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UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Jan 16, 1979

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 Computer 'joyriding' ends in court crash
EDMONTON (CUP) — A
computer joy ride ended in a crash
in court Friday for two University
of Alberta students convicted of
deliberately "crashing" the
campus computer system.
The two 19-year-olds were
given one-year suspended sentences and a year on probation
after being convicted on theft
charges.
When caught in August, 1977,
the pair admitted that they had
cracked a code to alter computer
time billing and gained access to
the computer files of other users.
The university was unable to
jletermine how much money was
lost in the computer crime because
users of the broken code, including the two accused, Bruce
Christensen and Michael McLaughlin, reduced their own
computer accounts.
The U of A computer is used by
about 5,500 clients, including
3,500 students, as well as
hospitals, private companies and
government departments.
UBC computing centre director
Jim Kennedy said Monday in
Vancouver he hopes that the
conviction will discourage others
who are tempted to crash (disable)
the system or steal computer time.
Kennedy said that while the
situation has never occurred at
UBC, it would seriously inconvenience all users of the
campus system.
"We've never had anything of
that magnitude (the crashes).
(But) if people get in (to the
system) and start buggering up the
accounting system, you're in deep
trouble."
Kennedy said UBC regularly
has minor problems with students
discovering computer access
passwords and using other
people's time.
"Each year we find a few cases
of people finding someone else's
ID and using their allocation," he
said. "Call it 'joyriding' or call it
what you will, it's uncivilized
behavior."
"Anyone who is caught will
find himself up before a
president's committee for an
explanation."
Fortunately for the Edmonton
computer crime duo, Justice John
Hope of the Alberta Supreme
Court said they will be given an
absolute discharge — erasing the
criminal convictions — if they
successfully complete their
probation term.
Hope said there was no proof
that the two had sought monetary
gain from the incident and called
it "more of a challenge, a
curiosity, a fascination" with
computers that lead to the crime.
The court was told that McLaughlin was a "computer
alcoholic."
The case set precedents because
it was the first time a computer
has been recognized as a "telecommunication facility" under
the criminal code of Canada.
The crown counsel argued that
the two were guilty of theft under
a two-year-old amendment that
states "everyone commits theft
who fraudently, maliciously, or
without color of right uses any
telecommunication    facility.      j
Davis denies
SRA charges
LOOK! UP IN the sky! It's a bird. It's a plane. No, it's Ubyssey staffers.
Faster than an approaching deadline, stronger than an impending
lawsuit, able to write tall tales in a single day. Upholding truth, justice and
-torn hawthorn, peter menyasz photo/graphic
the yellow journalism way. Staff took time out for fly-past by Gage
Towers to advertise need for more recruits to SUB 241K, Mondays,
Wednesdays and Thursdays at noon.
AMS' general meeting is nothing special
A grandiose scheme to give the Alma Mater
Society a new constitution by calling a special
general meeting for Thursday has turned into
another AMS fiasco that no one wants.
The special general meeting, required when
a 1,200-name petition calling for it was
presented to the AMS last October, will be
held in the SUB ballroom at noon Thursday —
a room too small to hold the required quorum
of 2,300 students because of fire regulations.
And no one expects anywhere near 2,300
AMS members to show up anyway.
"This constitution has lost a lot of interest
on campus since its proposal last October, I
think, because the changes outlined in it are
not of the type most people are looking for,"
said AMS president Paul Sandhu Monday.
"If enough interest is shown, there are
provisions made to move the meeting to larger
quarters or, weather permitting, outdoors,"
Sandhu added.
But the special general meeting has been
regarded as an albatross around the neck of
the AMS since the original constitutional
proposal underwent drastic revision. Only the
original constitution can be acted upon at the
meeting.
According to sources, Brian Short,
president of the engineering undergraduate
society and an author of the original constitution, would now like to call off the
meeting but is unable to since under current
constitutional regulations any petition
presented must be acted upon. Short was
responsible for collecting the petition and
presenting it in October. He was unavailable
for comment Monday.
Since the original presentation of the
constitution, it has been rewritten and revised
by student representative assembly members,
including Short. The SRA hopes that the
revised constitution will be adopted at a later
date in a referendum vote.
The Short constitution, to be discussed at
the general meeting, has been attacked for
setting up a new SRA that lacks adequate representation for faculties of different student
populations.
The arts faculty for instance, with 5,000
members, would have one representative, the
same as the 3,400-member science faculty and
the 158 dentistry students.
Among other changes, the proposed constitution would have undergraduate society
presidents sit on the SRA instead of the
current policy of representation by population
in each faculty.
The proposal to be discussed Thursday
would also have only one student senator sit
on the SRA compared to the current 17.
When the constitution came up for
discussion in the SRA last year, a motion
stating the assembly's opposition to the
proposal failed when a 13 for, 13 against vote
was registered.
UBC's housing administration
has begun a counterattack against
criticisms of its handling of the
Gage Towers incident.
Housing director Mike Davis,
whose resignation was demanded in
an unanimous vote at Wednesday's
student representative assembly
meeting, said Monday no one had
complained to him about his
handling of the incident.
"I really don't know the people
who are complaining. They've
never called me about this or about
any other complaints in residence in
general," he said.
"On Thursday, I had my regular
meeting with the residence
associations, and when I asked
them if they had heard from any of
the complainants, they said that
'no, they hadn't.' "
But Arnold Hedstrom, student
services advisory committee
member, said Davis has made sure
no complaints reach his desk.
"He's wrong that there hasn't
been any complaints. He's just too
shielded by his staff for them to get
to him."
The SRA demanded Davis'
resignation for his handling of a
Dec. 5 incident in which Gage
Towers residents dropped water
bombs and other objects from
residence windows.
Two days after the incident
residence student affairs coordinator John Mate sent a letter to
about 15 students announcing his
decision to "hold all those people
who were present responsible."
Davis has said residents would
have to prove their innocence or
face eviction.
Arts undergraduate society
president Valgeet Johl also said the
advisory committee had received
complaints.
"We've had complaints. It's
difficult to get them to him and
what is he going to do about it?"
Committee member Eric Kehler
said Davis is "notorious for making
decisions from up on high without
ever bothering to get to the bottom
of the issue."
Glenn Wong, also on the
committee said they would be
calling for a review of housing's
past performance to determine if
Davis has been doing his job
properly. Wong also said the committee members would try to set a
time when residents could air their
complaints.
Mate said Monday that Davis'
critics did not realize the seriousness of the incident.
"They neglected to say that some
of the objects thrown were aimed at
people entering the buildings.
Several people were quite shaken
up, and a few said that they had to
literally run for their lives."
Mate said objects were dropped
from the higher floors,  posing a
See page 3: FALLING Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 16, 1979
ftucA etc <utd join,
!6e Ti^ey. S1CS 241X
SUMMER EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITIES
RED CROSS WATER SAFETY SERVICE
Area Consultants
Several vacancies exist from May 1. 1979 to August 31, 1979.
The Area Consultant is a Red Cross/Royal Life Saving Society Instructor and
Evaluator of broad aquatic experience. This individual has proven leadership
qualities, is independent, and is able to work without supervision, responsibilities include supervising approximately 30 water safety programs, conducting instructor clinics, and effecting public education programs.
Salary and benefits comparable to senior aquatic positions in British Columbia.
Submit detailed resume to:
Director, Water Safety Service
The Canadian Red Cross Society
B.C.-Yukon Division
4750 Oak Street
Vancouver, B.C.
V6H 2N9
APPLICATIONS WILL BE ACCEPTED UNTIL FEBRUARY 9, 1979
PANGO PANGO (UNS) — In
an unprecedented move earlier
today, The Daily Blah Co. spokesperson, Frat Ring, announced a
surprise dividend for all subscribers. Each lucky reader will be
the proud recipient of five shares in
the    corporation.
HOLLYWOOD
3123 W. Broadway 738-3211
THIS WEEK
Piper Laurie and
John Travolta
"CARRIE"
Rated Mature
at 9:20
PLUS
"WHAT DO YOU SAY TO
A NAKED LADY?
at 7:30
ADULTS & STUDENTS $2.00
UBC
READING, WRITING AND
STUDY SKILLS CENTRE
COMMENCING THE WEEK OF JANUARY, 27, 1979, THE
UBC READING, WRITING AND STUDY SKILLS CENTRE
WILL OFFER SHORT COURSES IN GRAMMAR AND COMPOSITION, WRITING THE SHORT PAPER, WRITING THE
LONG PAPER, READING IMPROVEMENT, VOCABULARY
BUILDING, SPELLING IMPROVEMENT AND STUDY
SKILLS DEVELOPMENT, ALL COURSES HAVE LIMITED
ENROLLMENT AND PRE-REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED.
FOR REGISTRATION INFORMATION,
CALL 228-2181, LOC 245
ELECTION
OF
STUDENT REPRESENTATIVES
TO SERVE
ON GOVERNING BODIES
-'Advance polls 5.00 p.m. to 7.00 p.m., Monday, January
15, 1979 as follows:—
Totem Park Common Block
Place Vanier Common Block
Walter H. Gage Common Block
•Polling Tuesday, January 16,1979 10.00 a.m. to 4.00
p.m. as follows:—
S.U.B.
Buchanan
C.E.M.E.
Education
Woodward Library
Sedgewick Library
MacMillan
Law
Henry Angus
(subject to students being available to run these polling stations)
Polling will also take place at V.G.H. and at the Industrial Education Building.
BRING YOUR A.M.S. CARD
-Senate  representatives from the student body at
large:
(five to be elected)
Anne Gardner (Third Year Science)
Jeffrey Holm (Second Year Applied Science)
Ron Krause (Third Year Arts)
Andrew Milne (Third Year Applied Science)
Chris Niwinski (Third Year Applied Science)
Brian Short (Fourth Year Applied Science)
Geoff Smith (Third Year Agricultural Sciences)
Allen Soltis (Third Year Arts)
Doug Watts (Third Year Applied Science)
* Board of Governors representatives:
(two to be elected)
J. Vian Andrews (Second Year Law)
Bruce Armstrong (Third Year Science)
Carlos Brito (First Year Law)
Glenn Wong (Third Year Commerce)
Senate representative from the Faculty of Law:
(one to be elected)
Carlos Brito (First Year Law)
Don F. Thompson (First Year Law)
(Voting for the Law student representative will take place in the Law
Building only)
NO PROXY VOTING WILL BE ALLOWED AND STUDENTS REQUIRE THEIR A.M.S. CARD TO VOTE
(It should be noted that any allegation of irregularities in connection with these elections must be submitted in writing to
the Registrar within 48 hours of the close of polling and must
include the signatures of at least three students eligible to
vote.)
BANK OF MONTREAL.
TOU
REALLY
SHOULD
LOOK
INTO IT.
We'd like to talk with you
about something that might not
have occurred to you...working
for us. Maybe you feel that banking is a business that hasn't
changed (or hasn't had to) since
your grandfather was your age,
and that the skills you've acquired in college or university
wouldn't be used in a career
with us.
That's just not true anymore.
The fact is. Bank of Montreal
has become the leader in an innovative movement that's seen
Canadian banking change more
in the past ten years than it has
in the past fifty. And we can offer you responsible, challenging
points of entry into a dynamic
business that just might go farther and faster
than any other in the next few years.
We need special people to keep us out in
front. "Special" means people who can
effectively manage and motivate others and
who are always perceptive and responsive
to our customers' needs. A career within our
branch system provides this continual challenge and a comprehensive
grounding in business and people
management.
The only common denominators with people who work
at Bank of Montreal these
days are the characteristics
that never go out of date...
talent, ambition and
determination.
You can find out a lot more
by dropping by. We're not into
hard sell on a career with Bank
Montreal. We'll just let the
facts speak for themselves.
We'll be at this campus on the
ates shown below.
We are on campus January 31 and February 1, 1979 and are interested in
talking with Commerce (all majors) and Arts (Economics) students.
Please contact the Canada Manpower Centre on campus to arrange an interview. All applicants will be interviewed.
J^k  The First Canadian Bank
Bank of Montreal Tuesday, January 16, 1979
THE      UBYSSEY
Pag* 3
AUCE stabs SFU's Achilles' heel
Striking clerical workers at
Simon Fraser University say they
have found the Achilles' heel of the
university.
The SFU computer centre has
been picketed since Thursday in a
move the union says will force the
university to accept their demands.
"It's my view that we've found
an Achilles' heel and all we have to
do is wait," said Chris Eve of the
Association of University and
College Employees, local 2.
"They'll have to lock us out or up
the ante."
University spokesmen say the
pickets will delay the construction
of a new computer. The centre's 24-
hour-a-day schedule has also been
reduced to 15 hours.
The university has been
negotiating with tbe federal government for a $4.2 million contract for
the use of the planned new computer, according to sources. It is
unknown how the delay will affect
the discussions.
About 35 computer workers are
idle because of the picket action.
Negotiations between the union
and the university broke off after
the union rejected a university wage
offer of six per cent over two years.
AUCE is seeking a wage settlement giving the more than 150
striking workers wage hikes of four
per cent in the first year and six per
cent in the second.
Pay for the striking workers
averaged about $950 a month
before the six-week-old strike
began, Eve said.
Various campus locations have
been subject to AUCE pickets,
including the bookstore, financial
aid office, and seven academic
departments. A picket line at the
gymnasium was removed Monday.
Library loans department employees are back to work, as the
600-member union continues its
policy of partial job action.
AUCE has not asked students to
respect the picket lines.
The implementation of Section
11 of Bill 46, the Essential Services
Act, has left the strikers unsure
whether they will be legislated back
on   the   job.   The   section   puts
UBYSSEY FIND THE PUCK winner, Saskatchewan Huskies goalie,
happily accepted prize of two more games with UBC Thunderbirds.
Although Huskies were on receiving end in this play, they left Vancouver
—peter menyasz photo
with two wins in weekend games and left 'Birds with Canuck-like depression. Huskies took this game Saturday 6-4, after blasting low-flying 'Birds
6-3 in ice action Friday.
Gov't student aid questions 'loaded'
OTTAWA (CUP) — Some
questions in a government
questionnaire on student attitudes
to student aid may be loaded,
according to representatives of the
National Union of Students.
The questionnaire, to be
distributed by mail to students
across Canada early next month, is
designed to obtain student views on
student aid programs. Eventually,
it will be used to develop student
aid policy.
But, according to NUS representative Len Taylor, some
questions may be designed to elicit
specific responses.
For instance, he pointed out, one
question reads: "Bearing in mind
that more taxes would likely be
required to provide more government student aid, do you feel there
should be more or less public
funding to assist students in the way
of loans or non-repayable aid?"
"That's just saying, 'Would you
like us to raise taxes to give you
more money?,' " Taylor said.
NUS executive secretary Pat
Gibson said another question asks
students which kind of government
aid program they would like, but
does not explain the more complicated forms.
Unless forms such as "loan remission" or "deferred grant" were
explained, she said, "one will not
necessarily be able to make an
informed choice."
Another question asked students
whether their parents had agreed
with their choice of courses. Gibson
questioned why this would be
asked, and doubted that it could be
always answered yes or no.
For instance, she asked how
students would answer if their
parents had initially disagreed with
their choice, but later said they
would support it because it was
their choice.
Canada student loans plenary
chairman F. C. Passy, one of the
authors of the questionnaire,
denied it was loaded.
The question on public funding
for student aid, he said, just
reminds   students   that   "money
doesn't come from heaven.
Someone has to pay."
"We want a reasoned answer
considering all aspects, not just a
restatement of the student union
position."
NUS has long contended that
students should be guaranteed an
income while attending school, to
ensure that people of all income
levels can get to post-secondary
education, and that increases in
student aid should come through
grants, not loans.
The questionnaires will be sent by
mail to 10,000 randomly-selected
students from 30 to 35 institutions
across Canada. Students from each
kind   of   institution   (university,
community college, technical institute, or private) in each province
will be contacted.
Some students contacted will
currently be receiving student aid,
Passy said, others will not.
He expected 3,000 to 5,000
questionnaires would be returned.
Separate questionnaires will be
sent to students' parents and to
institutions' awards officers. The
government has also commissioned
a firm to do a survey on general
public attitudes towards student
aid.
The NUS central committee will
be studying the questionnaires for a
further response when it meets at
the beginning of February.
'em up' minister says
OTTAWA (CUP) — The more the merrier might
become the new classroom rule for students in Ontario's public school system if education minister Bette
Stephenson has her way.
Stephenson suggested Friday that larger classes and
a longer school day and year might be introduced t&
deal with dropping enrolment and parents' concerns
about their children's education.
And Stephenson rejected educators' claims that a
lower student-to-teacher ratio improves the quality of
education. She said student need should be the
determining factor for class size.
"One teacher might be able to have 40, 50 or 60
students in a Grade 13 history class, so that students
will become familiar with the lecture format they will
experience in university," she said.
In her speech to the Women's Canadian Club here,
she also suggested that lengthening school days and
opening schools during the summer might be considered.
Stephenson said the suggestions may change
tradition and upset the educational system.
"They may not even work," she said. "But we will
never know if we do not set aside our preconceptions.
(The education system) must become far more innovative, far more flexible and far more responsible to
economic realities."
university and school workers
under the bill.
Jim Young, SFU student society
president., has abandoned plans to
use legal action against the
university.
The society had investigated the
possibility of suing the university
for breach of contract because the
SFU calendar outlines operating
hours for the library, which are not
being kept because of the pickets.
Colleges' staff
in Ontario
vote for strike
TORONTO (CUP) — Support
staff at Ontario's 22 colleges voted
overwhelmingly Thursday in favor
of striking to back up demands for
a better contract from the provincial government.
About 75 per cent of the
province's 4,300 support staff,
members of the Ontario Public
Service Employees Union, voted to
strike, which they can legally do
after Jan. 23, for the vote was a
record 91 per cent.
OPSEU president Sean O'Flynn
said the vote showed that union
members were "fed up" with the
government's unwillingness to
negotiate in good faith.
"We're not talking about steel
workers or auto workers, but
people have never been forced this
far," he said. "They are extremely
frustrated."
The workers, who have been
without a contract since August,
are asking for a 2.78 per cent wage
increase up to the end of Dec. 31,
1978, and a 7.75 per cent hike to
Aug. 31 of this year.
The government's last offer,
which the union rejected in
November, promised the union
2.78 per cent to March 31 of this
year and six per cent for the rest of
the contract.
Some student unions and faculty
associations across the province
have already pledged support for
the union.
Georgina Hancock, Algonquin
College Teachers Union president,
said faculty will have to cross picket
lines because of a collective agreement with the ministry of
education, but they will not be
asked to do any duties normally
performed by support staff.
Representatives of five college
student councils agreed Jan. 7 to
send letters to education minister
Bette Stephenson, urging her to
accept the union's position.
Tailing water
serious danger
to pedestrians'
From page 1
serious danger to people passing
below.
"There was at least one instance
of big bags of water that took at
least two people to carry being
thrown from the windows," Mate
said.
Mate added that a disproportionate amount of time was being
spent on people who could not
accept the responsibilities of living
in residence.
"Housing is not autocratic as
people make it out to be. Personally
I've been working on several
programs to make residence life
more stimulating and more of a
worthwhile experience."
Mate said the Gage standards
committee had already met with
about 75 students from the
residence, and added that he anticipated the committee would
finish its report by Thursday. Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 16, 1979
I got a rock
Not long ago, in a kingdom not far away, a human resources
minister gave away $100 million to the neediest people in the land.
The minister was Norman Levi and his department's overrun was
castigated by the Socred opposition of the day as a classic example
of NDP inefficiency and poor business management.
Late last week the Socred government, formerly the most bitter
critics of giving away anything for nothing, unloaded $152 million.
Not to people who may need help the most but to everyone,
regardless of wealth.
If your poison is bay rum, or if you sip Courvoisier, you get the
same bribe: five shares in the new B.C. Investments Corporation,
worth about $10 each.
But of course the "offer" (not really an offer, as we already own
the BCRIC assests collectively), is more advantageous to those
with the bucks to take advantage of the scheme.
Control of the resources owned by the private firm will steadily
gravitate towards those who can afford to buy out the little
shareholders. No doubt, a Socred philosophy.
A more cynical observer would suggest that a provincial election
is in the wind.
He might presume the funny money crowd are planning to make
us forget the unnecessary hardships they placed on British Columbians and the province's economy when they hiked auto insurance
rates, raised ferry rates, doubled the cost of bus transportation, added two cents to the sales tax, implemented fiscal policies which
forced local governments and school boards to raise property taxes
and made massive cuts to education and social services spending.
Such a cynic might presume that the new Bennett has perfected
the old Bennett's scam of buying voters with their own money.
Before, the scheme involved the none too subtle technique of
expanding road construction and other capital projects around the
province (particularly in crucial ridings) at election time.
Our cynic might propose that the new crew in Victoria have
perfected the bribing game. Before, the electorate was persuaded
to vote Socred through a cumbersome system of middlemen such
as highway contractors, developers and the like.
But the new efficiency has replaced such awkward attempts at
currying favor amongst the gullible public, with a direct $50 bribe
mailed to everyone in the province, the cynic would muse.
The Socreds should be rewarded  at the polls for their cynicism.
r
THE UBYSSEY
JANUARY 16,1979
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and not of the
AMS or the university administration. Member, Canadian
University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial office is in
room 241K of the Student Union Building. Editorial departments, 228-2301; Advertising, 228-3977.
Editor: Mike Bocking
Ths Magnificent Sg*n rode into the office, as the cold wind blew through the broken windows onto
the deserted desks. A tumblewsed skittered past an empty press ckib and frightened Kevin Finnegan's
horse. Stertted, Rose Burnett and Robert Cameron emptied their six guns into a gaping darkroom. "A
waste of good paperclips," said 881 tlebnen with his usuai terse wit, Kevin McGee took up the
challenge. "As useless as spitting sunflower seeds at Mike Bocking," he drawled. Peter Menyasz hauled the wily editor from his saddle before he could draw a bead on the varmint McGee. "This place
looks emptier than the head of some tuded out woman at the Body Shop," said Menyasz. "Not even a
disco open for us to torture this traitor in." Verne McDonald gave Tieleman and Bocking a steady stare
while his hand worked feverishly at the rope around his upper arm. "I'm in as deep as you, derangos,"
he hissed. "Besides, Tom Hawthorn gave McDonald an awl lop-sided grin and sang the song yet
another time. "Since my staff left me/1 found a newplaee to dwell/new place to dwell/It's down at the
end of the horse-shoe desk/It's called city desk hell . . Suddenly a stranger appeared among the
silent ruins, a white bearded sage with the sacred long feature written un clay tablets in his hand
"Where is everybody?" thoy all shouted at him. "We want to kill them." "Go ahead." said Moses artfully. "They're all drinking down at the Golden Caf andll probably be sick for forty days or more."
1 out of 2 ain't bad
It is a strange animal democracy.
The dictionary defines it a number
of ways and I would like to talk
about one of those ways here:
democracy  means   majority  rule.
Now, mayor Volrich and his
cohorts, the NPA, maintain that
they subscribe to democratic principles, but is this a true statement?
By that I mean, do the facts lead
one to that conclusion? On
examination of the facts, one can
only maintain, no!
The principle of majority rule
implies that when the majority of
citizens in a community express a
wish, and not only express that wish
but vote in favor of that wish, then
that is the path which the elected
officials should follow. Granted,
only 52 per cent voted in favor of
the ward system, but that still is a
majority; and the principle according to which our civic elections
operate, and to which the NPA
assert that they subscribe, is
democracy or majority rule. Or at
least I thought so!
Now, if one wants to change that
principle and maintain that 55 per
cent, 60 per cent or 80 per cent of
the population have to vote in favor
of a proposal (in order to have that
proposal accepted), then we are
operating on a different principle,
not majority rule and thus,
necessarily, not democracy.
One can concede that in a dire
situation, when there is a threat to
the security of the community, one
should relax one's principles and,
possibly, give up some of one's civil
rights, such as democracy. But the
threat must be so great and the circumstances so severe that no other
way is available. Is there presently
such a situation? Who is under
threat? It is the NPA of course;
they are afraid of a ward system;
and they will abridge the
democratic principles, which are
the right of the citizens of Vancouver, in order to dampen their
own paranoid fears of the proper
application of those same principles.
Daniel T. O'Reilly
grad studies
Letters
Davis in board hands
The following letter was sent by
AMS president Paul Sandhu to the
board of governors.
On Jan. 10, 1979, the student
representative assembly voted
unanimously to request the
resignation of housing director
Michael Davis. In regards to this
decision, I think it wise to offer the
board the following explanation on
behalf of the assembly.
It has never been the desire nor
the policy of the student representative assembly to call for such
drastic action in regards to the
conduct of any university employee. Rather, we have always
promoted a spirit of cooperation in
all areas where university personnel
are involved with the problems of
students.
However, the comments and
actions made by Mr. Davis with
respect to the incident which occurred on Dec. 5, 1978, were felt by
the assembly to be totally unbecoming of any person employed
at     this      institution.      More
Brito bites
BoG reps
I would like to take this opportunity to explain my opinion
regarding the student representative
on the board of governors. When I
decided to run, I took a hard look
at the two student members and
their relative policies to try to
determine which would be the best
way to attain student representation.
Paul Sand-who takes the approach that one must take a hardline attitude with the other
members of the board in order to be
successful. And he has been successful — successful in getting his
ass kicked off the board, that is.
It would seem to me that this
approach has not worked (don't tell
Sand-who, he won't believe it).
Then there was Basil Petered-
out. His approach was to sit back
and do nothing (except vote to have
Sand-who expelled from the
board). There must be a middle
ground available where the elected
reps can talk it out with other
members of the board (there are 13
of them and two of us — on important issues we are always outvoted). The time to make our views
known to the board is during the
policy formulation stage NOT
when the vote is actually taken (see
backbencher approach).
Carlos Brito
specifically, we feel that Mr.
Davis's "guilty until proven innocent" attitude is a clear example
of his authoritarian attitude toward
his responsibilities.
We who empathize with the
problems encountered by students
feel that this type of behavior is
unacceptable for someone who is
actually involved in bettering the
welfare of students on a day-to-day
basis.
In closing let me add that this was
not a decision that was made in
haste nor is it one which is based
solely on this particular incident.
The assembly gave careful consideration to every aspect of the incident, and felt that it was one in a
series of actions which contributed
to thr finality of our decision.
I hope you will give serious and
thorough   consideration    to   this
request and we hope to hear from
you soon in regard to this matter.
Paul Sandhu
Punk has spunk
Last Thursday's article about punk is strangely reminiscent of the
B.S. we all read about rock-n-roll 10 years ago. In fact it reminded me
of something by Max Salbrekken.
Punk is for the 70's. Peter, you must be old, bitter, or you just don't
understand any more. Rock is ready to roll out its old and ring in its
new in '79.
Today's striplings are set to become tomorrow's superstars while
rock's old faithfuls go on showing their age.
And as the now sounds battle to oust the Rock Fossils, the crunch will
come.
The bright, young generation is here to stay — acts like Elvis
Costello, Ian Drury, D.O.A., etc.
The devastating chart success of the striplings over the past year has
proved they are not one-hit wonders.
Now '79 is destined to be the year of the great rock crunch.
On one side will be the gutsy sound of today's young bands, the way
rock and roll was always meant to sound. On the other side will be the
has-beens.
The purveyors of lazy pension rock like the Stones, the Who. Led
Zeppelin and their generation have had their day.
Look at concerts, the audience is blundering towards middle age as
fast as the performers. The "Windmill" has one major quality, it is
alive and free of the plastic B.S. found in discos and other places Mr.
Menyasz frequents.
Punk is using your imagination and having fun. Punk is staying alive
in an oppressing society.
Patrick Mokrane
commerce 2 Tuesday, January 16, 1979
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
Letters
Vote yes for SUS to prevent a mess
The science undergrad society
(SUS) made many mistakes this
year. Just to mention a few:
• We ran a Book Day where
students could buy and sell used
textbooks and some people got mad
because they had to stand in a long
line because there were more people
than we expected;
• There were SUS sponsored
speakers about once every two
weeks. We had hoped to have a
speaker once a week;
• There were more science intramural teams this year than ever
before, but we still didn't enter
teams in all events;
• All   student   positions   on
faculty committees were filled this
year but only 82 per cent of the department rep positions were filled;
• We published course and
teacher evaluations for about 60 per
cent of the science faculty. Obviously, we didn't get 40 per cent;
e We sold calculators at a 10 per
cent discount instead of at the 12
Picture worth 1000 votes
The interviews with the senate
candidates appearing in Friday's
Ubyssey were on the whole informative and fair to each candidate. I noticed that the interviews
averaged 99 words and were
normally distributed about this
point with a standard deviation of
only 20 words.
I continued this analysis with
reference to the old Chinese adage
of 'a picture being worth a
thousand words' since some of the
SMITH ... at last
electorate will sometimes not
support a candidate simply because
he resembles a used car salesman or
his eyes are too close to one
another.
With this in mind I concluded
that The Ubyssey had inadvertently
given me an unfair advantage over
PUBLIC
228-6121
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SUNDAY
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STUDENTS
& CHILDREN     .75
ADULTS $1.25
THUNDERBIRD
WINTER
SPORTS CENTRE
THE
POPPY SHOP^
OUR CONCEPT — LOW PRICES?
UP TO 50% OFF
LADIES FASHIONS       -g^
Samples and size range also.
ONE SEASON AHEAD OF LEADING
RETAIL AND DEPARTMENT STORES
So, buy wholesale and sa*e   vV4
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ALSO GARAGES,
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CLEAN-UPS
iki
some of the other candidates by not
printing the picture taken of me last
Wednesday.
Kindly inform your readers that I
do not wish to compromise The
Ubyssey's policy of printing the
pictures of all the candidates interviewed (which it has done over the
last few years) regardless of any
benefits it may have to my campaign. This year, this candidate
intends to be elected without
resorting to dirty tricks.
P.S. That's 1001 words or. . . .
Geoff Smith
senate candidate
In reverse gear?
This Thursday, Jan. 18, at 12:30 in the SUB ballroom a forced
general meeting of the AMS will take place. At this meeting certain
factions on this campus seek to impose on student government at UBC
a new constitution which is only in the interests of those factions.
This constitution, if passed, would relegate the AMS to arranging car
rallies and cocktail parties with the administration, the activities these
factions perceive to be the proper role of student government, rather
than voicing effective opposition to tuition fee increases, university
funding cutbacks and woefully inadequate financial aid.
Moreover, this proposal is fundamentally undemocratic. It is not
based on representation by population, but rather concentrates all
power over student activities in the hands of a very small, easily
dominated, group of student politicos. Respect for even the most
elementary democratic principles is completely lacking.
^       David Coulsony
w
nee
^terhouse
.Co,
CHARTERED ACCOUNTANTS
SUMMER
EMPLOYMENT
Third-year Commerce Accounting Option or First-
Year Licentiate in accounting students who are interested in summer employment with the Vancouver Office of Price Waterhouse & Co.: Please
mail copy of your U.C.P.A. form or personal
resume and most recent transcript of marks to:
Personnel Manager,
1075 West Georgia Street,
Vancouver, B.C.
V6E 3G1
hair studio inc.
UNISEX HAIRSTYLES
FOR APPOINTMENT
master charge
224-1922
224-9116
578* University (Uaact to Bank of Commerce)
per cent discount we had hoped for;
• There were only a few SUS
mini-courses;
• Department associations were
given money but not nearly as much
as they would have liked;
Our social events were not attended as well as we would have
liked;
• We sold T-shirts, sweaters, lab
coats and crests and some people
did not like the design of them.
I could go on longer but there is
one big mistake which we made
earlier that I should mention. Last
year, we ran a one dollar fee levy
referendum in order to fund our
activities this year. Ninety-one per
cent of those voting voted in favor
of the levy but we did not obtain a
quorum. That is, only 14.9 per cent
of the science faculty voted. We
were 14 people short of the 15 per
cent need for a quorum. Because of
the AMS constitution, this meant
that the fee levy was good only for
one year and that if we want to have
a fee levy next year, we have to hold
another fee referendum.
The SUS is working to correct
past mistakes. Improvements on
this year's activities are already
planned. On Tuesday, Jan. 16,
there will be another SUS fee levy
referendum. Polls are in Sedgewick
and SUB at the same place you vote
in the board of governors election.
Please vote yes. We hate making
mistakes twice.
Anne Gardner
SUS president
Cinema West
presents
*Jan.18th
Thursday,
12:30 noon
SUB Aud.
U.B.C. N.D.P. CLUB & THE A.M.S.
PRESENT
ED BROADBENT
THE LEADER OF THE
OPPOSITION AND FEDERAL
NDP LEADER
THURSDAY
JANUARY, 18th
12:30
HEBB THEATRE
CENTRE FOR THE ARTS
SIMON FRASER UNIVERSITY PRESENTS
<p$&
*mm
&
**
,<***
.«>
^3
<®
&
°v*
8 P.M., SFU THEATRE
$4 General, $2 Students
Vancouver Ticket Centre (683-3255) and talons outlets. Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 16, 1979
'Tween classes
TODAY
CHARISMATIC CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Prayer and sharing, noon, SUB 213.
HILLEL HOUSE
First monthly open forum, noon, Hillel House.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION
Testimony meeting, noon, SUB 224.
VARSITY OUTDOOR CLUB
Slide show, noon, Chem. 250.
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
General meeting, noon, SUB 130.
BAHA'I CLUB
Informal discussion on the Baha'i faith, noon
SUB 113.
WEDNESDAY
ART OF LIVING CLUB
Art of living series No. 1 on Education: Prerequisite for self-fulfillment, noon, Buch. 319.
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Lesbian drop-in, noon, SUB 130.
OPEN HOUSE
Meeting with faculty, students and others, noon,
SUB 206.
UNIVERSITY LECTURES COMMITTEE
Lecture by West German professor Herbert
Grabes on Words into persons: Character in
literature, noon, Buch. 203.
UBC SAILING CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 205.
THURSDAY
CCF
Bible study, noon, SUB 111.
MEDIEVAL SOCIETY
Plotting of a theatre party, noon, SUB 113.
GAY PEOPLE OF UBC
Meeting, noon, SUB 212.
_
flashes
Money (that's
what I want)
Your grant has vanished into the
maw of the postal system, your
landlady knocks on the door every
time she goes down to do the laundry and Eaton's keeps phoning
threatening to repossess your
sister's Christmas present.
No worry, award office reps will
be available this Thursday to
discuss financial aid for needy
students at Speakeasy in SUB from
noon to 2:30 p.m. Bring down your
crying towel and stacks of unpaid
bills to get a good crack at going
more into debt to the system.
BLACK & LEE
TUX SHOP
NOW AT
1110 Seymour St.
688-2481
FORESTRY
UNDERGRADUATE
SOCIETY
RESULTS OF REFERENDUM
FOR A $2.00 F.U.S. FEE LEVY
HELD ON JAN. 10th Er 12th
1979
FOR: 144
AGAINST: 7
TOTAL CONSTITUENCE: 327
Playing this week—8:30 p.m.:
Tuesday
JAM NIGHT with DON OGILVIE
Wednesday
WESTSIDE FEETWARMERS
Thursday
DAVE ROBERTS JASSBAND
Friday
MOM AND POPS
Saturday
PHOENIX JAZZERS
TUES/WED/THURS - FREE for Members
LIVE—NEW ORLEANS JAZZ
36 E. Broadway — 873-4131
_   YEARLY MEMBERSHIPS - $3.00  __
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Women's drop-in, noon, SUB 130.
CVC
Disco dance lessons, noon, SUB 205.
INTER-VARSITY CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Paul   Stevens speaks on  the  need to  believe,
noon, Chem. 250.
UBC ACM STUDENT CHAPTER
Ray Roberts from CP Air speaks on computers
in airline operations, noon, CSCI 362.
PSYCHOLOGY STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Discussion on Rape Relief, noon, Angus 110.
FRIDAY
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Women's drop-in, noon, SUB 130.
FILMSOC
Joint general meeting, noon, SUB 247.
CVC
Wine and cheese party, 8 p.m., SUB 212.
ATA
Meeting   to   discuss   foreign   students   and
unionization, noon, Grad Centre garden room.
UBC HANG-GLIDING CLUB
Meeting and talk on obtaining a pilot's license,
noon, SUB 111.
MONDAY
EXTERNAL AFFAIRS COMMITTEE
General meeting, noon, SUB 262.
SUMMER
EMPLOYMENT
B.C.F.S. Helicopter Rappel Crews
PLACE: N.W.B.C. (Lower Post)
JOB: Initial Attack on Forest Fires
APPLY: Manpower Office on Campus
THERE ARE THREE STAGES
IN YOUR CAREER
WHEN YOU MOST NEED
FINANCIAL HELP:
1. To get through your graduating year
2. To get into practice
3. If you later branch out on your own
Through its Business Program for Professionals, specifically designed for the graduating student . . . the Royal
Bank is there with financial help when you need it.
7 branches conveniently located within the University area
• 10th & Sasamat  228-1 i41
• 17th & Dunbar 731-6501
• 2909 W. Broadway 733-8194
• 4th & Balsam 736-7684
• 15th & Arbutus  731-4938
• 41st & Collingwood   263-2308
• Kerrisdale 2208 W. 41 st   261 -1311
So don't hesitate to call on your Royal banker for advice or information on
any of the helpful Royal Bank services.
ROYAL BAN K
for a lot of reasons.
HILLEL   HOUSE
B'NAI BRITH
FREE   LUNCH
THURSDAY, JANUARY 18
12:30
WOMEN
IN SCIENCE
Do you know what field is for you?
If you are in 1st yr. Science
and undecided about your Major . . .
You are invited to a workshop on
"HOW TO CHOOSE
YOUR MAJOR"
2 Thursdays, January 18, 25, 1979
12:30 - 2:00, Brock Hall 301
For more information call
Women Students' Office, 228-2416
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES:   Campus - 3 lines, 1 day $1.50; additional lines 35c.
Commercial -r- 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional lines
50c. Additional days $2.25 and 45c
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance* Deadline is 11:30 a.m., the day before publication.
Publications Off ice. Room 241, S.UB., UBC, Van., B.C V6T UV5
5 — Coming Events
FACULTY MEMBERS of the
MANAGEMENT SCIENCE
DIVISION
In the Faculty of
COMMERCE AND BUSINESS
ADMINISTRATION
will hold an informal meeting to discuss
with interested students various M.SC. and
P.HD. Programmes offered by the division.
Information concerning other Graduate Programmes in the Faculty of Commerce will
be provided as well. The meeting will take
place
From 2 — 5 p.m. on
Friday, 19 January in
Henry Angus, Room 319.
THE JANUARY 19TH EVENT!
Speaker Mr.  DAVID  SUZUKI,  introduced
by DAVE BARRETT, MLA. Concert by
SUSAN JACKS and Band. Followed
by Dance.
January 19, 8:00 p.m.
Italian Cultural Centre
Grandview and Slocan
Doors open 7:00 p.m. Tickets $10.00 at door,
or call 879-4601. Production of
North Vancouver-Seymour & North
Vancouver-Burnaby NDP.
35-Lest
COLD BRACELET, Jan. 10, between
Law School and B Lot. Reward. 922-
0644, evenings.
FROM BROCK CARRALL, Book ot
Russian Fairytales. Please return or
Baba Yaga will get you.
LOST: Large oval ivory brooch between
bus stop and Buchanan. Last week.
Please phone 988-8993.
40 — Messages
THANKS to the honest person who
turned in my chequebook, Angus Jan.
4.  Faith Wood-Johnson.
60 - Rides
LEAVING for Quebec Wednesday Jan.
17—Space for one, share gas. Call
Denys, 221-2250.
65 — Scandals
70 — Services
10 — For Sale — Commercial
11 — For Sale — Private
COMMUNITY SPORTS — Excellent
prices for ice skates, hockey, soccer,
jogging and racquet sports equipment. 733-1612. 3615 West Broadway,
Vancouver, B.C.
20 - Housing
SUPER SAVERI One bedroom furnished
suite: Carpets! Drapes! Fenced yard!
2 appliances! All utilities paid! $185.
(1S01). Rentex, 299-8331.
VIEWI Large one bedroom furnished
apartment! Carpets! Drapes! 4 appliances! Only $260. OA1). Rentez, 298-
8331.
RATEHOLDERSI Save on rent! Furnished suites, apts., houses, townhouses,
acerage! Call us! We can show you.
Rentex,  299-8331.
25 — Instruction
HATHA YOGA CLASSES starting Jan.
22nd, Mon. & Wed. eve. $24 for 6
weeks.   Call  3554831.
85 — Typing
TYPING — 75c per page. Fast and accurate by experienced typist. Gordon,
685-4863.
TYPING: Essays, theses, manuscripts,
reports, etc. Fast and accurate ser-
viae. Bilingual, demy 324-9414.
EXPERT TYPIST. Essays, seminar
papers and thesis. 266-7710. 75c per
page.
90 - Wanted
99 — Miscellaneous
INSTANT
PASSPOR
PHOTOS
kgtf4MfjLLTD
l7^  4538 W 10th
224-9112 or 224-5858 Tuesday, January 16, 1979
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
Birds and Pronghorns spli
SPORTS
—ross burnett photo
UBC NET LOSS was result in 14th annual Thunderette Volleyball Tournament during the weekend. Thunderettes
were defeated by Old Time Ladies in final game by 15-5 and 15-9 scores. In picture above UBC's second team,
junior varsity squad, is shown in tourney action. Thunderettes travel to Victoria International Tournament next
week and in February host Canada West championships.
Intramurals ask for infusion
Intramural coordinator Nestor
Korchinsky has announced the
intramural program will try to hold
a referendum asking students to
pay $1.50 each to support the
program's activities.
The referendum, which would be
held in March, would generate
about $30,000 for the men's
women's, and co-ed sports, and
would negate the need for an annual grant to the program from the
Alma Mater Society. The grant
money, which this year totalled
$17,000, would be available for use
elsewhere in the AMS.
To hold the referendum, intramurals must have the permission of
the student representative assembly
or obtain 500 signatures on a
petition. Intramurals had been
promised an unspecified portion of
the general fee referendum that was
defeated in October.
Korchinsky, a physical education
professor, said that growth in the
program necessitated the move.
Last year's budget was exceeded
by $3,000, he said. Demands for
new programs, such as floor hockey
and indoor soccer, have been
rejected because of the fiscal
problems, he added.
Some new activities have joined
the more traditional ones to make
up the second term intramural
schedule. On Tuesday, women's
intramurals will hold a superstars
competition   in    War    Memorial
Gymnasium.
Registration in gym room 210
ends Wednesday. A beer garden
will follow the event.
HILLEL   HOUSE
3 REASONS TO BE THERE ON WED JAN. 17 12:30
WEEKLY SHEFA VEGETARIAN LUNCH
RETURNS WED. JAN. 17 12:30
FRIST SESSION OF INTERM HEBREW
CLASSES WED. Jan. 17 12:30
ISRAEL WEEK
COMMITTEE MEETING WED. JAN. 17 12:30
NOTICE OF AMS
SPECIAL GENERAL MEETING
AT THE STUDENT UNION BUILDING BALLROOM
ON THURSDAY THE 18TH DAY
OF JANUARY, 1979
AT 12:30 O'CLOCK IN THE AFTERNOON.
By KEVIN FINNEGAN
His team just recorded its second win and sixth loss of the
season this weekend. A starting guard has severely sprained
his wrist, and reserve guard Brad Findlay broke his arm at
work when it was caught in a Safeway freezer door. He faces
two consecutive weekend series against Calgary and Victoria.
What does UBC basketball coach Peter Mullins think of his
team's chances?
"We're going to finish second,"
he insists.
Before concluding that the dean
of Canada's university basketball
coaches has gone daft, consider the
situation. The Thunderbirds split a
pair of games in Lethbridge this
weekend, winning Friday 93-91 in
overtime and losing 67-55 Saturday, leaving them in fifth place.
However eight of their remaining
12 games are at home.
CANADA WEST
INTERCOLLEGIATE
ATHLETIC UNION
Men's Basketball
Standings
W    L
Pts.
Victoria Vikings
7  1
14
L'bridge Pronghorns
5 3
10
Alta. Golden Bears
5 3
10
Calgary Dinosaurs
4 4
8
UBC 'Birds
2 6
4
Sask. Huskies
1  7
2
This weekend, the Thunderbirds
are in a must-win situation with
league-leading University of
Victoria as the opponent Friday
and Saturday at 8 p.m. in War
Memorial Gym. Next weekend
Calgary is in town, and Mullins
admits the team must win all four
games if it is to stay in contention
for the second and last playoff
spot.
Two weeks ago the Thunderbirds
played in the Dinosaur tournament
in Calgary and finished last. They
lost to Manitoba by two points and
to Wilfrid Laurier by one point,
after being blown away in their
opening game against Calgary. The
'Birds shot 25 per cent from the
floor and dropped a 94-54 decision.
In addition, they finish the
season with consecutive home series
against Saskatchewan, the league's
perennial doormats, and Lethbridge which is only strong at
home, where the southern Alberta
referees have their own unique
interpretation of the rules.
This weekend the 'Birds found the
referees remarkably friendly and
the Pronghorns not quite so
receptive. On Friday, Ian MacKinnon tied the game 87-87 by
sinking his third attempt at a foul
shot with 22 seconds remaining. He
had injured his wrist while being
fouled and missed the allotted two
shots, but was awarded another
when a Lethbridge rebounder
moved too soon.
In the overtime, UBC got the
winning basket from Rob Cholyk
and then held the ball until time ran
out. MacKinnon was the high
scorer with 22 points, and Frank
Janowicz added 20.
Saturday the 'Birds had their
shooting turn sour at the worst
possible time and fell behind in the
fourth quarter after leading 51-50
with 10 minutes left. Cholyk led
UBC scorers with 16 points.
WOMEN'S SCOREBOARD
Basketball
Lethbridge            69
UBC 58
Lethbridge             61
UBC 45
Ice Hockey
Burnaby B               0
UBC 10
S. Delta                   6
UBC  0
Swimming
Cent. Wash.           85
UBC 37
Pac Luth                75
UBC 44
OPTIC
ZONE
Student Discounts
ARBUTUS VILLAGE
733-1722
STARTS THURS.    I
BURT    '
REYNOLDS
«
a
THE ENO*
Thurs, Sun 7:00
Fri. Sat 7:00 & 9:30
$1.00
SUB Theatre
APPLICATION
FOR
GRADUATION
Application for graduation cards are now being mailed to students
registered in the graduating year of the following degree programmes: B.A., B.F.A., B.Mus., B.Com., Lie. Acc't. B.Ed.(Elem),
B.Ed.(Sec), B.P.E., B.R.E., and B.Sc. All students who expect to
graduate this Spring are requested to complete and return both
cards to the Registrar's Office (Mrs. Kent) as soon as possible, but
no later that February 15, 1979. Any student in the graduating year
of these degree programmes who does not receive cards in the mail
should confirm with the Registrar's Office that his/her local mailing
address is correct.
Students in the graduating year of all remaining degree programmes,
except Graduate Studies, may obtain their "Application for Graduation" cards from their Faculty Offices. Students on the Graduate
Studies programmes may obtain their applications from their
graduate advisors.
"Application for Graduation" cards are also available in the Office of
the Registrar.
PLEASE NOTE: It is the responsibility of the students to apply
for their degrees. The list of candidates for graduation to be
presented to the Faculty and to the Senate for approval of'
degrees is compiled solely from these application cards.
NO APPLICATION-NO DEGREE Page 8
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 16, 1979
[ 11
Striking INCO steelworkers
face hardship in Sudbury
SUDBURY — The continuing strike by 11,700 workers against INCO Limited has sparked
unprecedented support across Canada for Local 6500 of the United Steelworkers of America.
The strike closed Canada's largest mining operation Sept. 15, but the grim determination of
the miners and smelter workers represents an escalating challenge to the power of multinational corporations over Canada's resources.
Feelings of union solidarity soared in the weeks before Christmas, as wives of the strikers
organized giant parties, with toys donated by unions across Ontario and Sudbury merchants.
But there's no early settlement
likely from the New York-based
INCO, long the capitalist world's
largest producer of nickel. The
mineral is an important alloy in
steel making, and its use in aircraft
and missile manufacture makes it a
strategic metal.
Negotiations between company
and union resumed in Toronto Jan.
3, but the sides were still discussing
only non-monetary items.
Since 1972 INCO has slashed its
work force in Sudbury from 18,000
to less than 12,000, and made
major cuts at Thompson, Man.,
and Port Colborne, Ont. Meanwhile, the company bought a major
battery manufacturer in the U.S.,
and sank more than $1 billion into
new mines in Indonesia and Guatemala, before growth in the nickel
industry slowed after 1975.
By ART MOSES
for Canadian
University Press
Then came the announcement of
layoffs in October 1977. INCO
chopped its work force in Canada
by more than 3,000, and forced
thousands more workers to accept
demotions into jobs where they
often could not use their particular
skills.
The layoffs set the stage for 1978
contract talks.
Holding a stockpile of nickel at
least six months above normal
supply, INCO demanded workers
accept a one-year wage freeze.
After an unprecedented six-week
summer shutdown, the company's
final offer in September was a wage
increase amounting to four cents an
hour.
The proposal emerged from an
eleventh-hour meeting between
INCO chairman J. Edwin Carter
and Ontario Premier William
Davis. Ontario derives about 60 per
cent of its mineral wealth from the
Sudbury Basin.
INCO's offer also included
demands to alter and weaken the
power of union stewards in
grievance procedure, and contained
no improvements in INCO's
pension. INCO pensions are among
the lowest in Canadian heavy industry. They are a top priority for
the union which wants to encourage
older workers to retire early to
enhance the job security of younger
workers.
Nickel industry analysts had
predicted INCO would try to
provoke a strike to force a
reduction in its stockpile. They said
that without a strike, the company's heavy burden of debt for its
third world projects would have
forced more layoffs in Canada in
1979.
"It's ironic," one analyst said.
"But because of those debts INCO
must cut production from its most
profitable operation (Sudbury) and
increase production from Indonesia
and Guatemala where profits will
be low for some time."
INCO chairman Carter denies
the company wanted a strike. "A
strike is economic warfare, and
there are no winners or losers," he
says.
The youthful president of Local
6500 disagrees.
"It's happening everywhere,"
said 29-year-old Dave Patterson,
elected president on a rank-and-file
program in 1976. "Companies are
trying to blackmail their workers
into giving up what they had in the
past. It's time somebody took a
stand and it might as well be the
workers in Sudbury."
His call has apparently captured
the imagination of labor groups
elsewhere in Canada.
After hearing Patterson speak in
November, delegates to the convention of the British Columbia
Federation of Labor voted to
donate 23 tons of herring to the
INCO strikers. Members of the
United Fishermen and Allied
Workers Union caught the fish, and
the International Woodworkers of
America paid for transportation.
Northern Ontario locals of the
retail, Wholesale and Department
store union raised money for 1,000
Christmas turkeys, a donation
matched by the union in southern
Ontario. The Canadian Food and
Allied Workers and the Ontario
Federation of Labor joined
"Operation Turkey" with 1,000
more birds of their own.
And the St. Catharines and
District Labor Council sent a
truckload of more than $35,000
worth of toys for Christmas.
A spokesman for District 6
(Ontario) of the United Steelworkers says donations from other
union locals to Local 6500 have set
a record for North America.
Teams of strikers are meeting an
unusually generous response
collecting money at plant gates
across Ontario.
And in January the local starts
sending strikers to other provinces.
The need is overwhelming. Local
6500 gets $360,000 a week from the
Steelworkers International strike
Fund in Pittsburgh. That works out
boost the weekend of Dec. 9-11
when supporters held benefit
concerts in Ottawa, Toronto and
Thunder ay. The events attracted
many students and professionals.
The mushrooming of support has
apparently impressed the leaders of
Steelworkers District 6, who were
known to be lukewarm at first.
District 6 director Stewart Cooke
organized a $40,000 Christmas
fund and a spokesman for Cooke
applauded "the courage of the
strikers in taking a stand against a
multinational that doesn't think it's
responsible to anyone."
That statement came when he
presented the money in Sudbury
Dec. 21. Combined with fund-
raising and a car raffle by a citizens'
strike support committee in
Sudbury, the money allowed Local
6500 to give strikers an extra $5 per
dependent child as a Christmas gift
voucher.
Cooke caused some bitterness in
September when he urged workers
not to strike. He was speaking in a
surprise telephone call to a reporter
from Atlantic City, New Jersey,
where he was attending the union's
international convention. Sudbury
media outlets used Cooke's
remarks to discourage a strike vote,
and the 61 per cent majority was
lower than expected.
Then two days after the strike
began former Ontario NDP leader
That works out to strike pay of
$25 a week for single workers,
$30 for married members, and
$3 per dependent child
to strike pay of $25 a week for
single workers, $30 for married
members, and $3 per dependent
child.
The local also needs more than
400,000 a month to pay the strikers
medical insurance and life insurance premiums. That leaves a
monthly deficit of more than
$200,000 for Canada's second
largest union local.
The strikers'  morale got a big
Stephen Lewis termed the strike
"sheer madness." In a newspaper
column he accused Local 6500
leaders of "misplaced militancy"
and of being "Archie Bunkers of
the left."
The column provoked an angry
reaction from the Sudbury area's
three NDP provincial legislators,
and federal MP for Nickel Belt,
John Rodriguez. In a clear
reference to Lewis they criticized
"those who would sneer at workers
struggles, and forget that many
gains in the past have been won
fighting against seemingly insurmountable odds. "They were
backed by current Ontario NDP
leader Michael Cassidy, and
delegates to the annual convention
of the Ontario Federation of
Labor, who gave Patterson a
standing ovation and called
unanimously for the nationalization of INCO "under democratic
and public ownership."
Advisors to federal NDP leader
Ed Broadbent initially urged he stay
away from the Sudbury strike, but
on Dec. 14 he visited the picket lines
to donate a cheque for $1,700 from
members of the party caucus in
Ottawa "to show we are deeply
committed to your cause." But it
was Broadbent's first comment on
the strike since it began.
Sudbury East NDP member Elie
Martel introduced a bill in the
Ontario Legislature in mid-
December calling for the
nationalization of INCO. He says
"within 10 minutes INCO public
relations was on the phone to ask
for a copy." But Broadbent told a
Sudbury news conference he
"would have to do more
homework" before he could endorse nationalization. Cassidy also
equivocates on the issue.
Until the 1960's Sudbury
produced more than 90 per cent of
the capitalist world's nickel. Since
then western financial institutions
and the U.S. government have
encouraged other producers to get
into the act. INCO's market share
has dropped to about 33 per cent,
but its Sudbury operations remains
the largest and lowest-cost single
source of nickel in the non-
communist world.
Local 6500 has been showing the
movie "Controlling Interest" on
the picket lines to focus worker
attention on the problem of multinational corporations having a
stranglehold on the world's
resources. The strike in Sudbury
may reach a turning point when
INCO workers in Thompson, Man.
decide what to do when their
contract expires Feb. 28 of this
year.

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