-art interactive language lab at UBC are requested. This lab involves technology which allows
for immediate positive feedback to the learning student; learning time for a foreign language can be cut
by up to 40%. The total cost of this project ts far
greater than the $3000 Grad Class contribution and,
at present, there are no other contributions. As a
result, funds will be kept in trust for a maximum
period of 36 months. If complete funding has not
been   achieved   by   that   time,   monies   will   be
reallocated to the most popular 1987 Grad Class proposal that did not receive funding.
Law    Students    Legal    Advice    Program
(LSLAP.)
Law Students Association.
Amount:
$3000.
Monies are to go to the hiring of a UBC law student
to work  in  the  LS.LA.P.-for the summer.  The
L.S.L.A.P. is the second largest legal aid organization in British Columbia, with an annua! budget in
excess of $100,000. The L.S.L.A.P. provides free
legal assistance to greater Vancouver residents who
cannot   afford   a   private   lawyer   (including   UBC
students),  gives  law  students  practical  legal  experience,   and   provides   legal   education   to   the
general community.
Neville Scarfe Children's Garden
Education Students Association, Landscape
Architecture Department.
Amount:
$3000.
Proposed is the creation of a children's garden in the
now unused grass area south of the Education
building.   Education,   planning,   and   architecture
students and faculty are involved in the design,
planning, and creation of this project, which will
serve as an outstanding demonstration project in
children's play environment, a retreat and sanctuary
for students, staff, and the public in general.
SUB South Plaza Benches
Alma Mater Society
Amount:
$3000.
Funding of this project will allow for the construction of several benches similar to those currently in
place. SUB Plaza is a very popular place, particularly
in good weather, and suffers from a serious shor
tage of seating. The gift of benches has been a
tradition for the Grad Class Council, and each bench
would   be   marked   by   a   plaque   or   inscription
acknowledging the generous donation of the 1987
Grad Class.
University Endowment Land
Public Information Display
Forestry Undergraduate Society.
Amount:
$1430.
Approximately 2,000 people, students and public,
visit the Endowment Lands trails each week, and
Forestry  feels  that   a   permanent   display  of   the
vegetation  (trees Et shrubs) found on the U.E.L.
would be beneficial to both the visiting public as
well as to students involved in the conception and
completion of this project   The display would be a
cedar-framed and roofed display board and viewing
bench.
• TAKE NOTE •
It Is Imperative That You Attend, As We Require A Quorum Of 400 Graduating Students
To Vote On The Gifts Proposals.
Without Quorum, NO GRAD GIFTS WILL BE FUNDED BY THE 1987 Class.
(The Grad Fees YOU Paid In September Will Be Turned Over To Next Years Grad Class.)
OTHER TOPICS TO BE DISCUSSED:
INFORMATION ABOUT:
1. GRADUATION CEREMONIES
2. GRAD TREE PLANTING
3. GRAD DANCE
4. GRAD-ALUMNI WINE & CHEESE
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION
CALL DON MUSTARD
228-6101
or
LEAVE A MESSAGE IN
SUB BOX 118 Tuesday, March 10, 1987
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 9
Letters
Propaganda rules future
More than 90 per cent of the people who live in B.C. have never
gone to university and probably
never will. Our government can cut
the university budget in half over a
decade and still get re-elected. Our
university responds by becoming an
"Expoversity" for, after all, the
B.C. Place deficit alone could have
paid all the expenses for all universities for a whole year and still have
some change left over.
The recent Open House, judging
by the crowds, was a great success.
Yet, Expoversity, and it paraphrased slogans can be seen as tragic
testimonials to the truth.
Knowledge and power are deeply,
intrinsically, related. However, in
the short-term, when political
power arises out of mere popularity, then to have knowledge, but no
power over action is, as Herodotus
wrote, the sorest of human ills.
To demonstrate the value of
education to someone who has had
dne is easy. However, how do we
educate someone about the value of
education when they necessarily do
not know what it means? This bald
paradox gives us the Open House of
Expoversity.
Look at the fact that 10 per cent
of the most ignorant and stupid
people in B.C. have just as much
political power to vote with as the
10 per cent who have university
degrees. There is no "discrimination" here, neither intelligence nor
education confer any political
power.
From a sublime stance if is
perhaps amusing — modern science
and technology has unleashed
powers which are literally billions of
times greater than any available to
previous generations of homo sapiens, meanwhile, how these
powers will be used in our society is
often decided by people who really
do not understand them. What we
need is not a weekend Open House,
but Expoversity 365 days a year.
Modern science is built on a
method of knowing, and that
knowledge has proven itself immensely powerful! But modern
society has appropriated the power
without appreciating the
knowledge. Oh well, that is the path
of least resistance, do whatever is
Housing
key policy
criminal
The purpose of this letter is to inform the campus community of a
housing policy that tends towards
acephalousy. If a student loses his
or her house or parking key, the
cost of replacement is thirty dollars,
per key. A criminal amount.
The housing department feels
that the high price of replacement
keys will control the amount of
keys, i.e. security.
However, if we examine a possible scenario, the absolute
mindlessness of their policy reveals
itself. If a young Fairvillewite, goes
out on the town and her purse is
stolen, why should she have to pay
an extra sixty-five dollars, because
her keys were in her purse? Let's be
real!!!
The hassle of replacing all your
identification is the shits. Why does
the housing office have to add insult to injury? I asked a housing office employee this same question, in
the context of this scenario. Their
reply was they "thought it was still
fair".
Can one reason with a brick?
Harris Silver
arts 2
immediately popular or profitable
first and then, maybe, think about
it later.
That is a fair turnaround, after
all, scientists and scholars were not
originally obliged to think through
the impact on society of their
research. The classic example was
Einstein and his "amusing and infectious idea" that matter could be
released as energy. For twenty years
nobody thought E = mc2 would
have any practical consequences —
while now we are in a runaway arms
race which is making an accidental
annihilation of civilization a real
and growing threat.
Yes, turnabout is fair play. When
this generation of high
technology job training succeeds,
there will be little work left whatsoever for human beings to do that
computers and robots can not do
better! There will be nothing left for
us to do but be human, and then
again perhaps education will
become a cultural adventure or
spiritual journey.
Whether our society can adapt to
or compensate for these changes remains to be seen. The human
species is the only animal that appears  to  be  able  to  deliberately
avoid its own ecology. More and
more an artificial environment is
being created to live in, but very
few, especially not the politicians,
are talking about the artificial selection that must go along with it. Insistence upon paying attention to
unpleasant, unavoidable truth is
not part of an Expoversity. Excellence of entertainment, rather
than the pursuit of truth, is why Expoversity is a perversity.
But nevertheless, we must all
hope the public enjoyed our Open
House. It is such publicity stunts
and propaganda that will probably
control the fate of higher education
in this province. As disgusting as
addressing this truth is, it is not
much compared to the facts in the
greater world system. After all it
really can make one puke to think
of the propaganda that can get us
nuked. It is necessary for our survival to smile at the profanation of
higher learning and say "ask me"
to the public. Welcome to Open
House, we don't discriminate
because we don't have the power
to. Like the nuclear missiles which
are aimed at us at this very moment,
Welcome to UBC.
Blair T. Longley
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APPLICATIONS
A.M.S. Summer Project Coordinators
The Alma Mater Society is now receiving applications from students interested in employment
as summer project coordinators. These positions
involve working for the A.M.S. on specific projects
as determined by the A.M.S. Hiring Committee. In
the past, projects have included the A.M.S. Used
Bookstore, High School Orientation activities and
the A.M.S. Tuition Fee Lottery. The complete list
of projects will be presented to candidates during
interviews.
The successful candidates will:
-be returning full-time U.B.C. students
-have had previous responsibility for staff or
budgets
-will be self motivated
-have the ability to work independently
-be   able   to   work   well   with   others   and
communicate effectively
Experience in marketing or public relations;
knowledge of the A.M.S., its operations and services; and supervisory or managerial experience
would be assets.
Period of employment will be a minimum of 12
weeks.
Applications can be obtained from and returned
with current resume to the A.M.S. Administrative
Assistant in S.U.B. 238.
DEADLINE for Applications:
4:00 p.m. March 20, 1987 Page 10
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 10, 1987
tween dosses
TODAY
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Co-op supper, 6:00 p.m., Lutheran Campus Centra.
UBC SPORTS CAR CLUB
Genera, meeting • Westwood and driver training,
7:00 p.m., SUB 213.
UNDERWATER HOCKEY
Drop-in game, everyone welcome, 7:00 p.m.,
UBC Aquatic Centre.
PSYCHOLOGY STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Meeting, third year atudanta intereeted in next
year's executive Committee, noon, Kenny 2004.
UNITED CHURCH CAMPUS MINISTRY
Informal worship, all welcome, noon, Lutheran
Campua Centre.
WEDNESDAY
UBC PERSONAL COMPUTER CLUB
Atari masting - avaryona walcoma, 4:30 p.m.,
SUB 212A.
UBC WOMEN'S CENTRE
General collective meeting, open to all woman
students and campua workers, noon, SUB 130.
CINEMA 10
Film - "Virgin Spring," directed by Ingmar
Bergman, 7:00 and 9:30 p.m., SUB Audrtorium.
POLITICAL SCIENCE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
General maating, noon, Buch D205.
UNITED CHURCH CAMPUS MINISTRY
Inductor service (recognition of incoming
chaplain! all welcome, 6:30 p.m., Lutheran Campus Centre.
THURSDAY
UBC PERSONAL COMPUTER CLUB
Commodore meeting, everyone welcome, noon,
Buch. B319. Also. Apple meeting, everyone
welcome, noon, SUB 213.	
Humiliation?
Big Deal . • •
It takes guts to
share your vapid
writing style with
15,000 readers.
Join the few, the proud,
The Ubyssey
SUB 241k
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SPEAKEASY
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Confidential Anonymous
Mon.-Fri.: 9:30 a.m.-9:30 p.m.
SUB CONCOURSE
228-3700
COME LOOK
AND
YOU'LL SEE.
Now in Point Grey
Fast, professional service to satisfy all
your Contact Lens and Eye Wear needs:
• Daily and extended wear
contact lenses
• Quality tinted lenses
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• Student Rates:
20% off contact lenses
this store only
10th at Aima
«imRGen
CONTACT LENS CENTRE SbIS*
3665 West 10th Avenue • Phone 736-5669
also 6 other locations
THE PIT PUB
Dance, win, fly. Dance wfth the right person at
the right time and you might end up in San Francisco. 8:30 p.m. - 1:30 a.m.. The Pit Pub.
STAMP CLUB
Swap end shop, noon at UBC, International
House, boardroom 400.
AMS INTEGRITY IN ACTION CLUB
A talk given by Richard Jones, "Responsible
Communication in the Media." Buch B 226.
UNIVERSITY CHRISTIAN MINISTRIES
Worship, discussion snd fellowship, noon, SUB
205.
PRE-DENTAL CLUB
Dr. Fulton on periodontics, noon. Wood fS.
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL OF UBC
Gueet speaker Rene Goldman wai speek about
the current human righta situation in the
People'a Republic of China, everyone welcome,
noon, SUB 211.
ENVIRONMENTAL INTEREST GROUP
Panel diacuaaion - stumpage - what's fair? re: environment labor and industry, noon. Law 102.
PACIFIC RIM CLUB
Speaker series: human rights - the Philippines
and Indonaeia today, with Rodney Haynee
-Amneety International, noon, Aaian Centre 604.
Slide show: Trekking in China and Tibet: with
Jake and Randy, 7:00 p.m., International Houae
- bzzr aveilable.
UBC AMATEUR RADIO SOCIETY
Spring general meeting, elections, WPX contest,
noon. Brock Hall Annex rm 368.
FRIDAY
UBC PERSONAL COMPUTER CLUB
Meeting for executive end chapter heads, noon.
Club office SUB 241.
PRE-MEDICAL SOCIETY
Gym night:  Volleyball,  badminton and pizza,
6:30-8:30 p.m., Osborne Gym.
ASTRONOMY AND AEROSPACE CLUB
General meeting and club executive election,
5:30 p.m.. Geophysics and Astronomy, room
142.
INTERNATIONAL   STUDENTS   ASSOCIATION
AND    POLITICAL    SCIENCE    STUDENTS'
ASSOCIATION
"Count  down  to   grad"   bzzr  and   margarita
garden, 4:30 p.m., Buch lounge.
LANGUAGE COURSES
LEARN A LANGUAGE...LIVE A LANGUAGE...
FRENCH in Paris, Lausanne,
Neuchatel or Amboise.
GERMAN in Cologne or Zurich
SPANISH in Barcelona or Madrid
ITALIAN in Florence
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VANCOUVER. BRITISH COLUMBIA V6T 1WS
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Courses offered at aD levels throughout the year.
For a free brochure, complete and mail thia application form to your TRAVEL CUTS office.
Name: 	
Address:	
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GRANVILLE ISLAND
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VANCOUVER. BRITISH COLUMBIA V6H 3S4
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APPLICATIONS
NOW
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wm
for the position of
JOBLINK
COORDINATORS
Resumes required with applications.
Deadlines for Resumes Applications
& Applications: Available
Friday, March 20, 4:00 p.m. SUB 238
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RATES: AMS Card Holders — 3 lines, 1 day $2.75; Additional lines, 60c. Commercial — 3 lines,
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Publications, Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
Charge Phonu Orders Over $10.00 - Call 228-3977
5 - COMING EVENTS
70 - SERVICES
85 - TYPING
CHILDREN &THE
NUCLEAR THREAT
presentation by
JOHN SEVILLE
Social Worker
Fri., Mar. 13, 1:30-3:30
AV. LOUNGE
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Open to All
GRAMMATICALLY YOURS
Let us improve your sentence
structure, punctuation, spelling,
grammar — everything!
Expert grammatical help
with anything you write.
Call Scot
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MINIMUM NOTICE REQUIRED Essays,
term papers, resumes, editing. UBC location. 224-2662 or 732-0529.
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST. 30 yrs. exp.
Wordprocessor & IBM typewriter. Student
rates. Dorothy Martinson, 228-8346.
11 - FOR SALE - Private
1977 FORD Maverick, Metallic brown, 4 dr.
6 cyl, auto, PS, PB, radio, new brakes,
muffler & radiator, 85,700 mi. $1000 firm,
phone 222-1890.
VOLKSWRITER 3 word processing software,
new, with spelling & math, for IBM & IBM
compatibles, $180, 261-4469.
SANYO dictating equipment — micro
cassette recorder, transcriber w/foot pedal
& earphones. Never used. $400 obo.
596-0016 eves.
15 - FOUND
A BROACH in Family & Nutritional Sciences
Bldg. downstairs. Wed., Mar. 4th. Call
270-1097.
20 - HOUSING
SUMMER ACCOMMODATION - Beta
House, 2140 Wesbrook Mall. Close to
classes, full kitchen, inexpensive. Apply
Now!!
OPEN HOUSE FOR NEW FAMILY HOUS
ING UNITS on Sat., Mar. 14th, the new
Family Housing Townhouse units at UBC
will be open to the public for viewing bet. 9
a.m.-4 p.m. Contact Student Housing Office at 228-4411 for details.
All are welcome
$155/mth. Beautiful, Shaughnessy home
with 3 furn. br, 2 full bathr, microwave,
laun. facil., Ige yard, near 41st & Granville.
We need a female UBC student to share
main floor with same in mixed house.
266-2636 eves, wknds or leave message for
Lisa or Tom.
THE ANGLICAN STUDENT
MOVEMENT AT UBC
CHORAL EVENSONG
7:30 p.m.. Alternate Sundays
SUNDAY, MARCH 15
Very Reverend
James Cruickshank.
"The Future
of the Church"
For transport from student residences call
224-5846, 4:30-6:30 p.m. Sunday.
Everyone is Welcome
ST. ANSELM'S CHURCH
University Blvd.
30 - JOBS
OUTGOING, sophisticated individuals, F/M,
required for flower distributing business.
New concept. Easy, pleasant evening work.
Approx. 20 hrs./wk. High earning potential. Ideal for college students. Must have
car. For interview call CACHET ENTERPRISES, 525-0424 bet. 8-10 a.m.
70 - SERVICES
AMS CUSTOMER OPERATED
WORD PROCESSING CENTRE
Lower Level SUB Rm 56 228-5496
50% OFF FIRST MONTH
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EXCELLENT   EDITING    SERVICES.    Pro
fessional editing for clarity, readability,
organization. Theses, articles, etc. 327-7547
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75 - WANTED
WITNESS NEEDED. A Chinese lady was hit
by a car while riding a bike in the intersection of Wesbrook Mall &■ University
Boulevard at about 8:15 a.m. on Wed. Jan.
28th, 1987. We know that two gentlemen
(may be doctors at UBC Hospital) were on
the spot when the accident happened. We
warmly acknowledge their help to the lady
after the incident. Now we still need your
help in order to settle what is involved afterwards. Please contact Mr. Hu at 228-3260
or 736-6704.
WANNA GO TO JAPAN? Student travelling
at end of April wants travelling companion.
Interested? Reply box 5000, c/o The
Ubyssey, 6138 SUB Blvd., Campus Mail.
GRADUATE & 4th YEAR Biochemistry,
biology & sociology students to research
textbooks on human sexuality. Must have
organized writing skills. 588-9268 Nick.
HAVE YOU OR A FRIEND experienced any
unwanted sexual contact while dating or in
a relationship with a boyfriend? We would
appreciate being able to talk with you. We
are researching this area, & hope to create
resources for women in dating relationships. Please call the SFU Criminology
Research Centre at 291-4127 between
8:30-4:30 p.m. weekdays to set up a
TELEPHONE interview with either Karen or
Cindy. All interviews will be kept strictly
confidential.	
80 - TUTORING
ENGLISH TUTOR: G. Harding-Russell
(PH.D) will tutor or give help with essays.
Phone 594-0960 after 6 p.m. $10/hr.
UNIVERSITY TYPING - word processing.
Papers, theses, resumes, letters, P-U &del.
9 am - 10 pm. 7 days/wk. 734-TYPE.
STUDENT/FACULTY RATES: $1.50/pg.
dble spaced text. Equations £r tables:
$14/hr. Resumes: $5/pg. 50 personalized
form letters only $35. Cerlox Binding El-
photocopying. Fast professional Service.
Jeeva's Word Processing. 201-636 West
Broadway. 876-5333. M/C & Visa accepted.
ADINA WORD PROCESSING for resumes,
essays, theses. Discount for students, 10th
& Discovery. Phone 222-2122.
WORD   PROCESSING   SPECIALIST.   U
write, we type, theses, resumes, letters,
essays. Days, eves., wknds. 736-1208.
JUDITH F1LTNESS
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263-0351
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WORDWEAVERS - Word processing
(multi-linguall. Stud, rates. Fast turnaround. 5670 Yew St. at 41st, Kerrisdale.
266-6814.
FAST TYPIST on word processor. Reasonable rates. Located near UBC, 8th & Fir.
Maureen. 875-0064 or 736-4411.
ACADEMIC AND BUSINESS WORD
PROCESSING/TYPING. Quality work,
very reasonable rates. Days/eves.
263-4862.
ARE YOU LOSING MARKS BECAUSE
OF YOUR WRITING STYLE? Call a pro
fessional writer with M.A. for quality word
processing, editing & writing services.
Resumes, theses, essays, letters, etc. Hand
in work you can be proud of! 324-9924.
WORD PROCESSING! Xerox 860 system.
Student rates. Editing avail. Erika Taylor,
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TYPING    FAST AND ACCURATE
Nanaimo/Hastings, 251-2566.
TYPING Quick Right By UBC $1.25/page
Rob 228-8989
PROFESSIONAL TYPING-Essays, theses,
resumes, etc. UBC Village, behind Kinko's
Copies. 224-0763. Student rates.
YEAR-ROUND expert essay, theses
typing from legible work. Spelling/grammar corrected. 738-6829, 10 a.m.-9 p.m.
King Ed bus rte.	
GET RESULTS
IN THE
UBYSSEY Tuesday, March 10,1
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 11
Roundballers
offtonational
By CHEW WONG
If you were up early this morning
you may have heard the Thunder as
the 'Birds departed this morning for
the CIAU man's national basketball tournament to be held in
Halifax March 12-14.
The eight team field was completed this weekend with Concordia
University winning the Quebec title,
St. Mary's taking the Atlantic conference, and the University of
Western Ontario and the University
of Winnipeg selected as the two
wildcard teams.
blems for the 'Birds. "They play
quite a bit like Alberta," says UBC
head coach Bruce Enns. "A lot of
full court man-to-man, and a lot of
pressure."
"The word from scouting reports
is that they're all about 6'4", 6'5",
and they're all good athletes."
UBC co-captin Paul Johansson,
a consensus Canada West first team
all-star, is optimistic.
"We're quite confident right
now," says Johansson. "But we
have to be careful — Western has
been in the finals with UVic several
(     SPORTS    )
Last weekend UBC, Toronto,
Brandon, and McMaster all secured
tournament berths by winning their
respective conferences.
Second ranked UBC will open
tournament play on Thursday afternoon in the 11,000 seat Halifax
Metro-Centre at 1 p.m. (Atlantic
time) against seventh ranked
University of Western Ontario.
Western  may  pose   some  pro-
m\ mm,
UBC MIRACLE MAN says he will beat the Soviets any day of the week. Man has been practising for the last
hundred years under the tutelage of Fidel Castro and another wild-eyed group of expatriates led by Che Guevera.
Championships disappoint gymnasts
The CIAU National Championships were held over the weekend
with disappointing results for the
Thunderbird gymnastics teams.
On the men's side York University won their eleventh straight title
while UBC's rookie-laden squad
finished in ninth position. Veteran
Kevin Seburn attempted to defend
the silver medal he won in last
year's final, but had to settle for a
third place tie.
The women's team came up with
a strong performance after their
dismal meet in the Canada West
championships, but still only
managed a sixth place finish.
The University of Manitoba led
the pack with 102.65 points and less
than two and a half points
separated the next five teams.
UBC's Jennifer Dong qualified
to compete on the vault in Saturday's individual events, but was
sidelined due to ankle injury she
had received Friday while dismoun
ting from the balance beam.
Women's coach Alena Branda
believes her team may have been
denied a shot at the medals by sloppy officiating. In particular she
took exception with a low score
given to Bev Beres on the balance
beam, costing Beres a chance to
compete in the individual finals.
Branda believes the judges were
out by as much as a point which
could have lifted UBC to third or
even second place.
Coach Branda has acquired a
video of Beres' routine and says she
is "going to pursue it all the way to
the judging body."
times. They have an experienced
team."
UBC's other Canada West all-
star, second team forward Aaron
Point, received some bad news this
weekend regarding the spiral fracture he suffered in his left hand in
the Saskatchewan series two weeks
ago.
"I got hit in last weekend's games
(against UVic) and the broken bone
moved back several millimetres,"
said Point. "It hurts a little, but not
that much. I'm still going to play."
Point will once again have to play
with the support of his custom or-
thoplast splint.
After the season Point will
undergo surgery to have the bone
reset — with a national championship ring on the adjoining finger, he
hopes.
Eightteams seek basketball title
HALIFAX (CUP) — The wagers
are coming in as Canada's top
men's university basketball teams
prepare for the Canadian Interuniversity Athletic Union's Men's
Basketball Championships here on
March 13.
The University of Victoria has
won the Championship for the last
seven years, but was beat out
recently by the University of British
Columbia. But this year, experts
say it could be a toss-up between the
eight top teams.
"No one team seems to be
dominating this year, the way
Waterloo or Victoria have in the
past," said John McConnachie,
public relations officer for CIAU.
"Someone gets hot for a couple of
weeks and rises up in the rankings
and then something happens . . .
and this has been happening in all
the regions."
Gerry Hemmings is a good coach,"
said Donahue. "U of T has been
playing up and down — they aren't
real stable but if they have a good
weekend, then they have an excellent chance," he said.
Gord Cutler, CIAU producer for
TSN, also mentions Brandon.
"Brandon has to be the favourite.
They are big along the front line,
and they have John Carson who
was last year's Most Valuable
Player. Toronto and McMaster are
quality teams but not good enough
to win the championship. Toronto
has been super inconsistent but they
played a great game to beat Laurentian for the OUAA East Title.
McMaster has a good work ethic —
they work hard but they were not
even   favoured   against   Western?
Regular season games have been
broadcast on TSN for the past three
years, but poor marketing on the
"Unless it's on TV,  people don't
believe it really happened. Television
makes it 'bigtime'
?>
Jack Donahue, who coaches the
Canadian National Team and does
colour commentary for the CIAU
games televised on the TSN cable
sports network, predicts that Saint
Francis Xavier will take the Championship.
"I would bet on St. FX off the top
of my head," said Donahue, "but
then I'm prejudiced because their
coach (Steve Knochalski) has been
working with me and the national
team for years.
"But you also have to look at the
sheer fire power of Brandon. They
have so many strong players and
part of Canadian universities and
low attendance at games may
jeopardize future telecasts. TSN
and CIAU will be re-negotiating
their contract this year and there is
talk of severely reduced coverage.
"If we came into a school, the
least we would expect that the
school would promote and market
the hell out of that event," says
TSN's Cutler. "If viewer A turns
on the TV and sees only 500 people
in the stands he's going to turn the
channel. We can only do so much.
We put it on the air to the best of
our ability: we can't put people in
the stands.'
McConnachie admits there have
been some difficulties with
marketing. "Marketing is a complex thing. Money is tight and we
can't keep going to students and administration for more money.
There isn't a lot of provincial
government assistance for university sport and athletics."
McConnachie says CIAU is concerned about the TSN contract
negotiations. "TSN has a double
impact in terms of exposure and
financially." He would not specify
the amount of the TSN contract,
but said it is "substantial by Canadian standards."
TSN producer Rick Briggs-Jude
said, "I'd like to keep the contract
and I'm sure they like the
exposure." But Briggs-Jude added
there has been no noticeable increase over the last three years in
the television audience of university
sport. "You have the core fans and
that's it," he said.
"I think TV whets the people's
appetite for the sport," says
Donahue. "This is the healthiest
situation now with TSN broadcasting games every week and with
regular updates of where the teams
are in the conferences."
"Unless it's on TV, people don't
believe it really happened. Television makes it 'big time"' he said.
Donahue also added that the extra exposure TV gives to Canadian
athletes means Canada loses even
more to American recruiters. "This
is the biggest problem for Canadian
sport, and the fault lies with the administration at the universities. If
our best business students all left
Canada for the States, you can be
sure we would do something about
it."
— steve chan photo
FABULOUS T-'BIRD FLIES high in the air to stuff orange spherical object into mesh and steel rim contraption. 'Birds continue to sing as they
head into national championships in Halifax. Page 12
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 10, 1987
Provinces pleased with funding
OTTAWA (CUP) — Economically
depressed provinces are the winners
in regional funding allocations for
the Summer Employment/Experience Development (SEED)
component of the Challenge 87
wage subsidy program.
Though critics continue to
dispute the government's claim that
Challenge 87's $180 million budget
is the same amount spent last year,
on the assumption that Challenge
86 included the extra $30 million
spent on the national census, most
are relatively pleased with the funding redistribution. SEED this year
comprises about 70 per cent of the
Challenge budget.
This year's allocation reflects
varying   regional   unemployment
rates. Nova Scotia and British Columbia, which posted respective
unemployment rates for returning
students last summer at 22.6 and
20.1 per cent, received the highest
SEED increases, of $1.49 million
and $1.85 million, respectively.
Ontario, on the other hand, saw
its unemployment rate for returning
students slip last summer to under
nine per cent. Consequently, the
federal government dropped SEED
funding in Ontario by $4.4 million.
Funding was increased for Newfoundland, Prince Edward Island,
New Brunswick, Alberta and the
Yukon. Funding was decreased for
Quebec, Manitoba, Saskatchewan
and the Northwest Territories.
Jean Wright, a researcher for the
Drinking age unchanged
TORONTO (CUP) — Ontario
students can heave a sigh of relief
now that a provincial advisory committee has recommended retaining
the current drinking age of 19.
The report, submitted to Consumer and Commercial Relations
Minister Monte Kwinter, also calls
for extended hours of operation for
drinking establishments, tougher
restrictions on advertising, and
looser guidelines on the sale of
alcohol at sporting events.
"A philosophy of moderation
and responsibility" was the driving
force behind the committee's initiatives, according to project
manager Rosemary Grange. Many
of the report's more than 90 recommendations aim to reduce drinking
and driving, cited as the most important alcohol-related problem.
Student reaction has been almost
universally positive, following months of intensive lobbying to prevent
an increase in the drinking age.
"We're very pleased," said
University of Toronto student
council vice-president Titch
Dharamsi. "An increase would
have been a big mistake."
Guy Giorno, president of the
Young Progressive Conservatives in
Ontario, also embraced the recommendations enthusiastically.
"We find it very positive," said
Giorno, whose group had pushed to
reduce the age to 18. "The majority
wanted to raise it, and leaving it required willpower. Statistically it is
still inequitable, but holding the line
is, to us, acceptable."
John Bates, president of People
to Reduce Impaired Driving
Everywhere (PRIDE), said he
found the report deplorable.
"It's disastrous," Bates said.
"Not only will the extension of
drinking hours surpass subway
closure times, but the refusal to increase the drinking age will cost
many people, especially teenagers,
their lives."
Most of the recommendations
can be implemented by the government immediately, although
Kwinter will probably bring them to
the legislature first.
Should they be passed in their
current format, there could be major repercussions for students. Not
DISPLAY YOUR
CHARACTER.
Kinko's self-service
typewriters and copy
creation centers give your
reports arid presentations
the clean and impressive
professional look they
deserve.
kinkcs
(,ki \i ( oi-ii s(,ki \i pi on i
5 "Or* I 'ni\ orsii>  BUil.
222-16XS
MTH 8 9 F 8-6 Sat 10-6 Sun 11-6
only will pubs be allowed to stay
open until 2 a.m., but alcohol could
be served at many campus sporting
events.
"It's nice to see them bringing
Ontario into the 20th century,"
Dharamsi said. "If (the recommendations) are enacted, you can bet
that the student-run pub will be
open later the very next day."
Canadian Federation of Students,
said the allocation changes are
"logical, given those rates". She
said, however, it is unfortunate that
funding had to be decreased in
some areas to redress high
unemployment in others.
Barney Savage, chair of the
Students' Union of Nova Scotia,
was pleased with the increase to
Nova Scotia SEED funding.
"It's obviously a policy change
for the government, and we're
pleased with that," said Savage,
who is waiting for the provincial
government to announce its summer program for students.
"We are worried, though, that
the provincial government will look
at those (SEED) figures and cut
back on its own program," Savage
said.
New Democratic youth critic
Howard McCurdy questioned how
SEED money will be shared in Ontario.
"Anyone who thinks things are
booming outside of Toronto just
doesn't know Ontario," said McCurdy, who cited his own riding of
Windsor-Walkerville as an area faced with an unemployment rate of
about 20 per cent for returning
students.
JOIN THE UBYSSEY!
♦
CONSIDER A CAREER
in
NATUROPATHIC MEDICINE
The Ontario College of Naturopathic Medicine
(OCNM) is currently accepting applications for classes
commencing in September 1987. Prerequisites include 3
years of university with specific science courses. We offer
a four year clinically oriented program which leads to
graduation as a Doctor of Naturopathic Medicine and
eligibility for registration. The curriculum includes basic
medical sciences and clinical disciplines as well as naturopathic diagnosis and therapeutics. OCNM is the only
recognized college of Naturopathic Medicine in Canada.
For full information about the naturopathic profession and
the program offered at OCNM call direct (416) 251-5261 or
write:
The Registrar, OCNM
Dept. 200, 60 Berl Ave.
Toronto, Ontario M8Y 3C7
HOORAY!
American Express makes it especially easy
for Graduating Students to qualify for the Card!
Now, before you leave school, American Express
lets you qualify for Cardmembership under
special criteria.
American Express believes you, as a graduating
student, have a future to be proud of. We'd like
to be part of it.
So, if you are graduating this year and have
accepted career-oriented employment at a minimum annual salary of $10,000, we have created
special acceptance standards for you.
Perhaps you've thought of the American Express®
Card as the one you'd like to carry some day.
But the truth is that NOW may be the most important time for you to have its benefits.
Why you need the Card now
The Card can help you take control of your
finances as you move into your new life. In most
cases it provides you, not just
with a listing of expenditures,
but with actual duplicate copies.
Record-keeping becomes easy.
And, since it is not a "credit" card
you aren't encouraged to get in over
your head. You pay your bill in full each
month.
Apply right away - before you leave school -
and take advantage of our special Graduating
Student Criteria.
Look for the special "Take One" stands on
bulletin boards.. .and take one. Or call this toll
free number:
1-800-387-9666
'"CopyrKjh: American Express Caracla. Inc   1987 All rights <■
ed   American ? <r:ess Company is Ihe c

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