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The Ubyssey Oct 30, 1984

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Array By JOANNE DI
TOMMASO
Joanne di Tommaso, a masters student in education] „
the first-prize winner in The Ubyssey ghost story contest.
See page 2 for other winners.
"I cou-cou-couldn't f-find my my c-car jn Bbb-B lot,"
Craig stammered repeatedly to officer Lowry. He sat
slumped and shivering against the door if Ihe cruiser. His
hair, matted and wet, straggled over his shirt, which was
shredded and blood-stained. The rain, which had started
earlier that night, now pounded down on the roof and windshield, and the gleam from on-coming cars sent strobes of
light on Craig's face.
Lowry thought he might possibly be sick if he continued to
look at the boy's face, drawn and deathly white, and at his
eyes that stared dully into some unseen horror. He also
ubconscious state
oe recounted until
:mergency waiting
avily sedated, and
he could do that
>ple about, it was
realized that the boy had slippec1 :-~ '
and that his story of the ordeal c
the boy could begjedically treat
A few minjSe^uer, Lowry s
room. The bH Al been admitt
Lowry knewSi^Bhere was no
night. But, Beflt least, there
warm and dfl ^B it was brightly lit*
He knew Bvflsilly, but right now he just couldn't face
sitting in his^rarcened patrol car, alone, with the vision of
the crumpled, wild-eyed figure he had found. Man, that kid
was tryng to dig a hole in frozen ground with his bare hands!
He shuddered. The kid's nails had been splintered and
bleeding, and he had been moaning, "Brian, Briiaaan . . ."
There had been no one else there.
*        +        *
Alex grinned at the others, his thin lips sliding up to reveal
four sharp, yellowed, pointed teeth. He ground them back
and forth and surveyed his five friends. No, fellow comrades, he thought. Alex had been at this, the PLACE for
three years, and for the three long, goddamn years he'd been
in this prison he had been tortured, HUMILIATED and
scarred beyond recognition. The others had arrived one by
one and he had watched as they, too, had been brutalized,
and the fury inside Alex had started to grow. It had gotten so
strong lately that he didn't even feel the pain anymore and a
plan had started to formulate in his little brain.
Ahh, but everything was falling into place, and it had been
easier in the long run than he had thought. Now that they
were free, they'd show those, those HUMANS what they
thought of their sick little games. They'd SHOW them that
they weren't so goddamn smart as they thought.
He scanned the group. Some of thenroore minor wounds;
proof of the preceeding event, but they were keen. They fixed their beady eyes on Alex and grinned back at their leader
in eager anticipation. Alex felt the energy exploding between
them, thel>ride they felt of their revenge glaringly obvious.
*        *        *
All across the campus, the ghosties and ghoulies were out
in full force. Most were headed towards the Armouries for
the annual Hallowe'en bash of the year. They giggled and
complimanted* each other on how much better they looked
than the other party-goers, plans for the prize money dancing
around in their heads. Sue wasn't dressed up.
Sue wasn't going out tonight to have fun with everyone
else. She sat in Main Library totally steamed because some
arrogant, dumb professor had decided to have an exam the
next morning. Fine, she thought. Absolutely frigging fine!
Still fuming, she got up to find the book she needed in the
racks.
Alex and the gang had found the library mostly by accident, but it looked like the sort of place they might find some
people. Besides, it looked nice and dark. "Gloomy atmosphere for a grizzly, gloomy fate," Alex snarled as the rest
squeeled in anticipated delight. They bounded up the stairs
and slid noiselessly into the stacks of books.
Sue located the text, grumbling still about the unfairness
of it all, and returned to her seat. Alex was the first to spot
they surrounded the desk. Ooohh, they calculated it carefully. As Alex clamped onto her neck," th; others began their at-
As Alex clamped onto her neck, the others began their attack, nails and teeth flew in a maddened frenzy. Sue's
screaches echoed and bounced through the empty halls,
sounding like the wail of a cat in battle, and temporarily
stunned the group of attackers into retreating.
Mrs. Mark, at the circulation desk, dropped her cinnamon
bun in disgust. What the hell, she thought. This was the last
damn Hallowe'en she was going to %v. stuck supervising the
library night shift. Students just had na respect for education
anymore. They couldn't keep their silly, BARBARIC
Hallowe'en meanderings to. the Armouries or their
residences. Oh, no, they had to infest these fine places of
learning. Mrs. Mark thought it was absolutely sacreligious.
She supposed she could try and find the little shits, but then,
they'd come out sooner or later. Besides, it did seem a little
creepy to have to wander through the stacks unaccompanied.
After all, there were so many weirdo students, probably love
to give an old lady a thrill.
By the time Alex and his voup had gotten themselves
together again, Alex was no longer shocked, but he was
furious. "Listen," he growled in disgust, "we can't turn all
mousy (nervous giggles from the others) about all of this.
Have you guys forgotten what has been done to us? Can so
few of us even partially retaliate the horrors that have been
inflicted on us? Max, just look at yourself and remember
those who have inflicted their horrible little thrills on you.
You should all feel ashamed that you'd turn tail and run at
first bloodshed. We all have to prepare ourselves for what
can only get worse. Now, let's find out where everyone does
hang out around here." Burning with humiliation, they
followed Alex out into the soggy night.
Back at the Armouries, the troops were getting completely
pissed. With the fanfare of costume prizes finally over, there
remained ample time for the winners to gloat and the losers
to grumble. The band started a particularly obnoxious rendition of "War" to which hundreds of witches, monsters,
hobos, and a few out-dated tylenol bottles bounced
drunkenly off one another.
Paula and Sandy, still pouting about the "terrible judges"
for the contest, decided to head for another, less
'animalistic', party off campus. Just as they reached the
front doors, Paula tripped on something and, trying to
regain her balance, pushed Sandy into a table, sending both
women flying into an entanglement of arms and legs. Paula
started to scream hysterically.
"Paula, for God's sake. It's only a few bruises," Sandy
scoffed. "Here, let me help you up." She crawled over to her
friend who was no longer screaming but lay contorted and
still, face down on the floor. Sandy rolled her friend over and
froze in horror. Paula's neck had been ripped through to the
cartilage, and the blood streamed down into her witch's
cape, which was already soaked. Her eyes were huge and
filmy, her mouth in a permanent, silent scream.
Sandy dropped her friend's arm and started crawling
backwards into the room. She thought she might be screaming too, but she couldn't seem to tell reality anymore. And I
then there was a piercing pain, and that was very real. Someone, or . . . thing was grasping her leg. Sandy felt like she
was being . . . CHEWED on. She started crawling faster,
kicking her leg behind her but the intensity of the pain was so
bad that she couldn't seem to see straight anymore. Then a
feeling of warmth, painless and engulfing, started to spread
over her and she passed out.
» * *
Lowry sat back in his cruiser, with his hands cupped
around his thermos of coffee. He thought to himself, as he
had every night for the last month, that he really should get
himself another job. Night shift here was starting to get to
him. So damn'slow, too much coffee keeping him up half the
morning.
See Page 2: THESE Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 30,1984
"These weren't even people anymore.
WW
From page 1
If he didn't watch himself, he'd
end up with an ulcer. Then, one incident, the first in months, could
turn him into a paranoid, quivering
piece of jelly. Night watchman at a
7-11, a healthy paycheque, and an
early retirement. Maybe that would
keep the old lady off his back too.
Lowry was so engrossed in these
thoughts that he almost didn't hear
the radio go off.
"Yeah?"
"Get your ass over to the Armouries as fast as possible! There
seems to be some sort of a riot go
ing on over there!"
Oh, man, what Lowry didn't
need was to have to bust up another
brawl by himself, he thought as he
fired on the siren and pulled out onto Wesbrook Mall. What he
couldn't have imagined was the
shambles that would greet him at
the Armouries. The few people that
remained were no longer tittering in
the Hallowe'en fashion. As Lowry
stepped into the room and flipped
on the lights, he froze in shock.
There must have been 30 . . . bodies
. . . laying amidst the beer cups and
garbage.
Ghost committee reveals winners
After hours of consultation,
argument, laughter and hard work
The Ubyssey's ghost story committee chose its favourite ghost story.
The winning story was chosen
because it fit the requirements and
because it was judged to be both
readable and entertaining. The
committee chose The Stalking by
Kelly Stubson as its second
favourite tale and An Uplifting
Halloween Tale by Sharon Fletcher
as its third favourite tale. If space
permits The Stalking will be printed
in this Friday's Ubyssey. If Joanne,
Kelly or Sharon so desire, they can
enter the maelstrom, SUB 241k, to
receive the prizes the winners have
been promised: a dinner for two at
Fogg and Suds, $10 towards dinner
at Fogg and Suds and a press night
dinner with UBC's own loveable
Ubyssey staff. To all those who
entered but did not win, thank you
for entering. We received more than
20 entries and enjoyed reading them
all.
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These weren't even people
anymore. The macabre sight was all
the more creepy because all were
dressed in ghoulish fashion,
throats, eyes, chest shredded
beyond human form, with a blanket
of drying blood like a shroud
thrown over them. Not one moved.
It was clear that the living had
vacated this place of massacre.
Lowry stumbled back outside
and, leaning against the wall, succumbed to the convulsions that
overtook him. He couldn't possibly
re-enter the building. What the hell
for? He had one very real thought
to get back into his cruiser and get
the hell out of this entire town. At
least, he figured, he could lock
himself in his car and wire for help.
Stumbling sickly, he made his
way back to the car and slumped in
side. He opened the window and
leaned his head out to get some air,
hoping he wasn't going to pass out.
One thing was certain; Lowry was
definitely quitting now. He tried to
battle further nausea, inhaling
slowly. What Lowry did not know
yet was that he would never work
here again, for just as he reached
for his radio, his silence was forever
ensured. So totally exhausted and
numb, Lowry didn't see the scurry
of attackers for the open window,
and was not aware of his cries into
the otherwise silent, still night.
They say it took over eight hours
to clear the campus of its evening's
grizzly affairs. Poor Mrs. Mark and
Sue in the library, Brian (reduced to
a lump of bones and flesh under
some shrubs near B-lot), and many
more dozens scattered crazily about
the campus. They also say that it
was the most gruesome of mass
murders in North America to date.
The students of UBC had been
reduced to terror, and still they
avoid the dark areas of the campus
for fear of stumbling on yet another
undiscovered corpse. It is reputed
that George Pedersen, president of
UBC, personally printed in The
Ubyssey's next issue an apology to
all friends and family of the deceased for their nightmares to come.
Oh, and a small headline, overlooked by most except maybe Craig and
a few others who have yet to be able
to come to terms with their own
horrors of the night . . .
"Science reps are still looking into the mysterious disappearance of
six laboratory rats, missing since
Hallowe'en."
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TIMES: MONDAY, November 5 /
TUESDAY, November 6 >   5:00-9:00 p.m.
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THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
UBC threatens centre closure
By ROBERT BEYNON
The curtain is about to drop on
UBC's graduate student centre.
UBC administration representatives did not attend a last minute
meeting with the graduate student
society executive Monday to
forestall a threatened administra
tion closure of the facility.
Neil Risebrough, associate vice
president student affairs, sent the
GSS a letter last week saying the
university will close the centre or
revoke its liquor permit if the GSS
and the administration cannot
reach an agreement by Thursday.
The letter cited bartender hirings at
the centre as key problem.
The university has said it might
close the centre since May when it
took it over, froze its assets, and
laid off catering employees.
Risebrough could not attend the
meeting due to personal reasons, his
secretary said, adding he might not
UBC WOMEN'S SOCCER team finished last weekend's round robin tournament undefeated, to win the Canada
West soccer championship for the second consecutive year. See story p. 11.
Cutbacks squeeze women students
By PATTI FLATHER
Women students and instructors
are being squeezed out of community colleges as they bear the brunt of
funding cuts, the vice-president of
the College-Institute Educators
Association of B.C. said Monday.
Karen Ewing said programs with
predominantly female enrolment
are being eliminated due to provincial government funding cuts.
"They're not seen to be as essential
as other courses such as business
management," said Ewing.
And government "privatization"
of other programs containing a majority of women means students
face tuitions five to 10 times higher,
said Ewing. These include
secretarial and hairdressing programs.
Ewing said the Status of Women
Committee of the CIEA noticed
mature women students are disappearing from the college system.
She said many single parents,
predominantly women, have trouble financing education, especially
with the abolishment of provincial
grants last February.
And women on UIC or welfare
usually have access to only one or
two year programs that put them
"in the job category that is often
low paying or has a strong possibility in the future of being taken over
by technological change," Ewing
said.
Ewing, a Capilano College professor, said women faculty are also
vulnerable. If cuts result in layoffs,
women faculty are concentrated in
the lower ranks and make up the
majority of parttime instructors.
"They have no protection," said
Ewing, adding when layoffs occur
"usually the parttime people go."
The committee's report asks for
an inquiry examining whether
women are being discriminated
against by cuts.
June Lythgoe, UBC women
students' office director, said
everyone knows mature women are
rapidly being cut off from post-
secondary education. "For single
mothers or mature women who
don't have independent resources
— who can cope if you have two
kids to support?"
But Lythgoe said she is not sure if
other women are affected yet, adding the 17 per cent drop in first
year enrolment should be investigated for this trend.
A faculty association report on
the status of women at UBC notes
that as in colleges, women faculty
form a small but growing proportion of the university and are concentrated in its lowest ranks.
The report advises that "the high
proportion of non-tenured women
should be born in mind in the formulation of policies regarding
layoffs."
even be on campus today.
GSS secretary Brian Baine said
Risebrough's absence was unfortunate considering how little time
there is before the threatened actions.
"And revoking the liquor permit
is as good as closing the centre,"
Baine said, "because we won't be
able to fund the centre's upkeep if
we have to end Friday beer nights."
He said the GSS must reconsider
the situation since Risebrough
could not make the meeting Doug
Low, Alma Mater Society vice
president organized.
If the university closes the centre,
the GSS will consider legal action
against the university who they say
is breaking a 1982 agreement. The
agreement transferred centre con
trol to the GSS.
Frank Frigon, GSS external affairs coordinator, said a takeover
might be better because then the administration would be forced to
deal directly with graduate
students.
Frigon said administration claims
the centre must be closed because
the GSS is breaking union contracts
regarding the hiring of non-union
bartenders is false. "We can hire
non-union staff for periods shorter
than four hours a day," Frigon
said.
Thursday Risebrough said the
centre had to be closed down if the
GSS did not stop breaking union
agreements because the CUPE local
is threatening to take the case to arbitration.
Law attacks cuts
Lav/ students voted Friday to
subsidize the cost of keeping the
Law library open extra hours in
November.
At a general meeting of the Law
Students Association the membership ratified a deal between LSA executive and the law faculty to extend the library's hours.
LSA ombudsperson Theresa
Stowe said the association's agreement to pay the law faculty half the
costs of adding five hours of library
time per week was a dangerous but
unavoidable precedent.
Stowe said some students are
unable to complete factums —
special reports which require texts
on reserve at the Law library —
because the library is open 15 fewer
hours per week than last year.
Stowe said the LSA tried to find
funding in numerous other ways
but could not. She said the association approached the faculty and
UBC president George Pedersen
but neither could find the $1,400 required for the extra hours.
"We   didn't   need   that   much
money," Stowe said.
Stowe said as well as allocating
the funds at Friday's general
meeting the LSA set up a committee
to organize a protest to UBC's
president in conjunction with other
professional faculties including
medicine, engineering and pharmacy.
"We should have replies from the
other faculties by Thursday,"
Stowe said.
But Elaine Mah, Alma Mater
Society council member and
Medical Students Union representative, said the medical students
voted to only support the law students' protest in principle at their
Monday night meeting.
She said the MSU did not see
how supporting the law students'
protest would help their own
demands for more library hours at
Woodward library and at Vancouver General Hospital's
biomedical branch library.
Mah added, "We're trying to
avoid this kind of confrontation."
Blacks losing war
By PETER BURNS
"Blacks are continuing the struggle against the repressive South
African regime, but it's a losing
battle," a former South African
student said Monday.
Up to three million people have
been forcibly moved to
government-created 'homelands' in
the north, with Nambibia the
largest of these, John Willcocks
told 30 people in Buchanan B214.
"Blacks have been forced to
retreat to refugee camps in
neighbouring Swaziland and
Angola, where they live virtually in
hand-to-mouth existence," said
Willcocks, who now lives in
Canada.
The South African riots are due
to frustration among blacks in attempting   to   shape   their   own
r
Torios nray cut oclifccitloit grants
-\
By DAVE STODDART
The new federal government may reduce its post-
secondary education transfer payments to the provinces when it cuts its budget, the new treasury board
president told die Sun Wednesday.
Robert de Cotret said he directed every cabinet
minister to find programs in their departments that
could be reduced in funding. He added social programs would not be excluded in the cutbacks.
The federal government transfers close to half of
B.C.'s post-secondary education budget through the
established programs financing act of 1979.
De Cotret said the Progressive Conservatives were
"looking at everything. We're not excluding anything
and we're not targeting any particular program.
"We've inherited a mess from the former government and we've got to restore some financial and
economic credibility," he said.
Analysts say the new federal government will have
to cut some social programs despite earlier campaign
promises. These programs include unemployment insurance payments, Canada pensions, family
allowances and grants and transfers to the provinces
for health care, education and welfare.
De jCotret's media attache Claude Durand said
Monday the cabinet is still discussing areas to target in
the uptoming budget. Durand said he could not reveal
the ar^as targeted for funding reductions.
"We'll have to wait until next week or later this
week at the earliest before we can be certain what
changes will be implemented," he said. "And I don't
think the Secretary of State or anybody else really
knows; just what will happen,"
Jane Burnes, provincial universities ministry assistant, sjaid she could not comment on possible reductions (jo the EPF grant. "It would be premature to
make a comment at this point," Burnes said.
The federal secretary of state who oversees EPF
financing was unavialable for comment.
political future and to the violence
and oppression with which the
South African police and army have
acted against peaceful black demonstrations, he said.
Campaigns initiated by the
African National Congress have included passbook burnings and marches, Willcocks said.
All of these peaceful attempts at
political change have met with total
and violent government response.
In 1976, Soweto, the black
counterpart of Johannesberg, was
the site of a confrontation where
children and young students,
demanding better education were
met by police tear gas attack.
Children threw rocks back at police
and the police opened fire.
Estimates put the number of dead
children at between 350 and 400,
Willcocks said.
"The South African authorities
haven't stopped there," Willcocks
said, "and they've raided refugee
camps in neighbouring countries,
killing indiscriminately."
The events taking place in South
Africa are not new — the government has continued to use methods
to exterminate those who oppose it,
Willcocks said. These methods take
the form of high taxes to extract
slave labor or mass relocations of
people to areas more isolated from
White South Africa.
Modern concentration camps are
disguised as homelands and
autonomous governments but are
under the tight control of the South
African government, he said.
The National Party of South
Africa, which gained power in
1948, formally introduced^ "apartheid" as official policy, Willcocks
said. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 30, 1984
OH     MY   GOD I
THESE    MULTIPLE
CHOKE     ARE
O.K.     t>0H»T    frxNlC.
use    Your   superior
INTELLECT        TO
LOGICALLT    HOUCE  THE
CORRECT    ANWEK.*    ANt>
FLlniMATE     THE    WH0N6J
Pulling back
Sometimes you have to draw
back a bit.
Sometimes it hurts, sometimes it
is embarassing, but sometimes
drawing back is the only thing to
do.
This is true in the case of the
graduate student centre. Last week
the administration told the
Graduate Student Society they will
close down the centre if administration and the GSS do not reach an
agreement by Nov. 1 regarding
some contentious points.
At this point the ultimatum appears to be the last salvo in a battle
between the GSS and the administration that has waged since
last May. But the battle should not
end with this ultimatum.
A Monday meeting organized
between the administration and the
GSS fell through. Neil Risebrough,
the administration's representative,
failed to attend the meeting.
Another meeting should therefore
be organized.
This probably is not possible
before Nov. 1, the day on which the
university said it would act. So the
university should not act then.
If the university would behave in
good faith it would meet with the
GSS to discuss its ultimatum. To
do less is to admit they are only
operating from a powerful position
with expediency in mind.
And when the administration
does meet with the GSS it should
explain a few points before it closes
the centre. It should explain why it
has refused to allow the provincial
ombudsoffice to investigate the
case and why its calculation of the
centre's debt vary considerably
from B.C.'s auditor general's
calculation of the debt.
A third party should be brought
in and the problem should be
cleared up cleanly and fairly.
THE UBYSSEY
October 30, 1984
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Fridays throughout the
academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British
Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and are not
necessarily those of the university administration or the AMS.
Member Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is
SUB 241k. Editorial department, 228-2301/2305. Advertising
228-3977/3978.
"We can hear someone's mother making rad and green ribbed Jello almost half a mile away!" chortl
ed Denise Coutts, Rory Allen, Charlie Fidelman, Peter Burns, Robert Beynon and Monte Stewart as
the mushrooms began to take effect. "Glass is a supercooled liquid!" chorused Rick Klein, Chris
Wong, Dave Stoddart, Eric Eggertson and Kelly Jo Burke in harmonious unison (although nobody
seemed to give a shit). Eventually, the mass hysteria subsided and the Blorgs of the Blah began to
chant: "We're all ugly farts." Such is life in Pango Pango.
Just where was The Ubyssey on Oct. 18?
On Thursday Oct. 18, Intramurals celebrated its 65th anniversary of the Arts '20 Relay
Race. Attendance records were
broken once more and everyone
who took part had a terrific time.
Again, UBC's intramural sports
program retained the title of being
host to the largest intramural event
in Canada. The Vancouver Sun was
there. The Province was there. Even
BCTV was there. Simon Fraser
University participated as did two
high schools.
More importantly, almost 200
UBC student teams took part. The
only organization not in attendance
that day was UBC's own
newspaper, The Ubyssey. You
should be ashamed of yourselves.
You call yours the university
newspaper?
When you find world politics and
international events more important than major events which occur
right under your nose, in the very
community you profess to inform
and represent, you obviously show
your lack of priorities.
Over 50 people volunteered many
hours to organize and run this major undertaking. Over 1,500 people
took part in the relay, the university's president included. By doing
so, they proved that this campus
does not, as you like to profess continually in your articles, possess an
apathetic nature void of spirit. I
argue that it is your organization
with its illogical slate of priorities
Ubyssey suicide not answer to arms race
The UBC "peace" club and The
Ubyssey are to be condemned for
advocating the suicide "option" as
an answer to the growing war
danger. Their assertion that people
have "no say" in the arms race and
the war preparations being undertaken by the bourgeoisie is not at all
true ("Peace club seeks new stock
for cyanide solution" and "Shocking," Oct. 23).
The bourgeoisie wants to persuade the people to withdraw from
the growing movement against the
imperialist war danger and give
them some breathing room from
the mass demonstrations and pro-
Yes for CFS
It should come as no surprise to
UBC students to know that the
quality of education at this campus
and across the province has
undergone a steady erosion over the
past few years. A UBC degree is no
longer worth what it once was.
There is an organization of
students that is dedicated to
fighting these cuts and making
students' voices heard: the Canadian Federation of Students. UBC
students will have a choice to make
in November about whether or not
to become full members of the
federation.
If you are interested in promoting
the "yes" side of the referendum,
or would like more information
about the CFS, there will be a
forum in Buchanan A204 this
Thursday at 12:30. As well, the
"yes" committee will be holding a
meeting this Friday at 12:30 in SUB
213. Be there if you care.
Lawrence Kootnikoff
CFS yes committee
732-5045
tests. One way of doing this is to
represent themselves as genuinely
interested in peace.
Prime Minister Brian Mulroney
does this. He has said that peace is
his "number one" priority, and all
the while he and the bourgeoisie
cry on escalating their preparations
for war. The "wisdom" of the
peace demagogues is that the people
should leave it to the "experts," the
ambassadors and negotiators of the
two superpowers, and they will look
after achieveing peace.
Another way of quieting the
peace movement down and leaving
the bourgeoisie a free hand to
prepare for war is to sow despair
and dejection among the people,
telling them that their efforts are
futile, and that ultimately suicide is
the only option left to them. This is
the way of The Ubyssey and the
"peace" club.
But the "suicide option" reflects
the logic of U.S. president Ronald
Reagan, Soviet leader Constantin
Chernenko, and Mulroney. It is
they who grow nervous and contemplate suicide when they are facing the revolutionary struggles of
the peoples of the world. From the
Philippines to South Africa to
Afghanistan to India, from Europe
and Britian to Canada, the U.S.
and Central and South America,
the people are dealing with the
danger of imperialist war and the
attacks of the clients of the two
superpowers by stepping up their
mass struggles in a self-sacrificing
manner.
Suicide by cyanide capsule is a
ritual of the SS and other Nazi war
criminals. Hermann Goering, it
must be remembered, took poison
rather   than   face   the   anti-fascist
forces  who  were  about  to judge
him.
The fact is that we do have a
"say" in the war danger being
organized by the bourgeoisie, the
pessimism and fatalism of The
Ubyssey and the "peace" club notwithstanding.
The "suicide pill" proposal
should be rejected. We should step
up the mass struggles against the
war danger and not give the superpowers and the Canadian
bourgeoisie a moment's respite.
The "suicide option" is an attempt
to allow the warmongers a free rein,
to petrify and slow down the growing opposition to the danger of war,
and we must never concur with this.
Allen Soroka
law library
that lacks campus spirit.
When such a high-charged campus event occurs, one with so rich a
history and so vital a purpose, it is
your duty to report on it.
Granted, many negative things
are happening on the UBC scene,
such as budget cuts and the like.
But the intramural sports program
and its dedicated staff, just like
many other individuals and
organizations on campus, proves
that some positive things are happening on Point Grey as well.
Report on these! Apathy does not
become you. Rick Thomas
UBC intramural sports program
Staff note: A Ubyssey
photographer covered the event and
The Ubyssey ran a photograph on
the news page in the Oct. 19 issue,
with a caption saying the event took
place.
Gaaaaaaaaa . . .
Regarding the recent spate of letters concerning heavy workloads.
Gaaaaaaaaaa . . .
V. Bareau
F. Duncan
M. Eby
W. Fajber
P. Kinahan
A. Labun
among others
engineering physics 4
The grass is greener
r
Fraternity offered generosity
Fraternities were dying out in the '60's and you wouldn't find a
tear on my face. I was what the press called a hippie and we were not
in the same ball park as the "frat rats". All of my friends were hippies and their friends were hippies. Their dogs were hippie dogs who
only played with other hippie dogs. (Fraternity dogs had fraternity
fleas.)
Two years ago my six-year-old son and I found ourselves at UBC
without family housing for almost six weeks. We slept in our '66
Chevy panel truck but our home was Psi Upsilon. My opinions on
frat rats have changed considerably.
Psi U not only provided us with a badly needed home but also
voted to feed my son nutritous meals out of their own pockets. To
this day I cannot walk by Psi U without thinking of the fraternity
that was there when my family desperately needed a home.
I may never have the opportunity to return the favor, Psi U, but
my son and I will never forget your incredible generosity and
hospitality. Thank you.
Tom Neuhoff
masters in fine arts
Varsity sports vs. grass tennis
courts: three varsity teams were
discontinued this year, while 10
others saw their entire budgets
taken away.
Amidst this grief we see four
grass tennis courts being set up at
UBC ("Tennis court transfer still
mysterious," Oct. 26).
To the point — the cost of this
might be peanuts for board chair
David McLean but to those people
who no longer have a varsity team it
means a great deal.
The board of governors and the
responsible people in the athletic
department should set their
priorities straight. Surely 13 varsity
teams are a greater asset to this
university than four grass tennis
courts which only can be used in the
summer, when the majority of
students are not on campus.
All UBC students should be
deeply concerned with this
misallocation of scarce resources in
a time of restraint. An explanation
of this decision by the board of
governors is required.
Simon Hoogewerf
science 3
Ian Gillespie
Ok Anker-Rasch
commerce 4
We want your letters. They must
be typed, triple-spaced on a
70-space line. We edit for grammar
and brevity, and do not accept sexist or racist letters. And don't forget
that "Dear Sir" went out at The
Ubyssey years ago, but the letters
edHor becomes overjoyed when she
sees a letter addressed to the "Dearest editorial collective." Tuesday, October 30,1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
U.S. discredits Latin elections
By RICK KLEIN
The American government is
condemning upcoming elections in
Nicaragua because its interests in
the area are better served militarily,
said a university professor and
author Saturday.
Edward Herman said the San-
danista government of Nicaragua
does not conform to American
ideas of world order. The Reagan
administration   urged   elections
believing they would not be held, so
they could call the Sandanistas dictatorial. When the Nicaraguans
agreed, the U.S. response was to
discredit the elections as
undemocratic.
"The Americans are simply
waiting to find a pretext for an invasion. If you look at historical
events in Latin America, whether in
Grenada, Guatemala, the
Dominican Republic, or in Chile,
the U.S. did not hesitate to use armed force or covert activities to
replace legitimate popular governments with regimes that more closely reflected American interests. The
writing is on the wall."
Herman spoke to 300 people at
the Robson Square media centre as
part of a special panel on elections
in Latin America. Herman charged
election conditions in Nicaragua,
while not  perfect,  are far  better
PETER PUMPKIN PONDERS precise meaning of life after discovering "Pumpkin pie, recipe" in UBC card
catalog. Pumpkin was at loss to explain entry, found while looking for ancestral roots. "And now I have found
something I can sink my teeth into," said Pumpkin just before being run over by run-away book cart.
Hunger striker demands transfer
OTTAWA (CUP) — The 53-year-
old mother of one of the "Vancouver Five" is appealing to the
federal government to transfer her
sone from Archambault prison near
Montreal to a penitentiary in his
native B.C.
Agnes Stewart, who left her
school teaching job in B.C. to lobby
Corrections Services Canada officials, wants her son to be moved
immediately.
"I don't want him to die from his
hunger   strike.    It's    reaching   a
dangerous stage," Stewart said in
an interview in Ottawa.
Stewart started his fast Oct. 6 in
protest of his July transfer from
Kent penitentiary near Vancouver
to Archambault. He wants to be
returned because he is thousands of
miles away from his family and
friends and does not speak a word
of French, the main language of the
institution.
Stewart pleaded guilty in June to
the bombing of a B.C. Hydro
power plant on Vancouver Island
U of W library reopens
WINNIPEG (CUP) — The University of Winnipeg has re-opened
its library on Saturdays despite no
help from the provincial government in easing the library's poor
finances.
The U of W took drastic
measures in September to reduce
the university's financial woes, including closing the library on Saturdays, and cutting 60 courses and 20
faculty jobs.
But the library is open Saturdays
again for student use even though
the provincial NDP government
refused to give the U of W ar
emergency $165,000 grant t(
reinstate the services.
"In some ways it's a success,
because the library is open again,"
said student council president
Gaylene Van Dusen. "But it leaves
questions as to why it took less
funds to reopen then we were
told."
Education minister Maureen
Hemphill said the university administration's management is to
blame for the shortfall and refused
to grant more money.
"(Hemphill) claimed there must
be money they (the administration)
can divert to more important
areas," said Van Dusen.
University president Robin Far-
quahar said the administration
reinstated the library services
without the province's help by
redistributing the library budget
and using money from the university's endowment fund which had
been earmarked for the library.
"This is an ad hoc, short-term
solution," said library director
William Converse. "The question
is, what happens after April first?"
UBC  students lost   112  library
hours this year due to budget cuts,
affecting evening and weekend
hours at all libraries except
Sedgwick. The Law Students
Association and the law faculty are
bringing back some law library
hours through donations but are
planning a protest.
and received a six-year sentence for
his part in the action.
Stewart said her son was transferred without any warning. After
repeated attempts by letter to find
out why he was transferred, the
mother said federal corrections service officials told her he was moved
because he is considered a "security
risk" at Kent, a maximum security
prison. The authorities also told her
Doug had to be separated from the
other members of the group and
from his home territory.
"I think none of their reasons are
justified," she said.
As of Oct. 25, Doug lost 12
kilograms.
Ruth Fahlman, a close friend of
Doug's who came to Ottawa from
Vancouver with his mother, says
support groups in Ottawa, Montreal, Vancouver, Toronto and
other cities in Ontario and the
Prairies are pressuring the government for Doug's return to B.C.
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than those that existed for the U.S.
sponsored elections in El Salvador.
Heinz Dietrich of the University of
Mexico said it is necessary to place
events in Nicaragua in context.
Nicaragua is a country under siege.
The CIA has armed a force of
15,000 "contras" that is fighting an
undeclared war against a legitimate
government. Still there is an election going on with press freedom
and normal constitutional
guarantees.
Said Dietrich, "you can compare
this to events in Canada, when in
1970 a few bombs in Montreal
resulted in the imposition of the war
measures act.
Herman called recent elections in
El Salvador and Guatemala, "mere
formalities for international consumption." These elections produced outcomes little different from
the despotic rule they were supposed to change. "These
"democratic" elections are meant
to convince the American population that the governments of
U.S.-placed goons are popular."
NDP justice critic Svend Robinson (Burnaby) called on the Conservative government to rethink its
position on the Nicaraguan elections. "I think Canada should be
sending observers to the
Nicaraguan vote. External affairs
minister Joe Clark is sending a
message to American interests that
we will not rock the boat."
George finds hope
UBC president George Pedersen
says he has found a positive side to
recent post-secondary education
restraint in B.C.
"Apart from the obvious bad
news, fiscal cutbacks and myriad
other problems we confront in administration seem to have also
created a climate receptive to
change, innovation, and leadership
at all levels," Pedersen told the
Pacific Association of Collegiate
Registrars and Admissions Officers
Convention in Victoria Sunday.
Pedersen said universities must
definitely take advantage of this
new climate to create leaner, more
effective operations. Pedersen did
not say if this meant cutting faculty
or staff.
Pedersen said in the past univer-
sified their resource base enough
but have relied completely on
government funding sources. But
this is changing as community,
business, and industry links with
education are strengthening, he
said.
"Academic organizations have
shown a capacity to respond to the
problem of fiscal restraint and to
diversify their bases of support,"
Pedersen said, adding the financial
crisis is not over yet.
UBC hired a new vice president
development and community relations this year and other institutions
have created similar positions to attract private funds.
The challenge of restraint, said
Pedersen, has given universities a
skies and colleges have not diver-   chance to reappraise their goals.
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THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 30, 1984
Steroid use on increase
The use of anabolic steroids is increasing among community
athletes, the director of the B.C.
sports medicine clinic said Wednesday.
Speaking on an open line radio
program, Jack Taunton said high
school atheletes are starting to use
steroids. Parents and coaches are
advising athletes to use the synthetic
hormones, he added.
Taunton was chief medical of-
THIS FRIDAY at
THE UBYSSEY
SCHOOL
Of
JOURNALISM
Erin Mullan
presents
"News writing
for even
Ubysseyers
(and beginners)"
ALL WELCOME
our favourite
city editor
robert beynon
will be there too
for abuse
he missed
at
prevbus meetings
ficer at the 1983 Pan American
Games in Caracas, Vanezuela,
which saw numerous athletes disqualified for drug use.
Those games have gone down in
history as the most drug-marred
athletic competition. Several
athletes — including New
Westminster's Guy Greavette —
lost their medals after testing revealed the athletes use of anabolic
steriods.
Taunton, along with other sports
medicine experts across the country, have launched a campaign
against drug use. Taunton said the
group is opposed to the use of
steroids on "physical, moral, and
ethical grounds."
The sports medicine clinic has set
up a new hotline for athletes who
have used, or are thinking of using,
steroids as a means of improving
athletic performance.
So far the clinic has received calls
from several parents, coaches, and
athletes who have concerns about
steriod use. Most of the calls to date
have suggested that athletes are
leaning towards using some form of
artificial stimulant, he said.
According to Taunton, steroid
use has increased among "recreational athletes." He claimed people
use steriods to improve muscle tone
and just to bulk up, and not solely
for athletic achievement.
Medical experts have determined
that steroid use — at the high
dosages athletes prescribe for
themselves — can cause impotence,
brain damage, and paralysis.
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FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 2
"Women and Alcohol"
—Ms. Gaynor Simpson,
Alcohol and Drug Program,
Ministry of Health
PLACE: WOMEN STUDENT'S LOUNGE,
BROCK HALL, Room 223
TIME: 12:30-1:30 p.m.
Sponsored by the Office for Women Students with
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Hear B. C.F. W. member groups speak on:
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• SEXUAL ASSAULT (RAPE RELIEF), Thurs., Nov. 22,
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All talks in WOMEN STUDENT'S LOUNGE
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Tuesday, October 30 — 8:00 p.m.
WAR MEMORIAL GYM, UBC
Zhe-Jiang is one of China's top "A" Division teams
and has represented China internationally in the
past.   UBC  features   university  all-stars   Erminia
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Tickets: Students $1, Adults $3
For more information call
228-3917 or 228-2295 Tuesday, October 30, 1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
*<•»■ - *  _i» *       t.
■ *?"^*v u^^* ft ****** ? ^X*S
* »,''  "--■** Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 30,1984
Trade partners fill schools
MONTREAL (CUP)—For the
Quebec government, a degree from
a Quebec university is just like an
ingot of aluminum, a roll of
newsprint or a watt of electrical
power, according to a recent report
by the province's largest student
association.
The government fills its quota of
subsidized places in Quebec schools
with students from countries which
are valuable trading partners with
Quebec, the report says. International students who fail to get into
the quota program must pay $5,800
per year.
According to the report, written
by l'Association nationale des etu-
diant(e)s du Quebec, most of this
year's 3,500 students who are exempted from the high fees are from
rich countries. "Ranked by (gross
national product) per capita, the
top 10 countries are offered two-
thirds of the exemptions while the
bottom 10 receive only seven per
cent," the report says.
"International student seats in
Quebec schools are being sold to the
highest bidder with no consideration for the principles of academic
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The report was delivered to
Quebec education minister Yves
Berube last spring. Concordia
students followed with a postcard
campaign to the minister, asking
that the quota system and fee policy
be changed. Berube has not replied.
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THE    UBYSSEY
Page 9
Davis evolving new directions
By CHRIS WONG
Jazz, like any other creative art
form, is constantly evolving
towards new, unproven directions.
While the commercialism of the
eighties is tempering current efforts
to achieve originality and innovation, previous generations of jazz
hipsters pioneered numerous styles
and techniques that remain vital
elements of the music.
Most of those pioneers have
played their final choruses. Charlie
Parker, Louis Armstrong, John
Coltrane, Thelonious Monk and
Charles Mingus were brilliant artists who shaped the face of modern
jazz — all are history, kaput,
resting in collective peace.
Miles Davis
Queen Elizabeth Theatre
Tonigh*
A few early pioneers still remain
such as Dizzy Gillespie and Art
Blakey. These artists have essentially plowed on with the same musical
approach for the last three decades.
Yes, their music has always been inspired, exciting and totally competent, but they were not among the
few who totally rethought their
music, and introduced new concepts and ideas.
One such musician, who will be
appearing at the Q.E. Theatre
tonight, is trumpeter Miles Davis.
His name conjures up visions of a
far out jazz God, whose unique personality and playing cause him to be
revered by the masses.
Indeed, no other figure in contemporary jazz has been more imitated than Miles Davis. That is, a
horde of young trumpeters in
search of the hippest sound around,
have undoubtedly turned to Davis'
well recorded legacy for inspiration.
Any aspiring horn player hoping to
one day achieve brilliance must first
as an undisputable prerequisite
study and ananlyze his lengthy contribution to jazz. Who better to
look for direction than the creator
himself.
He was a member of Gil Evans'
nine piece Birth of the Cool band
that set the trends for west coast
jazz. He went on to join Parker and
the other jazz rebels to create the
definitive bebop style — a style that
embraced a radically new rhythmic
and harmonic conception.
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On the album Kind of Blue,
Davis anticipated the sixties avant-
garde directions with his excursions
in modality — improvisation based
on modes instead of chords. His
final innovations were in the jazz-
rock fusion genre, probably the
most controversial change of his entire career.
Controversial simply because
many critics do not consider fusion
a true form of jazz. The Illustrated
Encyclopedia of Jazz lists In A
Silent Way as the last Davis record
of any worth to jazz fans.
"Although labels are arbitrary,
Miles Davis' subsequent output is
of little interest to the jazz record
collector," writes the author.
Attitudes like this towards Davis'
fusion music are common. At his
last performance in Vancouver at
the Queen E., a substantial portion
of the audience walked out after the
first 15 minutes, unmoved by the
extended improvisation based tunes
booming out of the amplifiers on
stage.
They didn't realize this thin,
gaunt little man on stage is not
content with musical stagnation. To
expect Davis to still play the old
standards he first recorded with
Parker in 1945 is like asking
Beethoven to compose another
Fifth symphony 10 years after the
fact.
Davis is a creative genius. As a
gifted performer, composer and
band leader, he is naturally restless,
fidgety and not content with sticking to the norm. It's true, electric
guitars and large amps are now part
of a Miles Davis concert. But jazz
purists need not fear. Davis will
never abandon his roots — he'll just
pull them up and rearrange them a
bit.
X
Special effects fashion Solide success
By CHARLIE FIDELMAN
Michel Lemieux the high-tech
magician put on a spectacular show
with his newest creation, Solide
Salad, at the Vancouver Cultch last
week.
Some call him Montreal's top
performance artist or Canada's
answer to Laurie Anderson, while
others label him a self-indulgent
man who plays with expensive toys
on a stage.
Despite labels, Lemieux is a one-
man show combining music, movement, lighting, and sculpture who
keeps his audiences on the edge of
their seats. The performance ranges
from the technologically complex to
the humanistic and simple. There
are 11 songs in the show and each
one leads to the next.
Solide Salad begins with a slide
show and Lemieux emerges from
the screen wearing white geometric
forms and becomes a moveable
screen that blends into the
background like a chameleon.
The music is familiar, something
one can hear on the local FM stations, and something one can put a
handle on in the new performance
art, a situation without traditional
cues for its audiences. And
although Lemieux tries to involve
his viewers in a piece using fog, mirrors and lights shining directly on
their faces, the effect remains:
Lemieux, the one-man magician
show.
Some of the other magical techniques involved fluorescence.
Lemieux used a whole sheet of
material soaked in the substance to
trace an eye with a flash light and
then himself in various poses by
flashing a series of lights.
The pace is fast. There is no time
to separate the hightly stylistic
visual images — all graphic in content and structure. But because he
wants the show to be a communication, Lemieux sings and speaks in
French, English, and a Germanic
gibberish.
There is fog, a bizarre appliance
named Oskar, an electric toy drum,
moving backdrops that fill up with
fog and tumble open to blast those
in the front rows with smoke . . .
plus many more electrical gadgets.
One song's chorus repeats "learn
to survive, learn to stay alive."
Lemieux's message seems to be
learn to survive with toys and
gadgets     by     playing     like
sophisticated children.
"I want to be the taste in your
mouth, I want to be the stage of
your show ..." sings Lemieux in a
song titled appropriately enough, I
Want. And what he wants is apparent enough. Lemieux is for the
most part a self-indulgent man, a
direct product of the "let it all hang
out" uninhibited sixties, who
managed to turn a livingroom performance into a technically superb
extravaganza.
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Co&8ut*r
6&23U Page 10
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 30, 1984
"$*&
<UM0fi
TODAY
DANCE HORIZONS
Registration for the new dance work by Jennifer
Mascall, 11:30 a.m. to noon, SUB 216E.
PRE-MEDICAL SOCIETY
Lecture:   anaesthesia,   Dr.   Jenkins,   dept.   of
anaeasthesia UBC, noon. Wood 1.
WORLD UNIVERSITY SERVICE
OF CANADA
Organizational meetings, noon, Buch A202.
INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR
STUDENTS OF ECONOMICS
AND COMMERCE
Sale of Canada Savings Bonds, 11:30 to 1:30
p.m., SUB Concourse.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Supper and program, 6 p.m., Lutheran campus
centre.
UNDERWATER HOCKEY
Practice, 7 p.m., Aquatic centre.
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Aerobic class, 4:30 to 5:30 p.m., SUB 207/209.
PANGO PANGO (UNS) — Hairy
puce blorgs on this tiny island community erupted in revolt today after
it was learned island vice dictator
Slug Glow was caught foolishly
spending island moolah.
The scandal came to light after
Island Chancellor of the Exchequer
Jams Hollow blabbed the scandal
to the island newspaper The Daily
Blah. Hollow said off-the-record he
hoped by the action to win over The
Blah's support in the upcoming
Blorg of Governors election.
It is alleged Glow spent $75 of
island money on a catered lunch for
himself and some friends on the
pretence of arranging a "meetings
of minds" between the graduate
students and university administration. Reliable sources have informed the Blah Glow dined on Beef and
Shrimp-stuffed Croissants and a
variety of face-stuffing gluttonous
materials.
OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS
Open sharing meeting,  newcomers welcome,
noon, conference room, Lutheran Campus centre.
INTERNATIONAL VOLLEYBALL
The Thunderbird women host the Zhe Jiang province (China) in the second of two matches, 8
p.m., War Memorial gym.
WEDNESDAY
JEWISH STUDENTS
ASSOCIATION/HILLEL
Falafel lunch, noon, Hillel House.
NDP CLUB
Events committee, noon, SUB 230C
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL UBC
Film: Your neighbour's son, noon, SUB 211.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Gallery lounge meeting,  newcomers invited to
meet at SUB 237A, 4:30 p.m., Gallerv lounge.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Bible study, singing and fellowship, noon, SUB
213.
PSYCHOLOGY STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Selling t-shirts,  golf shins,  etc.,  11:30 to 1:30
p.m., Buch near A205.
INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR
STUDENTS OF ECONOMICS
AND COMMERCE
Sale of Canada Savings Bonds, 11:30 to 1:30
p.m., SUB Concourse.
CFS YES COMMITTEE
Info table, 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., SUB Con
course.
THURSDAY
THUNDERBIRD FIELD HOCKEY
CIAU Women's national championship tournament, noon, McGregor fields, Thunderbird park.
LATIN AMERICA SOLIDARITY
COMMITTEE
Poetry reading, 3:30 p.m., Buchanan penthouse.
UBC WOMEN'S CENTRE
Lecture   on   the   feminist   movement,    noon,
women students lounge, Brock Hall.
PSYCHOLOGY STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Taking orders and payments for t-shirts, 11:30 to
1:30 p.m. near Buch A205.
APOLOGETICS OF CHRISTIAN
THOUGHT IN SCRIPTURE
Video:   The   Edwards  vs  Craig;   humanism  vs
Christianity debate, noon, Scarfe 204,
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Guest speaker: Jaimie Smith on Homophobia,
noon, SUB 215.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Small group home meetings, 7 p.m., for info call
224-4553.
NEWMAN CLUB
Meeting, noon, St. Mark's college, club room.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
"Toymaker and son", drama presentation, 12:15
p.m., SUB Plaza.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Conversation meeting, 1:30 p.m., International
House.
UBC CHINESE CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
A talk on "God's promise, grace and love", part
1, by Dr. Stark, noon, Scarfe 206.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Lecture   —   Alderman   Bill   Yee,   all  interested
welcome, noon, SUB 119.
STUDENTS FOR A
DEMOCRATIC UNIVERSITY
Forum on the CFS, noon, Buch A204.
CAMPUS COMMUNITY ALLIANCE
General meeting, noon,  Lutheran campus centre,
ISMAILI STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Lecture — the memoirs of the Aga Khan, noon,
Woodward 6.
DANCE HORIZONS
Registration for dancers for new dance work,
11:30 to 1:30 p.m., SUB foyer.
SOCIALIST EDUCATION SOCIETY
Booktable, 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., SUB Concourse.
INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR
STUDENTS OF ECONOMICS
AND COMMERCE
Sale of Canada Savings Bonds.  11:30 a.m   to
1:30 p.m., SUB Concourse.
CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR CHRIST
Weekly meeting, noon. Brock Hall 302.
ROCKER
Meeting to discuss Saturday s bear garden jam,
noon, SUB 212.
FRIDAY
INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR
STUDENTS OF ECONOMICS
AND COMMERCE
Sale of Canada Savings Bonds,  11:30 a.m. to
1:30 p.m., SUB Concourse.
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TRAVEL CUTS VANCOUVER       TRAVEL CUTS VANCOUVER
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604 224-2344
Expo '86
will be conducting interviews
on campus November 14-22
for Part-Time and Full-Time
employment effective January
15, 1985. Appointments can be
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Hall) up to close of business on
October 30, 1984.
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UBC SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM
Newswriting seminar for all staff, including
Robert, by Erin Mullan, famed and funky CUP
B.C. Bureau chief, noon, SUB 241K.
BAHAI CLUB
General meeting, 3:30 p.m., International
House.
PYSCHOLOGY STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Selling t-shirts, 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., near
Buch A205.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Conversation meeting, noon, International
House.
STUDENTS FOR PEACE AND
MUTUAL DISARMAMENT
General organizational meeting for Helen
Caldicott event, all welcome, noon, SUB 205.
THUNDERBIRD VOLLEYBALL
UBC AA and A invitational tournament, all day,
War Memorial Gym.
CFS YES COMMITTEE
Meeting, noon, SUB 213.
ENGLISH DEPARTMENT
Reading by Canadian writer Audrey Thomas
reads from her recent work, noon, Buch B322.
THUNDERBIRD FIELD HOCKEY
CIAU Women's national championship tournament, all day, Warren, McGregor fields,
Thunderbird Park.
'THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: AMS Card Holders - 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; addit.onaf
lines, 60c. Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $4.50 additional lines, .70c. Additional days, $4.00 and .65c.
Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m. tne
day before publication.
Publications Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
Charge Phone Orders over $10.00. Call 228-3977..
11 - FOR SALE - Private
WANTED TO BUY!! Old records: scratched
or unscratched. Call Al before 9 a.m. or
Sat. all day 228-0995.
1985 SALOMON, SX91 boots, never used
$275. Dynastar MV5 210 cm with Look
NR99, $275. Dynastar OME glass 207 cm
with Look NR99, $275. Either with poles
N/C. Full package: goots, skis, bindings &
poles. S500. ph: Bill 731-6037.
BIANCHI BIKE, 12 speed. Quick release
front tires. Lightweight frame. Color:
white. $200. 731-9857.
15 - FOUND
TO THE GUY IN MATH .
for    help.    You    forgot
291-8363.
. who asked me
your    umbrella.
20 - HOUSING
ON CAMPUS HOUSING, avail, reasonably
priced, rent incl. Great meals prepared by
our full-time cook. Contact David Kelly,
224-9930 or drop by Deke House, 5736
Agronomy Rd,
25 - INSTRUCTION
LSAT. GMAT, MCAT preparation. Cal
National Testing 738-4618. Please leave
message on tape if manager is counselling.
LSAT/GMAT preparation courses, coming
to Vancouver. For info call 1-800-387-3747.
30 - JOBS
NEED HELP to care for elderly gentleman in
UBC extended care. Please call Julie aft. 6
p.m. 224-7631.
WEEKEND WORK available in alarm
answering service. $4/hr   731-8204.
35 - LOST
LOST: GLASSES, light blue frame, in a
grey corduroy case. Lost somewhere between B-Lot and Math building Oct. 22, 9
a.m. Reward, Please phone Kim 879-5973.
LOST FRI. OCT. 19: Two tickets for Van.
Symphony in December. Please call
255-5205.
40 - MESSAGES
FIND A TUTOR
BE A TUTOR
Register at
SPEAKEASY
Mon.-Fri.
9:30am-9:30 pm
SUB concourse
(Phone 228-3777)
70 - SERVICES
MODE COLLEGE of Hairdressing & Barber-
ing. For students with ID, body wave from
$17. 601 West Broadway (B'way Plazal
874-0633.
ILLUSTRATOR: Scientific, graphic &
general illustrations. No job too small.
Quality work, low prices. 734-5039.
85 - TYPING
WORD PROCESSING $1.50/PG (DS1
CRWR major - Winona Kent 438-6449
located in south Burnaby.
EXPERT TYPING. Essays, term papers,
factums, letters, manuscripts, resumes,
theses, IBM Selectric II, reasonable rates.
Rose 731-9857.
WORD   PROCESSING   SPECIALIST.   All
jobs, year around student rates,  on King
Edward route. 879-5108.
85 - TYPING
WORD WEAVERS - word processing.
Student rates, fast turnaround, bilingual
5670 Yew St. at 41st 266-6814.
YOUR WORDS PROFESSIONALLY
TYPED - TO GO. Judith Filtness, 3206
W. 38th Ave., Van. 263-0351 (24 hrs.). Fast
and reliable.
WORD    PROCESSING    SPECIALIST.    U
write, we type theses, resumes, letters,
essays. Days, evenings, weekends.
736-1208.
WORD PROCESSING (Micom). Student
rates $14/hr. Equation typing avail, ph
Jeeva 876 5333.
WORD PROCESSING 90c pg. Dot matrix
$1.'pg Daisywheel. Mon-Fri. Pick-up on
campus.  Spelling correction. Call 433-0167.
MINIMUM NOTICE REQUIRED. Typing
essays & resumes. Spelling corrected
733-3676
TYPING SERVICES. Experienced typist.
Reasonable rates. Call Mary Lou at
421-0818 (near Lougheed Mall).
TYPING: Essays, theses, term papers,
mscps. Reasonable rates. Call 876-2895;
872-3703.
ABOVE AVERAGE TYPIST.  For accurate
professional results call Audrey, 228-0378.
W/P & TYPING: Term papers, theses,
mscpt., essays, incl. reports, 'letters,
resumes. Bilingual   Clemy: 226-6641.
WORD PROCESSING Reports, essays,
resumes, etc. For professional results at
verv competitive rates call 266-2536.
PDQ WORD PROCESSING Whatever you
need papers, theses, articles, manuscripts.
Your work stored — no retyping. Call us for a
good price, friendly service. 731-1252.
WORD PROCESSING. Reports, term
papers, mspt.. theses. $1 25/pg IDS).
Resumes $10. Fast professional results. Call
eves., wkends. 734-0687.
WORD PROCESSING/TYPING. Student
rates. Ideal for students on North Shore.
Days, eves, weekends. 985-8890.
OCTOBER SPECIAL
10% DISCOUNT
Double Spacing
Reg. $1/pg., NOW 90c/pg.
Single Spacing
Reg. $1.80/pg., NOW $1.60/pg.
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CALL 734-8561 eves or weekends
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All types of written material accepted.
SUPPORT SERVICES INCLUDE:
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•Binding (Unibind)
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•Translation & Tutoring
222-2661
WORD PROCESSING
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DAYS!   NIGHTS!   WEEKENDS!
Spelling & Grammar
Expertise
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NANCY
266-1768 Tuesday, October 30,1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 11
r Birds rout hapless Huskies
By MONTE STEWART
UBC was in a "must win situation."
"We knew we had to come out
on the go from the opening whistle
— which we did," said men's soccer
coach Joe Johnson of the final
game of the Canada West season.
After failing to sew up first place
Friday afternoon, the 'Birds lambasted the Saskatchewan Huskies
7-0 at O. J. Todd field Saturday to
win the Canada West title. It was
UBC's first ever men's soccer
championship.
Under the unique national playoff structure, only the first place
teams from the Canada West, Ontario and Quebec, and Atlantic
Conferences qualify for post season
play.
"We knew we had to come to the
SPORTS
Huskies early," said Johnson.
"Scoring a few more goals was just
icing on the cake."
Mike Malana scored the only
goal the 'Birds needed to do in the
Huskies. The second year commerce student headed home a long
cross from the corner as the 'Birds
persistently bombarded the Saskatchewan box.
Jonathan Pirie and Kent
Burkholdter each notched a pair of
goals while Ken Mulleny and Paul
Dalla Lana also netted singles.
The "Birds blew their chance to
wrap up the title on Friday, bowing
3-2 to the Alberta Golden Bears.
Jos Adam's goal with less than two
minutes remaining in the game pro-
UBC hosting field hockey
UBC, last year's winner of the
Canadian Interuniversity Athletic
Union Women's Field Hockey
Championship, is hosting this
year's tournament.
Six field hockey teams — two
from each of the three Canada Conferences: the West, Ontario-
Quebec, and the Atlantic — begin
round-robin play Thursday on
Warren and McGregor fields.
The six teams are divided into
two pools. In Pool A are Victoria,
No. 1 West, St. Mary's, No. 1
Atlantic; and Waterloo, No. 2
Ontario-Quebec; UBC, No. 2 West;
and    the    University    of    New
Brunswick, No. 2 Atlantic in Pool B.
Both pools play each of the teams
in their own pool once, for a total
of two games on Thursday's
schedule. The two top teams from
each pool then advance to semifinal action on Friday and the remaining two teams are eliminated
from further play.
St. Mary's University objected to
an earlier draw where UBC would
face the top teams first. This was
revised to UBC's advantage.
The team's first game on Thursday is at 12:00 against UNB. This
will be UNB's second game of the
day  after  a   match  against   York
earlier in the day. The UBC team
can watch this game and see their
opponents in action.
Should UNB lose to York and
then be beaten by UBC, UBC
automatically advances to semifinal play on Friday, regardless of
the result of their 3:00 game against
York.
Coach Gail Wilson said she is
concerned about converting scoring
opportunities into goals, something
the team did not do well against
Victoria in the final game of the last
CWUAA Tournament to weekends
ago.
Gridsters fumble way to loss
By MONTE STEWART
It was like a funeral march.
The Thunderbirds walked
solemnly off the field last Fiiday
night as their woesome Western Intercollegiate Football League
season came to a close at Thunderbird Stadium. The Alberta Golden
Bears defeated the 'Birds 28-9
before a sparse and partly costumed
crowd.
Already out of the play-offs, the
'Birds entered the game intent on
revenge — Alberta shaded UBC 8-3
last month in Edmonton — while
the Bears were salivating over a
possible first place finish. The Bears
moved into first place probably for
good.
Jeff Funtasz reaped havoc on a
UBC defence that did everything it
could to make up for a mediocre
Thunderbird offence. The Alberta
running back romped for 254 yards
and two touchdowns on 31 carries.
The tight Thunderbird defence
kept the score low until a miscue by
Randy Jamieson turned the
momentum in Alberta's favor.
Jamieson fumbled while trying to
return a punt in the second quarter
Alberta recovered the ball on
UBC's nine yard line. Moments
later, Funtasz trotted into the end
zone. The 'Birds never recovered
after that major.
Glenn Steele ran for the 'Birds
only touchdown late in the third
quarter. Ironically, the major was
set up by a fumble recovery when
Danny Rousseau dropped the ball
while trying to field a punt.
Several 'Birds might have played
their final regular season game in a
UBC uniform. Several fourth year
players have become eligible for the
Canadian Football League draft.
Linebacker Greg Kitchen and offensive lineman George Piva have
used up their five years of collegiate
eligibility.
Glenn Steele and defensive back
Bruce Barnett are virtually assured
of being drafted or retained as one
of the B.C. Lions' territorial protections. Defensive end Cary Lapa
may join a CFL team as a free
agent.
Calgary regained a share of first
place with a 22-12 victory Saturday
over Saskatchewan. The Bears and
Dinosaurs have 6-1 records with
one game remaining for both
teams.
Alberta takes on winless
Manitoba this weekend while the
Dinosaurs stage a rematch with the
Huskies in Calgary.
The Bears, the only team to
defeat Calgary this season, have a
better points for and against record
than the Dinos'.
The 'Birds finished the regular
campaign with a 3-5 mark for their
first losing season since 1980. This
Saturday at 1:00 p.m., the club will
close out the 1984 season with an
exhibition game against Montana
Tech at Thunderbird Stadium.
THE
THUNDERBIRD
SHOP
HALLOWE'EN
PARTYING!
Monsters
Ghouls
Bums
Devils
Babies
Bunnies
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Lower Level            Hours: Mon.-Fri.        Telephone: 224-1911
Student Union       8:00 a.m.-7:00 p.m.    Visa & Mastercharge
Building, U.B.C.    Sat. 10 a.m.-5:00 p.m.           Accepted       __
vided the margin of victory. After
trailing 2-0 early in the contest, the
'Birds bounced back to tie.
UBC and the University of Victoria Vikings actually finished in a
tie for first but the T-Birds gained
the title by virtue of a better points
for and against record.
Johnson said he was not pleased
with the tie because the league indicated it would suspend UVIC's
wins — UVIC used two carded
players from the Canadian national
team. The league then reversed its
direction, claiming the players were
eligible.
"The   national   team . . .   just
left for Africa with one of the
players who played for UVIC,
namely Ian Baird," said Johnson.
Two players, Frank Iuele and
leading scorer Rob Shelley, were injured in Friday's match, Iuele with
a cracked cheekbone. "We're just
going to have to adapt," said
Johnson, "and bring in a couple of
young players."
The Birds face the national semifinal contest against Concordia
University in Montreal this Saturday. The 'Birds must win to qualify
for the national championship at an
undetermined Atlantic site.
Soccer women tops
The women's soccer club
defeated Calgary Dinnies 1-0 on
penalty kicks Sunday to win the
Canada West soccer championship
for the second year in a tow.
Coached by Bob Allen, UBC
finished the round robin tournament undefeated. The most significant victory occurred Saturday
when the Birds shut out the Univesi-
ty of Victoria Vikettes 3-0.
The Thunderbirds dominated
most of the play in the final contest.
But some tight defensive play by the
Dinnies — and sloppy field conditions — prevented UBC from scoring in regulation time.
Canadian Intercollegiate Athletic
Union rules stipulate at least three
conferences must participate in a
certain sport before national championships can be held for the sport.
Since only Canada West and Ontario universities compete in
women's soccer at the varsity level,
there will be no national finals for
the women's team.
Hockey squad wins two on road
The hockey Thunderbirds continue to make amends for an inconsistent road last season. The 'Birds
swept the Lethbridge Pronghorns in
a pair of games last weekend.
Friday, UBC doubled the 'Horns
4-2. Jay Soleway, Bill Holowaty,
Dave Brownlie and Daryl Coldwell
for the T-Birds. Saturday, the
'Birds skated away with a 4-1 victory.
Last year, UBC was plagued by a
poor road record. The team only
managed to sweep one weekend
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THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 30, 1984
RAB
mstemmmm® By eric eggertson m
%*Z@£M
There was an occupation in East Vancouver this summer. No hostages were taken,
though a few demands were made.
For 75 days from July until September, as
few as two and as many as 60 people inhabited a ramshackle settlement of tents on a
small patch of land perched between Vancouver harbour and the Downtown Eastside.
North Shore commuters could see the multicolored collection of tents from the Seabus,
but few of them knew why the tents were
there.
It was the Create a Real Available Beach
camp-in on Vancouver Port Corporation
land at the foot of Main Street.
Don Larson was one of the campers. For
the past 27 months he has been a member of
CRAB. He, with other local residents, have
been waging an ongoing campaign for a
waterfront park in the low-income
Downtown Eastside.
Their demands to the federal Crown corporation are simple. They want to meet with
the Port. They want a say in the use of the
last piece of waterfront property in the
Downtown Eastside that isn't part of the industrial wasteland of container terminals,
docks and factories. They want to pressure
the Port management to make good on its
promise of "a waterfront park with full
public access" in the area.
Getting agreement on the need for a park
has been CRAB's easiest task. Vancouver City Council and the Parks Board have both
approved motions calling for a waterfront
park in the Downtown Eastside. Politicians,
including federal energy minister Pat Carney,
in whose riding the park would be, and Vancouver East NDP MP Margaret Mitchell,
pledged strong support for a park. The
Downtown Eastside Residents Association
and the Vancouver Waterfront Coalition, a
collection of 30 community groups and
unions, support CRAB's proposal.
But turning that support into parkland has
proved to be a long, frustrating process.
Larson fears that Port planners left to
themsleves  will   squeeze  a  tourist-oriented
park between several other developments on
the site, leaving residents without a place to
relax, watch the activity of Vancouver's harbour, and maybe dip their feet into the water.
"We see a seniors area for the park," he
says. Eighty per cent of area residents are
seniors. "And an area for children. More
children are moving into this area for the first
time. There would be walkways, covered
benches, trees and grass, maybe even a
covered fishing pier like the Elliot Bay Park
in downtown Seattle."
Larson has a realistic idea of the residents'
needs — he lives there and works at
Carnegie Centre, a focal point for the community's social activities.
From the pier people could see the working
harbour, tugboats going by and the freighters
being loaded. "There are 20 kinds of birds
down there. The park could have a natural
bird marsh so you could enjoy seeing them,"
Larson says. "We're not against the Port and
the jobs it brings, but what's the use of having a job if you can't get down to the water
and see the natural beauty there?"
The Port, in its master plan for the area,
recognizes the need for a park. But the plan
lists a dozen other potential uses for the land,
including moorage space for pleasure and
fishing boats and a possible Expo 86 development. To get the park they want, Larson and
the hundred members of CRAB must mount
political pressure, and make it clear the needs
of the community are more important than
the needs of other groups.
Larson, sitting in his Downtown Eastside
apartment, describes the two year struggle
that promises to last a while longer. A mouse
pops its head out from the kitchen wall.
"There are 10,000 low-income people
down here," Larson says. "They're mostly
elderly, living in these tiny, steamy
cockroach-ridden rooms, and they only have
one park. And Oppenheimer Park is only one
city block. The baseball teams dominate it.
"We're saying we need a second park for
this community. The Downtown Eastside has
the lowest percentage of park space of any
community in Vancouver. In the west side of
the city all you see is green space and sand.
Then you come to the east side and see industry."
Parks Board planner Peter Rutgers agrees
the area is "park-deficient." "Oppenheimer
Park is one of the most heavily used parks in
our system," he says. "If we had another
park it would get used."
Libby Davies, a former parks board
member and current Committee of Progressive Electors alderman, sees the CRAB
issue as a political dispute over the use of a
piece of land. "Is it for public use or development?" she asks. Davies feels it is more important people have a place to go down by
the waterfront.
Of CRAB she says, "People have banded
together to fight for what they really need,"
adding CRAB is taken seriously as a lobby
group. If CRAB hadn't gathered very broad
support, the issue would have died long ago,
she says.
"They have taken one issue and educated
people about it. They've learned how to use
the system."
Support for a waterfront park is
widespread, but CRAB supporters must keep
up constant pressure, enlisting the aid of
politicans, residents and the media for their
cause.
The latest move by CRAB supporters was
to plant a 35 foot spruce tree on the site — a
gift from CRAB to the board of the Port
Corporation. "It's a symbol of the spirit of
co-existence between the Port and CRAB
during the 75 days of camping there," Larson explains. He adds wryly, "It being a gift
makes it harder for them to bulldoze it."
LARSON . . .  not asking for moon.
At a meeting two weeks ago CRAB
organizers planned a parade to the Port Corporation offices and a vigil until the Port
agrees to another meeting and citizen participation on planning boards for the Port's
land. The vigil will take place today and
Wednesday at the Port Corporation's office
at the foot of Granville Street. "You have to
use symbols to make your point," Larson
says.
The Port Corporation has been
remarkably silent lately. A federal government directive banned any comments to the
press on any subject until the new Tory
government has had time to review policies.
A Port employee who requested anonymity
would only confirm on the telephone that the
land is owned by the Vancouver Port Corporation.
City planner Ted Droettboom
acknowledges the change of government
makes no plans for a park have been confirmed with the Port. "The actual definition,
size, and type of park are still uncertain. The
Port master plan refers to the difficulty of accommodating resident wishes for "touching
access" to the water, and recommends viewing areas set back from the waterfront. No
one knows what plans the Port is making
behind its veil of silence, but the possibility of
a scaled down park, ignoring community
wishes, is very real.
It is no accident that Downtown Eastside
residents have to band together and lobby for
a three-block stretch of waterfront park
when residents of the West End and most of
Kitsilano and Point Grey have direct access
to waterfront parks and beaches. The low-
income east side has traditionally been less
active in civic politics than the more affluent
residents of Shaughnessy, Kerrisdale and
Point Grey. That imbalance has led to a three
decade dominance of the parks board by the
NPA, a collection of business types and
lawyers who have seen to their
neighbourhoods while ignoring the Eastside.
CRAB is a sign that times are changing.
The Downtown Eastside, lacking representation on the parks board, has instead formed a
lobby group to fight for credibility.
It has been done before — a similar battle
was won against City Hall and developers.
This fight was to save the land on Georgia
Street at the entrance to Stanley Park from
becoming a massive hotel complex.
The only difference between Devonian
Park, as it is now called, and CRAB, is that
CRAB has no lawyers and doctors pleading
their case for them. CRAB does have the support of city council, giving them some
leverage against a Port Corporation that considers rerouting industrial and commuter
traffic through the Downtown Eastside an
appealing prospect. Council, with its base of
support in the community-oriented, left-wing
COPE party, would be loathe to rezone the
area for heavier traffic flow or an Expo 86
spillover project while ignoring the clearly-
stated wishes of the Downtown Eastside
residents.
Larson claims the Port values the proposed
park land at $120 million. And with the
restructuring of the local National Harbours
Board into the Vancouver Port Corporation,
there appears more emphasis on running the
Port as a profitable company. So plans for
the Port land can go two ways, as Libby
Davies says — for public use or for development. The residents are clearly in favor of
public use. But can they convince one area of
government — the federal Port Corporation
— to acquiesce to the wishes of another area
of government — Vancouver council and
parks board?
Don Larson is hopeful. "We're not asking
for the moon. The Port put in about 18 acres
of landfill down there, we're just saying they
should give something back to the people."
A case of
parkland
versus
development
The CRAB campers
occupied Port land for
75 days. The Port
agreed to talk, but
made few promises.

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