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The Ubyssey Jan 24, 1967

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Array solidarity
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. XLVIII, No. 39
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, JANUARY 24, 1967
224-3916
Strike ballot Feb. 14
— al harvey photo
INTENT TUBA player gathers a big gasp as he sees Vivaldi's Nocturne in
F flat for solo tuba approaching on the Mardi Gras parade marching score.
A tuba, if treated well, will not backfire.
Council calls vote
if needs not met
The Alma Mater Society will lead
students to strike the university if
the provincial government does not
vote $66 million to higher education
in B.C. next year.
The strike, to be held in early
March after the department of education estimates come before the
legislature, would mean that all 'buildings and roads on campus would be
closed for at least one day.
Student picket lines would be organized to prevent campus access to
all but researchers engaged in uninterruptible projects.
Students will vote yes or no, for
or against the council strike plan, with
second slate elections Feb. 14. The
referendum, which council is pledged
to support, is worded:
"If the B.C. government does not
allocate $66 million to higher education in B.C. as recommended in the
Macdonald formula, would you support an AMS-sponsored week of concern including a strike within that
week and would you serve on a picket
line?"
The referendum needs a total turnout of 20 per cent of students and a
two-thirds majority of those voting to
pass.
At the four-hour council meeting
Monday, AMS president Peter Braund
called the strike vote the "most important decision in the history of this
institution."
Braund favored moderation in any
action council might take.
"A   week-long  strike  would   de
finitely grind this place to a halt," he
said.
First vice-president Charlie Boylan
said: "We have to take the initiative
and use flexible tactics."
Boylan strongly favored a week
long strike at UBC.
"Suppose the referendum fails?"
asked science president Frank Flynn.
"That will prove we have a wishy-
washy student body," said Boylan.
The action is unique in AMS council history.
Never before has the AMS or any
other Canadian university student
union voted to strike over financial
problems.
A second referendum will appear
on the Feb. 15 ballot to poll student
opinion on the Vietnam war.
It will serve to guide student council in informing the Canadian government of student opinion.
Students will vote "yes" or "no"
on three statements:
"I believe the Canadian government should:
• Advocate the U.S. government
stop <bombing North Vietnam and
negotiate for the withdrawal of U.S.
and allied troops from South Vietnam;
• Continue its present policy of
armament sales to the U.S. which indirectly supports its involvement in
Vietnam;
• Pledge total support for U.S.
policy as presently being carried out
in Vietnam.
'NAZIS CONTROL  GERMANY
WOULD BE SENSATIONALISM'
Plummer cans von Thadden speech
By VAL THOM
Adolf von Thadden, leader of the new rightist
National Democratic Party in Germany, will not
speak at UBC.
Special events chairman Brian Plummer announced Friday afternoon that he had retracted
his invitation to von Thadden.
In a telegram to the German he stated: "Consider both your policies and those of West German
government detrimental to the cause of democracy
and peace. I must therefore deny you a platform
to espouse a philosophy which is contrary to
humanity."
"I am convinced von Thadden represents a
very- real threat to European peace and democracy," Plummer said.
Plummer felt that von Thadden's presence in
Canada would be a "concession to the forces of
hatred, tyranny, and war."
Von Thadden was first invited to speak on
campus a week ago.
Plummer invited von Thadden to speak to
"explore in an academic, reasoned environment
what he had to say, to discover toy means of a
panel if there was any danger of fascism in Germany, and to see if there was any parallel between
von Thadden, the Hitlerite past in Germany, and
the present resurgence of the ultra-right in the
United States."
However Plummer said Friday he now feels
this aim could not be achieved.
"It is obvious already from the press coverage
given to my invitation of von Thadden that my
original purpose for inviting him has been defeated.
"There would be no coverage of his policies
in depth. There would ibe sensationalism and confusion and the only ones who could benefit from
this would be von Thadden, his neo-nazi party,
and the ultra-rightist groupings in Canada."
Plummer's reversal of his decision was a result
Technology poet here
The first poet of technology and anticipator of
the world to come is himself coming to UBC
Wednesday.
Buckminster (Bucky) Fuller will speak at
12:30 in the armory on the Invisible Evolution.
The visionary of the 20th century invented the
geodesic dome in 1947.
The dome is made of interlocking, lightweight,
triangular sections and uses less structural material to cover more space than any other building
yet devised.
He will also speak at Totem Park on Thursday
at 8:15 p.m. on how the world could be made to
work.
of extensive readings on the German situation
since he invited von Thadden to speak.
Research led Plummer to decide that "there is
no glaring difference between von Thadden and
Kiesenger.
"By focussing attention on the 'extremist' von
Thadden, we would obscure the fact that the nazis
in Germany are not a minority threat, but are in
fact already in control in many areas of German
policy.
"In my study of the German situation, I discover that von Thadden's policies are by and large
already advocated toy the present West German
government," Plummer said.
Plummer cites chancellor Kurt Kiesenger as
an example of nazism in the present German
government.
"He was not just a small-time nazi. He was
supreme censor of Interradio AG which broadcasted German nazi propaganda."
Plummer also refers to the Emergency Law,
passed in June 1966, "which enables the chancellor and the president of West Germany to
declare a state of emergency and begin military
operations to reclaim the lost territories."
The "lost territories" referred to the area now
incorporated into East Germany.
Plummer concludes: "It is for these reasons
that I refuse to invite von Thadden to UBC under
the auspices of my committee.
Plummer stated that it was not pressure from
any group which led to his action. Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 24,   1967
VIETNAM LIKE ALICE'
STUDENT COMMENTS
Asian fight confusing
Vietnam is experiencing the problems
of an emerging nation comparable to the
underdeveloped countries of Africa and
Asia.
"Vietnam has to preserve its economy
but catch up in the world," said Hyunk
Khanh, a Vietnamese student born and educated in Vietnam.
Khanh, a PhD student from Berkeley
and Dalhousie universities, spoke Friday in
the auditorium on The Rise of Vietnamese
National Communism.
He compared Vietnam's problems to
those of Alice in Wonderland.
"Alice faced similar problems — she had
to run twice as fast to get anywhere," Khanh
said.
"The conflict in Vietnam seems more
and more confusing everyday. It seems that
the Vietnamese war does not lend itself to
any truthful interpretation."
He said there exists no democracy to
combat communism  in  Vietnam  today.
"Nor are the communists in Vietnam
controlled by the Communist bloc, Russia
and China.''
"Vietnam is another emerging country.
Prior to de-colonization after World War II,
independence was the greatest aim. No at
tention has been given to post-independence
problems."
Khanh said there has been a tendency
of the super powers to dump foreign aid into
the underdeveloped countries and ignore its
real problems.
He named Vietnam's problems as corruption in high places and a lack of sociopolitical coherence and organization.
"In Africa and Asia most countries look
to a military government for a strong, centralizing situation."
He said that both the old colonialism
and the new imperialism bring the "seeds of
destruction."
"Communism has been successful in Vietnam because the ground has been prepared
for it by France and the U.S."
"The communists are strong because
they've had a strong communist ground and
a strong organizational pattern.
"The Vietnamese have had no experience
in voting or electing officials — they are not
familiar with democracy.
"Free elections in Vietnam today would
not make much sense. Most of the votes
would go to the Communists because of the
people's hatred for the Americans, arising
from the American destruction.
French Red rebels ^Jjt'tT
rock student union
STRASBOURG (UNS) — A new French student movement has stirred up a crisis here.
The   movement,   calling   it
self the International Situa-
tionists, has caused alarm
among the more orthodox
members of the student body
by first taking over the students' union, and then announcing its intention of disbanding it.
The Situationists, a "revolutionary" movement, claiming to derive from Marxism,
has been described as "beatniks" and "provos" — after
a militant group in Amsterdam.
Situationists reject both
labels, however, and in a pamphlet, present their own detailed critique of contemporary society, which they sum
up as being "commercial and
sensational".
Their solution for society is
"finally creating a situation
which will make any turning
back impossible," and "dissolving present society and entering the reign  of freedom."
Merriment is also high on
the agenda: "proletarian revolutions will be festivals or
they will not be, if the life
that they foreshadow will be
itself created under the sign
of  festival."
The Situationists, revolutionary as they claim to be,
took over the students' union
in   Strasbourg  democratically.
They are now legally in
charge of the union's assets,
including a restaurant, various bars, and a holiday center.
When the rest of the students realized what had happened, they set up a"counter-
government", which has attracted the support of Strasbourg's deputy mayor and a
senator.
The Situationists, whose
long hair is said to upset the
general populace, are critical
even of left-wing students'
movements.
They write that trade unions and political parties are
simply regulators of the mod
ern capitalist system, They
say they are bureaucratic organizations designed to manipulate their members.
Of the modern universities,
they say they are "institutional organizations of ignorance,
guided by an economic system demanding "massive fabrication of students who are
uncultivated and incapable of
thinking."
BURNABY (CUP) — Simon Fraser students' council has voted 7-6 to remain
outside the Canadian Union
of Students.
At the same time, the
council decided to submit
the question to a student
referendum, scheduled for
Feb. 3.
Simon Fraser withdrew
from CUS early in December, becoming the eighth
CUS member to sever ties
with the national student
organization during the current academic year.
MARDI GRAS IS COMING!
Tickets available at the A.M.S. — Brock
FARES?
YES! AND CHEAPER TOO
IBtt? We have all the details
2||pCall in anytime
Open 9-5 p.m., incl. Saturday
Hagan's Travel Service Ltd.
HAGEN S
736-5651
2996 W. Roadway
CHEMCELL LIMITED
The Company is offering six fellowships annually,
one of which shall be held at a Ftench language university. Field of study is in Chemistry, Engineering,
Physics or Mathematics. Value is $2,500 per annum,
for up to three academic years and $1,000 to receiving
university. Closing date for this year's competition is
MARCH 1st
Further information and application forms:
DIRECTOR OF  AWARDS
Association of Universities
and Colleges of Canada
151 Slater Street
Ottawa, Ontario
WESTERN  CO-OPERATIVE
FERTILIZERS  LIMITED
We have a number of positions available for
1967   GRADUATE   ENGINEERS
in the following disciplines:
CHEMICAL
ELECTRICAL
MECHANICAL
Our Director of Personnel will be available for interviews at the Placement Office on
JANUARY 30 AND 31, 1967
Interested persons should arrange appointments
through this office.
A Challenging Career Opportunity
A representative of
The British Columbia Probation Service
will  interview candidates
for
Probation Officer Positions
Appointments may be arranged at The University Office
of Student Placements for February 8 or 9, 1967.
Study Year Abroad
In Sweden, France or Spain
College prep., junior year abroad and graduate
programmes. $1,500 guarantees: round trip flight
to Stockholm, Paris or Madrid, dormitories or apartments, two meals daily, tuition paid. Write SCANSA,
50 Rue Prosper Legoute, Antony, Paris France.
STARTS WEDNESDAY
4-DAY PRE-CH1NESE NEW YEAR
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JANUARY 25-28
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EVERYTHING ELSE IN THE STORE
INCLUDING
BOOKS, SCROLLS, SHOES, TEA, GIFT ITEMS, ETC.
SHOP 'TILL 9:00 P.M., WED.-FRI.
(Binajlrts © Crafts Ltd.
33 East Hastings 681-4916
Products Exclusively from the People's Republic of China
FILM SOCIETY
PRESENTS
THURS. JAN. 26
12:30
3:30
6:00
8:30
Admission
50£
"THE COLLECTOR
it a film worthy of the two
Cannes Awards it received" —
N.Y. Time*. Tuesday, January 24,  1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
FATAL SEATTLE  TRIP
King candidate killed
MOUNT VERNON, WASH. (UNS) —
Robin Asselstine, one of 14 candidates nominated for UBC Mardi Gras king, was killed
here Sunday in a traffic accident.
Asselstine was one of four members of a
UBC fraternity on a one-day trip to Seattle
when their car stalled on an overpass on
interstate highway five three miles north
of here.
Kerr called lackey
by UBC graduates
"Lackeys are expendable."
This according to Dr. Benson Brown is
the moral to the story of Clark Kerr's presidency of the University of California.
"He was the lackey of the regents and
of the conservative forces in the state," said
Brown.
Brown was engaged in graduate studies
at UC two year's ago and is now an assistant professor of mathematics at UBC.
"I was pleased to see him fired", said
Brown.
"Kerr's role was to do what he called
'maintaining the integrity of the university'
by consistently caving in to all pressures
from outside the university, particularly
pressures to limit the political activity of
the students."
Reports from UC prior to Kerr's firing indicated the board of regents was disgruntled with the president for failing to
be tough enough on Berkley's rebellious
students.
Recent policy clashes wtih California's
new governor, Ronny Reagan preceded Friday's firing of Kerr, president of UC's
nine campuses since 1958.
Kerr had opposed Reagan's proposal to
initiate fees at the university.
California has a 99 year tradition of
free higher education and Reagan has suggested a $400 annual tuition.
Reagan terms Kerr's dismissal 'very
reasonable'.
Campus-wide yell
opens Edact week
Education week, which will culminate in a mass march on the legislature
Friday, erupts with a cross-campus yelp
today.
Following is today's schedule. All
meetings start at noon.
Forestry and Geology 201: Dean J. A.
F. Gardner and AMS second vice-president Carolyn Tate will speak to foresters
and geology students.
Hennings 307: Dr. G. E. Rouse, curriculum chairman, and AMS president
Peter Braund will give the word to
sciencemen.
Education lounge: Education students
will hear Dean Neville Scarfe and first
vice-president Charlie Boylan.
On Wednesday, arts students will
hear Dean Dennis Healy and Boylan in
Buchanan lounge at noon. At the same
time Dr. G. W. Marquis and Miss Tate
put music students in tune with education in Music 104.
Three of the travellers were pushing the
car across the overpass when they were
struck by a B.C. car.
Listed in critical condition in a Seattle
hospital is UBC commerce student John
Lavan. UBC students Earl Matheson and
Gary Goodman have been released from
hospital.
Washington State Patrol said the freak
accident occurred at 1:50 a.m. after the car
ran out of gas while approaching the crest
of the overpass.
They said the three had pushed the car
over the crest in an attempt to park it on
the highway shoulder.
It was struck from the rear by the B.C.
car cresting the rise.
Asselstine and Lavan were members of
the Phi Gamma Delta fraternity.
"Robin was a friend of the entire fraternity," said member Dwight Young.
"He was gregarious and happy — never
moody. He was also well known on campus,
and a candidate for Mardi Gras king," he
said.
Sharp sharpens
welfare arrows
By CHARLOTTE HAIRE
Federal finance minister Mitchell Sharp
told a UBC audience Friday Canada's government has no further great advances to
make in social legislation.
Sharp, speaking to the Liberal club in
Brock Hall, said that with four pieces of
social legislation — the Canada pension
plan, the Canadian assistance plan, the
guaranteed income plan for old-age pensioners, and medicare — passed, Canada
must change emphasis.
"Our concern is not with social security," he said, "but with creating a better
kind of society — a society of greater opportunity."
In the society of greater opportunity,
said Sharp, there would be equal educational opportunity, with allotment of more
federal taxes for financing of education.
Also, he said, we must investigate problems of pollution, beautifying cities, rural
poverty, and retraining people to fit them
into modern society.
When a student asked Sharp to clarify
Canada's role in supplying arms to the U.S.,
the cabinet minister said Canada is merely
acting in accordance with treaties.
"As Lester Pearson has pointed out," he
said, "under the NATO military alliance
we have a production-sharing agreement
with the U.S. We intend to keep the agreement.
"I do not feel," said Sharp, "that it
would do anything to shorten the war In
Vietnam to abrogate this treaty."
He said Canada's commitment to the
NATO treaty is not inconsistent with the
Geneva accord pledging neutrality in Vietnam.
"We are actually importing more than
we are exporting to the States," he said,
"but as I do not know technically enough
about what we are supplying to the Americans for Vietnam, I can't tell you much
more."
— judy hilt photo
UNINFORMED STUDENT Stan Liebowicz attempts and fails
to get first aid from station at new music building site.
UBC health czars require all injured and dying students
to  report  to Wesbrook  for treatment.
FOR MENTAL HEALTH
Men's dean urged
By NORMAN  GIDNEY
Two UBC professors Monday urged establishment of
a dean of men's office to implement the Schwarz report on
student mental health.
Dr. Ian Ross, head of eng-
lish 100, and Cathleen Gose
of the English department
said, "Girls have it easier.
"They can go to the dean of
women and get direct counselling," said Ross.
Ross said the office should
be staffed with people who
have some training in counseling and who could refer students to psychiatrists if necessary.
Commenting on the Schwarz
report on mental health services at universities in Canada, Ross said: "There's still a
stigma attached to mental disease. Students feel some sort
of shame in admitting they
can't cope with their problems."
Ross said Ubyssey assistant
news editor Al Birnie's analysis of the Schwarz report (The
Ubyssey, Jan. 17), presented a
radical view of university psychiatric counselling.
"The report was called
timid because it doesn't present a radical viewpoint," said
Ross.
"It's true we need more interaction among faculty and
students. One thing is the new
arts program. It will deal with
broader questions relating the
students' knowledge to life,"
he said.
"Birnie had the idea of psychiatric and counselling services retooling students for
the multiversity.
"Someone who's had counselling is better able to recognize his problem and live with
it."
"I think Clark Kerr's vision
of the multiversity is more a
nightmare than reality. Students are tough-minded
enough to resist the multiversity attitude. They are more
critical and independent," he
said.
Mrs. Gose emphasized the
fact that third and fourth year
students have more access to
counselling services.
"First and second year students need an easier way of
contact. Through the majors
program in third and fourth
years, students at least have a
faculty advisor," she said.
She said one source of
worry about the present system stems from the fact that
many on the faculty who are
not qualified to counsel find
themselves doing so. mmsm
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
the editor's and not of the AMS or the . university. Member, Canadian
University Press. Founding member. Pacific Student Press. Authorized
second class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa, and for payment of
postage in cash."
The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review.
City editor, 224-3916. Other calls, 224-3242: editor, local 25; photo. Page
Friday, loc. 24; features, sports, loc. 23; advertising, loc. 26. Night calls,
731-7019.
To be Canadian today can only mean, objectively, to struggle against the American empire.
-JEAN ETHIER-BLAIS
Montreal, Jan. 7, 1967
JANUARY 24, 1967
Strike of power
The strike referendum to be held with AMS elections is the most important vote UBC students have
ever been asked to make.
The passage or failure of that referendum will
mark the worth or the worthlessness of student government.
If the referendum fails, it will mean student government has no power to represent students, because
students don't want to give it that power.
If it passes, it will be a vote for action by students
to take part in their own destinies — to become involved in the decisions that create the kind of university this is.
It will commit students to irresponsible action —
the only kind of action open to them.
Irresponsible means action that is not niceynice,
action with enough force behind it to stand a chance
against the force wielded by those who call it irresponsible.
Les Peterson and the Social Credit government
control the destinies of B.C.'s universities.
That control is unchecked except by provincial
election — when there are many issues and education
can be lost in things like power dams and 13-year
records of "achievement".
Friday's march is no kind of power, and is wholly
useless unless it is followed by strike action. If the
government does not meet university needs, the march
serves as a preliminary to the ireal business, and shows
that the time of nice briefs is over.
A strike — held only if the province does not find
the wherewithal for $66 million president Macdonald
says is essential — is raw force. It is saying we disagree
with the government's policy toward education, and
we will refuse to accept made-in-Birdland decisions.
It tells where students stand and why — and chal-i
lenges the university administration to stand with students or against us.
For a strike is one of the few kinds of meaningful action students can take. The university administration must recognize this and support it; to do otherwise is to support education minister Les Peterson and
calmly accept whatever deal he plans for the universities.
The responsible kinds of action have failed students. Briefs are only dropped in convenient receptacles.
Marches are just that — marches through the rain.
But marches and briefs backed by strike action
can ensure victory.
Nazis and friends
Adolf von Thadden's invitation to speak here this
month focussed attention on him and made him important to people.
Special events has now decided von Thadden's
appearance would not expose him; instead it would aid
the rise of fascism by aiding tacit acceptance of it by
Canadians.
We would agree completely if that analysis has resulted in an invitation not being extended in the first
place — but the uninvitation focusses even more attention on him and inflates his validity, rather than diminishing it.
Far better to rectify the original error, by hearing
him, and working hard to expose the Nazi for what he
and Keisinger are.
m&
Mardi Gras spirit's pretty strong this year.
'.-^w^/^^' ''t$
Eat in sartorial splendor
For the benefit of those of
you who missed this column
on Tuesday, it concerned the
pitfalls of a blind date, with
specific reference to being
invited out for supper. This
is the next instalment in the
series.
Let us suppose you have received and accepted an invitation to supper. The young
lady who is to be your partner sounds human, and the
chance seems to be worth taking. There are several problems. The first one: what to
wear.
There are several schools
of thought on this matter.
The clothes - make - the - man
school, says you should dress
as well as possible, thus presenting a better front, and
making chances of a return
engagement that much more
certain.
This is a good theory, but
the 'Dependent' school has a
lot on its side when it says
'Don't look too good or the .
hostess won't ask you back
because you don't need her
enough. Better look a little
seedy, so she feels needed.'
Finally, there is the peace-
at-all-costs-and-we'd-be -better-
off-red-than-read   type   that
By IAN CAMERON
seems to be so well represented at UBC, and whose idea of
fit attire for any occasion is
the Donovan cap and dirty
blue jeans (with the 'Union
made' label still attached, of
course) but these people stick
together, so you won't come
in contact with them.
If by some chance you are
invited out by one of these,
don't go. You can imagine
what the girl will look like,
and the food is likely to be
Pekinese steaks fried in worker's sweat, and served with
imported rice, flavored with
blood.
I personally favor the
'smart, but not too gaudy'
school. Look as if you know
how to dress, but can't afford
to.
This will indicate to the
hostess that you really need
the free feed, but will not
make her feel as if she is
entertaining a bum. at her festive board. Besides, if the
blind date they have arranged
for you is not to your liking,
you won't look too attractive
to her. I went out not too
long ago and made the mistake of wearing a new suit
and a pair of diamond chip
cufflinks. By the time my
date got the loupe out of her
eye, I was a marked man.
The only thing that saved me
was the fact that this was in
Victoria, and I live in Vancouver.
On the other hand, if you
want to make a big impression on your date, have a
special kit for this purpose,
consisting of a silver cigarette case and a pill box to
match. You can then take a
pill now and then, muttering
about your ulcer as you do so.
This suggests that you are
hard-working, since you have
an ulcer, and successful, since
you have a silver pill-box.
If you don't think you want
to make the impression, leave
the silver in your pocket.
Finally, learn to commit a
good faux pas now and then.
Everyone likes a good laugh,
and everyone likes to feel
superior. You can give people
untold pleasure by using
'Shawinian' instead of 'Shavian', or saying you believe in
democracy, or that you think
John B. Macdonald is a good
president.
Good luck, good eating, and
good health. And remember,
a plastic bag is great for taking home leftovers. Just put
it under your shirt.
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
'Regrettable  act'
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Brian Plummerls decision
(assuming it was his decision)
was a most regrettable act of
political cowardice. Informed
and critical questioning
might have exposed the farce
of Sunday's 'interview' with
Herr von Thadden.
Plummer's action has deprived all of us of the opportunity to examine and to
have   examined   critically   a
man and a movement whose
activities concern us all.
We hesitate to stoop to in-
science' lay behind Plum-
mer's startling moral revela-
EDITOR: John Kelsey
Managing __.   Richard Blair
Newt    -.                Carol Wilson
City _       Danny Stoffman
Photo        Powell Hargrave
Page Friday    -    -     Claudia Gwinn
Focus      Rosemary Hyman
Sports           __    .    Sue Gransby
Asrt Newt Al Blrnta
Ass't City    _ _.   Tom Morris
CUP Bert Hill
nuendo.   But   we   can   only
speculate what 'forces of con-
tion. CARL DIEHL
arts 3
To page 5
Capable Klrsten covered council.
So did Norman Gidney. Murray
McMillan heard Lsd-man. So did
Chu Chiu-pai. These also wrote:
Dave Cursons, Margaret Ladbury,
Val von Thorn, Charlotte Haire,
roadrunner Val Zuker, Don Stanley and Charlotte Mundie. None
other than the inscrutable Irving
Fetish and the nauseating Wang
Ming appeared. Kathey Tait cried.
Chris Blake, Kurt Hilger and
Al Harvey fotograf.ed. Mike Jes-
sen, Ross Evans, Tony Hodge,
Jim Maddin and That Zit watched
UBC lose like good sports. Tuesday, January 24, 1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
LETTERS  CONTINUED
rimii papv *w
'Write MLAs
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Next Friday in the hopes
of achieving action on educational policies a number of
UBC students will take a
holiday to Victoria to stand
in the rain on the lawns of
the Victoria legislative buildings, like a flock of confused
sheep.
The hardware merchant
from Kelowna will pretend
they are not there and the
carpenter from Nanaimo will
commend the students with a
few platitudes.
The average citizen of British Columbia will wonder
why he should give more
money to those who haven't
the sense to move out of the
rain.
The claims of the students,
which are for the most part
reasonable and worthy of at-
tention, will be again
ignored.
What I suggest is that every
student sit down (much less
trouble than going to Victoria) and write his MLA and
enlist his support by explaining why he thinks the government should adopt these
policies.
ERIC   TOMLINSON.
President,
B.C. Progressive
Conservative
Federation.
Hungary  restated
Editor, The Ubyssey:
I wish to reply to Mr. Epstein's letter of Jan. 19 re his
criticism of what were not
my views but rather those of
an unfortunate misreport.
For the sake of brevity, allow me to note some of the
important aspects of what I
said about Hungary:
*&sr
1. Before the war, there
was a fascist government.
2. If the anti-semitism of
that time cannot be called
called popular, neither can it
be called unpopular.
3. The Communist Party
represented a distinct minority.
4. The CP recognized that
it could not have come to
power without the presence
of the Red Army.
5. The bouregois-capitalist
ideology was well developed
in Hungary after the war and
this frustrated the CP.
6. The CP sought to take
the country directly to socialism, bypassing capitalism.
7. The CP also sought to
create an entirely new mentality and consequently a
new ideology in the people.
8. Since the CP had not
experienced a period of revolutionary struggle with the
people in the country against
fascism, there was the absence of a revolutionary
cadre which eventually, with
the victory of the revolution,
became the administrative
core of the nation.
Consequently, the bureaucracy that could not be avoided placed obstacles in the
path of the CP, hindering
every effort towards efficient leadership.
9. The CP was also hindered in its work by the establishment of the CIA-
financed Radio Free Europe
which broadcasted what can
only be called lies to every
nation of East and Central
Europe and Soviet Russia.
10. It is clear that the
Hungarian people are essentially reactionary. Their attitude in regard to the Rosenberg case, the struggle of the
Greeks for national liberation, the Korean War against
the puppet Rhee and USA
occupation, just to mention
three instances, testifies to
this.
11. The Hungarian uprising of 1956 was a classic
19th century revolution. But
it occurred in the 20th century when the political reality of the world is radically
different from that of the
previous century.
12. At the base of the matter lies the problem of the
Hungarian people's inability
and/or unwillingness to
understand the real aims of
the Communist Party. That
is, Leninism as the only solid
alternative ideology to imperialism was disregarded.
And these people were
revolutionaries.
Correction: counter-revolutionaries.
SCOTIABANK CENTENNIAL SCHOLARSHIPS
Six awards will be made annually, three to French-
speaking candidates and three to English-speaking
candidates for graduate and undergraduate students
in their second last year of a first university degree
programme. Graduate awards are valued at $2,500
and undergraduate at $1,500. Closing date for this
year's competition is
MARCH 15th
Further information and application forms:
DIRECTOR OF AWARDS
Association of Universities
and Colleges of Canada
151 Slater Street
Ottawa, Ontario
13.    However,   it  must   be
pointed out that the events of
October-November 1956 may
be discussed in terms of the
development that took place.
There was a degree of 'humanism' as Mr. Epstein
would wish to characterize it
during the first phase of the
uprising.
This was followed by a few
days of quiet during which
time many political parties
began to organize.
The third phase began on
the fourth of November when
the Red Army began its offensive, once the Party realized the direction events
were taking.
The Soviets or Workers'
Councils that Mr. Epstein refers to failed to provide the
anti-fascist initiative when
such a move should have
come.
Furthermore, there was
general agreement on the aspirations of the uprising by
the lower echelon partici-
pants regarding economic
questions which would have
made Hungary as socialist as
Herr Adenauer's Germany.
In conclusion, I wish to express the hope that I have
given some justice to my intentions when talking about
Hungary, Cuba and Canada.
This was to render an impression of the complexities of
social change and casual relationships.
ALEX   BANDY
SFA
Mardi Gras
PEP MEET
King-Queen presentations
Gym—January 26,  12:30
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WHEN  THE  NIGHT  BEGINS
AND THE VANCOUVER LIGHTS
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Take an Angel to
the-Paradise
Enjoy the best Italian Dish
Open   every   night   except   Sunday
5:00 p.m. — 2:00 a.m.
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SPECIAL
U.B.C. STUDENT DISCOUNT
10%  to  15%  on weekdays
ITALIAN PARADISE
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1047 Granville      685-9412
—from the UWO Gazette
Listen babe. You play your cordis right, I can line you
up a regular singing job with  the Nihilist Spasm band !
ATTENTION:! ALL TEAMS,  CLUBS FRATERNITIES,   ETC.
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•  CLUB JACKETS • BLAZERS •  UNIFORMS
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CLUB
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SPORTSWEAR    LTD.
3743 Main Street, Phone:
Vancouver 10, B.C. 874-7231
"The Most Respected Name In Club, School and University Apparel"
Announcing
Bell Canada Centennial   Fellowships
for Post Graduate Studies
FIELD OF STUDY: Unrestricted, but preference is given to those subject
areas most directly relevant to the scientific, political, social, or economic
needs of  Canada.
NUMBER: The program establishes eight graduate fellowships. Four will
be  awarded  in   1967,  and   renewable  in  subsequent years.
VALUE: $5,000. Successful candidates will receive $3,500. $1,500 will
be given to the University to pay for tuition and other expenses.
For further information, apply before March  15th:
Director of Awards,
Association of Universities and
Colleges of Canada
151 Slater St., Ottawa, Canada
r
i
GRADUATE PHARMACIST
Applications are being accepted from Pharmacists graduating this spring for the position of assistant to the
Chief Pharmacist in a 326 bed, fully accredited hospital.
The area has a modern expanding University Centre.
Excellent fringe benefits. Applications with full particulars should be addressed to:
Mr. G. O. Scott,
Personnel Director,
Sudbury General Hospital,
Sudbury, Ontario.
-I
I
GRADUATE PHYSIOTHERAPIST
Applications are being accepted from Physiotherapists
graduating this spring to work under the Chief Physiotherapist in a fully accredited, 326-bed, hospital. The
area has a modern expanding University Centre. Excellent fringe benefits. Applications with full particulars
should be addressed to:
I
Mr. G. O. Scott,
Personnel Director,
Sudbury General Hospital
Sudbury, Ontario.
11 Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 24,   1967
CHINA
SEMINAR
BROCK    LOUNGE
Jan. 24
12:30
THE BRITISH AMERICAN OIL
COMPANY LIMITED
The Company is offering five fellowships annually,
tenable in any field in any Canadian university. Value
$3,000 to Fellow and $1,000 to receiving university.
Closing date for this year's competition is
MARCH 1st
Further information and application forms:
DIRECTOR OF AWARDS
Association of Universities
and Colleges of Canada
151 Slater Street
Ottawa, Ontario
SUMMER EMPLOYMENT
British Columbia Forest Products Limited anticipates
several openings for undergraduates of any faculty, any
year, for summer employment. Locations are sawmills at Victoria, Lake Cowichan and Hammond, and
pulp and paper operations at Crofton.
There will a number of jobs available at Crofton
in maintenance and engineering for Mechanical, Chemical and Electrical Engineering undergraduates in the
classes of 1968, 1969 and 1970.
Interested students are invited to register at the
Placement Office for interviews February 1, 2 or 3,
when Company representatives will be on the campus.
Painful victory
Rugby on the weekend proved victorious but costly for the
UBC Thunderbirds.
Although the Birds won their opening game of the Northwest Intercollegiate Rugby Conference 13-0 over University of
Victoria, injuries crippled the team.
Keith Watson, team captain and kicker will be out for six
weeks, and Scolfield will be out a month.
These injuries come at a crucial time, for the Birds
and Braves are off to Oregon to play University of Oregon this
Thursday and Oregon State on Saturday. But the more crucial
game is coming up Feb. 16, against the touring Australian National Team.
Tickets are available for the Wallaby game from any rugby
player. The price is $1 for students and are good for either the
UBC-Wallaby game or the B.C. rep.-Wallaiby game.
In the Birds' Victoria game, Brazzier was high scorer
with two tries and a convert, Watson kicked one convert before
leaving the game, and Preston scored another try.
In other rugby action, Braves lost to North Van 6-0, Tomahawks won easily over a weak SFA team 12-0, and Totem lost
to St. George's 8-3.
Gillespie best of losers
The UBC swimming Birds succumbed to defeat this weekend when they were beaten by Central Washington State College.
The Birds, who have a one and three record, lost the meet
by a score of 65-39.
Outstanding in defeat was veteran Bill Gillespie, who
picked up two wins and a second place for the team, scoring
one third of the teams total points.
Newcomers showing improvement are Phil Winch who
placed second and third respectively in the longest races and
Martin McLaren who placed second and third also, but in the
two shortest races.
Also getting points for the Birds were Gary Baker, Bill
Storey and Jim Maddin.
Sole diver for the Birds was Laurie Wyles who took a
third place.
A special travelling team of swimmers will be going to
Seattle and the University of Washington next weekend to
their regional championships.
— bob powers photo
North-Rite "195" passes 23 strict quality and endurance tests before it is finally
packaged and shipped to your dealer... that is why we have no hesitation in giving
you a written guarantee for life. Even the ink cartridge is guaranteed to write for
one full year or we send you a replacement free. The new stainless steel ball and
socket eliminate ink leaks on hands, clothing and paper.
J/ORth-JlitE
THE COMPANY THAT MAKES A POINT OF QUALITY.
GYMNASTS SWING MEET
UBC gymnasts made an impressive season opening when
they topped a four-way meet Friday.
The team gathered 123.5 points. Everett Junior College
followed with a close 123.35 and University of Alberta with
119.30. University of Victoria trailed with 91.8.
UBC's Bill Mackie won the all-round title. John Samela
took third and Dennis Fridulin fourth in all-round events.
The floor exercises, long horse, parallel bars and rings also
went to UBC. U. of A. won the high bar event.
Mackie, Samela, Fridulin, Peter Prince, Clint Buhr, and
Ray Stevenson travel to the Western Canadian Intercollegiate
Gymnastics Championships in Edmonton this weekend.
In all probability five men from UBC will then be selected
to compete in the Canadian Championships.
CHRISTIAN  TEACHER'S CORE
is the subject of
BILL SHARP
returned
Missionary Teacher
of
Kenyo East Africa
THIRSDAY NOON - ANGUS 410
ALL WELCOME Tuesday, January 24, 1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
— derrek webb photo
SAVES BY THE U. of A. goalie were common Saturday afternoon, as the Golden Bears
were victorious over the Thunderbirds, to clinch the Hamber Cup. The visitors took
three out of three games  in  the  series.
Bears bruise Birds
By ROSS EVANS
In ice hockey last weekend the University of Alberta Golden Bears downed the
Thunderbirds twice, 2-1 on Friday night,
and 7-3 on Saturday.
Friday's victory clinched the Hamber
Cup for the Bears, marking the 15th season
they have won it since it was donated in
1950 by the late Hon. Eric Hamber, former
lieutenant governor of B.C. and former UBC
Chancellor. The Birds have won the cup
twice, in 1950 and 1963.
Friday's game was a closely-fought affair in which all the goals were scored in
the second period. At the 3:25 minute mark,
Dale Rippel opened scoring for the visitors
tipping Brian Harper a slapshot past Russ
Kirk while the Birds were short-handed.
Eight minutes later the Bears went ahead to
stay, on a goal by Gerry Braunberger, also
a deflection.
A five minute spearing penalty to Birds'
Doug Purdy paved the way for their only
goal at the 17:44 mark. Al McLean made
what looked to be a pass to Miles Desharnais
stationed in front of the n'et, but Desharnais
missed the pass, the goalie fanned on it, and
the score was 2-1 for the Albertans.
In the third frame the Thunderbirds
pressed hard for the tie, but the Bear de
fence tightened up and allowed UBC only
6 shots.
Kirk turned in an excellent game in the
Birds' net, blocking 34 shots, many of them
from point-blank range. The UBC defensive corps gave their best performance to
date.
Saturday's game, a regular league game
worth 2 points, saw the Bears display accurate shooting and crisp goalmouth passing
in thumping the Birds 7-3.
Harper opened the scoring for Alberta
at the 55 second mark of the first stanza.
Bob Apps and McLean replied for the Birds,
and Kevin McGladery almost made it 3-1
for UBC, but a whistle-happy referee had
blown the play dead. 30 seconds later Jack
Nicholl scored on a deflection which tied
the game at 2-2.
The Bears pulled away in the second,
Braunberger bagging two and Jones the
third, before Tom Koretchuk completed a
fine three-way passing play from Len Bosquet and Desharnais at the 19:47 minute
mark. In the third, Kirk had to be sharp in
holding the Bears to two goals, one each by
Del Billings and Darrell Leblanc.
The team travels to Saskatoon next
weekend for two encounters with the second place Huskies. The Bears are leading
the league with nine wins in ten starts.
LATEST CANADIAN CHANGES
OTTAWA (CUP) — Second place circulated like a piece of currency at the weekend in Canadian College hockey and basketball games.
Alberta had moved out of a second-
place tie into sole possession of first place
in the west, Waterloo had tied Western
Ontario-Quebec league, and Mount Allison
had all but resigned themselves to a second
place finish in the Maritimes by losing 5-4
to St. Francis Xavier.
Nationally third-ranked Alberta broke
their second-place headlock with Manitoba
in Vancouver, by sweeping a three-game
series  against British Columbia.
The three games count as four in the
standings, due to scheduling problems.
The series gives the defending Western
league champions nine victories in ten official league games. The Golden Bears have
lost once to Saskatchewan, whose 8-2 record now places them second.
Waterloo received their second-place
tie by defeating the Universities of Guelph
and Montreal 7-1 and 6-1 respectively.
Western Ontario lost a chance to gain
on first place, top-rated Toronto when they
lost 6-1 to the Blues in London.
Mount  Allison's  hopes  shattered for  a
league championship when a late goal broke
a 4-4 tie and gave St. Francis a commanding
lead in the Maritime Intercollegiate Conference.
In basketball in Edmonton at the weekend, Alberta and B.C. took turns hurting
the other's chances for finishing first. The
fifth-ranked Bears won an easy 61-49 victory Friday, but felk 81-52 before a well
executed tight press employed Saturday by
the seventh-rated Thunderbirds.
Saturday's game left Alberta in second
place in the west, two points short of third-
ranked Calgary.
Saskatchewan moved within two points
of Alberta by defeating Manitoba twice in
Winnipeg, 90-79 and 77-59. Saskatchewan's
4-2 record gives them a two-point margin
over B.C. Saskatchewan and B.C. have each
played two games less than Alberta and
Calgary.
Meanwhile in Windsor, Canada's top-
rated basketball team, Windsor Lancers,
took another step toward defending their
National Championship. The Lancers dumped tenth-rated Waterloo  80-60.
The loss was Waterloo's second last
week. They were stopped 54-49 Wednesday
in Waterloo by eighth-ranked Toronto.
World hockey
OTTAWA (CUP) — Canada's first annual international
hockey tournament was born in Montreal two weeks ago.
And if the infant can be nurtured to good health it will
provide Canadian college hockey with a new booster.
Invitations have already been received toy ambassadors
to Canada from Russia, Czechoslovakia and Sweden for university teams from those countries to participate in next year's
Centennial College hockey tournament.
The invitations were sent by J. David Molson, Montreal
Canadiens president, whose team financed the initial all-Canadian tournament.
As foreign teams are added, the number of Canadian
participants would be dropped to a probable minimum of three.
He also thinks there should toe more "channels" to take
care of the academic and athletic needs of Canadian youth.
These channels he feels are needed to take young Canadians
"beyond the norm" without having to resort to U.S. colleges.
"Canadian college hockey is not as good now as it can and
will be," he says.
"We need better coaching and more training in the basics
of hockey."
The tournament developed this fall out of "informal meetings between Molson, Ed Enos and Floyd Curry, athletic director
and hockey coach at Loyola College, which officially sponsored
the event.
The Canadiens lost a "substantial amount of money" on the
latest tournament, but Molson says no figures are to be released.
"The money doesn't matter right now, it's the development
of hockey that's important,' he said.
SCHOLARSHIPS
University of Torontos hockey coach Tom Watt was something less than an enthusiastic receiver of the J. David Molson
trophy in Montreal after his club won the first annual Centennial College hockey tournament.
It isn't that Watt dislikes the trophy, or the tournament or
the Canadiens organization.
In fact Watt likes just about everything about Canadian
college hockey. But he likes it the way it has been in the past,
and not the way it appears to be directed — toward top-level
promotion and athletic scholarships.
"I don't like it. I'm against athletic scholarships.
"Why should students be paid to play, or be paid to do anything at university, unless they have definite need?"
The youthful coach of the Varsity Blues, Canada's top-
rated college team and defending national champions, says universities should not be competing for top talent but rather
should be concentrating on "providing an opportunity for students to participate in athletics.
"If the Canadian Intercollegiate Athletic Union endorses
scholarships, I think our league (Ontario-Quebec Athletic Association) will pull out,", he said.
Watt says he is also opposed to the five-year eligibility rule
adopted by the CIAU last year to prevent athletes from playing
inter-collegiate athletics for more than five years.
"This way it's hard to break in a freshman player. I may
not ibe able to play some of my boys because as soon as I do
they lose a year of eligibility.
"We play some small colleges who try desperately to
produce good teams and are hampered by a lack of talent,"
he says.
"But will scholarships answer the problem?"
Basketbirds equalled
The UBC basketball Birds had to settle for a split in
games when they met the rough Golden Bears from Edmonton
on Friday and Saturday.
The Birds lost the first game 63-49 but stormed back to
take the second 81-51. Both games were played on the University of Alberta campus.
The UBC squad played one of their worst games in the
first meeting. Lack of accurate shooting was their downfall.
Phil Langley led the team with 14 points. Bob Molinski had 12.
The second game was a complete reversal of the first.
UBC played an especially strong second half, scoring 45 of
their points after emerging with a slim 36-33 lead following
the first twenty minutes.
The speedy Birds' zone pressed the Bears and were in
complete control of the game from then on. Neil Murray scored
20 points and Langley 14.
They now have a 3-3 record in WCIAA games and are in
fifth place in the six team conference. The UBC squad, however, have six more games to play, two more than most of the
other teams.
The Birds' next four games will be worth four points
each and so they are extremely important if UBC is to finish
leading the league.
The UBC basketball JV's finished their regular season
atop the standings in the Inter City Jr. Men's league. Their
record was 14 wins and no losses. They played their final
game Saturday night, a 73-37 victory over University of Victoria. Sam Vandermeulen, who was the second leading scorer
in the league with 217 points, led the JV's with 16 on Saturday.
The next game for the JV'§ is the opening of the semi-final
series against YMCA at John Oliver gym on Thursday at 8:30
p.m. Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 24,   1967
'TWEEN CLASSES
Chinese puzzle probed
CHINA SEMINAR
Profs. Goldman, Solecki and
Wilmot   discuss   events   in
China,    today,    noon,    Brock.
Admission 25 cents.
LSM
Norwegian  baritone  Harald
Tolfsen plays, sings and speaks
tonight,    10   p.m.,    Lutheran
Campus Centre.
PHYSOC
Two talks on amateur photometry tonight, 8 p.m., Henn.
201.
NISEI VARSITY
Meeting,   today,   noon,   Bu.
205.
UBYSSEY
Want to find out who really
rules Pango Pango? Come and
work for The Ubyssey. See
us any noon in the basement
of north Brock.
EUS
The director of the selective
service for Washington speaks
on the draft Wednesday, noon,
Eng. 201.
BRIDGE CHESS CLUB
Meeting    Wednesday,    7:30,
Brock TV lounge.
PRE DENTAL SOC
Dr.   Lindsay   discusses   oral
surgery (with slides), Wednesday,  noon, Bu.  204.
MATH  CLUB
General meeting today,
noon, Ma. 204. Dr. Whittaker
speaks on Tracking the Infinitely Small Through Darkest
Algebra, Wednesday, noon,
Ma. 204.
POLAND LECTURES
Dr. Z. Folejewski speaks on
Pasternak, Sholokhov and the
Nobel Prize, Wednesday, noon,
Ang. 110; and Between Mar-
ism and Existentialism: Contemporary Polish Letters,,
Wednesday, 8:15, Bu. 102.
UN CLUB
Special events chairman
Brian Plummer discusses his
actions in not bringing Adolph
von Thadden and explains
what special events is supposed to be doing, Wednesday,
noon, upper lounge IH.
EDUCATION
Eric Dehn speaks on Britain,
France and North America:
Contrasts in Education, Wednesday, noon, Ed. 202.
CHINESE  VARSITY
Consul General Peng discusses China . . . The United
Nations, Thursday, noon, Bu.
104.
FILM SOC
Four showings of the Collector, Thursday, 12:30, 3:30, 6
p.m. and 8:30, auditorium. Admission 50 cents.
Students given votes
CALGARY (CUP) — University of Alberta at
Calgary students have won representation on the general faculty council, the body which controls the university's operation and has final say in student affairs.
The 44-member council voted Thursday to give
students three seats on the policy-making body.
The students will be represented by the students'
union president and two students at large who will
be appointed by the general faculty council upon recommendation by the students' council.
The UAC general faculty council is similar in function to the academic senate at most Canadian universities.
Your   SKI   MYSTERY   Entry
ii
presented by
CYVR RADIO-UBC RADIO SOCIETY
duMAURIER     INTERNATIONAL
196 7
CAS A
cmmwt.
EVENTS      ORGANIZED     BY     THE      CANADIAN      AMATEUR     SKI     ASSOCIATION
AT WHISTLER
The Clues to date:—
1. Birds of a feather flock together.
2. Person,  Place or Thing  are  clues,
of which you need remember two.
Listen to CYVR for daily clues
AMS Entry Boxes are provided.
Prizes
1. Pair of skfs
2- Dinner for two atop Grouse
3. Months supply of cigarettes.
YOUR OFFICIAL ENTRY
All entries become sole property
of CYVR. Judges decisions final.
First 3 correct answers win respective prizes upon receipt of entr.y
ANSWER .       .      	
NAME       	
ADDRESS   PHONE	
All UBC Radio Society Members & Employees of doMaurier are Ineligible.
International
Ball
Friday, Jan. 27, 9-1 Regal Ballroom, Hotel Georgia
Floorshow — Brick Henderson's Moonlighters Orchestra
TICKETS $5 couple - $2.75 single at I.H., A.M.S. & The Bay
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, S.75—3 days, $2.00 Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Publications Office: Brock Hall.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost & Found
 11
DESPERATELY IMPORTANT TO
owner. Reward for return of jade
and silver ring lost. Library WA
2-8318.
1 LENS FOR PROJECTOR, IN
Buchanan 202 Wednesday a.m.,
Jan. 18. May be recovered in Buchanan  267.
FOUND: PAIR OF LADIE'S
Glasses on East Mall on Thurs.
Claim in publications office.
Brock Hall.
BLACK WALLET CORNER MAR-
ine Dr., Chancellor Jan. 19. Probably in a black TR 3. Please
phone   224-5958.	
LOST     —      CHAMOIS      FLEECE
"Gloves"   last   week   —   freezing
cold   hands  —  Please  leave  mes-
sage   at   "Mothers"   —   987-4757.
FOUND NORTON ENGLISH AN-
thology, steno notebook sitting
in Buchanan locker since September.   Phone   261-2440.
LOST: BLACK ALASKA RING IN
Education washroom on Wednesday, Jan. 18th — Sentimental
value.   Phone   Isabelle.   327-2423.
LOST LADIES WRIST WATCH—
about two weeks ago if found
phone   325-5591.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Miscellaneous
34
LARGE OAK CHINA CABINET,
convex glass sides $139.50; Oak
writing desk 114.60; Bed chesterfields $16.60 & up; Walnut bedroom suite $59.50 complete; complete line of unpainted furniture
at reduced prices.
KLASSEN'S USED FURNITURE
MART
3207 W. Broadway RE  6-0712
Also Beer Bottle Drive at Rear
Scandals
39A
WANTED, INFORMATION ON
psychedelic usage in Vancouver,
for publication. Phone 732-2686
(days)   or 987-1284   (nights).
RED    GUARDS    INVADE    BROCK
Hall   Tuesday,   January   24,   12:30.
CUT DOWN TOUR OVERHEAD —
get a hair cut. Campus Barber
Shop,  Brock  ex.
DINE IN STYLE AT THE BUS
stop, today at noon. Service with
a  smile.
ZETA   BETA   TAU   TAKES  OVER
the Bus Stop today at noon.
Coming Dances
12A
MARDI GRAS CHARITY BALL,
Show Mart. Tickets on sale now
at   AMS   office.   $5.00   per   couple.
INTERNATIONAL BALL JAN. 27,
9-1 only. $5.00 couple. Tickets at
I.H.   &   A.M.S.
CRYSTAL BALL DANCING EN-
tertainment, refreshments Jan. 28.
Brock Hall, only $3.50 cpl. Tickets
at   A.M.S.
THE   NOVEL   SOUND   COMES   TO
Brock January-31.  At noon.  Its a
Brave   New   World  Mixer.	
KENTISH  STEELE
and
THE SHANTELLES!
Will be playing at Campus A Go-
Go (revisited) on Sat. nite, Feb.
4th. And this great Soul Sound is
only 1 of 3 great reasons why you'll
want to be at this Giant Dance.
And the cost? only $1.50/person.
And at that price, this has to be
the greatest entertainment value
of the year!
Special Notices
13
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance rates? If you are over 20 and
have a good driving history you
qualify for our good driving rates.
Phone Ted Elliott 224-6707.
GEOLOGY MUSEUM OPEN MON.-
Fri. 12:30-1:30 F.&G. 116 — come
and  see  our minerals and  fossils.
PROFESSORS WILMOTT, SOLEC-
ki and Goldman speak at China
Seminar, Brock Hall, Tuesday,
Jan.   24 —  25c.
YOU WILL NOTICE A BIG IM-
provement in the atmosphere to-
day at noon in the Busstop.
TWO GREAT BANDS! INTERNA -
tional Ball Jan. 27. Tickets only
$5.00/couple. Available at IH and
A.M.S. ;	
A FEW TABLES ARE STILL
available for group bookings at
Mardi Gras. Saturday, Jan. 28
for clubs, dorms and other organizations. Call Charlie Graham,
224-9769   for   arrangements.    	
A FEW SATURDAY NIGlfT
Mardi Gras Dance tickets should
be on sale at the Showmart, 9:00
p.m.  sharp.     	
IF ANY "THEOLOGY STUDENT
or teacher, or anybody else, happens to know the sooof sermon
based on the text "Hey, Diddle
Didle, The Cat and The Fiddle
etc.,"   please   call   922-7153.
Transportation
14
MINT-BUS, SLIGHTLY USED,
for sale, Aquire Auditorium The
Collector 12:30, 3:30, 6:00, 8:30
Thurs.,  Jan.  26.   Only 50c.
Wanted
IS
Travel Opportunities
16
TRAVEL TO BROCK HALL AND
meet China face to face! Tuesday,
January 24 — 25c.
STUDY TOUR EUROPE — SUM-
mer '67 — $750. Students under
21 years. Write M. Goodwin, 7011-
20th  Ave.  N.E..   Seattle, Wash.
TWO AMS RETURN FLIGHT
ticUots London-Vancouver. August 25th. Each $195.00. Phone
CA  4-3329.
AUTOMOTIVE   &  MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
'52 PONTIAC SEDAN 6 CYL.
stand, shift. City tested. Good
transportation. $1qq.  261-7166.
1958 DODGE V-8, auto., $450. 1956
Humber 4-speed. Runs excellent.
$175. 731-1566, Tony, after 7 p.m.
1961 VAUXHALL VICTOR. EXC.
cond. First owner, $650. Ste. 203,
2285 W. 6th Ave.   733-2379.
INTERNATIONAL BALL, JAN. 27,
Hotel Georgia. Moonlighters' Steel
Band & Brick Henderson. Tickets
$5.00/couple   at  I.H.   &  A M.S.
YOU HAD BETTER GO TO
Mardi Gras on Saturday night,
because   after  that,   it's  all  over!
ALL   THE   HIGH-STEPPERS   HIT
Mardi   Gras   on   Saturday   night.
WIN FRIENDS! INFLUENCE
People! Mardi Gras! Saturday
night!
WHO DID TERRENCE STAMP
keep in his basement for 39 days.
See it on Thurs., Jan. 26, 12:30,
3:30', 6:00, 8:30 at the Auditorium
only 50c. "Remember the Collec-
' tor".
Typing
43
TYPING—FAST,    ACCURATE    EF-
ficient,   any   time.   224-5621.
Professional  Tvping
ARDALE   GRIFFITHS   LTD.
8584   Granville   St.
70th   &   Granville   St. 263-4530
STUDENTS   —   TYPING   DONE   IN
my   home.   Essays,   theses,   etc.,
low rates. Phone 733-0734 anytime.
FAST EXPERIENCED TYPIST IN
Acadia Camp. Phone 224-1441
Special student rates.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
HELP!  RED GUARDS MARCH ON
Brock Tuesday, January 24.
Work Wanted
52
INSTRUCTION — SCHOOLS
Music
63
WANTED — EXPERIENCED
drummer and experienced singer
for rock groups. Phone John, rm.
250,   224-3112.
Instruction-Tutoring
64
ALL FIRST AND SECOND YEAR
subjects by excellent tutors: Sciences and arts. 736-6923.
ENGLISH, FRENCH AND History lessons given by B.A., M.A.,
B.L.S.   736-6923.
Instruction Wanted
66
WANTED: STUDENT TO TUTOR
Grade 9 math to girl. $2.00 per
hour.   224-7196.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
'65 MODEL FENDER BASSMAN
Amp. Special heavy-duty speaker
system. New condition. Student
must sell. Phone Pete eves, 224-
5958.
20,000 BUTTERFLIES ONLY 60c.
See The Collector at 12:30, 3:30,
6:00, 8:30 Thurs., Jan. 26 in the
Auditorium.
BRAZILIAN CLASSICAL GUITAR,
hard shell case, Berlitz Spanish
Records, Fort Camp, Hut 4, Room
23,   224-9853.
RENTALS  ft  REAL ESTATE
Rooms
•1
1 SINGLE BEDROOM WITH BATH,
telephone $45 mo. 2606 W. 33rd
Ave.   263-8428 after 6 p.m.
Room & Board
82
Furn. Houses and Apts.
83
1966 HONDA RDSTR. S 600 LIKE
new. Best offer. Phone Gerry
after  6.   732-5663.
1950 AUSTIN, GOOD RUNNING
condition $49.00 for only $1.00
more buy a 1952 Austin for parts.
731-3738 after 6 p.m.
WANTED ONE MALE STUDENT.
21 yrs. to share basement suite.
Private entrance, kitchen, share
bath, $32 per month. Start now.
Phone 261-6120. ask for Bill.
STUDENT WOULD LIKE TO
share her apartment with
another girl over 21. Call 738-6412.
QUIET RESPONSIBLE GIRL
wanted to share apartment with
two others. Near gates on 10th.
Phone   224-4267   after   4   pm.

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