UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Jul 19, 2011

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0128657.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0128657.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0128657-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0128657-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0128657-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0128657-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0128657-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0128657-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0128657-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0128657.ris

Full Text

Array Making offensive comments about your dead grandpa SINCE 1918
EYE ON THE
PRIZE
Mark Rogers takes
the reins from soccer
legend Dick Mosher as
head coach of the UBC
women's soccer team.
Meanwhile, the team
keeps up their game in
the off-season against
seasoned amateurs in
the Pacific Coast Soccer
League.
MORE ON PAGE 6
X
»
July 19, 2011
SUMMER VOLUME 28, NUMBER 6
ROOM 24, STUDENT UN30N BU3LD3NG
FEEDBACK@UBYSSEY.CA
mi
H
-.mi
EU
BYSS
RY
►                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        I
AMS FORCASTS
MULTI-YEAR DEFICIT
DESPITE REFERENDUM, BUDGET STILL NEGATIVE
Blackboard Leam ho
Hace dialed Vlsfea LMS
UBC d.w$k$ iKterckaKcie
tireless Kefcwoorte
*UBC" *>lpedl off
ARSHY MANN
webeditor@ubyssey.ca
A few months after a fee referendum that the AMS claimed was
needed to save them financially,
the society is continuing to budget for the worst.
The preliminary budget which
will be presented to AMS Council this Wednesday plans for a
$100,000 deficit despite an extra $400,000 in revenue that students will pay in fees over the
next year.
The financial hole is a result of
flagging business revenues and
increased administration costs.
A few unforeseen events had to
be accounted for, including the
rise in the provincial minimum
wage and the Canada Revenue
Agency's (CRA) attempt to tax the
AMS's businesses as for-profit.
According to VP Finance Elin
Tayyar, this budget is considerably more cautious than any other over the past few years.
"We're adjusting our expectations for our businesses to a more
realistic level," he said. "Lastyear
we were expecting $900,000 [in
revenue and] obviously we didn't
get anywhere close to it."
The budget also lowers expected revenue from sponsorships,
allows for higher legal fees, expects a combined $48,000 loss
from First Week and Welcome
Back Barbecue and sets aside
$149,000 as a contingency fund.
However, if the contingency
fund is not spent, then the AMS
will not run a deficit.
"That's kind of important to
understand [that] we're not necessarily signing ourselves up for
a $100,000 deficit. But we did
want to be conservative."
According to Tayyar, the AMS's
goal is to stay afloat until the new
SUB is completed, when they expect business revenues to rise,
due to the new building's appeal,
rebranding, increased size and
capacity of food outlets and longer hours.
However, with the Whistler
Lodge bleeding money and the
AMS expecting less traffic in
the current building when construction begins on the new SUB,
Tayyar expects that in the short-
term, the AMS's businesses will
continue to struggle.
"We're looking at a multi-year
deficit," he said.
The AMS is also adding a number of administrative positions
this year that will contribute to
the deficit, including a director
of operations, a director of student government and an extra position for their human resources department. They will also
be reinstating a policy analyst.
NO TAXATION VACATION
Earlier in the year, the Supreme
Court of Newfoundland and Labrador ruled that the Memorial
University Student Union had to
pay taxes on their student pub
and copy centre.
The CRA is now questioning
the AMS.
"The CRA thisyear did an audit of our account and they came
back saying that we would need
to pay tax on our profit centres,"
said Tayyar.
Although the AMS plans to
fight the CRA, they have budgeted enough to pay their taxes if they lose.
BUDGET WOES, YEARS PAST
Tayyar doesn't expect a repeat of
last year's budget drama, when
AMS Council held the budget
up for a month over concerns
regarding Block Party and executive spending.
"We sent it out and we've had
open consultation sessions. Very
few councillors have actually
showed up for that, so that's a
little bit of a concern. If there's
a huge problem with the budget as is...it's because councillors haven't actually done their
homework and approached us
with their issues.
"I don't foresee too many problems. But never say never." va
—with files from Kalyeena
Makortoff 2/UBYSSEY.CA/GAMES/2011.07.19
JULY 19,2011
SUMMER VOLUME XXVIII, N° VI
EDITORIAL
COORDINATING EDITOR
Justin McElroy: coordinating@ubyssey.ca
MANAGING PRINT EDITOR
Jonny Wakefield: printeditor@ubyssey. ca
MANAGING WEB EDITOR
Arshy Mann: webeditor@ubyssey.ca
NEWS EDITORS
Kalyeena Makortoff & Micki Cowan:
news@ubyssey.ca
ART DIRECTOR
Geoff Lister: art@ubyssey.ca
CULTURE EDITOR
Ginny Monaco: culture@ubyssey.ca
SENIOR CULTURE WRITER
Taylor Loren: tloren@ubyssey.ca
SPORTS EDITOR
Drake Fenton: sports@ubyssey.ca
FEATURES EDITOR
Brian Piatt:features@ubyssey.ca
VIDEO EDITOR
David Marino: video@ubyssey.ca
WEB WRITER
Andrew Bates: abates@ubyssey.ca
GRAPHICS ASSISTANT
Indiana Joel: ijoel@ubyssey.ca
WEBMASTER
Jeff Blake: webmaster@ubyssey.ca
Room 24, Student Union Building
6138 Student Union Boulevard
Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z3
tel: 604.822.2303
web: www.ubyssey.ca
e-mail: feedback@ubyssey.ca
BUSINESS
BUSINESS MANAGER
FerniePereira: business@ubyssey.ca
AD SALES
Alex Ho opes: advertising@ubyssey,ca
Room 23, Student Union Building
print advertising: 604.822.1654
business office: 604.822.6681
web advertising: 604.822.1658
e-mail: advertising@ubyssey.ca
CONTRIBUTORS
DUNCAN CAIRNS-BRENNER
JOHN CHIANG
RAVEN GEISTDESCHAMPS
TREVOR RECORD
KAI GREEN
WILL MCDONALD
JOSH CURRAN
VINICIUS CID
VERONIKA BONDARENKO
KATHY YAN LI
LEGAL
The Ubyssey is the official student newspaper of
the University of British Columbia. It is published
every Monday and Thursday by The Ubyssey Publications Society. We are an autonomous, democratically run student organization, and all students are
encouraged to participate.
Editorials are chosen and written by the Ubyssey staff. They are the expressed opinion of the
staff, and do not necessarily reflect the views of
The Ubyssey Publications Society or the University of British Columbia. All editorial content appear-
ng in The Ubyssey is the property of The Ubyssey
Publications Society. Stories, opinions, photographs
and artwork contained herein cannot be reproduced
without the expressed, written permission of The
Ubyssey Publications Society.
The Ubyssey is a founding member of Canadian
University Press (CUP) and adheres to CUP's guiding principles.
Letters to the editor must be under 300 words
Please include your phone number, student number
and signature (not for publication) as well as your
year and faculty with all submissions. ID will be
checked when submissions are dropped off at the
editorial office of The Ubyssey; otherwise verification will be done by phone. "Perspectives" are opinion pieces over 300 words but under 750 words and
are run according to space. "Freestyles" are opinion
pieces written by Ubyssey staff members. Priority
will be given to letters and perspectives over free-
styles unless the latter is time sensitive. Opinion
pieces will not be run until the identity of the writer has been verified. The Ubyssey reserves the right
to edit submissions for length and clarity. All letters
must be received by 12 noon the day before intended publication. Letters received after this point wil
be published in the following issue unless there is
an urgent time restriction or other matter deemed
relevant by the Ubyssey staff.
It is agreed by all persons placing display or classified advertising that if the Ubyssey Publications
Society fails to publish an advertisement or if an
error in the ad occurs the liability of the UPS wil
not be greater than the price paid for the ad. The
UPS shall not be responsible for slight changes or
typographical errors that do not lessen the value or
the impact of the ad
7\V
^» %f^ Canadian
-r?. qi *~-> University
roL        Press
jpe- Rainforest
Alliance
Canada Post
Sales Agreement
#0040878022
GAMES
CROSSWORD (CUP.CA)
1
z
3
'
1
■
'
6
'
■
1
•
9
10
11
12
"
"
,s
16
"
-
1$
20
"
■
"
■
■
25
■
■
26
27
28
29
■
31
M32
33
"
33
36
II
"
m
1
41
42       1         ■   ■.:
"
■
-
■
"
47
■ w
49
-
SI
52
53
1 M
SS
S6
S7
SS
59
60
61
-
1
"
1
-
es
66
-
68
■
...
■
-
PUZZLES PROVIDED BY BESTCR0SSW0RDS.COM. USED WITH PERMISSION
s   s
3
N
1
■ S
3
v ■
0
a
a
3
1   1
N
1
^
O
^
3
V
N
3
1
a
3    W
V
3
3
S
0
0
n
0
H
3
\
N    V
l"J
O
w
S
1
11
D
V
H
V
w
■ V
0
1 ■
■ O
N
V
1
■ 3
3 |)j.
N
V
A
w] V
V
1
V
s
a  1
I ■ S
3
1
V
a __ n
n
3
3
0
N    V
8
■ '<
X
a
V
J  ■ H
S
V
H
3    A
V
N
1 ■  ]
3
M
D
N _§ 3
3
1
■
a
n
3
sLi
i
V
W
v a,
°
■ V
f
3
(1 ■
■ H
V
N ■
V    d
±   n
-m.
3
H
1
O
IN
9.
N
V
a
tj
a
?.
3
V
n
S
°.
1
3
N
1
\
0  s
N
1
S
3
a
O
\
'
1
0
1
1    I,
n(
a
1 A
V
■
5.
3
N.
0.
SUDOKU BY KRAZYDAD
2
4
3
8
6
7
5
8
4
4
1
7
5
2
8
1
6
7
3
5
4
9
2
1
P
8
z
6
L
L
9
9
e
9
6
e
8
P
9
Z
i.
L
9
i.
L
e
9
Z
6
8
•?
6
e
P
z
L
8
L
9
9
i.
L
8
9
e
9
t>
6
z
z
9
9
L
6
P
e
L
8
e
P
6
9
8
L
L
z
9
8
9
L
L
Z
e
9
P
6
L
Z
9
P
9
6
8
e
L
Tofino twice a day... Every day...
Call 1.866.986.3466
or book online and Save!
<___M____}
G2E1E>»
WMti'lHI*                H0RSESH0EBAY
• •    	
___T__Y
TOFiHOBOS.COM
G____B  •
^
Island Express
ACROSS
DOWN
1-Addition column
1- Designer Cassini
5- Express
2-Film
8- Downfall
3- Gas burner or Sicilian volcano
12- Monetary unit of Lesotho
four—Yellowish brown pigment
13- Judgesv' garments
5- Fair
15-Not             many words
6-Adjoin
16-              kleine Nachtmusik
7- Casual assent
17- Customary
8- Curved bone
18- Very dry champagne
9-Illegible
19- Mum's mum
10-The jig            !
22- Clean air org
11-             bene
23- Where some vets served
13- Fossick
24-            vu
14- Snow conveyances
26- Stage plays
20-Rum
29- Pretended
21-Smell
31- Driver's aid
25- Sixth month of the year
32- Monetary unit of Zambia
26- Trades
34-Jack
27- Investigated
36-            browns;
28- Body of honeybees
38- 71 per cent is under water
29-Minor
40-Abba of Israel
30- Egg-shaped
41- Fuming sulphuric acid
31- Howe'er
43- Gives a 9.8, say
33- Baseball stat
45- Old Ford
35-Break off
46- Peace salutation
37- Hawaiian native dance
48- Federal soldier in the Civil War
39- Earphone
50- Pealed
42- Numerous
51-1950 film noir classic
44- Reason to cancel school
52- Brit's raincoat
47- Brightly coloured lizard
54- Woman who sails a yacht
49- Fine white clay
61- Bounce back
52- Nothing more than
63- Bullwinkle, e.g.
53- Biting
64- Gammy
55- Soft drink
65- Nothing, in Nantes
56-Gap
66- Dole out
57- General           chicken
67- Monogram Itr.
58-Long luxuriant hair
68- Corm ofthe taro
59- French friends
69-Loser to DDE
60- Devices for fishing
70- Capone's nemesis
62- Lennon's lady
A cartoonist looking for some
exposure? An artist with a few
thoughts for the world? Get in
touch, and you could see your
work here. Garry Trudeau started
with his campus paper.
So could you.
Jonny Wakefield | printeditor@ubyssey.ca
U THEUBYSSEYc
Your campus radio station
with online streaming
and podcasts
CiTR
1Q1.9FM/CITR.CA
OWN YOUR FREQUENCY
and
publisher
ll^l#RI=R 2011.0 7.19/UBYSSEY.CA/NEWS/3
NEWS
EDITORS KALYEENA MAKORTOFF & MICKI COWAN»news@ubyssey.ca
UBC increases Aboriginal faculty numbers
KALYEENA MAKORTOFF
news@ubyssey.ca
Two years after UBC initiated its
Aboriginal Strategic Plan (ASP),
the number of aboriginal professors has nearly doubled.
UBC had 11 Aboriginal professors in the 2007/2008 academic
year, the year before the ASP was
implemented. Today, UBC employs 21 aboriginal professors
across a number of faculties,
including Education, art history and zoology.
'At various points for much of
Canada's past and in the University of British Columbia's history, Aboriginal people have been
effectively excluded from participation," said Line Kesler,
Chair of the First Nations Studies Program.
"So seeing at this point a
change—not only for access for
Aboriginal students to study at the
university, but to continue on to
advanced education and become
professors in various disciplines-
is really an overdue development."
The ASP never set up a target
number for its professorial hires.
"We've been very careful, for example, in our Aboriginal Strategic Plan to not say things like,
'we will recruit this many faculty by this date'," said Kesler. "Because UBC is a research-intensive
university, faculty here operate
at a very high level in their field
and our purpose is not to recruit
Line Kesler chairs the First Nations Study Program at UBC. He started at UBC in 2003. COURTESY OF UBC
anyone we can who fits a certain
ethnic profile."
Anna Kindler, Vice Provost and
Associate Vice President Academic Affairs, co-chaired UBC's Aboriginal Strategic Plan with Kesler. She explained that there are
certain challenges to attracting
and retaining aboriginal faculty.
"Much remains to be done in order to create the kinds of environments and the kind of opportunities that the plan purports to create for Aboriginal students and
Aboriginal faculty...we are very
committed to continuing on this
track, but we realize that we still
ABORIGINAL REPRESENTATION AT UBC
"We're now seeing people study across a lot of different disciplines," said Kesler. "So the representation of aboriginal scholars is changing quite rapidly."The following professors have been
hired since the plan was implemented in 2009.
Faculty of Arts
Dana Claxton: art history, visual art and theory
Glen Coulthard: First Nations studies, political science
School of Journalism
Candis Callison
Faculty of Education
Mark Aquash
Department of Zoology
David Close: Fish Centre
Department of Curriculum and Pedagogy
Peter Cole
Tracy Fiedel
have a long way to go," she said.
Kindler added that a growing cohort of aboriginal professors at UBC create role models
for students who identify with
Aboriginal backgrounds.
ABORIGINAL RESEARCH
MaijaTailfeathers, an Aboriginal
student from the Blood Reserve
in southern Alberta and the indigenous Sami of Scandinavia,
recognizes UBC's efforts but says
that under the ASP, the university should continue working with
existing faculty members.
"I definitely think it's important
and it's a step in the right direction. However, I also think that if
UBC really plans to implement
and properly gauge this Aboriginal Strategic Plan, that the existing faculty, whether they be
Aboriginal or not, are kind of
brought up to par on Aboriginal issues," she said.
"It's kind of a heavy burden to
carry as an indigenous student
in the classroom when these
topics come up and the faculty
or the professor, the staff, isn't
able to really properly deal with
the discussion, and they often
get out of hand."
Jordan Wilson, a recent graduate from the First Nations Studies Program and a member of
the Musqueam band, said that
"there is resistance in certain
areas to recognizing whose
land we're on, recognizing the
Aboriginal history, listening to
an Aboriginal perspective, specifically a local perspective," alluding to the unceded Musqueam
territory on Vancouver's coast,
which includes UBC.
Wilson said that while he wants
to see more Aboriginal faculty
hired, it is the work—not necessarily the background—of professors that counts.
"I'm more interested in faculty that are engaged with community and community interests [and] while, I think, in many
cases it would be Aboriginal faculty who are doing that [research],
at the same time, I don't think non-
Aboriginal faculty should be ruled
out."
Kindler said the next step is to
continue supporting Aboriginal
graduates who will pursue academia as a career, increasing the
limitedpool of qualified scholars
in light of competition with other institutions.
UBC has made significant
progress, said Kesler.
"We're certainly in the forefront..UBC has always had some
very strong programs and scholars but I think that in terms of a
university-wide approach, we're
now increasingly being recognized as people who are doing
some interesting work in this
area." tl
SFU student union locks out unionized staff
DAVID PROCTOR
The Peak(SFU]
BURNABY (CUP) - After more
than two fruitless years of negotiations, the Simon Fraser Student Society board of directors
has voted unanimously to lock
out their unionized office staff.
The board alleges that compensation costs have ballooned out
of control and restricted the society's ability to fulfill its mandate;
the union claims that the lockout
is ideologically motivated.
The lockout affects the 15 full-
time, five term and student members of CUPE local 3888 unitfive.
Groups affected include the SFSS
office staff, who are responsible
for managing clubs, departmental student unions and day-today operation of services like the
women's centre and Out on Campus, a queer-supportgroup at SFU.
The lockout will not apply to SFSS
Food and Beverage Services employees or any other CUPE-union-
ized staff at the university.
SFSS President Jeff McCann
argued that the massive financial burden of staff compensation meant that the board had
no other choice.
"We have faced budget deficits
in the last four years, and massive cuts to this year's budget to
accommodate the union," he said.
"It is clear that if we cannot realize reductions we will be unable
to fulfill what our constitution
mandates: fund clubs and departmental student unions."
"We think that the reason that
they're trying to gut the collective agreement is a philosophical
thing on the part of Jeff McCann,"
retorted CUPE 3888 business
agent John Bannister, who conjectured that McCann's real goal
is "to get rid of all the long-term
employees and the collective
agreement."
According to McCann, the 12
permanent full-time employees
are paid an average of $30.48 per
hour, which, together with benefits and lower wages for temporary workers, cost the society
more than $700,000 this year.
McCann said that the most recent offer to the union was a
wage rollback to an average of
$26.66 per hour, plus a four per
cent raise over the course ofthe
agreement and improvements to
the dental plan.
CUPE did not explain their
demands in detail, but said in a
press release that "the union's
proposals, including suspending cost of living increases [currently applied quarterly to a maximum of 3.5 per cent], have been
rejected by the SFSS. In return,
the SFSS has proposed only dramatic wage rollbacks and cuts to
staffing levels."
Bannister added that "we
think our compensation is on
par with not only workers here
[at SFU] but other student society workers."
He said that because of the
lockout, "the students will be deprived of the services of the society that our members provide
them," including distribution of
money to clubs and departmental student unions, women's centre peer support and crisis referrals and the SFSS copy centre.
NEWS BRIEFS
UBC RESEARCHERS MAKE
PROGRESS ON PARKINSON'S
For the first time since 2004,
a gene that causes Parkinson's disease has been discovered—and it's been done by
UBC researchers.
Members of UBC's Centre
for Molecular Medicine & Therapeutics have published a study
showing the link between the
mutation named VPS35 and
late-onset Parkinson's.
"This new finding provides
another piece ofthe Parkinson's
puzzle that will allow us to investigate what's going on in the
brains of people with Parkinson's-
and to work towards developing
and testing novel therapies to halt,
treat and potentially cure this terrible disease," said Matthew Far-
rer, the senior author ofthe study,
published in The American Journal of Human Genetics.
Farrer and post-doctoral research associate Carles Vilariho-
Guell used exome sequences
to isolate the gene, which was
found in the DNA of 11 members
of a Swiss family, all of whom
have Parkinson's. "This conclusively proves that this mutation is
the cause of disease in these patients," said Vilariho-Guell.
RUMANA MONZUR WILL NOT
REGAIN EYESIGHT
Rumana Monzur will not regain
her eyesight, despite undergoing four surgeries since her arrival on July 5. Monzur was viciously attacked by her husband on a
trip home to Bangladesh in June,
her eyes gouged and nose bitten.
"I am very grateful for the medical care I have received," said
Monzur in a UBC press release
she asked to be shared. "It had
been my wish to recover my eyesight so I could see all the people who have been helping me.
I want you all to pray for me. My
family and I will need some time
to adjust to this news."
So far, individual donations and
community events have helped
raise the equivalent of $61,000
towards the $70,000 goal, which
will cover health and living expenses overthe next six months, and
the cost of finishing her studies.
The UBC master's student arrived in Canada with her father
and will soon be joined by her
mother and daughter.
FORMER UBC OFFICIAL ACCUSED
OF STEALING $450,000
John Mwotassubi, aformerfinan-
cial manager in the UBC department of pediatrics has been accused of stealing over $450,000
from the university.
A search warrant filed by Richmond RCMP alleged Mwotassubi of used a chequing scheme.
According to a Vancouver Sun
article, he wrote 75 unauthorized cheques to JHM Consulting, his own private company.
Mwotassubi admitted to writing
the cheques after he was confronted by UBC-hired auditors in
June 2010. He was subsequently suspended with pay and later
fired, after serving his post for
eightyears between 2002-2010.
Police continue to investigate
the case but no charges have
been laid. Phone   POWHHJIY
D-Unk  6/UBYSSEY.CA/SPORTS/2 011.0 7.19
SPORTS
EDITOR DRAKE FENTON »sports@ubvssev.ca
Sophmore soccer coach starting his own legacy
Hoping to build off of last season's sixth place
finish, Mark Rogers has women's team in fine form
DRAKE FENTON
sports@ubyssey.ca
Taking over for a legend is no
easy feat, but the transition is
going relatively well for UBC
women's soccer head coach Mark
Rogers.
That legend would be former
coach Dick Mosher. During his
tenure as the women's head
coach, Mosher took the program
to nationals 11 times, and won
the title three times. For multiple years Mosher also simultaneously coached the men's squad—
a team he led to six CIS national
titles. By the time he called it a
career he had a combined overall record of 244-54-50.
Following Mosher's retirement, Rogers was asked to take
over the program. In his debut
season he led the 'Birds to a silver medal at the Canada West
championships and a sixth place
finish at nationals.
"As a new coach you sort of
inherit a group, but I was really pleased with how they bought
in and how they realized that
some of the stuff we were doing was a little different from
what they had done in the past,"
said Rogers.
"In the end to qualify for nationals was a good accomplishment for us."
Though pleased with his
team's success last season, Rogers wants more.
"UBC has a foundation of excellence in the soccer program
and I would like to build from
there," he said. "That means
challenging for the trophies
and the titles. You always want
to be in the mix, and the reality is if we put all our pieces together we have a chance,
and then you just have to hope
that things work out for you in
those big games."
Rogers knows that winning
those big games is easier said
than done. The level of competition in the CIS, and specifically the Canada West, is intense.
To have a chance to "be in the
mix" Rogers felt that his team
needed a different preseason
program.
The team is playing in the
Pacific Coast Soccer League
(PCSL), a highly competitive
summer league for teams in the
lower mainland. Trinity Western and the University of Fraser Valley both have teams in the
league, and it also plays host to
the Whitecaps prospects squad.
The 'Birds are currently in
first place and have yet to lose
a game. In the 13 contests they
are 10-0-3, and have only conceded five goals.
a placeof mind
THE   UNIVERSITY OF  BRIT
"They've played very well
and I am really pleased with
their progress," said Rogers.
"Playing teams like the White-
caps and Trinity is tough. Most
of the teams [in the PCSL] are
very strong teams so I think it
is very valuable and beneficial
for us to be playing them now.
"You need to have experience
to win in the Canada West. Having played the Whitecaps and
other teams of that ilk will prepare you for the Albertas and
UVics ofthe Canada West."
With nine new recruits beginning their UBC careers
this summer, the PCSL has
also given the team a chance
to bond before the start of the
CIS season.
"Now they are not coming in
August and just meeting each
other," Rogers said. "At this stage
the result isn't the most important thing. Though everyone
wants to win games, meshing
as a group right now is just as
important as getting the result."
The PCSL will conclude this
week and the 'Birds will have a
brief break before training camp
starts on August 13.
"We will see how this [off season schedule] will translate in
the Canada West in the fall," said
Rogers. "We'll see, but I think it
will be beneficial." va
CAMPUS + COMMUNITY PLANNING
Public Open Houses
You are invited to attend an Open House to view and comment on 2 new development proposals:
1 - Medical Sciences Courtyard: fandscape and infrastructure improvements to the
Medical Sciences walkways and courtyard area.
2 - New Rugby Pavilion: The proposal is to build a new one-storey 650 sq.m Rugby
Pavilion to be located just south of the Doug Mitchell Thunderbird Sports Centre.
The project proponents, architecture team and Campus + Community Planning staff will be
available to provide information and respond to inquiries about these projects.
Date: Thursday, July 28,2011  11:00 AM -1:00 PM
Location: Lobby - Woodward IRC, 2194 Health Sciences Mall
MacDonad Meeting
Location
Friedman
Copp
^
Wesbrook
Thunderbird
Parkade
Oi.
UBC |
Hospital c
c
!:
K'
Health Sciences Mall
Doug Mitchell
Thunderbird
Sports Centre
New
Tennis
Centre
Health
Sciences
Parkade
Rugby
Pavilion
East Mall
For directions visit: www.maps.ubc.ca. For more information on this project, please visit the
C&CP website: www.planning.ubc.ca
Please direct questions to Karen Russell, Manager Development Services email: karen.russell@ubc.ca
JON CHIANG PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
BIRD DROPPINGS
U.JL C
DAVID ELOP PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
FOOTBALL ALUMS KANYA AND
EMRY FACE OFF
There must be something in the
water at Thunderbird Stadium,
because former UBC linebackers
Nathan Kanya and Shea Emry
are both making noise in the
CFL.
Kanya was a team captain and
a defensive standout with the T-
Birds, but lastyear he was hampered by a neck injury and consequently was not selected in this
year's CFL draft. Despite this,
Kanya was able to sign a free
agent contract with the Hamilton
Tiger Cats during the off-season.
He was invited to training
camp to try out for the team,
but few expected him to make
it. At best, it was thought he had
a chance to make the seven-man
practice roster. But following a
stellar camp, Kanya was able to
crack the 42-man opening day
roster as a special teams player.
Three games into the season, his
four special teams tackles have
him tied for third in the league.
"Kanya was working really
hard in the weight room and
doing extra work," saidjerome
Erdman, UBC's defensive coordinator. "Once you get up
to the pros it's about being
in the right place at the right
time, but saying that, he had an
opportunity and he took it. He
played well on special teams
and that's what you have to do
as a rookie."
Emry has met similar success since he entered the league
as the 7th overall pick of the
Montreal Alouettes in the 2008
draft. Recently, Emry signed
a two-year contract extension
with Montreal. In 2009, in his
second season, he became a
starter and has since helped
the Alouettes hoist the Grey
Cup in 2009 and 2010. Last
year he had 58 tackles, one
sack and one interception.
He has seven tackles in three
games so far in 2011.
"We knew [Emry] was special when he was here," Erdman said. "He is a very instinctual linebacker, but smart too.
He is great from side-to-side
and he can really run. And
when he gets there he'll put a
hit on you."
Kanya and Emry will be reunited on the field very soon
as their teams will square off
on Friday, July 29 in Hamilton.
The game will be broadcasted
on TSN at 3:30pm.  8/UBYSSEY.CA/OURCAMPUS/2011.07.19
OUR
CAMPUS
JUSTIN MCELROY
sports@ubyssey.ca
It wasn't quite the Tour de
France, but that didn't stop hun-
dreds of curious Vancouverites from coming to campus last
Tuesday to watch the inaugural
UBC Grand Prix, part ofthe "B.C.
Superweek" series of cycling
events in the Lower Mainland
this month.
The men's race was won by
Carlos Alzate. The Colombian
and 2008 Olympian won the
40Tap, 52-kilometre race in a
time of one hour, 15 minutes
and 8 seconds, defeating Victoria native Marsh Cooper by three
seconds. Alzate earned $1,500
for the win, and an additional
$1,000 in prizes.
The total purse for the week of
races was valued at $65,000.
GEOFF LISTER PH0T0/THE UBYSSEY
JOSH CURRAN PH0T0/THE UBYSSEY
GEOFF LISTER PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
amS Insider weekly
student society
Keep up to date with the AMS
Facebook:
UBC Alma Mater Society
a weekly look at what's new at your student society
www.ams.ubc.ca
*
Twitter:
AMSExecutive
Do you have a project idea targeting sexual violence?
Would financial assistance help to make that project a reality?
Apply today for the
Sexual Assault
Support Services Fund
Applications are accepted on a rolling basis and can
be found on the Sexual Assault Support Centre's
webpage: www.ams.ubc.ca/services/sexual-assault-
support-centre/
Email your questions to: slcom@ams.ubc.ca
SASC
Sexual Assault Support Centre
STUDENT
UNION
BUILDING
MAIN
CONCOURSE
JULY
4,5,6&7
11,12,13,14&15
19,20&21
26,27 & 28

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0128657/manifest

Comment

Related Items