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The Ubyssey Nov 26, 1964

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Array WAIT FOR 7969: 'ALL HELL BREAKS LOOSE'
By mike horsey
Ubyssey Editor-in-Chief
1969 is the year when the
'Commies" and the "Niggers"
will run wild in the streets,
according to the American
Nazi leader.
And George Lincoln Rockwell is waiting in the wings
with his storm troops to bring
back order.
By 1969 Rockwell feels the
country will be in such poor
economic shape — because
of credit buying and deficit
budgeting — that it will fall
into chaos.
Then he feels the Communists will be marching in
the streets in open rebellion.
"The people will realize we
are the only ones with any
power to restore law and
order,"   he said  in  an early
ROCKWELL
morning interview with The
Ubyssey.
After he has restored
order, with the powerless and
ineffective U.S. government
watching, h will run for president in 1972.
'In 1973 we'll call a constitutional convention and get
rid of the laws that allow
niggers to be Americans."
Rockwell said he plans to
advocate a negro colony
"somewhere" in Africa.
He said he feels most
Negros will realize Rockwell
is working for their good.
The 47-year-old former
U.S. Navy Commander, said
he feels that power is only
attained legitimately.
To do this he sees a four
stage process:
The first, which he feels he
has already achieved, is to
reach the people by dramatic
moves.
"You know, demonstrations to let them know you
are there," he said.
"Then you enter the propaganda phase," he said,
straighten out all the terrible
lies that have been told about
the Nazis.
"After that you use the organized people to help you
and then you get elected."
He said he feels he is somewhere "between the second
and third stages."
Rockwell said he is running for the governor of Virginia next year. He believes
he will be elected.
In Virginia, Rockwell has
his national offices which
consist   of    one    remodelled
house and a 23-bedroom mansion.
The mansion, surrounded
by 29 acres of land and numerous guards is barracks for
40 men.
"My type of movement
ment doesn't attract the intellectuals or rich people.
They have too much to lose.
"My guys take part in
leadership and business training, I tolerate no bullies or
drunks.
"My men have never hurt
another, but they are trained
in use of judo, guns and other
weapons."
Rockwell   says    his   movement     has     "about     12,000
people   on  his  mailing   lists
(Continued  on  Page 3)
SEE:   NAZI
VOL XLVII, No. 29
TMimsm
VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 1964 <@»
CA 4-3916
:*^    ''—
^Hfo,,    '      Mi&t
Nazi leader
arrives late;
no speech
The Second Coming has come and gone. George Lincoln
Rockwell, American Nazi leader, arrived in Vancouver late
Wednesday but left early today.
He had been slated to ap-
YOU  ARE  REQUIRED TO  REPORT WITHIN  48  HOURS
(Monday to Eriday only)
in person at the Traffic Office
at the western end of the University Boulevard with this Traffic Offence
Notice.
If it is not possible for you to report in person, you should do so in writing to
the Director of Traffic, University of British Columbia, Vancouver 8, B.C.,
quoting the number of this Traffic Offence Notice.
Failure to report within forty-eight hours is an offence against the
pear in the Armory billed as
the Second Coming but arrived after speaking arrangements had been cancelled.
He left early today after
discussing his legal status in
Canada.
AMS president Roger McAfee said the AMS contacted
Rockwell two weeks ago and
promised to pay his travelling
expenses. He was to be allowed to speak at UBC only if he
entered the country legally.
McAfee said the AMS contacted Rockwell two weeks
ago and promised to pay his
travelling expenses and allow
him to speak at UBC if he
entered Canada legally.
"Rockwell said he would
contact us once he arrived in
Canada," McAfee said. "Our
agreement was he would contact the AMS by 12:30 pm.
Wednesday, which would allow us a full day to complete
our arrangements."
A telephone call to U.S.
Nazi Party headquarters in
Arlington, Virginia, by Special Events chairman Chris
Wootten today failed to determine the whereabouts of
Rockwell.
"They told me they hadn't
heard from him for five
days," Wootten said.
Wootten made the first
contact with Rockwell two
weeks ago, after the Nazi
was reported to have come to
Vancouver to watch himself
on a CBC-TV interview.
Rockwell is considered a
prohibited person by the federal Immigration Department
Platform for free Speech
Regulations.
PATROLMAN-
FORM   453
p—*^L
(SEE OVER)
—don kydd photo
Traffic office is a big hole in the ground but that's wh^re
tickets tell students to pay fines. (See story Page 2.)
and    is    forbidden to enter
Canada.
"Rockwell told me he
thought he could get into
Canada legally," Wootten
said.
President McAfee said if
Rockwell had appeared the
AMS would have immediately contacted Immigration officials to make sure Rockwell
was in Vancouver legally.
"Our purpose in asking
Rockwell to speak to UBC
students was to provide a
platform for free speech,"
Wootten said.
"Also, we wanted students
to have a chance to hear
something they've only heard
at second hand."
Council Monday night in an
in-camera session approved
Rockwell's appearance on
campus, 12 in favor, 10
against, with one abstention,
according to Council minutes.
McAfee said first official
contact with the administration about Rockwell's visit
was at 10:30 a.m. Wednesday.
McAfee said he talked the
matter over with UBC President John Macdonald.
"I got the impression Dr.
Macdonald was in favor of
political speakers on campus
of any political belief," McAfee said.
President Macdonald Wednesday declined to discuss his
conversation with McAfee. Page 2
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 26, 1964
Brief asks
matching
grants
Provincial government scholarships should be matched by
the federal government, according to the UBC Alumni
Association.
The association recommend-
ed the additional scholarships
in a brief to the Bladen commission on financing higher
education in Canada.
• •   •
The brief also recommended
the top 10 per cent of university graduates be offered graduate scholarships.
The association said the
scholarships should be tenable
anywhere in Canada.
The alumni group which
prepared the report was headed by housing administrator
John Haar.
• •    •
The brief also suggested expanding national exchange
scholarships.
It recommended overseas
scholarships be set up to enable Canadian students to
study abroad.
The association called for
the government to establish a
revolving account to provide
money for construction of non-
academic buildings for students.
• *    •
At the present time the government offers no capital except for construction of student residences, the report
said.
The UBC delegation also recommended an independent
grants committee to control
the distribution of academic
funds in Canada.
Trick or treat
SASKATOON (CUP) — At
least $500 damage was done to
the University of Saskatchewan
campus during on Hallowe'en
weekend.
JOHN HAAR
. . more money
Fines in air
as office turns
to big hole
Traffic fines have become
buried treasure since the old
traffic office became a hole in
the ground.
Lome Mallin, Ed I, wants
to pay his parking ticket.
Friday afternoon he found
his car, parked in the faculty
lot behind the Field House,
adorned with a traffic notice.
"You are required to report
within 48 hours (Monday to
Friday only) in person at the
traffic office at the western
end of the University Boulevard with this Traffic Offence
Notice," said the traffic ticket.
"But when I got to the
western end of University
Boulevard the ground was
bare,"  Mallin said.
"I will only pay my ticket
at the location stipulated," he
said. "I have my rights."
The traffic office building
was moved to the gardeners
compound opposite Totem
Park when the office moved
to new quarters in the Olympic hockey house on Wesbrook
Crescent.
Ambulance system is best
available, says supervisor
The ambulance system at UBC is the only feasible one,
according to Wesbrook hospital nursing supervisor Muriel
Upshall.
"There does not seem to be any other feasible system
other than the one now in operation," she said.
She was commenting on an incident Monday when an
injured student waited more than an hour for a downtown
ambulance.
The student, Trudy Monk, P.E. I, was discharged from
hospital Wednesday.
Telephone 681-2004
336 West Pender St.
VANCOUVER 3, B.C.
$1000 bond
Selman convicted
in narcotics case
A fourth-year arts student
of naTcotics in Vancouver
Magistrate Bernard Isman.
George Dallas Selman, 23,
who gave his address as 2400
York, pleaded guilty to the
charge, was placed on a $1,000
peace bond for two years and
was ordered to report monthly
to a probation officer.
Selman, Helen Lynne
Hughes, 24, of Seattle and William Fred Bissett, 24, of 3317
Fleming were arrested in an
RCMP raid early Saturday at
Bissett's home.
All three pleaded guilty to
a joint charge of possession of
marijuana.
"It's quite impossible to understand why anyone, including UBC students, finds a need
to resort to a prohibited drug,"
said Magistrate Bernard Isman.
"I'm sure there are enough
stimulants and other means of
excitement without resorting
to   something prohibited."
Miss Hughes, a folk singer,
was placed on a $500 peace
bond and banned from Vancouver for two years.
Bissett, an artist, received
the same sentence as Selman,
a $1,000 bond and two years
probation.
Student Barbara Budd, Arts
II at UBC also appeared in
police court Tuesday charged
with possession of marijuana.
Her case was adjourned until next Tuesday.
was convicted of possession
police   court   Tuesday   by
Oxonians meet
UBC debaters
Two Oxford students will
debate with two UBC students in Brock Hall at 8:00
p.m'. Dec. 8.
The Oxford students, David Penrey-Davey and John
Thane, will oppose the resolution: "The Commonwealth
is a gigantic farce."
Dave Buchanan and Graham Phillips, second-year
law students, take the affirmative for UBC.
JOBS
(Continued from Page 1)
hired for a week or two weeks
at the most," he said.
"All we can do is negotiate
through the authorities."
The UBC Employment of-
f i c e Wednesday announced
openings are available for
Christmas employment at last
year's rate.
The student must be able to
start work at 8 a.m., Dec. 16.
No time off for exams will be
given.
Males register at 8 a.m.
Dec. 3 and females at 8 a.m.
Dec. 1 in Hut M5.
Your Choice of Anything in the Store
AT WHOLESALE COST
Friday and Saturday - Final 2 Days
CLOSE-OUT SALE
WI 1 I   ■*     LINGERIE and HOSIERY SHOP
5732 University Boulevard
In the University Shopping Centre
(§) Westinghouse
Will be on Campus November 30 and December 1 and 2
to interview 1965 University of British Columbia graduates in electrical engineering mechanical engineering
and engineering physics.
A well-defined training program is
offered   to prepare  candidates for
positions of responsibility in:
Design Engineering
Research and Development
Manufacturing Engineering
Industrial  Engineering
Apparatus Marketing and Sales
Field Installation
Service Engineering
These positions will afford opportunity for career
development to Engineering graduates with potential. Professional salary scale and increases based on
performance as well as excellent employee fringe
benefit plans.
Contact the Placement Officer for detailed information, brochures and interview appointments.
Fund raiser talks
at last meeting
Final student council meeting of the year will be held
Monday in Brock council
chambers.
Alfred Adams, UBC co-ordinator of the tri-university
funds drive, will speak to
councillors.
DAVE
BROADFOOT
Canada's No. 1 Comedian
pins song* by
DONNY WRIGHT
Monday through  Thursday
al the
BUNK HOUSE
COFFEE SHOP
813 Davie
Reserve Now . . . 683-9790
. . . and remember
Jazz every Sunday Afternoon
2-5:00 p.m.
STUDENTS!
Enjoy Europe
independently on
$5 a day in 1965
Here's one for the rugged
individualist Wrighfs Travel
will arrange fine accommodation (with breakfast) in any
city you wish to visit. Make
whatever choices you wish.
Wrighfs will see the cost does
not exceed $5 a day. But
transport is up to you.
Want to be more
sociable?
Choose this 57 day
escorted tour
Guide, motor coaches, accommodation supplied on this 57
day trip. You'll see the major
cities in 11 countries. . . know
the real excitement of Europe.
FROM LONDON
May 20, or June 23
$350
Go two low cost ways
to Europe . . . leave
early May return late
August.
Fly there in a matter of hours.
Return economy air-fare is only
$664.75
Or relax aboard ship . . and
see Canada on the way.
The Rail-Sea return fare is
$651
Gel   mere   information   today   from
#
822 Howe St Ph. 684*185 Thursday, November 26, 1964
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
GETTING INTO swing of things are dancers (left to right) Sue Turnbull, Morley Adelman
and Lynne Grinwood.. They're trying out for Mardi Gras floor show. Auditions continue
until Friday in TV room in Brock Hall.
20-minute wait inevitable,
says report on emergencies
By AL BIRNIE
Ubyssey Council Reporter
Present university emergency services are entirely adequate, claims a report tabled
in student council Monday
night.
The report, compiled by
Nursing president Wendy
Woodland, said a minimum 20-
mihute wait for a downtown
ambulance cannot be helped,
and students would be better
off taking advantage of UBC
hospital  facilities.
"The university patrol wagon, equipped with stretcher
and staffed with qualified
first-aid trainees, is available
24 hours a day for emergencies," the report said.
•    •   •
"A call to the health service
at university local 333 during
the day or CA 4-5650 after 5
p.m. puts a student in immediate contact with a nurse, who
may summon the patrol wagon, a doctor, nurse, or city
ambulance   immediately."
UBC meets UBC in rugger
game at Varsity stadium
UBC's Thunderbird rugby team will clash with the
rugger Braves today at noon in Varsity stadium.
It will be the first meeting of the year between the two
teams, both in the Vancouver Rugby Union's first division.
The Birds, currently one point behind the first place
Meralomas, are riding an upsurging crest which promises
to sweep UBC into another "Wonder Birds" era in rugby.
Mickey Mousers
play Santa Claus
The Education Undergraduate
Claus.
They have invited 80 underprivileged children to a Christmas party in the education
lounge the afternoon of Dec. 5.
Sandy White, Education III,
organizer of the party, said
the children range in age from
six to 11 years. They are from
Alexander and Gordon Neighbourhood Houses.
"This is the third year we've
held the party." Miss White
said.
"The kids play games, get
gifts from 'Santa Claus' and
feed on hot dogs, coke, donuts
and dixie cups," she said.
About 55 education students
are looking after the arrangements.
Society is playing Santa
The report showed that in
the one-year period ending
Jan. 31, 1963, 31 calls, only
two of them requiring the
assistance of a doctor, were
made to the Health Service.
Eighteen patients were
transported by the patrol wagon to the university hospital;
one trip was made downtown.
• •    •
"The period of waiting for
treatment at a downtown hospital may be quite lengthy,"
the report says.
"University provision for
emergencies provides faster
medical care."
"The emergency service pror
vided on campus is as adequate as any received in the
Vancouver area."
• •    •
Woodland recommended the
health service emergency
numbers be listed in Bird
Calls in the future.
Council will discuss the report next week.
msoirnoN i
EYE GLASSES
Atl Doctor's Eyeglass  Prescriptions   ,
filled. First   quality   materiel*   used.
Alf  work  performed  by  qualified
Oplicions.
GRANVILLE OPTICAL
861 Granville      Ml 3-8921
Says convicted fratman
1965   GRADUATES
seeking employment
register NOW with the
EXECUTIVE and PROFESSIONAL DIVISION.
NATIONAL EMPLOYMENT SERVICE
Phone Mr. W. L. Roberts who will mail you
an application and arrange an interview to
discuss employment opportunities.
UNDERGRADS—will be registered later—
Watch for notice.
1145 ROBSON STREET
MU 1-8253
Liquor available
to any member
A minor, charged with possession of liquor, said in court
Tuesday he got it from his UBC fraternity house.
John
Donald John Howell, 20,
Comm. I, pleaded guilty to the
charge of having an opened
bottle of beer outside his
Kappa Sigma fraternity house.
He was fined $10 and $5 costs.
He told court liquor is available in frat houses to any
members,   regardless   of age.
Magistrate Andrew Johnson
told court he thinks the fraternity is more to blame than
Howell.
"They should keep closer
control over their liquor cabinets so that persons under 21
don't have access to liquor,"
he said.
Kappa Sigma has been indefinitely suspended by the
Inter-Fraternity Council.
IFC vice-president Martin
Zlotnik said the council strongly disapproves of drinking in
frat houses because of the improbability of it being restricted to persons over 21.
"The example we made of
Kappa Sigma has already
made the other fraternities
much more cautious in this
regard," said Zlotnik.
IFC has had frat houses under strict surveillance since
Howell was charged Nov. 8.
NAZI
(Continued from Page 1)
and  about   700   active   card
carrying members.
Rockwell says his views on
Jews  are  often   misrepresented in the press.
"I am not against Jews as
a race, but most of them are
out to get me," he said.
Rockwell said he thought
Barry Goldwater's crushing
defeat was engineered by the
Communists.
"He was a dupe, put up by
the Commies to destroy the
right wing in the United
States," he said.
He said he was a conservative until about 1957
when I became disillusioned
with them."
"The conservatives were
like a lot of little old ladies
running around in tennis
shoes," he said.
$2.00 A Day
Christmas Holiday on Mt.
Baker. Phone Bob 987-5010
OK   BRAKES
1st Ave. & Main St. Phone: 879-3014
* For all popular makes:—
Brake Shoes (4 wheels) $16.50
Wheel Kits (4 wheels) $10.00
Both Shoes and ——
Wheel Kits $25.00
* Special 5% Discount Before Xmas, for UBC Students
SPECIAL EVENTS
PRESENTS
RAVI
SHANKAR
SATURDAY
NOV. 28
Auditorium 8:30 pan.
"INDIA'S MAN-OF-MUSIC" returns. His country's most famous
musician, composer and conductor comes to the U.S. and Canada
for his first coast-to-coast tour since the spectacularly successful
one of 1961, again brought by the Asia Society Performing Arts
Program. It follows last season's new triumphs at the Edinburgh
Festival, in London, at the Berlin Festival and in other Continental capitals. At his second recital in London's Festival Hall, he
set a new attendance record. ALL STANDING ROOM WAS
FILLED AND HUNDREDS TURNED AWAY.
HURRY! Tickets are going FAST!
Students 50c — Adults $2.00
at AMS, Vancouver Ticket Centre or at the Door THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater Society, University of B. C. Editorial opinions
expressed are those of the editor and not necessarily those of the AM8
or the University. Editorial office, CA 4-3916. Advertising office, CA 4-3242,
Loc. 26. Member Canadian University Press, Founding member, Pacific
Student Press. Authorized as second-class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for gen ral
excellence and editorial writing.
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 1964
Sieg Heil
It is unfortunate George Lincoln Rockwell, alias the
Second Coming, can't or won't be coming to UBC.
Rockwell, fiery leader of the American Nazi party,
would undoubtedly have caused plenty of controversy
had he come.
He is hot property in every sense of the word.
The Canadian Immigration department considers him
a "prohibited person" and would have deported him to
the U.S.
And since his appearance on the CBC program, This
Hour Has Seven Days, he hasn't exactly gained any
friends in Canada.
His non-appearance at UBC has neatly covered up
the cries that surely would have arisen.
The university administration would have frowned—
Rockwell types stir the status quo and don't help fund
drives.
The law would have frowned — especially on those
who arranged the speaking engagement.
Parents, who fought Hitler and his stomach-turning
doctrines, would have been incensed.
And students—who believe this man to be a real
danger, and his utterings foul—"would have made
noises.
All of which would have been a healthy exercise.
Let's face it. Rockwell, a pip-squeek Hitler, was being
brought to UBC as a form of entertainment.
He is a step or two above the usual blathering politician on the showmanship scale.
Nazism, and Neo-Nazism, especially since Rockwell's
CBC appearance, are of great interest.
Rockwell's enthusiastic presentation would have had
more meaning than a dozen readings of his monthly,
pamphlets.
And undoubtedly his ravings would have been discussed long after he left.
This still seems pretty healthy to us.
It seems a part of university life—to be stimulated
and confronted with different doctrines and situations.
Rockwell could not have spoken anywhere but at
UBC.
Student reception here, we think, would have been
responsible.
Few lunch bags would have landed on the man and
certainly no mad applause.
Certainly bringing Rockwell here would have been
branded irresponsible.
The adult world would call it so because the adult
world lacks the vitality of the student world.
We don't think it would have started World War III,
nor do we think our fund drive would have been substantially upset.
Rather, it would have started a helluva controversy
about the man, his methods, doctrines and the students'
motives for bringing him here.
And that, no matter how horrible or abominable the
subject matter, would have been a good thing.
Real George
George came too late for us to do anything but have
a hurried interview.
It was frightening to watch him calmly discuss the
death of "Commies" and hear him speak of deporting 20
million Negros to Africa.
He was too calm, too assured, too convinced his particular philosophy is right.
He has had his say, perhaps it is the best way to show
his philosophy is so full of holes that it is a sieve.
"My brothers, this is an absurdity. Who among us can conceive of us British
Columbians as being descended from anyone but the Almighty himself."
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
EDITOR: Mike Horsey
City ._ _ Tom Wayman
Newt   _  Tim Padmore
Art    Don Hume
Sports     George Reamsbottom
Managing   Janet Matheson
Asst. Managing   Norm Betts
Asst. City   Lorraine Shore
Asst. News   Just Miss Munroe
Associate -  Mike Hunter
Associate  _ Ron Riter
Magazine  Dave Ablett
Those who toiled on this happy,
happy day were Art Casperson, Al
Francis, Carol-Anne Baker. Bob
Burton, Richard Blair, Steve Brown,
Mike Vaux, Sara Simeon, Lome
Mallin, Corol Smith, Art Neumann,
Robbi West, Al Birnie, Paul Terry,
Brian Staples, Sheri Galen and the
happy, happy editorial board. As of
6:00 p.m. Wednesday, it's Be Kind
to Sharon Week.
One more paper to go, gang.
Hazards of study
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Re: Ridington Room Construction:
I can understand the necessity for completing the library expansion as quickly as
possible. But, when, in a
crowded study area, workmen chip away at the ceiling from a scaffolding directly above those trying to
study, the limit has been
reached.
It is not only difficult to
concentrate with the reverberations of hammers and
pneumatic drills, but attempts
at study have become a physical hazard.
Might I therefore suggest,
more suitable hours for certain "questionable" tasks.
R J L
•T*    V    *r
Unusual bus driver
Editor, The Ubyssey:
This is your university bus
driver calling. Won't you
"lend me your ears"?
During the last 26 years I
have made 162,572 trips to
UBC and return. The number
of passengers carried must
have been in the millions (no
accidents).
I'm going to ask you all a
favor or at least, those of. you
who live with your parents
in Vancouver or are residing
in this city.
The City of Vancouver
needs well educated men on
Council.
Through the long 162,572
trips your bus driver has also
taken a few courses at UBC.
So many, in fact, that I have
81 units to my credit.
I said that I had taken a
few   courses. These  resulted
in my being graduated with a
BA in Economics, Psychology, and History.
I also did graduate work
in Municipal Law, Municipal
Management and Public Finance.
In addition I have spent
five years in banking and
many more working with a
Credit Union. The above education, I feel, would be beneficial to any membr of Council. (Many on Council have
no  appreciation of the Arts.)
I have many other interests
which would not interest you
young people—at present.
What I would like you to
do is—ask your parents or
landlords to vote for George
Jons for Alderman (1 year
term).
Thanks — and the best of
luck in your Christmas
Exams.
GEORGE   JONS
•p       «p       ef*
Rah, rah-bah
Editor, The Ubyssey:
With regard to Mr. Banno's
article in Tuesday's Ubyssey,
in which he described our
present athletic program as
a half-baked hypocritical failure, I feel that he is completely misinterpreting both
its purpose and its results.
I feel that our present blase
approach to athletics is more
mature than the 'rah-rah'
kind of set-up that Mr. Banno
would wish upon us.
So what if the only spectator is a tweedy type with a
blue and gold scarf, intensely muttering "On the Birds."
At least he's there for the
love of it.
Under our present system
those who want to play, can
play; those who want to
watch, can watch; and those
who want our teams to be better than everyone else's
teams, can rot.
So don't buck the system,
Mr. Banno.
IAN MILLER
Engineering II
•Je     ¥f>     «Ji
No honor system
Editor, The  Ubyssey:
Regarding the article in
Tuesday's Ubyssey quoting
John Parnall as saying that
"The method of giving exams
here is basically an honor system even though it is not
called that."
No wonder it is not called
that! Whoever heard of an
honor system which includes
presiding teachers on the
look-out for cheaters? This
fallacy is analogous with saying that our speed regulation
is basically the honor system.
Sure it is—if you ignore the
radar traps.
Though I have no criticism
of supervised examinations,
it seems to me basically incorrect to call our system
basically an honor system.
BARRY L. WILSON
Arts II
•3P     •!•     V
Well, wa' happened?
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Because of my boredom
while studying in the library
I took a survey. The survey
involved 41 boys, as they
entered the men's washroom.
I concluded that 41 boys
within an hour and a half
went in while only 33 made
an exit. Just out of curiosity
what happened to the other
eight?
WONDERING? Thursday, November 26, T964
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 5
BACKGROUND
Psychiatry neglected
By ART NEUMANN
Ubyssey Medical Reporter
Psychiatry   has   been   neglected in the furor over Medicare.
Consider the following: the
analysis of a psychiatric patient must involve a sacrifice
by the patient; otherwise it
becomes a matter of indifference to him.
•   •   •
That which we receive free,
we all know, is of less consequence to us than that for
which we have to sacrifice.
If a patient pays a sufficiently high fee for treatment,
he would hold the sessions
with the analyst far more
worthwhile than if he were
sent there, for free.
And how about the actual
psychoanalysis? The patient
must feel completely free to
air his most troubling
thoughts and vent his aggressions.
Art Neumann is a fourth
year science student going
into medicine next year. He
plans to be a psychiatrist.
Any inhibition of this vital
process will undermine treatment.
The fee counteracts the
guilt feelings he would have
for his aggressions and demands on the psychiatrist.
No opportunity arises for a
humiliating debt of gratitude
to   the   analyst.   The   analyst
ART NEUMANN
. . . probes inhibitions
remains an object of professionalism to the patient, a
person trained and paid to
perform the function of treatment.
And how about the question of lower, or partial payment? With a fee obviously
below that required by an analyst's qualifications or below that which the patient
can afford, might not the patient feel his analyst will develop inhibitions toward him?
That the psychiatrist is
afraid of him?
•   •    •
That the psychiatrist wants
to bribe him to be an "easy"
patient?
Psychoanalysis, like the employment   of   an   obstetrician
or a tailor, involves a certain
balance of giving and taking,
accompanied by other unconscious exchanges.
The observation and understanding of these intangibles
constitute the essential uniqueness of psychoanalytic
treatment.
•    •    •
Finally, it is interesting to
note that the government of
Sweden, on introducing their
three-quarter payment compulsory sickness insurance
system in 1955, made no provisions for psychoanalytic
treatment.
Did they doubt the value of
such a move?
We must make sure this
problem is considered when
drawing up our own medical
care program.
For th* w«ll dr«»»d
man who insists on th*
vory host . . . fine
quality shoos by Nwrtn
Bush. Price? A ploas-
ant surpriso!
Clinton's
MEN'S WEAR
742 GramiU* Street MI-M2S
Academics seeking
delegates for Algeria
The 1965 World Youth Festival will be held in Algeria,
and the Academic Activities Committee is already looking
for students to go.
Academic Activities has set
up another committee under
Brian Mackenzie, Arts III, to
interview prospective delegates, publicize the event, and
raise the $750 cost per delegate.
"The number of delegates
we send depends entirely on
the number of interested
people and the amount of
money we raise," said Mackenzie.
The World Youth Festival—
July 28 to Aug. 10—will be
followed by a three-week tour
of European countries.
"The purpose of the Festival
is for students to see each
other as individuals, divorced
from their political backgrounds," said Mackenzie.
Interested students should
apply through the Academic
Activities Committee office—
Brock extension 360.
726 SEYMOUR
presents
Allmanac
Part One
featuring the inn group
A    VERY    FUNNY    REVIEW
NOV. 27 . 9:00 P.M.
UBC Thunderbird Winter Sports Centra
For   SKATING,   CURLING,   HOCKEY
Pleasure Skating Hours:
12.45 p.m. to 2.45 p.m. Tues., Thurs. and Sunday
3.00 p.m. to 5.00 p.m., Friday and Saturday
7.30 p.m. to 9.30 p.m., Tues., Fri., Sat. and Sunday
THURSDAY STUDENT SPECIAL 15c
Skating Parties each Wednesday, 7:30 p.m. - 9:30 p.m.
SKATE RENTAL AVAILABLE, ALL SIZES
Book Now for Your Club
Skating Tickets al Reduced Rates Available
For Information Phone Local 365 or 224-3205
ALMA MATER SOCIETY
THIRD ANNUAL
CHARTER FLIGHT TO EUROPE
MAY 21-AUGUST 5
$360
WHEN
—Leave Vancouver May 21.
—Arrive London May 22.
—Leave London August 5.
—Arrive Vancouver August 5.
COST
$360.00 which includes:
—Return flight by C.P.A. jet prop Britannia.
—First class meals with complimentary dinner wines during flight.
—44 lb. baggage allowance.
—Transportation from London Airport to London City centre.
—London Airport Taxis.
WHO IS ELIGIBLE
—All members of Alma Mater Society.
—UBC Faculty.
—Members of immediate family of above two categories which includes:
—father and mother if living in same household.
—husbands, wives and children.
—Members of immediate family must be accompanied by member of
A.M.S. or Faculty.
APPLICATIONS
—Applications may be picked up at Travel Directors Office — BROCK
HALL, or write to TRAVEL DIRECTOR, AMS CHARTER FLIGHT,
BOX 140. BROCK HALL. U.B.C. Further information available from
Travel Director.
TRAVEL IN EUROPE
—In co-operation with World Wide International Travel information
on travel in Europe will be available through the Travel Directors
Office.
COMPARABLE FARES
—A person travelling by commercial airliner Vancouver to London
and return would pay:
—First class—in excess of $1,000.00;
—Thrift Class—in excess of $600.00;
—21 Day Excursion—in excess of $550.00.
AS THERE ARE ONLY 110 SEATS AVAILABLE THOSE
INTERESTED ARE URGED TO APPLY AS SOON AS
POSSIBLE. Page 6
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 26, 1964
Seattle thinking
of going Beat
SEATTLE, Wash. (PSP)—
Seattle University is considering establishing a coffee
house on the campus.
Student government officials say students need a casual meeting place for the
evenings and  weekends.
"We want something with
a small, warm atmosphere,"
said Roger Hennagin, head
of the committee investigating the plan.
Across Canada
Staples pried
away from
Frosh books
By AL FRANCIS
President K i m Campbell
took over the purse-strings of
the Frosh Undergraduate Society, Monday, relieving Treasurer Brian Staples of his signing authority.
'He could never be found to
sign cheques," said Miss
Campbell. "I am more accessible."
Miss Campbell said the takeover was engineered by herself and AMS Treasurer Kyle
Mitchell.
Staples denied he was unavailable. He said he lives on
campus and is easily found.
"It's just that they hardly
ever look for me," he said.
Editors resign,
police suggested
HAMILTON (CUP)—Five editors of McMaster univer-
ity's student paper have resigned.
The   Silhouette,   which   had
been produced twice-weekly
until the resignations, will
now appear once a week.
The paper from the McMaster campus had won the
Jacques Bureau Award as the
best college weekly in Canada for the last seven years
before it entered the twice-
weekly field this year.
The   editors   said  they   left
because of academic pressures.
•    •    •
MONTREAL — Engineers at
McGill University lost their
princesses to members of the
university's Winter Carnival
committee.
"The girls are pleased to be
in the company of civilized
gentlemen," said their kidnappers.
The stunt preceded the annual Winter Carnival at McGill.
•    •    •
OTTAWA — An English-
language radio program at the
University of Ottawa has supported a plan to set up a student police force on the campus.
A panel said the force would
improve the image of the uni-
I versity.
Second society
backs Federation
A second undergraduate
society has come out in support of the B.C. Student
Federation.
The Science Undergraduate Society Wednesday passed a resolution supporting
the newly-formed group.
The Education Undergraduate Society last month
passed a resolution of support.
CHURCHILL-
Man Of The Century
How could an arrogant boy
with a speech impediment
who stood at the bottom of
his class grow up to be Prime
Minister? Here is the full
story ... from his improbable
birth in a ladies' cloakroom
to his illustrious days of
leadership during World War
II. Read the whole story compiled by a panel of famous
authors including Winston
Churchill himself, in December Reader's Digest, on sale
right now.
What's doing in
ALCAN CHEMICALS?
Over one million tons of alumina are produced for
the reduction cells to make aluminum metal.
Over 250,000 tons of related chemicals are produced
and include:
sulphuric acid
caustic soda
chlorine
alumina sulphate
magnesia
refined fluorspar
A graduate chemical engineer joining Alcan faces
almost every unit operation common to chemical
industries. As a process engineer, a development engineer or a design engineer, he will deal with fluid
flow, heat transfer, crushing and grinding, evaporation, mixing and separation, crystallization, calcination and related processes. Graduate chemists
will also find interesting careers in control, development and research.
Photo illustrates row of decomposer towers in the chlorine
plant at A/can's Arvida Works.
Please ask your Placement Officer
for literature and an appointment
to meet the Alcan representatives
on January 11, 12, 13, 14.
4
ALCAN
ALUMINUM  COMPANY
OF CANADA, LIMITED
DON'T
BE
LATE
FOR A
VERY
IMPORTANT
Representatives from Bell
Telephone will be on Campus
to talk about
YOUR FUTURE WITH THE BELL.
Appointments for interviews
can now be made with your
Placement Office for male
students graduating in
• ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING
• COMMERCE
• BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
BELL tJlJ Thursday, November 26, 1964
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 7
Residence probe
Married
students
quizzed
A questionnaire on married
student problems will be mailed out next week. It is the first
step towards providing the
university's 2,500 married students with residence facilities.
The survey, compiled by a
graduate student committee
under Cliff Millward, Law II,
will probe students for details
of rent, living, and travelling
costs while they attend UBC.
Results of the survey will
be presented to the administration and the AMS.
"The survey will be used as
a basis for determining the
rents, size, and facilities provided in new married student
residences," said Millward.
"The importance of married
students turning in this questionnaire cannot be over-emphasized," he said.
The survey was drawn up
with the co-operation of the
faculty-administration housing
committee, under Dean of
Graduate Studies Ian McTaggart-Cowan.
The administration is awaiting results before progressing
with residence plans.
"The university has recognized adequate married student housing as essential if
UBC is to increase its position
as a graduate school," said
Millward.
"President Macdonald wants
to set an early construction
date for these residences, but
our survey is essential to adequate planning," he said.
Millward's committee will
spend the Christmas holidays
tabulating  questionnaires.
Final results will be published early in January.
The questionnaire will ask
students whether they live at
home, the distance they travel
to campus each day, travel
costs and size of their present
home.
Information on students' financial possessions, occupation
of spouse, and why, if ever,
their education has been interrupted, will also be sought.
AU 2,500 married students
will receive copies of the survey.
Any students who do not
receive copies next week
should call the graduate student centre, university local
708.
Soviet- medicine
Executive director of the
B.C. Medical Association E. C.
McCoy will speak on Soviet
medicine noon today in Wes.
100. Dr. McCoy has just returned from a three-week tour
of Russian hospitals and medical schools.
* Eye Glasses
* Contact Lenses
* Prescriptions Filled
* Immediate Optical
Services
- Student Rates -
PITMAN OPTICAL
Vancouver Block
734 Granville       MU 5-0928
—ilon kydd photo
MUSHROOMING campus construction projects are changing the face of the university.
Here's another one. Workmen are putting up multi-dollar bicycle shed at front of
A-lot.   Overburdened   C-lot   shed   is   gettin g an addition, too.
the
drunkard
(SOLD OUT TONIGHT
AND WEDNESDAY.
RESERVE EARLY FOR
FUTURE    SHOWS)
ie
3607 West Broadway
Reservations: RE 6-6011
Playboys consider
hi fi girls dull
MONTREAL (CUP)—"One of the basic problems of contemporary playboys is their appreciation of low frequency
and high fidelity in sound, and high frequency and low
fidelity in women."
Dr. A. Walsh made this
statement in a talk to students
of the United Theological College here.
The main factors in the
playboy syndrome today are
pleasure, obsolescence and
conquest, he said.
Driven by hopes of conquest
the playboy begins by hunting
and ends by hating.
He wants a jmre woman and
yet is driven by strong desires
for the sensuous type, the doctor went on.
The resulting confusion
gives him an infantile attitude
towards responsibility, and he
ends up insecure and lonely.
opINNing
November 27
"THE" PLACE
to meet
your friends
is at the
Do-Nut Diner
4556 W. 10th Ave.
Try Our Delicious T-Bone
Steak 91.35
It's really Good!
Full course Meals
within your Income
Students Meal Tickets
Available
GUITARS
FROM SPAIN
Instruction • Group ft Private
Music - Strings - Repairs
Mediterranean Shop
4347  West 10th Ave.
Phone 228-8412
ENGINEERS!
ROTP
NEEDS YOU!
Contact
Flight Lieutenant
R. B. ROBINSON
The Armoury
CA 4-1910
V.C.F. presents . . .
DR. STEWARD BABBAGE
• Chairman of Billy Graham Crusade in Melbourne
• Dean of the Cathedral in Melbourne.
• Lecturing at Columbia Seminary, Georgia, U.S.A.
11
speaks on
Foundations of Faith
n
Buch, 106
Friday Noon
■^
Katual-shouldor Vested Suit
For the man who demands authentic traditional
styling, here it is in luxurious herringbones,
hopsacks and diagonals. It's the Casual Country
Look in earthy shades of deep olive, rich brown,
grey.
Authentically finished details—raised seams,
stitched edges, hook center vent, slim plain-
front trousers. (Coat combines beautifully with
contrasting slacks for a second outfit.)
Sizes 36-46 With vest *75.00
POET O'CALL
AUTHENTIC TRADITIONAL CLOTHES BY
TIP TOP TAILORS
PORT O'CALL MEN'S SHOP
637 Granville ... a few
steps north of the Bay.
399 W. Hastings
653 Columbia, N. W«t. Page 8
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 26, 1964
'fween classes
Indian trades words in IH
Indian Trade Commissioner
Y. R. Dhawan speaks on The
Foreign Trade of India Since
Independence at noon today in
International house.
• •    •
PHYSICS SOC
Meet the Oceanography and
Geophysics research groups
today at 1:30 in Henn. 204.
Discussion of research and
grad opportunities.
• •   •
ONTOLOGICAL SOC
Richard Thompson speaks
on The Living Present noon
today in Bu. 221.
• •    •
CUSO
Slide show and talk on
CUSO, Canada's Peace»Corps,
in the Lower Lounge of the
Grad Centre at 7:30 tonight.
• •    •
WRITER'S WORKSHOP
Next meeting: January 9.
• •    •
ROD & GUN
Bill Fedoration, of B.C. Safaris, will show films and speak
on hunting and fishing in B.C.
noon today in Bu. 203.
• •    •
SPECIAL EVENTS
Ravi Shankar Saturday at
8:30 p.m. in Aud.
• •    •
UBC CHOIR
Annual Fall Concert noon
Friday in Brock Lounge. No
admission charge.
REV. JACK SHAVER
. . . Godless world
ANGLICAN CHAPLAINCY
Rev. Jack Shaver speaks on
Living In a World Without
God, tonight at 7 p.m. at 4660
W. 9th.
•    *    •
AQUA
Regulator repair and maintenance instruction today at
6:30 p.m. in Clubroom.
•    •    •
VCF
Dr. Stewart Babbage, Chairman of the Billy Graham Crusade in Melbourne, Australia,
speaks on Foundations of Faith
Friday noon in Bu. 106.
AFRICAN STUDENTS
Film: Africa Awakening
noon today in Bu. 102.
• •    •
ACADEMIC GOALS
Meeting today noon in Graduate Student Centre. Open to
;veryone.
• •    •
RESEARCH  VOLUNTEERS
Appointments for volunteers
who signed up for the Polar-
cardiograph project are scheduled for the spring term, not
"all as* originally planned.
Sex is fun,
funny says
minister
BALTIMORE (UNS) —
Human sexuality should be
considered inherently good,
fun, funny and natural, the
Rev. F. G. Wood of Goucher
College said recently.
He said he hadn't told students if they should, shouldn't
or even how far to go because
to do so would violate individual freedom.
"There are absolutely no
laws attached to sex," he said.
"Anyone who tells you there
are may be guilty of mistaking
social and cultural custom for
divine sanction,"  he said.
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES
VANCOUVER, B.C.
offering careers in
Data Processing - Scientific Computing
and Data Processing Education
Will Conduct Campus Interviews
on November 30th,
December 1st and 2nd
For Post Graduates and Graduates
UBC cellar-il triers
meet cellar-dwellers
The promising but floundering basketball Braves take on
cellar-dwelling North Shore
Mountaineers in Inter - City
Junior League action at noon
today in the War Memorial
Gym.
Braves are currently in
sixth place in the eight team
league with a 3-5 won-lost record. North Shore is winless in
seven starts.
Asked to explain the
troubles  of the highly-regard
ed frosh team, Thunderbird
coach Peter Mullins said:
"It will only be a matter of
time before this team becomes
a smooth, cohesive unit. The
material is clearly superior to
that of the other teams."
Former high school stars on
the Braves roster include Vic
Rahn of Abbotsford, Ken Kern
of West Van, Neil Murray of
Magee, John Klassen of John
Oliver and Dave Rice of Delbrook.
in
ENGINEERING
MATHEMATICS and PHYSICS
HONORS MATHEMATICS and PHYSICS
COMMERCE
Arrangements for Personal Interviews
May Be Made Through
The University Placement Office
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES  COMPANY  LIMITED
1445 West Georgia      -     Vancouver, B.C.      -      682-5515
IBM
like Joy. Skiing like Stein.
Parties   like   Limbo.
Comfy Stay like Bayshore.
We have it on Mt. Baker.
Phone Bob:  987-5010
AUTO INSURANCE AT
SUBSTANTIAL  SAVINGS
For Drivers 24 yrs. & up
Call Bab Balnr of A. R. lalnr ltd.
1327 Marin., W. Van.      92341M
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, 75c—3 days, $2.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Publications Office: Brock Hall.
Lost & Found
11
FOUND ADS inserted free. Publications office. Brock Hall., Local 26,
224-3242. 	
LOST—Slavonic Studies 205' notebook. Reward. M. Hilmo, 224-5439
after  6.
LOST—1 brown wallet two Saturdays ago, Eng. Bldg. Reward offered.  Phone  Mike,   CA  4-9856.
LOST—Arrow-shaped sorority pin.
Jewels on shaft. Greek letters
Pi Beta Phi on head. Phone Carole
Munroe, CA 4-9070 after 6.
Reward.
POUND—Duffel coat at Zate House
on homecoming weekend. Will exchange for mine which is smaller.
Phone   Josie,   RE   3-1566.
FOUND—Silver ring in Upper Physics Bldg. men's washroom. Call
Bob,   RE  1-5533.
FOUND—Umbrella. Two girls hitched a ride in my blue (English) car
from the UBC gates on Saturday,
October 31, leaving umbrella be-
hind.   A.,   phone  263-4364.	
FOUND—D.    N.    Kilbey,    Arts    III,
claim wallet.  Pub.  Office—now.
FOUND—Two chickens in the vicinity of ATC. See Room 211, Saint
Marks  College.
POUND Lady's wrist watch Friday night, 5 p.m. in front of Hebb.
Phone Gery,  224-9910.	
Special Notices.
13
'STEPS TO UNITY"—CUS Seminar on Confederation, Internat.
House—Jan. 14. Apply before Dec.
19   AMS   office.
UNION COLLEGE—Tour Doomsday
approaches.
MOON RIVER PROM featuring "The
Sinners", Dunbar Heights, Kairos
24th & Collingwood, Nov. 28, 8.30
p.m. $1.50 per couple. Tickets at
the door.
HEAR the young lovers in action.
731-9108. Soon you can SEE the
young lovers in action.
Wanted
15
VOCALIST WANTED—Male  or female.  Bernie. WE 8-1559.
WANTED—Experiments in Organic
Chemistry by Frieser. Call AM
1-0592.   Ian   McCrick.
DESPERATELY NEEDED—EC 321
Notes, etc., from past years. CA
4-4748,  evenings.  Ron.
WILL PAY $5 to borrow for one
week a set of Philosophy 100
notes.   733-7830.
Automobiles For Sale
21
'61 ALPINE new oversized engine.
Excellent condition. HT, ST., T.C.
wire wheels, black with red up-
holstery.  Phone Gerl, CA 4-9258.
FOR SALE—1960 Voiks; radio, good
engine. Fort Camp Permit. $600 or
best offer. Phone Garrie Gott, 224-
9833.	
PERIPATETIC STUDENTS! — 1964
Honda 50, excellent condition, carrier included. Only $200. Call 422-
7965   after  six.	
'55 PONTIAC 4-door—Clean, FM-
short wave transistor radio, seat
belts, floor shift. $495. RE 1-1246
after 6  p.m.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
YOU ARE AS SMART as they say
you are, if you get CUS Life Insurance. Enquire Rm. 258, Brock
or phone TR 9-2924.
Transportation
14
WANTED ride to Ottawa or vicinity
Xmas. Will share expenses & driving. Phone Mel 224-9011,  Rm.  170.
BEAT bridge rush! Deep Cove -
North Van driver needs passengers
for 9:30's. Phone 929-1575, 988-8405.
WANTED — Driver rider carpool
vicinity 21st Street, West Van.
WA   2-6729.
SOUTHBOUND for Xmas? Frisco,
L.A., Mexico? Phone Rolf, TR
9-4430.
HELP!—Ride wanted vicinity Sperling and Kingsway. Phone Rick,
HE   5-9762.
RIDE WANTED for two passengers
from Kootenay Loop or Second
Narrows Bridge area, Mon. - Fri.
on Campus 8:30-4:30. Phone 299-
6191   evenings.
TRANSPORTATION WANTED—to
Cranbrook (or vicinity) after
Xmas Exams. Will share expenses.
Ray.   FA   7-6482. 	
2 STUDENTS want ride to San
Francisco Xmas. Will share costs
and driving. Phone Scott, WA
2-2844.
Ski Trips
16
SMART QUALTTY clothing for all
the family, like new, at terrific
savings. Ex Toggery Shop, 6246
E.  Blvd.  AM 6-6744.
FOR SALE—Metal Blizzard Reisen
slalom skis, 200 cm. Hardly used,
new $150. Sell for $100. Call Helen
Stirling CA 4-9090.
GOOD QUALITY used Nordica Alpine ski boots, size 10 or 11. Phone
Brian,   YU   7-5447.
"FABULOUS!"—"I don't know how
I ever got along without it," "Indispensable", "It sure helps me to
understand what I'm doing."
These are typical of the enthusiastic reaction to the recently published book, "A Complete Guide
To Chem 101 Labs" which is now
available at the College Shop,
Brock Exension for a reasonable
$2.50.
RENTALS   &   REAL  ESTATE
Rooms
81
DOUBLE ROOM for 2 M. students.
Private entrance, fridge, phone &
bath. Ride avail. Occup. Jan. 1.
4433  W.   16  Ave.   CA 8-8967.   $30.
CLEAN, WARM H.K. ROOM for a
young man, vicinity Macdonald &
16th Ave.  738-1043 or 738-5844.
Room & Board
82
AVAILABLE AFTER XMAS for
new term, single rooms & board.
Male  students.  AM  6-2593.
FOR RENT—Accommodation in a
new Fraternity House, available
Jan. 1. For information contact
Ron at CA 4-7421.
ROOM & BOARD—available near
gates. $75 per month. Phone CA
4-9286.
MT. BAKER Ski package every Sat.
& Sun. for $9.50. You get return
bus trip, l1/, hour ski lesson, all
day rope tows, 20% off rentals.
Deadline to sign up Thursday eve.
Tickets at all Eaton Stores, Tepee
Sporting Goods, 1017 Robson and
3279 W. Broadway, and Blueline
Sporting Goods Ltd., 154 W. Hastings, or phone CA 4-3955.
ROOM & BOARD now available at
Phi Kappa Sigma House, excellent cook, 2 blocks from University
gates.   4506 West  9th.  CA  4-3601.
AVAILABLE NOW, single room &
board, male student. AM 6-2593.
Furn. Houses & Apts.
83
SHARE  SUITE  in  West  End  with
2  other girls.  MU  4-0925.

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