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The Ubyssey Jan 7, 1983

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THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXV,No.ld^4
Vancouver, B.C. Friday, January 7,1983
By R. ROBINSON
Reprinted from the Sheaf by
Canadian University Press
When Sara went to the
hospital to have her
baby, a woman in a nurse's
uniform gave her a free tin of
Lactogen, a powdered baby formula. The woman said that Lactogen would be good for her
baby if her own breast-milk
"wasn't enough." Sara was
worried: she wanted the best
food for her baby. She started
feeding her baby Lactogen as
soon as she got home.
Sara's own milk dried up
before she had even finished the
free sample, so when it did
run out she had to buy more. It
was very expensive. Sara diluted
it with more water than the instructions said, but she didn't
know that — she couldn't read
anyway.
Within two weeks her baby
was sick. Thinking the mixture
too rich, Sara diluted it further
with the dirty, rusty water from
the pump in her neighborhood.
It took a lot of time to mix the
formula. It was more convenient
to mix a whole tin of Lactogen
and keep it in a pail on the floor.
Then she could feed the baby
whenever she wanted.
Her baby became very sick.
He vomited and had diarrhea.
He soon weighed even less than
at birth. By the time Sara took
him to the doctor, it was too
late. He died of gastroenteritis
and malnutrition at age six
weeks.
Lactogen is a product of Nestle, the second-largest food company in the world and the
leading seller of baby-milk
substitutes. The women in the
nurse's uniform was a Nestle's
employee. Nestle products and
practises have been linked to
hundreds of thousands of infant
deaths in the Third World. According to the executive director
of the United Nations International Children's fund, a million
deaths could be prevented every
year if mothers were not
discouraged from breastfeeding
their children.
Although not the only company selling baby formula in the
Third World, Nestle is by far the
largest.
It has been the target of the
largest non-union boycott in
history, started in 1973 when
New Internationalist magazine
first made the company's activities public.
The publicity associated with
the boycott resulted in the
World Health Organization's
passing of the International
Code for the Marketing of
Breastmilk Substitutes. Despite
promises to the contrary, Nestle
has not conformed to the WHO
regulations in any basic way.
The boycott of all Nestle products continues around the
world.
Cow's milk based infant formula was invented in the 1860's
by Henri Nestle, a Swiss
laboratory assistant, and
Nestle's products have always
dominated the industry. When
prepared and used properly,
Nestle formula can be a good
substitute for mother's milk if
necessary. But when Nestle
began expanding its market into
the Third World, misuse of its
formulas produced serious problems,   namely   malnutrition,
LACTOGEN
INFANT FORMULA
ingredients:
nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, weight loss,
gastroenteritis, malnutrition,
and eventual death,
keep out of reach of children.
disease, and death for millions
of infants.
Proper use of infant formula
is complicated and requires a
knowledge of proper preparation methods as well as germ-
free facilities. Both are largely
unavailable in the Third World.
To properly prepare a germ-
free solution for her baby, a
typical Third world mother has
to collect firewood or charcoal
to make a fire, get water from
almost certainly polluted source,
and then boil the feeding
paraphernalia for ten minutes
minimum.Then, she must find a
clean surface on which to set the
boiled bottles and nipples, and
boil a guessed at amount of
water to mix the formula.
Even if a mother goes through
the whole process once a day,
she has no refrigerator, and leftovers are swarming with
bacteria by the time they are used.
Formula costs often take up
nearly half of the income of a
family with a six-month old
child, and many mothers cannot
resist the temptation to over-
dilute. Some, in fact, don't seem
lo see the connection between
the mixture and their baby's
health.
The results are not hard to imagine. Since babies receive none
of the natural immunizing
agents found in breast milk, they
are more susceptible to gastric illness and chest and ear infec-
228-2301
tions. Germ? on bottles, nipple>,
measuring .spoons, and in the
water are likery^ausejaiarFhVa.
Diseases like eczema and
asthma can also occur. If these
alone do not kill the baby, it will
still almost certainly be
malnourished.
"It's like giving a stick of
dynamite and a large matchstick
and a barrel of high-grade petrol
to your children to play with and
saying 'Please be careful how
you handle it.' this is the way we
look at artificial feeding," says
Dr. E. M. Semba, director of
medical services for Gambia.
If a bottle-fed Third World
survives its infancy, its physical,
mental development will almost
certainly be stunted.
What was happening before
Nestle came along? Women were
breastfeeding, of course. Aside
from providing vital immunization against disease, "breast
milk is the original convenience
food. No mixing, warming, or
sterilising needed; no dirty pots
and bottles to wash up afterwards; always on tape from its
specially designed unbreakable
containers. And it is genuinely
the most nutritious wholesome
product on the market. A copywriter's dream," says Mike
Muller in the Baby killer.
Even malnourished women
can adequately breastfeed. "The
remarkable ability of poor
women to breastfeed their babies
for prolonged periods is the
most redeeming feature of an
otherwise bleak nutritional
situation," says Dr. C.
Gopolan, Director General of
the Indian Council of Medical
Research. Breastfeeding can also
increase the time between
babies. The contraceptive effect
comes from the release of the
fertility-inhibiting hormone prolactin directly after stimulation
of the nipples.
Despite the lack of a need for
baby formula products (even industry estimates say that at most
only five per cent of women are
unable to breastfeed), Nestle and
its counterparts have created a
dangerous market in the Third
World using aggressive sales and
advertising tactics. With a
shocking lack of concern for the
consequences, Nestle has played
on the ignorance of its Third
World customers.
Formula advertising aims first
of all to undermine, however
subtly its "competition,"
breastfeeding. Advertisers say
that their products are for use
"when breast milk fails" or "if
mothers' breast is insufficient,"
for instance.
By introducing the idea that
mother's milk could fail, the
likelihood of it happening increases — "fear and anxiety can
actually stop lactation," says
New Internationalist magazine.
An ad saying "with Nestle you
can choose the product best
suited for baby" implies that
breastmilk is not best. And formula ads associate bottle-
feeding with the "good life."
Other aspects of Nestle's promotional campaigns include free
samples, the use of company
personnel acting as health
educators, and industry gifts to
health workers.
Free samples have only one
See page 3: NESTLE Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, January 7,1983
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SIAIV SIAIV SIAIV SIAIV SIAIV SIAIV SIAIV SIAIV SIAIV SIAIV SIAIV SIAIV Friday, January 7,1983
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Nestle infanticide formula
From page 1
purpose — to create a physical
need for the product. By the
time a mother has used up her
free sample she is well on her
way to being unable to
breastfeed. If she buys more (it
costs much less to feed a
newborn than an older infant),
she is hooked. By donating their
products to hospitals, Nestle can
distribute these samples for next
to nothing.
Many Nestle employees have
worn uniforms that are . indistinguishable from those of the
actual employees of the clinics
and hospitals where the babies
are born. Since the Nestle
workers never say that they are
not health workers unless asked,
it is likely that their words about
infant formulas will be taken as
babymilk companies. Nestle and
the rest of the industry denied
that anything unethical was happening. In 1977 a group formed
the Infant Formula Action
Coalition (INFACT), and launched the Nestle Boycott.
Prompted by United States'
Senate hearings on babymilk
sales in the Third World, WHO
and UNICEF met in 1979 with
government and industry
representatives. The industry
agreed to stop promoting its products to the public, but before
the end of the year the International Baby Food Action Network documented over 1,000
violations of the agreement.
The World Health Assembly,
governing body of WHO, met
again in May, 1981, and after
hearing evidence from both sides
NESTLE
absolute fact by intimidated and
unquestioning mothers.
Nestle spends a lot of money
courting the health care profession, subsidizing office furnishing, research, gifts, conferences, publications, travel —
anything to create good will or a
feeling of obligation within the
profession.
"In developing countries
babies who are not breast-fed
die," according to Dr. Samuel J.
Fomon, Vice-President for the
12th International Congress on
Nutrition. "It's hard enough for
these babies to survive under the
best circumstances; exploitative
marketing and merchandising is
tantamount to mass infanticide."
After the first expose of infant
formula-related deaths in The
Third world in 1973, research by
church, consumer, and development groups piled up more and
more    evidence    against    the
voted by a 118 to 1 margin to ac-"
cept the International Code for
the Marketing of Breastmilk
substitutes. The United States
was the lone dissenter. The
WHO code asks governments to:
1) Stop all public advertising
and promotion of artificial
babymilks.
2) Stop the distribution of free
milk samples.
3) Prohibit the use of health
care systems to promote
breastmilk substitutes and to
prohibit the use of company
employees acting as health
educators.
4) Restrict industry gifts to
health workers.
5) Require improved labelling
to emphasize the importance of
breastfeeding and the hazards of
artificial feeding.
In 1978, a Nestle spokesperson called the boycott "an indirect attack on the free world's
economic system. A worldwide
"In developing countries babies
who are not breast-fed die."
church organization, with the
stated purpose of undermining
the free enterprise system, is in
the forefront of this activity."
In 1980 a Nestle influenced
article in Fortune magazine called the boycotters "Marxist marching under the banner of
Christ." When the WHO code
was passed, Nestle said it was
not bound by the code because it
was not a law, but then in March
of this year Nestle said it would
abide by the code.
The apparent purpose of this
Jst x q/ve
V\ some
VWLIC.
was to stop public criticism and
the Nestle boycott.
But violations continued. In
Nairobi, Kenya, Nestle was still
giving out free samples in April.
In Brazil, the Nestle president
said that the Nestle interpretation of the code would require
only "minimal adjustments" to
their practices. In Malaysia Nestle "mothercraft nurses" are still
at work.
The WHO code does not have
the force of law. While certain
countries such as Algeria,
Guinea-Bissau, Lesotho, Sri-
Lanka, and Sweden have practically eliminated unnecessary
bottle-feeding, some countries
don't seem very concerned
about their children.
Pakistan has adopted an
eight-page infant formula
marketing code, six pages of it
written by the industry. Mexico
has done nothing, but recently
received an offer of research
money from Nestle and other
babymilk producers. In India,
Nestle has helped to prevent the
Legislature from considering the
strong  code  which   it  initially
favoured. Everywhere Nestle is
pushing its own interpretation of
the code.
At Home —
The Nestle boycott is alive at
UBC.
The graduate student society
voted during last summer to
boycott Nestle products at the
graduate student centre.
Shortly afterwards, the Alma
Mater Society voted to boycott
Nestle products in its operations,
after receiving a presentation
from INFACT representatives.
Some council members voted
against the motion, saying they
felt they were being asked to
vote "for or against breast
feeding."
The AMS boycott extends to
the Pit, confectionary, and vending machines. Prior to the action, Nestle crunch bars and
nestea had been sold in SUB.
For more information about
INFACT and the Nestle boycott
at UBC, contact Rolf Brulhart at
the graduate student centre.
Until the company shapes up in
its promotion of breastmilk
substitutes in the Third World, the
boycott is still on. It covers the
following products of Nestle and its
subsidiaries:
Coffee & Tea:
Decaf
Encore
Nescafe
Nestea
Taster's
Choice
Beverages:
Montclair
Water
Nestle's
Cosmetics:
Frozen
Maggi
Quik
Lancome
Foods:
McNeill
Crosse &
L'Oreal
Stouffer's
and
Blackwell
Libby
Confectionery:
Fruits,
Souptime
Cheese:
Nestle's
Packaged
Miscellaneous:
Cherry
Crunch
Soups &
Beech-Nut
Hill
Nestle's
Vegetables:
Baby
Old Fort
Swiss
Puddings
McFeeters
Gusto
Pizza
Foods
In the words of a Canadian
Knight
Honey
Nestle   marketing manager,
"Every time » consumer conies
Wispride
Butter
Libby's
into a store and makes a conscious decision not to buy one of
our products, it hurts us." Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, January 7,1983
Racist I.Q. study controversial
By PETER BERLIN
The emminent educational
psychology professor at Berkeley
University is a racist, and he's not
ashamed of it. Professor Jensen
believes that black children are, on
average, 16 intelligence quotient
(I.Q.) points below their white
counterparts. Jensen is careful not
to say that blacks are inferior to
whites. But inevitably, his whole
argument leads him to a racist conclusion.
Common Sense about I.Q.
By Arthur Jensen
Macmillan, 270 pages
The talents which mental tests
analyze, determine, Jensen believes,
the social usefulness and success of
an individual. People who score
below 75 will be unable to run their
own lives, he asserts. He approvingly quotes psychologist Barbara
Lerner who says I.Q. tests reveal a
hard and fast relationship "between
intellectual competence and national productivity, and about the
escalating price we are paying for
incompetence in an increasingly
competitive world market." In
other words stupid people are a
drain on the economy.
Jensen dismisses all those who
have attempted fo argue that I.Q.
tests are culturally, ethnically or
class biased. The current wisdom,
he asserts, is tests that are scientifically accurate and totally unbiased.
Jensen has even less time for
those who claim an individual's
I.Q. test score is largely determined
by the environment he or she grew
up in. On the contrary, Jensen
believes it is beyond doubt that
genes are three times as important
as environment in determining an
individual's I.Q. score. In other
words, our intelligence is determined by what our parents gave us.
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Intelligence then, like other more
visible characteristics, is genetically
determined; just as one race is a different color from another so different races have different average
I.Q.'s. Jensen divides the human
race into Mongoloids, Caucasoids
and Negroids. Except mentioning
that Japanese children score an
average six points higher than
Americans, he ignores Mongoloids.
(The well known I.Q. populariser
and controversial Professor Eysen-.
ck, who Jensen admires, is fond of
telling British audiences that Orientals are smarter than they). He concentrates on whites and blacks.
Blacks, he insists, are 16 points
below whites and over three times
as many fall below the crucial 75
point line.
This book is written for the
layperson. Jensen wisely avoids any
long and complicated technical
passages. He proves each point by
asserting that his views are what all
respectable academics currently
think. He dismisses critics such as
Leon J. Kamin of Princeton. An
eloquent and trenchant critic,
Kamin is mentioned once and put
down as a 'committed an-
tihereditarian.' A quick check along
the shelves of the various campus
libraries indicates that recent books
by psychologists are running two to
one against Jensen's position.
Jensen claims he is a scientist and
the political and philosophical implications of what he writes are not
for him to discuss. His calling compels him to tell what he knows, and
those who try to tell him to shut-up
are undemocratic. In truth he
has forgotten Thomas Jefferson's
exhortation in the Declaration of
Independence. "We hold these
truths to be self-evident that all men
are created equal, that they are endowed by their creator with
certain inalienable rights." Jefferson had no scientific basis for his
claim, his words recognize it is fundamental to a democracy that all
people are treated as equals and
believe themselves to be equal.
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EVERYTHING YOU EVER WANTED TO KNOW ABOUT BEER
Lesson #4 "The pour"
There are many theories regarding this particular facet
of the beer mystique. The one we favour builds a beer
head from the bottom. Start by keeping the glass
upright and pouring down the middle until a head
begins to form. Stop, let the foam build, then tilt the
glass to a forty-five degree angle and continue to pour
down the side. As the glass fills, bring it back to the
upright position leaving a head about two fingers tall.
The beer pour is nearly always followed by the ever
popular beer "unpour", an exercise in which many of
you are already well-versed. Friday, January 7,1983
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Richly boring, mediocre music guide
By KERRY REGIER
The New Penguin Stereo Record
and Cassette Guide should be most
valuable as a small monument to the
modern triumph of mediocrity and
the celebration of indistinguishable
uniformity as a necessary virtue.
The New Penguin Stereo Record and
Cassette Guide
By Edward Greenfield, Robert
Lay ton, and Ivan March
Penguin Books
$14.95
This fat, expensive paperback
volume purports to be a "comprehensive guide to the finest stereo
records of permanent music."
Disregarding the snobbery implied in
"permanent" (Is Duke Ellington less
permanent than Claude Boiling?),
the book is more a guide to the
bland, inoffensive, and
unimaginative, "motorway
music," as the authors describe
Ron Goodwin's highly recommended scores for such films as those
Magnificent Men In Their Flying
Machines.
Almost invariably the authors
praise those performances that are
perfect from a technical viewpoint,
but display as much heart and
humanity as a glass of distilled
water. Their unwritten code, too
literally drawn from the great interpreter Toscanini by less fiery minds,
holds that an exact translation of
printed score without alteration is
the musical ideal, as if any possible
notational system could fully represent a human emotion.
Greenfield, Layton and March
dismiss and trace of this sort of living performance as "idiosyncratic,"
or worse, "distorting."
And thus the New Penguin Guide
condemns any performance which
adds expression to that printed in the
score, and thus Brahms whose
sparsely marked scores demand interpretation, becomes the cold in-
Forty-eight
farcical
funnies
By JACK T1ELEMAN
Forty-eight Hours does what
many movies attempt and fail. It
combines comedy with a thriller.
The humor in this feature is good; it
meshes itself within the plot and
flows smoothly from scene to scene.
The movie does not cover any new
ground as far as the story line goes.
It is your average cop versus
escaped convict movie with a few
twists. This time the convict is chased by a cop and another con on 48
hours leave.
48 Hours
Playing at Downtown
The movie stars Nick Nolte and
Eddie Murphy. Aha, you say, Nick
Nolte comprises the dramatic part
of the film and the new wonder
from Saturday Night Live, Eddie
Murphy, does all the comedy.
Wrong. Eddie Murphy does both.
On the other hand, Nick Nolte
plays, well, Nick Nolte.
The plot has a slightly different
slant to it, involving a prison break
out that unites two members of an
old gang who are after the loot
which has been hidden for years.
Murphy just happens to be a
member of the same gang, and
Nolte's after the gang because they
killed two cops. Exciting car chases
and shootum ups follow. The only
drawbacks of the film are excesses
of blood, and flaws which do not
detract from the film. Besides the
old plot line and a few absurd
scenes, the movie is very funny and
entertaining.
tellectual Bernard Shaw believed him
to be, boring and devoid of any
emotional nuance, as in the performances of Karajan who receives high
honors.
In the introduction, the new
Penguin Guide limits itself generally
to records from the last five years.
The authors try to rationalize this by
writing about availablity, but the
real reason, only fleetingly stated but
clearly evident from their reviews of
records, is that their prime consideration in music is the qualtity of
recorded sound.
And there, in the illustration of
that attitude to music, the Penguin
Guide is most valuable. For over the
last three decades it has become the
fashion (and not only in music) to
concentrate on mere technical accuracy and precision that can be
gained without risk and to deny and
It may be that the problem arose,
as Walter Benjamin fifty years ago
suggested it would, with the
unlimited reproduction of art. When
Almost invariably the authors praise
perfect performances which
display as much heart and humanity
as a glass of distilled water.
even attack the little mannerisms and
idiosyncrasies, the asymetries that
are the essence of individuality and
life.
everything is equally easy to obtain,
everything becomes equally valued
— that is, cheaply — and so the
overwhelming alpine grandeur of a
Bruckner symphony becomes common, ordinary, a background to
other things: "motorway music."
Nearly all the recordings recommended in the New Penguin Guide
make superb background music, but
they are impossible to listen to by
themselves from beginning to end,
for they are infinitely boring in their
sameness. To be sure the sound is
always miraculously opulent, but it
is the opulence of unvarying
niceness, of lounging all day unmov-
ing in a Jacuzzi, of a diet devoted exclusively to chocolate candy, or of
Ray Bradbury's coddling wall-sized
televisions; music as a pleasant
unruffling anesthetic.
Good movie, but verdict obvious
By PETER BERLIN
The television advertisements
really give The Verdict Away. It is
clear from them that this is another
courtroom drama movie in which
the lawyer for the goodies pulls a
late stunt to convince the jury and
win the case against impossible
odds. For those who don't watch
television, the title alone should be
enough.
The Verdict
Playing at the Capital 6
The press showing of The Verdict
was on the same night as the Hill
Street Blues Christmas Eve Show —
so why abandon the manifold
delights of Frank Furillo and friend
to watch more of the same? In these
days of full color 36-inch television
screens and mini-cinemas, the sense
of seeing something special is rather
reduced.
' Well, warts and all, The Verdict
is well worth missing one Hill Street
Blues for — higher praise is not
possible (no-one in their right minds
would miss Hockey Night in
Canada for any movie).
This is largely because of Paul
Newman. Frank Galvin, the
alcoholic two-time loser of a Boston
lawyer he plays, is not a saint
(which is why, after 18 months of
trying, Robert Redford gave up on
the part) but Newman makes the
audience identify with him entirely.
Newman makes Galvin three
dimensional and believable, and is
on screen almost throughout the
film.
The   Verdict's   strength   comes
from the fact that it is not just
NEWMAN, RAMPLING
another courtroom drama. It is also
the story of Frank Galvin's self-
redemption. The man has not won a
court case in four years. When
Galvin is offered a generous out-of-
court settlement by the Boston Archbishop responsible for the
hospital which turned his client into
a vegetable, he turns it down. His
client's relatives are furious, the
defense counsel Concannon (James
Mason) is incredulous.
The film is also the story of
Galvin's romantic involvement with
a mysterious woman played by
Charlotte Rampling and this aspect
of the film is unusually well handled. Nowadays "romantic interest"
almost invariably means a bit of
torrid sex. Here, the romance is actually supposed to engage the emotions.
U.B.C. DEPARTMENT OF STUDENT HOUSING
Invites Applications for the position of
SENIOR RESIDENCE
ADVISOR FOR 1983-84
Single Student Residences
The ideal applications for these positions will be students who
i are in their final undergraduate year, are unclassified, or are
graduate students and who have substantial experience living
and working in residence. These positions will be attractive to
those who have skills and interests in working in an extensively people oriented field. Major responsibilities include the
following:
(a) Supervising the residence's Advisors
(b) Being the contact person between the Department and
the Residence Association
(c) Ensuring that proper standards of behaviour are maintained.
Those interested in applying to be a Senior Residence Advisor should submit a resume and letter explaining their
reasons for being interested in the position to Dima Utgoff,
Coordinator of Residence Student Affairs, at the Ponderosa
Housing Office (mailing address: 2071 West Mall, University
Campus, Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Y9 on or before Friday,
January 14, 1983. Please phone Dima at 228-5778 for furtherj
information about these positions.
Many reviewers are talking about
this film as the one that will supply
Newman with his long-awaited
Oscar. This is not just because his
performance has "star" written all
over it but also because director
Sidney Lumet insists upon shoving
this into the viewers faces over and
over again. Lumet's direction suffers very much from being a solid
journeyman director trying, here at
last, to produce art. Right from the
opening credits there is a tendency
for shots to be terribly self-
conscious in composition. The film
is at its best when Lumet lets his
outstanding cast recite their excellent lines or when camera
operator William Steiner can just
point his camera at the dull winter
Boston landscape and produce pretty pictures.
Particularly strong in support is
Jack Warden as the long-time buddy of Galvin who throws the case
his way, though both Mason as the
ruthlessly efficient big-time lawyer
and Milton O'Shea (what a pleasure
to see himself on working this side
of the Atlantic) as the bullying
judge give both their characters
redeeming human features.
The Verdict, for all that it is
cliched and self-consciously serious,
is well worth seeing firstly for those
who wanted to suck in the star-
quality Newman radiates from
those blue eyes, and secondly for
those who want to see a well-
plotted, well acted, good-looking
and exciting movie that is a couple
of rungs above Hill Street Blues in
depth and is totally free from commencing.
Guess Who's Coming
To The Lethe?
"Winner"
JEFF KUWICA
Pick up your prize at Optical on Jan. 10th
ANSWER: OPTICAL DISPENSARIES
EYES ON CAMPUS
Opening Jan. 10th on the Main Floor of S.U.B.
Behind Info Centre
Come in anytime and meet
Brad Martin and Specs
WILL YOU BE READY
for the
English Composition Test?
ENGLISH COMPOSITION
WORKSHOPS
HIIES
Register Now!
Reading, Writing and Study Skills
Centre for Continuing Education.
228-2181 (245) Page 6
THE    U BYS S EY
Friday, January 7,1983
Rumour has it that
everyone on this
planet will become
enlightened at precisely the same time in the
early hours of Thursday morning next
week.
But before that happens staffers are required to attend the
following meetings to
ensure the universe
unfolds as it should.
Friday
at   3:30
meet in the office to
discuss autonomy.
Sunday
at 1:00
women staffers meet
at Mings and then go
to Kelley's.
Wednesday
at 2:30
general   staff
meeting.
The world awaits . . .
CORKY'S
APPOINTMENT Sf RVlCE
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3644 West 4th Avenue
At Alma
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V    • fascinating articles • travel tips    JjC
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*&    the best prices on travel anywhete    <&»
"'    in the world: travelcuts. And for    v
info on special budget offers. The
Canadian Student Traveller is
the magazine to read.
Available on campus soon! Ask for
,, _    it at your student union or at ynur     '
TRAVEL <T'TS office!
Goire   *41RAVEL
i;.   YourW5y!H   CUTS
>, The travel company of CFS
TRAVELCUTSVANCOUVER
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Learn how to operate and maintain powerful ice breakers,
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- Follow a three-year training program and then embark
on an exciting career which you will find rewarding
in both job fulfillment and salary.
Join the Canadian Coast Guard for
excellent advancement opportunities
offered both women and men.
Eligibility lists for the following categories
will be established and applications will be
accepted until January 31,1983.
• Navigation — English or French
• Marine Engineering — English or French
For more information on admission requirements
and application forms,
return the coupon below to:
Registrar
Canadian Coast Guard College
P.O. Box 3000, Sydney, N.S. B1P 6K7
Please send me an information kit on the
Transport Canada Coast Guard College.
98
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Address.
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STUDY LESS - AND LEARN MORE!
Learn how to reduce your study time and
build a lifetime skill that will help you become
more competitive in the business world.
We'll show you how to:
• Read up to 15 times faster — as much as 3000 words per minute.
• Improve your understanding and recall, even at these fantastic
speeds.
• Breeze through your studying. End all night cramming sessions
and have more free hours.
See how you can increase your reading speed
easily! Visit our FREE lesson demonstration
and registration.
JAN. 11-13 / JAN. 18-20 / 5 p.m. and 8 p.m.
STUDENT UNION BUILDING ROOM 211
Chris Walden, the course leader, has instructed hundreds in Evelyn Wood Reading
Dynamics.
Course is Government-Approved
and course fees are tax deductable.
For more information, call the Reading Academy
986-0216 / 277-0788 / 929-5634
Wmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm^m
WM@W#MMMgM®$M&MM§MMMM Friday, January 7,1963
THE    U BYS SEY
Page 7
Good mystics weaken fantasy
By PETER BERLIN
Dark Crystal is the latest film by
the makers of the Muppets.
Jim Henson and Frank Oz expended a great deal of time,
creativity and money on this puppet
fantasy.
Dark Crystal
Directed by Jim Henson
and Frank Oz
Playing at the ??????
The basic shape of the plot will be
familiar to any fantasy fan. The
world is dominated by forces of absolute evil (the Sketsis-boo) who
live in a nasty castle. The forces of
absolute good (the Mystics-rah) are
not able to thwart them. The wisest
Mystic sends a little Gelfling to find
a bit that was chipped off the Dark
Crystal a thousand years ago. He
must find it and enter the Sketsis
castle where the Dark Crystal is
kept and make it whole again at the
upcoming alignment of the three
suns.
The movie's strength is in its
lesser characters and the Sketsis.
They are marvellously horrible.
Enough to freak out any child. The
movie's weakness is the Gelflings.
They are obnoxiously sweet and
lovable. Any normal viewer would
willingly see the unbelievably
unpleasant Sketsis rule forever, for
the pleasure of seeing the creepy little Gelflings stonked.
For all the creators' hard work
the film falls down because it tries
too hard. It tries to make sure that
it will attract the older fantasy fans
while not abandoning the type of
style that is meant to appeal to
younger children. It's a pity because
it could have been very good.
Become Famous
THE ARTS SOCIETY REVIEW IS
NOW ACCEPTING POEMS, SHORT
STORIES, SATIRE, DRAWINGS,
PHOTOGRAPHS, ETC. FOR
PUBLICATION IN JANUARY'S
MAGAZINE. IF YOU HAVE SOME
WORK YOU WOULD LIKE CONSIDERED FOR PUBLICATION, SUBMIT IT, COMPLETE WITH YOUR
NAME AND PHONE NUMBER, TO
THE ARTS UNDERGRADUATE
SOCIETY OFFICE IN ROOM 107,
BUCHANAN. FOR MORE INFORMATION, CALL 228-4403 OR DROP BY
THE AUS OFFlCE.DEADLINE JANUARY I4t 19S3
CONCORDIA
UNIVERSITY
Graduate
Studies
in Religion
M.A. History and Philosophy of Religion
M.A. Judaic Studies
Ph.D. Religion (Comparative Ethics option
Judaic Studies option)
Registration in January, May and September
Research Assistantships available
For information on Concordia Fellowships Write:
The Awards Officer, Graduate Studies Office
Tel: (514) 879-7317
For information on programs and research
assistantships Write:
M.A. Program Director
or Ph.D. Program Director
Department of Religion
Concordia University
1455 de Maisonneuve Blvd. West
Montreal, Quebec, H3G 1M8
Tel.: (514) 879-4194
a.1/,    NON-CREDIT COURSES INSTRUCTIONAL SPORTS PROGRAM - 1982-83
There is an extensive non-credit instructional sports program covering a wide variety of sport/recreational
activities. Registration for all classes will take place during regular office hours at the Intramural-Recreational
Sports Office, Room 203, War Mem. Gym. (Phone 228-3996).
SECOND TERM REGISTRATION: Monday, January 3-Friday, January 14, 1983
PLEASE NOTE: Classes CANCELLED on the following holidays: Mid Term Break, Thurs.-Fri., February 17-18, 1983
***AII dates are subject to last minute changes!!
Course
Code
Course
Day(s)
Term
Time
Place
Fee
Date(s)
Max.
Number
100 FITNESS DIVISION
112
142
144
146
148
152
154
162
172
Yoga (Hatha)
Strength & Circuit Training
Strength Training for Women
Strength & Circuit Training
Strength Training for Men
Rhythm Fit—"The Fitness Group"
(Higher Intensity)
Rhythm Fit—"The Fitness" Group
(Lower Intensity)
Rhythm Fit—"The Fitness Group"
Drop-In (All Levels)
Faculty/Staff-Exercise Class
(Dr. Stanley Brown)
Gymnastics (Recreational Level)
*Fee is the cost of membership
Mon/Wed
Mon/Wed
Turs/Thur
Mon/Wed
Tues/Thurs
M/Tu/W/Th
Mon/Wed
Wed/Thurs
Sat
Tu/Wed/Th
Mon/Wed
Sat
Sat
Mon/Wed/Th
4.30- 6:
4:30- 5:
4:30- 5:
4:30- 5:
4:30- 5:
7:30- 8:
12:30- 1:
4.40- 5:
10:00-11
4:40- 5:
12:30- 1
10:00-11
10:00-11
:30 p.m.
30 p.m.
30 p.m.
:30 p.m.
30 p.m.
:15 a.m.
15 p.m.
;30 p.m.
:00 a.m.
:30 p.m.
:15 p.m.
:00 a.m.
:00 a.m.
War Mem. Gym-Room 211
Weight Room-War Memorial Gym
Weight Room-War Memorial Gym
Weight Room-War Memorial Gym
Weight Room-War Memorial Gym
SUB Ballroom
War Memorial Gym
Gym B-Osborne Centre
Gym B-Osborne Centre
Gym B-Osborne Centre
War Memorial Gym
Gym B-Osbome Centre
Gym B-Osborne Centre
$25.00
$10.00
$10.00
$10.00
$10.00
$30.00
$30.00
$30.00
$30.00
$30.00
$30.00
$30.00
$1.00 per
10
16
17
12:30- 1:05 p.m.
Tues/Thurs II 7:00- 8:30 p.m.
in the Intramural-Recreational Sports Program — F/S Members
Gym E-Osborne Centre
Gym G-Osborne Centre
•$30.00
$25.00
Jan. 17-Mar. 30
Jan. 17-Feb. 9
Jan. 18-Feb.
Feb. 21-Mar.
Feb. 22-Mar.
Jan. 17-Mar. 31
Jan. 17-Mar. 30
Jan. 19-Mar. 31
Jan. 22-Mar. 26
Jan. 18-Mar. 31
Jan. 17-Mar. 30
Jan. 22-Mar. 26
Jan. 22-Mar. 26
Jan. 17-Mar. 31
Jan. 18-Mar. 1
30
20
20
20
20
100 +
100 +
100 +
100 +
100 +
100 +
100 +
50 +
50
20
200 COMBAT SPORTS DIVISION
212 Fencing
222 Shotokan Karate
232 Women's Self Defence
■     242 Kung Fu
300 OUTDOOR PURSUITS DIVISION
Wed/Fri
Mon/Thurs
Mon
Mon/Thur
9:30-10:30 p.m.
7:00- 9:00 p.m.
7:00- 8:00 p.m.
9:00-10:30 p.m.
Gym E-Osborne Centre
Gym E-Osborne Centre
Gym E-Osborne Centre
Gym E-Osborne Centre
$20.00
$20.00
$10.00
$20.00
Jan. 19-Mar. 2
Jan. 17-Mar. 31
Jan. 17-Feb. 21
Jan. 17-Mar. 28
16
30 +
40
30 +
312 Power Skating (Learn to Skate)
322 Power Skating (Hockey Players)
332 Mountain Climbing
342 Golf
352 Orienteering
363 Flat Water Kayaking
Mon/Wed
Mon/Wed
Thur (4 lessons only)
Tues/Thurs
Thur (4 lessons only)
Mon
Mon
Sat (Open
Water session
II              10:30-11:30 a.m. Thunderbird Winter Sports Centre $20.00
II              11:30-12:30 p.m. Thunderbird Winter Sports Centre $20.00
II              12:30- 2:30 p.m. Osborne Centre-Room #203 $20.00
II               1:30-2:30 p.m. Gym E-Osborne Centre $20.00
II              12:30-2:30 p.m. War Memorial Gym-Room #211 $10.00
II               9:00-12:00 p.m. UBC Aquatic Centre (Film & Lecture $90.00
10:00-12:30 p.m. and Poo| Sessions)
10:00-3:00 p.m.
Jan. 17-Mar. 30 30
Jan. 17-Mar. 30 30
Mar. 3-Mar. 24; Sat.. Mar. 26 15
Mar. 1-Mar. 31; Sat., April 2 16
Mar. 3-Mar. 24; Sat., Mar. 26 15
Feb. 28 & Mar. 7; Mar. 14 & Mar. 21 8
Sat., Mar. 26
"Taught by: Brian Creer — Whitewater Canoeing Assoc, of B.C.
400 TEAM SPORTS DIVISION	
412      Power Volleyball - all levels
(Beg. & Intermediate)
500 RACQUET SPORTS DIVISION
Tues/Thurs
3:30- 4:30 p.m.
War Memorial Gym
$10.00
Jan. 18-Feb. 22
30+
512 Tennis (Beginner)
514 Tennis (Beginner)
516 Tennis (Beginner)
518 Tennis (Beginner)
528 Tennis (Advanced)
530 Tennis (Advanced)
534 Tennis (Beginner)
536 Tennis (Intermediate)
542 Badminton (Beginner)
544 Badminton (Intermediate)
564 Racquetball (Intermediate)
600 DANCE DIVISION	
Mon/Wed
Tues/Fri
(9 lessons)
Mon
Tues/Fri
Mon
Mon
Thu (8 lessons)
Thu (8 lessons)
Mon/Wed
Mon/Wed
Tues/Thur
12:30- 1:30 p.m.
1:30- 2:30 p.m.
8:30-10:30 p.m.
1:30- 2:30 p.m.
8:30-10:30 p.m.
11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
12:30- 2:30 p.m.
12:30- 2:30 p.m.
6:30- 7:30 p.m.
6:30- 7:30 p.m.
4:15- 5:00 p.m.
Armouries
Armouries
Armouries
Armouries
Armouries
Armouries
Armouries
Armouries
Gym B-Osborne Centre
Gym B-Osborne Centre
Winter Sports Centre
$20.00
$20.00
$20.00
$20.00
$20.00
$20.00
$20.00
$20.00
$20.00
$20.00
$35.00
Jan. 17-Feb. 16
Jan. 18-Feb. 15
Feb. 21-Mar. 21
Feb. 22-Mar. 25
Jan. 17-Feb. 14
Jan. 17-Mar. 21
Jan. 20-Feb. 10
Feb. 24-Mar. 24
Jan. 17-Feb. 16
Feb. 21-Mar. 23
Feb. 22-Mar. 24
24
24
24
24
16
12
24
16
20
20
8
612 Modern Dance (Beginner)
622 Modem Dance (Beg.-Inter.)
632 Modem Dance (Intermediate)
642 Modem Dance
652 Jazz Dance (Level III) (Intermediate)
654 Jazz Dance (Level I) (Beginner)
666 Jazz Fit
658 Jazz Dance (Level II) (Beg.-Inter.)
672 Character Dance
Tues
Mon
Thu (9 lessons)
Wed
Mon/Wed
Mon/Wed
Tues/Thur
Tues/Thurs
Tues/Thur
2:30- 4:30 p.m.
5:00- 7:00 p.m.
2:30- 4:30 p.m.
5:00- 7:00 p.m.
12:30- 1:30 p.m.
3:30- 4:30 p.m.
12:30- 1:30 p.m.
12:30- 1:30 p.m.
4:30- 5:30 p.m.
Armoury-Rm. 208 $30.00
Armoury-Rm. 208 $30.00
Armoury-Rm. 208 $30.00
Armoury-Rm. 208 $30.00
Gym B West-Osborne Centre $30.00
Gym E-Osborne Centre $30.00
Tues: Gym E-Osborne $30.00
Thurs: Gym B West
Armoury-Rm. 208 $30.00
Armoury-Rm. 208 $30.00
Jan. 18-Mar. 22
Jan. 17-Mar. 21
Jan. 20-Mar. 24
Jan. 19-Mar. 23
Jan. 17-Mar. 30
Jan. 17-Mar. 30
Jan. 18-Mar. 31
Jan. 18-Mar. 31
Jan. 18-Mar. 31
25
25
25
25
75
75
75
50
15 Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
criday. Jam
Voodoo hum
—chrla wong photo
MORELAND
From  punk to metropolitan rodeo   music.
Wall of Voodoo is an exciting
new American band on the rise.
When they played the Luv-A-Fair
in December Ubyssey staffers Peter
Berlin and Chris Wong talked to
guitarist Marc Moreland and
keyboard player Bill Noland. Now
read on . . .
You started out  making  soundtracks, why soundtracks?
We've been in bands all our lives.
When the Scolls broke up, the punk
band me and Chas were in, Stan's
band had broken up too. We just
met up and we both kind of were
looking for the same thing, not to
play any bands anymore and just
get away from the whole band
thing, and make money in other
ways we enjoyed musically. We
were both interested in doing
soundtracks.
Was it easy to get work doing that?
No, it was real hard. In fact
that's why we're not doing it now.
Why did you call your company
Wall of Voodoo?
We thought it would explain
what the music is about because
what we were really looking for was
low-budget type horror stuff. And
we thought the name Wall of
Voodoo would present it pretty well
because that's what we kind of
sound like, a wall of voodoo. It
would keep us away from the big
timers and automatically the low
budgeters might pick up on it.
One of your tracks we heard seems
influenced by Morocone, and Interstate 15 sounded very much
Morocone.
That's one thing that me and
Stan have in common. We have
always been listening to Morocone.
We're both into those spaghetti
westerns that he did. We were trying to get into the same thing but it
Luv-a-fah
By PETER BERLIN
Stanard Ridgway is a star. He is
the first person who I have seen at
the Luv-a-fair nightclub who has
been more interesting to watch than
the image directly above on the mirrored ceiling.
It is difficult to say exactly what
it is about Wall of Voodoo's lead
singer that makes him so
fascinating. In part it's the music,
no doubt, but movements and personality are most unusual even in
the rock world where studied eccentricity is the norm.
Ridgway dresses rather like the
ex-country singer in his sports
bootlace tie, dark jacket and shortish haircut. But though he dresses
conventionally, it becomes immediately apparent that he is really
quite unusual. And so are the rest
was just kind of ridiculous. We're
from Hollywood, we didn't fit.
We couldn't get into it. We got a
lot of offers. We were supposed to
do a movie called Motel Hill. That
fell through because somebody with
connections who knew the producer
got the job.
Does that love with The B-movie
carry over in the musk now?
Yeah, definitely I think so. On
our album Dark Continent, it
didn't so much. A lot of that was a
collective history of Wall of
Voodoo. The first EP we did and
the new record, Call of the West,
are pretty much what we are aiming
for.
You have an odd line-up, it's not
the conventional sort of bass,
guitars, drums. What is the actual
line-up of the band now?
We have two rhythm machines
and Joe plays drums and percussion
over the machines and the percussion is more than just your standard
fare. There's blank guns and pots
and pans and duck calls and all
sorts of things.
Does he just do that for a gimmick
or is it because he likes the sounds?
No, he's really interested in the
sound and the texture. He's not your
typical drummer, or your typical
person.  Mark plays guitar. Chas
"Our version of
Ring of Fire,
that was
a mistake.
We just plugged
in these wires
and it made
this
noise.
»
plays a mini-moog and bass guitar,
and does some backing vocals. Stan
plays guitar on one song and plays
some keyboards. I play a Jupiter
Eight, and a Roland little organ,
and I play coronet on a couple of
songs.
You got into all these sort of things
like rhythm machines and electronic
keyboards slightly before the
modern vogue started.
When me and Stan started, it was
just me and him and the rhythm
machine. We played around, and iry7,1983
THE    U B YSSEY
Page 9
anizes with duck calls
hit with wall of noise
of the band and their music.
Wall Of Voodoo is a very
evocative name, it immediately conjures up images of something dark,
menacing and very solid, and that is
what the band sounds like.
With Chas T. Gray and Bob
Noland on a variety of keyboard instruments, Marc Moreland playing
guitar and Joe Nanini on percussion
with the assistance of several self
playing rhythm machines, the band
produces, you've guessed it, a
veritable wall of noise.
The sound is distinctive and
several of their original songs with
simple melodies picked out on the
synthesizer are, like the plague,
quite catchy.
Alongside the writhing Ridgway,
who teased the audience mercilessly
between songs, Marc Moreland is
also a fascinating spectacle. His
face changes expression with every
note he plays.
The band of course had sound
problems. Its all part of the wacky
Luv-a-fair scene.
Towards the end of the set the
originality began to wear thin and
some songs sounded loud and
uninspiring. Maybe the volume had
made me deaf to the subtlities.
Still the set was full of good
things. Stand out songs were the
band's own version of Johnny
Cash's Ring of Fire, the slow
builder Lost Weekend and the
Morricone-ish Interstate 15.
But the individual songs are not
important Ridgway and his band,
look and sound truly original and
they don't seem to be trying.
RIDGWAY
bizarre
people were not ready for it at all.
The rhythm machine thing had not
began yet in England or wherever it
did come from. At that time it was
pretty rare.
Do you think it's going to replace
the good old guitar and so on? How
much further do you think you can
take it?
We're not really trying to take it
anywhere. I don't even consider us
as an electronic type synthesizer
band or rhythm machine band. We
just like to mess with that junky
electronics with acoustic instruments, percussion, anything.
As far as the synthesis and stuff
go, we really don't know much
about how it works. It's kind of just
trial and error and punching the
buttons and doing some things right
and doing some of it wrong, hooking it up wrong.
Our version of Ring of Fire, that
was a mistake. That was when we
first bought our Moog synthesizer
and we didn't know anything about
that stuff. We just plugged in these
wires and this Oberheim sequencer
we purchased and made this noise,
the Ring of Fire noise. Finally
everything just blew up and all this
smoke was coming out. We took it
to the mechanic and he said, "What
are you guys doing this is all wrong,
no wonder it blew up." So he had
to modify it for us to play it.
I always thought and I still think
(our) music isn't so mechanical as a
lot   of   synthesizer   and   rhythm
machine bands. There's a couple of
reasons for it. One is Joe playing
over the rhythm machine with
drums and pots and pans, it adds an
element to it. And the fact that we
really don't know that much about
the technical aspect of the synthesizer. We tend to add a little
human qulaity to it, it is not so
polished.
I gather that Stan doesn't go in for
the sort of automaton type lead
singing. I gather he gives quite an
act.
A lot of people won't understand
it. Sometimes it can be real sarcastic, but in a kidding way but
some people get really mad. He's
not your typical lead singer. He
doesn't wear a leather outfit and do
splits in the air.
Given that when you started Wall
Of Voodoo, you didn't want to get
into the band thing, you're enjoying
playing concerts and stuff.
We found out we could play in a
band and enjoy ourselves at the
same time. There are things we
don't like about the music business.
The wliple business is horrible.
Your signed up to I.R.S., which is a
big international record company,
selling millions of records in Japan
and Europe.
Who us? We haven't been released in Japan. In Europe we're doing
pretty well. We just got back from
England and the press has been
really really good.
What's it like being mega stars?
I haven't been recognized yet. As
far as making money and things, I
made more money as a gardner.
We're just on salary right now. It's
progressively moving.
Do you think it begins to get in the
way, ~J>;! you begin to worry about
selling records rather than doing
what you want to do?
Oh no. That's not why we got in
this business. Money buys time.
That would be nice, but the most
important thing is making music we
would like to go out and buy.
Nobody's told us how to make the
sound. The two can go hand in
hand and if it doesn't, I'll go back
to gardening.
People tend to talk about the L.A.
scene. You played in bands around
L.A., did that influence you?
I'd probably end up making the
same kind of music wherever I lived. Its kind of funny being tagged a
Los Angeles band because I don't
think Wall Of Voodoo sounds like a
typical L.A. band. We're not Axe
or the Beach Boys. There's kind of
this weird attitude towards west
coast bands in the rest of U.S. and
Britain. And I think maybe we've
been hopefully kind of a pleasant
surprise to them that we don't have
the sound like the L.A. bands.
You said that you all had something
in common.
What I mean by that is our attitude. Our musical differences are
completely opposite which kind of
makes Wall Of Voodoo. When me
and Stan started the band, I had
generally been playing punk and I
had been playing a lot of heavy
metal when I was a kid. And Stan
had been playing country and
western. We had nothing in common as far as musical tastes.
"We thought »tx atari In * untvarae l« eomethlng the Stan «4n't notice la (terkneM forever
and ever and mm end tMwtla are breaking fe and we didn't knew v» uMnYknow and
anything — " "    * _    "•
Somaof»e»»wadMtr»toir^andh*atta^anuH«do«.lft -
of tha Indifferent Star* leaped nearer to thern-
On tha horizon outelde the window. In the direction of Sato Cetf. a cftmeon glow Began
£, Irftorowins atrengthefting In brlghtneea. that wee not the glow of the aim.
'-   *!*   The Long Night had come again.
Jazz vocal group
sticks with Santa
By CHRIS WONG
Those who expected to hear jazz
with the Badazjazz ensemble at the
Commodore Ballroom Dec. 20 were
only partially satisfied. The group,
which consists of eight female
vocalists and a backing quartet, only dabbled in a true jazz vein as
their entire repetoire consisted of
Christmas songs arranged in a slick
but dry manner.
True, the concert was billed as an
Uptown Christmas, but enough is
enough. Song after song talked of
sugar plums, snow fairies, and Santa Claus. But despite most of the
audience's warm reception, a few
scrooges made their presence felt by
talking loudly and clinking glasses
to a distracting level.
The brightest moments came
when some of the vocalists stepped
forward to belt out solos. Colleen
Savage was particularly impressive
with her soulful, gospel-like singing. She displayed confidence
through her clear delivery and
strong, broad tone. Lovie Eli was
also notable. But some of their co-
singers were not so successful. They
seemed to be shouting rather than
singing.
The Tom Keenlyside Quintet
played between the vocal group's
two sets. Their performance was
enough to satisfy a jazz lover's appetite. The group erupted with the
Eddie Harris tune, Freedom Jazz
Dance and kept a high energy level
throughout their performance.
Keenlyside screeched and wailed,
building his solo to a furious
climax.
After years of grinding through
the routine of the local music scene,
Keenlyside has developed a distinctive and powerful style. But influences on his music are still evident. The John Coltrane classic
Giant Steps, which involved a sax-
drum duet between Keenlyside Coltrane classic Giant Steps, which involved a sax-drum duet between
Keenlyside and Graham Boyle, was
very reminiscent of the bizarre
duets that Coltrane carried on with
his drummers.
Keelyside's band also gave a
notable performance. Ted Quinlan
on guitar was impressive and one
wonders why he is still trudging on
in the jazz wastelands of Vancouver. The same can be said of
keyboardist Dave Pickell, whose
wild body movements complimented his virtuoso playing.
But the band needs. better
material. Some tunes played sounded dangerously close to the slick,
commercially geared muzak which
has been plaguing the jazz world.
Tunes like George Duke's Brazilian
Sugar are catchy and pleasant to
listen to but they soon wear thin
and sound tedious.
LJ^%        F0R ™EaTRE INFO CALL 687-1515
voquE
In the Age of Wonder
the
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Director.
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(jMAJURE) Dunbar 7:30 9:40
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CCIMBIAQ "b c  Director.
DARK
CAMBIE at 18th
876-2747
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Wmrn 6 TRACK DOLBY       THE EXTRA-TERRESTRIAl\
fin Six Weeks, you can find memories to/
last a lifetime, (c
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| 70 7   W. BROADWAY      -B.C. Director.
874-1027
at 7:00 9:00
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M\RY Til-ER MOORE
Warning:    Frequent   gory
violence. —B.C. Director.
CflKPSHOW
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70 7 W. BROADWAY
8741927
By George A. Romero, creator of "Dawn of the Dead" and writer
Stephen King creator of "Colo".
The
Price
is Right
hair design ltd.
cut
&$-3S3t
£%£... ute/cvAit buck /
0-ur rt-erd <&set>*£n £ />/z*r~
$a fan ?
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Can Xee/r t/ct/r Aa/y- &c£- Page 10
THE    U BYSS EY
Friday, January 7,1983
Predictions
Several noted newshounds went into seclusion in a cave on Vancouver Island nearly a month ago. The studied the entrails of a
Ubyssey staffer who missed a deadline, took the world and Doug
Kenney's horoscopes, read Tarot Cards ad infinitum, and came up
with these accurate predictions for 1963:
Computers discover humanity; they name Time magazine rag or
the year.
Sports news...team Uganda defeats Soviets in basketball. Win
attributed to human diet.
Socreds defeated by NDP in a landslide election victory; Rhino
candidate gets more votes than our beloved Pat McGeer.
From the floor staff at College Printers...Ndt once will The
Ubyssey finish production before going into overtime.
The Socreds paint pink polka dost on B.C. Place stadium roof.
No reason givne for move.
In a startling revelation it is disclosed that a new president will
appear at UBC in July. It is believed that he has a Scandinavian
name.
Star Wars III...Darth Vader turns out to be E.T.'s father. Steven
Spielberg is shattered.
Princess Di gives birth to quintuplets; British kingdom divided.
The Pope converts...Moonies get new leader.
The Ubyssey gets autonomy in a landslide referendum victory.
The newspaper is no longer in the evil clutches of the AMS.
Hobbitses discovered living in tunnels beneath UBC campus;
Kenney finds a shiny new ring.
Cure for conservatism found; people the world over rejoice in the
streets.
Grad meeting
The next meeting of the grad
class council is January 7, 1983 (today) at 12:30 p.m. in the council
chambers.
The objectives of the grad class
council is to promote direct and
control all grad class activities and
to encourage full participation in
these activities by all graduating
members:
1. Baccalaureate service.
2. Tree planting ceremony.
3. Class day exercises.
4. Congregation ceremonies.
5. Graduation ball.
6. Any additional activity as may
be approved by the grad class. Also,
the grad class council presents the
university with a suitable gift, both
as a symbol of the class indebtedness to the university and as
a memorial of each particular grad
class.
All students in the winter session
who are registered in the final year
of a course leading to a bachelors of
the M.D. degree are eligible to be
members of the "grad class."
The members of the grad class
council include the executive:
President: Tim Hicks (engineering).
Vice President: Bruce Armstrong
(science).
Treasurer: Alan Pinkney (commerce).
Secretary: Jane Newton (home
economics).
Social Convenor: Terry Bert well
(agriculture).
In addition the grad class council
consists of members representatives
from each of the degree granting
faculties or school. The following
faculties or school still need representation.
Agriculture
Arts (2 delegates)
Dentistry
Education
Library students
Medicine
Pharmacy
Planning students
Rehab medicine
Science
The grad class council invites all
interested grads and new representatives to attend today's meeting at
12:30 p.m. On the agenda for this
meeting is the grad class gift,
whether or not to continue funding
grad class composites and proposed
amendments to the constitution
regarding quorum and the valedic-
torium. I urge all graduates to get
out and voice your views.
Cynthia Southard
faculty of education
representative to the
grad class council
CFS and NDP not
sleeping together
I apologize for any misconceptions that may have occurred
resulting from the article in The
Ubyssey (Tues. Nov. 30, p. 3) on
the NDP Convention. There is no
link between the Canadian Federation of Students and any political
party.
In the context of the situation, I
was speaking against a motion that
would force college board elections
to be at-large, elected from the
community, like for instance school
board elections. Present NDP
policy calls for student, faculty,
staff and community representatives to make up the majority of
college boards.
To ensure a_ representative
democracy each.member must be
elected from the community he/she
represents. The motion was suc
cessfully referred to the education
policy committee to be rewritten. I
was pressing the delegates towards
what I saw as a more progressive
education policy that would be better for students. This could be interpreted as "currying" the votes of
the student movement.
Many students, including CFS-
Pacific in B.C., have been trying to
get student college board reps like
we have at UBC. CFS will not be
"pushing" for any political party,
though if there is an election they
will be publicizing the education
policies of each party running. I
hope this has cleared up any confusions.
Lisa Hebert
arts 3
NDP Point Grey delegate
(1W WANT TO TRANSFER
io use roR ONE f£AR?
GE£,   I DWMO,..
News item: G.B. Trudeau to suspend Doonesbury cartoon strip as of Jan. 1983.       '/7l-/?'l
v&Wf
THE UBYSSEY
January 7,1983
"rtte Ubyssey is published every Tuesday and Friday through the university year by the
Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and
are not necessarily those of the AMS or the university administration. Member, Canadian
University Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is in SUB 241k, with the advertising office
in SUB 266. Editorial department 228-2301; Advertising 228-3977.
Why? aakad Robby Robertaon. It buga ma. quipped Nail Lucerne. Juat becauee, aaaerted Pat MacLeod. For many reaaone. none of which I want to
discus* now .napped Snaffin Sharif. That requiraa careful thought, pondered Arnold Hedetrom. It may have something to do *"fojw»*. Sunneee.
aurmiaed Stephen Wiaenthal. Why not? crabbed Jack Tletoman. Socialiem, dogmatized Craig Brooks. Not for my health, whimaied Lisa Morry.
That's life, eulked Jane Bartlett. Fer shurr agreed KeKey Jo Burke. Hafta Selaiaae said so inferred Chris Wong. Prejudice, gesticulated Peter Berlin.
W>hat,flbJout.rtow, what, where and when inquired Robby.
Seek penance before God
As Almighty GOD, I greet you:
As the waning days slip silently
by, My Son and I look forward to
early retirement - near the end of
this year, 1982.
The grind has been devastating
upon human flesh and blood. My
Son works forty hours per week in a
machine shop. Saturdays and Sundays should be a few days of rest
Self-made plug
I am a candidate for the position
of senator representing the faculty
of Graduate Studies. The elections
are to be held January 17 for those
in residences and on Jan. 18 for
most students. I hope that you, my
colleagues, will exercise your franchise.
To aid you in making your decision, I will hold informal discussions with any graduate student on
any relevant topic in the Grad
Centre lounge. The hours when I
will be in attendance will be posted
in the Grad Center.
My concerns are very broad, as
the informal discussions will reveal,
but the following are of particular
concern:
1. The role of graduate students
in adapting the university to the
needs of ordinary people while
developing practical experience in
the use of their knowledge.
2. The need to provide student
housing that integrates such
priorities as day care.
I look forward to your participation in the dialogue of which this
election is but a beginning.
Frank Frigon
candidate
-not so with My Son. He will
sacrifice these days to send Our Letters of hope throughout the world.
We also answer letters from people
who were kind enough to write.
As Almighty GOD, I ask Our
many friends in the newspaper industry to contribute - a sum of
money, no matter how great or
small, whatever your heart dictates
- to Our endeavors to keep Our correspondence alive. I ask this in My
Name also My Sons. We must
sacrifice Our Dignity to ask for
enumeration to keep hope alive
throughout these declining years of
worship. We desperately need funds
to revive Our first Book - ALL
SOULS ARE MINE - so more people will know that I Am truly alive
in  this   Dimension  of  Time  and
Light.
The meager assistance from
Social Security, a small bank account of four thousand dollars and
a paltry pension, is not enough to
carry on Our Works in years to
come.
In My Son's worldly assets, I
must also mention He owns NO
Real Estate whatsoever, nor does
He have an automobile. He owns a
typewriter, a color TV and as He
says, some dingy clothes.
By Grace, We would like to
receive $10,000.00 to reproduce
Our Book; ALL" SOULS ARE
MINE, plus postage.
Eugene Changey
Ohio
Eastern ignorance evident,
editor neglects poverty
Please consider my application
for the position of arts editor for
The Ubyssey.
How much does this job pay? If
it is somewhere in the
neighbourhood of $150-5200 take-
home per week, then I'm interested.
However, if I can take home an
equivalent amount of Vancouver
Island mushrooms, that will be
fine.
I can write real good too.
Even though I'm in Windsor
right now, and I realize that this
might pose some problems in actually editing the copy, doing corrections, etc. I don't see any reason
why all of this can't be done
through the mails: i.e., you mail me
the flats and tell me what bands,
plays, etc. will be performing at
UBC, say, in the next two weeks,
and I'll do the reviews, have them
typeset, and mail them back to you.
Okay?
Thank you for giving me this job;
enclosed   is   my   social   insurance
number for accounting purposes.
John Liddle
editor-in-chief
The Lance student newspaper
University of Windsor
P.S. I am a Bucchanalian.
Sorry John, but all positions on The
Ubyssey are unpaid.
— letters editor Friday, January 7,1983
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 11
One finger up best for traffic and security
A friend of mine tells of his
stratagem for coping with a traffic
police officer who signals him to
stop so he can be charged for an infraction: "If they wave a huge red
flag, or sets off a shower of
fireworks, or shoots a cannonball
that whistles right past my
ear...OK, then they've got men, fair
and square. But if they just crook a
finger suggestively, or simply lean
on their horn, I'm liable to suddenly remember an appointment and
burn rubber putting space between
us.
They might catch up; but then
I'm at my incredulous best: "Oh,
you meant...you wanted me to
stop. Wow, oh geez, hey sorry officer. Here, wanna borrow my
pen?" On audacious days you
might hear me say, "Oh, the cannon blast...I get it, that was supposed to tell me to stop. Right..."
Like a police officer who has
resorted to dragnets, loudspeakers,
walls of flame and parachuting men
and dogs waving flags to provide
recalcitrant drivers with an un-
mistakeable message to stop, the
university goes farther than normal
diligence demands in bringing
students to start.
I refer, of course, to The Buzz,
that stupendous peal of noise that
erupts twice hourly to make us
shake off our inertia and shuffle on
to our next class. Like a swarm of
military police descending with
nightsticks on hapless loiterers, the
barrage of decibels materializes all
around with heart-stopping suddenness. This ubiquitous cattle-prod
mauls our senses with a fury potent
enough to arouse the most obtuse
and lethargic among us.
The Buzz is no respecter of
scholarly contemplation. It
tramples Shakespeare and Einstein
alike. "I've got my job to do," it
thinks, gathering up the force to
savage thousands of thought processes campus-wide.
The Buzz has surpassed its
nominal role of merely marking the
transition between contiguous time
periods. It itself constitutes a
bizarre, twisted period, in which
tranquility is overturned and chaos
reigns. Its strength is only exhausted after approximately four
white-hot seconds. Like a military
commander unleashing a nuclear
first strike-against his opponents'
arms stockpile, The Buzz stamps
out all vestiges of mental advancement which have occurred in the
preceeding 60 minutes, perceiving
the threat to its survival posed by
Dog-breath passes her by
This letter is for the owner of the
black Norco ten speed with the blue
handlebar tape who passed me this
morning and all his likeminded
friends. Take it you dog-breathed
cretin and stuff it down your rear
derailleur. Just because I was zipping along at a faster speed than you
were and naturally overtook you
there was no reason for you to put
on that sudden spurt and pass me
ten yards later.
There were any number of ways
you could have justified your
slower speed without assuming you
were physically inferior to a female
and saved yourself the mental
agony of propping up your mar-
shmallow ego. I could be a morning
person, hyperactive, or on some incredible lung-expanding drug.
I hurl abuse at you because your
breath was particularly foul as you
panted your way past my left ear —
but you are not alone. In four years
of daily cycling I can think of only
two occasions when a male cyclist
did not react to being passed by a
female. One of them had a broken
arm.
Die you scum. I have now fixed
rotating spikes on my toe clip. And
when I colonize outer space, no one
— but no one — will be able to
come along unless they are smaller
than me.
Eunice Dunghill
dichotomy 2
Women Students' Office
SPRING, 1983
The following workshops, designed to address the particular
needs and interests of women students at U.B.C, will be offered without charge by the Women Students' Office in the
Spring '83 term.
Watch for additional programs by flyer and in The Ubyssey.
The spring schedule is as follows:
ESSAY BLUES
Thursdays (3 sessions) Jan. 20. 27. Feb. 3      12:30-1:30 p.m.
•TIME MANAGEMENT
Tuesdays (2 sessions)   Feb. 8. 15 12:30-2:20 p.m.
•TEST ANXIETY
Thursdays (5 sessions) Jan. 13-Feb. 10 1:00-2:20 p.m.
Buch. B.212
Brock 106A
WSO Lounge
Brock 223
12:30-2:30 p.m.      Brock 106A
12:30-2:20 p.m.      Brock 301
12:30-2:00 p.m.      Brock 106A
•BASIC ASSERTIVENESS
Tuesdays (3 sessions)   Jan. 11, 18, 25
•ASSERTIVENESS IN
SOCIAL SITUATIONS
Tuesdays (3 sessions)   Feb. 1,8, 15
•ASSERTIVENESS & THE
PROFESSIONAL
WOMAN
Tuesdays 13 sessions)   Feb. 22, Mar. 1, 8
•DECISION-MAKING
Thursdays (3 sessions) Feb. 24, Mar. 3. 10     12:30-2:00 p.m.      Brock 106A
•BROWN BAG
LUNCH GROUP
Wednesdays 12:30-1:30 p.m.     WSO Lounge
(13 sessions) — Brock 223
Jan. 5-Mar. 30
•Pre-registration required at Women Students' Office, Brock 203, tel: 228-2415.
For further information about these programs
or the resources and counselling services for
women students, drop by the office located in
Room 203, Brock Hall or telephone 228-2415.
enlightenment of any sort.
As The Buzz does not believe in
holidays, or rest in general, it remains on duty on weekends, jolting
deserted school buildings at regular
intervals while awaiting the return
of its live victims. The sight of a
casualty falling to the ground clutching his heart is a familiar one for
The Buzz.
This routinely happens to unwitting souls who stray too close. The
Buzz gives a ruthless snicker, makes
an internal note to update its body
count (for The Buzz is nothing if
not meticulous), and resumes its
silent countdown until the next
onslaught.
Could The Buzz be busted, innocence asks. The Buzz has powerful interests behind it, and the
momentum of an institution.
Superficial assaults are warded off
by its deceptively weak front-line
forces: "People wouldn't know
what time it is; classes would run
overtime and professors would demand extra pay; it has to be loud so
deaf students can see it; the cause of
the heart attacks has not been confirmed...."These defences belie the
evil potency of the monster that
lurks behind and has us in its in its
grip.
Uriel Wittenberg
unclassified
CFS plans picnic at hanging rock
The Canadian Federation of
Students (CFS) is Canada's national student organization. UBC is
a prospective member of CFS and is
, accorded all rights of a full member.
UBC must however hold a referendum before March 1984 as part of
the agreement.
On Wednesday January 19 CFS-
Pacific Region will begin a five day
general meeting. Students from all
over the province will descend on
White Rock to discuss a myriad of
issues facing them.
Different committees will be set
up at the beginning of the conference to deal with specific concerns such as CFS budget, student
rights, womens rights, organizational development, services, and
provincial campaign strategy.
Throughout the conference these
committees will make progress
reports and submit a final report to
be voted on by all the delegates.
What is hoped to be achieved by
this general is a coordinated effort,
by all student organizations in the
province, to come to some agreement on strategy to deal with student problems. Delegates will get an
understanding of all important
issues currently facing education.
The coming year does not look
any brighter than the previous one.
Funding cutbacks combined with
developments proposed by the provincial government and administrators could have grave consequences for education.
If you are interested in getting involved as a delegate, representing
UBC, contact Cynthia Southard,
Alma Mater Society, External af
fairs co-ordinator or AMS president Dave Frank in SUB. Four
students will be sent as UBC
delegates. Closing date for applications is Wednesday Jan. 12. Get involved and work with students from
across the province for a better
future.
Stephen Learey
deputy chair
CFS Pacific
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
Presents
SIX CHARACTERS IN
SEARCH OF AN AUTHOR
By Luigi Pirandello
Directed by John Brockington
JANUARY 14-22
(Previews — Jan. 12 & 13)
CURTAIN: 8:00 P.M.
Student Tickets: $4.50
BOX OFFICE * FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
* ROOM 207
Support Your Campus Theatre
NOMINATIONS OPEN
A.M.S. EXECUTIVE
President
Vice-President
Director of Finance
Director of Administration
Coordinator of External Affairs
And for people wanting to be voting
members on the Referendum
Capital Projects Development
Committee.
Forms available in Room 238 — Call
228-3971 or 228-3972 for more information.
CLOSE FRIDAY, JAN. 14th/83 Page 12
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, January 7, 1983
Basketball
'Birds future
open question
By MONTE STEWART
Christmas has come and gone
and another year is upon us but the
men's basketball team continues to
perform like a bunch of turkeys. It
remains to be seen whether the
Thunderbirds are a good team, a
fair team, or a mediocre team.
The 'Birds opened the 1982-83
season with a successful fall tour of
Southeast Asia where they posted
an impressive 5-1-1 record. They
returned home and maintained a
winning record in exhibition games
against Canada West Conference
and local opponents. However, it
seemed that, no matter what, UBC
could not win the big games —
tournament games, that is.
In their first tourney of 1982, the
Buchanan Classic, the hoopsters
lost the first game at Simon Fraser
University but rebounded to defeat
the Simon Fraser Clansmen at War
Memorial Gym. Unfortunately,
they lost the deciding game at SFU.
(SPORTS)
Nevertheless, things still looked
promising for the Birds — until
they lost starting guard Lloyd
Scrub, after he suffered a knee injury in practice just prior to a Winnipeg tournament. Scrubb, a
sophomore, had been the 'Birds
main offensive threat in most of the
games. Not surprisingly, the 'Birds
— minus Scrubb and point guard
Ian MacKinnon who had stayed
home to study — fared extremely
poorly in Winnipeg posting a
dismal 1-3 record. At this point, the
future appeared very bleak. But
then, just two weeks before
Christmas, UBc pounded Trinity
Western University 104-39 in a
game in which most of the reserves
stood out.
Next up were two Prairie tournaments: Edmonton for the Klondike Tournament which was hosted
by the University of Alberta Dec.
28-30, and Calgary Jan. 2-4.
In Calgary, the Birds started the
tourney the way they had begun the
season. They won. UBC defeated
Ottawa's Carleton University 85-78.
Jamie Boyle and Steve Glover led
the 'Birds with 24 points apiece. At
this point, the future was looking
brighter for the 'Birds. However,
they lost their next two contests,
93-89 to the University of Alberta,
and 66-60 to Athletes in Action.
UBC began the new calendar year
the way they had ended the old one.
They lost. Brandon University Bobcats defeated UBC 83-66 Sunday.
Pat West and Mark Marter paced
the Birds with 17 and 10 points
respectively against Canada's second ranked team. Tuesday, UBC
lost again as the University of
Alberta Golden Bears handed them
a 66-41 loss. Steve Pawlett was
UBC's leading scorer with just 12
points.
So now, the question remains:
Are the 'Birds any good?
To make the answer to this question even more uncertain is the fact
that the regular season has not
started yet. Hitherto, all games
have been exhibition contests.
The regular season does not begin
until Jan. 20 when UBC'travels to
Victoria to face the University of
Victoria Vikings. To make matters
worse, because-of those dastardly
budget cutbacks, the schedule has
been reduced from 20 to 10 games.
Therefore, the 'Birds will be hard
pressed to win in order to make the
play-offs.
"We intend to be one of the four
teams in the play-offs," coach Bob
Molinski stated recently.
That's fine but it still does not
answer the question.
SUPERSALE
5 Days Only
January 10th to 14th
LADIES       {
SWEATERS
Values to $40.
Now only
$17
MEN'S
CORDUROYS
Price was $25.
Now
$17
DRESSY
BLOUSES
Regular prices
$26-$38. Now only
$17
Men's Winter
VESTS
Sale priced
$22
Many new styles of jeans
at our usual low prices.
R. A. JEMS
Sale will be held in the
Main Concourse, SUB
The black sheep of Canadian liquors
Yukon
Jack
Soft-spoken and smooth,
its northern flavour
simmers just below the
surface, waiting to be
discovered. Straight, on the
rocks, or mixed, Yukon Jack
is a breed apart; unlike any
liqueur you've ever tasted.
Concocted with fine Canadian Whisky.
Basic human writes
<-4
pilot  prmm BolUwwf
Incredible new Precise Bail Liner.
Helpful, enlightening Fluorescent Spotliter.
Handy stand-by Fineliner.
Magnificent Mechanical Pencil.
And the world's strongest Lead.
They take your notes, do your term papers,
even write your finals.
On sale at the bookstore.
PHOT
We make it write Friday, January 7,1983
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 13
Asbestos causes Pit to stop
By CHRIS WONG
Cancer-causing asbestos was
removed from the ceiling of the Pit
over the Christmas break but remains in several locations in SUB.
Crocdolite asbestos found in the
Pit is "the most dangerous of
asbestos fibres in terms of causing
cancer," Dr. Eric Jeffries, UBC
Occupational and Environmental
Heath chair said Tuesday.
The asbestos was discovered in
the insultion in small areas of the
ceiling, said AMS general manager
Charles Redden. "There was approximately 300 square feet located
in two seperate areas," he said.
"There seems to be no reason
why only a couple of areas in the Pit
had asbestos and others didn't,"
said Jeffries.
The student pub was closed Dec.
16 and moved to a temporary location in SUB ballroom aftr a sample
analysis was taken by physical plant
and an investigation was done by
the Worker's Compensation Board,
Redden said.
"Once it was explained as to how
hazardous it was, we decided to immediately close the Pit down," he
said.
Redden said he is concerned over
— nail lucanta photo
FOREIGN STUDENTS from University of Mars were sucked into unenviable task of mining rich veins of
asbestos from Pit. Asbestos will be used for manufacture of Calvin Klein shrink-to-fit swimwear, lingerie, and
stockings. And as new cost-saving measure, Ubyssey will be printed on paper with 30 per cent asbestos content.
Red-hot issues in Ubyssey still expected to burn for rest of year though.
Bleak summer for paper
By LISA MORRY
Deficits and a poor local advertising market may strangle a student
newspaper this summer at UBC.
Charles Redden, Alma Mater
Society general manager, said last
summer's paper, the Conventioner,
cost too much and left a huge
deficit for publications.
"If there were to be a summer
student paper this year, there would
have to be fewer pages and a reduction in paid staff," said Redden.
The Conventioner was the first
summer student paper on this campus. The paper, which provided
jobs for six students was funded by
a government grant and local advertising.
Earlier in the summer, The
Ubyssey tried unsuccessfully to
operate a paper on campus using a
federal student employment grant
but was eventually forced to merge
with the AMS's Conventioner to
save the student jobs. The Conventioner published every two weeks.
"We can likely assume there will
be no grant for a summer paper this
year," said Redden. "We will have
to see how much subsidy can be obtained from council." Student
council president Dave Frank said
"last year's problems should be
avoided, the publications office is
upset because The Ubyssey was supposed to eat the summer losses this
winter."
Publications manager Sue
Cadeny said "there won't be a
Ubyssey this summer, we can't afford it." She is doubtful that the
AMS can afford a Conventioner
either.
"A summer Ubyssey is the furthest thing from my mind," said
Cadeny, "I'm trying to get throu
gh The Ubyssey, and I don't want
to tackle getting advertising for a
summer paper."
"The convention delegates want
to read light, nice things," said
Cadeny. "They don't want UBC
news.
"There are more tourists on campus in the summer than students,"
she said, "they want to read about
Stanley park, the Botanical
gardens, and other tourist attractions."
"As for a summer student
newspaper, I'm not going to waste
more time on it," said Cadeny.
"I would like to see a summer
Ubyssey," said Frank, "but I think
you are looking at once every two
weeks, and there won't be much
money for student salaries. I
would have to be a labor of love,"
he said.
This year council wants to charge
summer students a pro-rated AMS
fee.
The summer paper is a service for
summer students so some money
from summer session students fees
should contribute to it Frank said.
"There are administrative problems
involved in collecting the money
however," he said.
"The Conventioner was financially and business-wise a good
decision, but a poor product,"
said Frank and added The Ubyssey
should come up with a proposal."
Bank held up
The line up stretches to the
doors of and rapidly loops
around the opposite wall.
It's Tuesday, 12:35 p.m. and
the Bank of Montreal extends a
familiar welcome to its student
customers.
"I wouldn't do it. It's ethically debased, there's something
morally wrong about it," said
Walter Wilting, English 4, contemplating the 40 to 50 minute
wait to reach one of the six
tellers.
As Wilting wandered off in
bewilderment, the line up swelled behind him with the arrival of
half a dozen people that were
there in response to a finance
department statement that second term fees were due January
4. Some waited anxiously to
deposit money in their account
before the university cashed
their cheques.
"I prefer to do things the
other way around," said Chris
Richardson, Science 2, who
didn't know that fines for late
payment of fees don't apply until January 14.
"We were surprised at the
number of people who reacted
to that one," said P. D. Bullen,
senior accountant at the finance
dept. referring to the December
fee statement.
There was a "constant
stream" of students through his
office all day, he said.
"It's always been that fees are
due the first day of lectures. If
we sent out statements saying
fees were due the 14th then we'd
have 20,000 students in here on
the 14th."
the long period of time people have
been exposed to the asbestos which
has beep in the ceiling since the Pit's
opening.
"You're talking about seven
years. You're going to have someone jump up and have a handful
(of the asbestos) in that period," he
said.
But there is no danger to previous
Pit patrons, according to Jeffries.
"There would probably be no more
danger than the amount of asbestos
in the environment. The amount of
exposure was minimal, almost
negligible," he said.
"It was beginning to flake and its
only dangerous when it flakes," added Jeffries.
Jeffries said the greatest potential
hazard is to maintenance staff who
were in close contact with the
asbestos.
It was initially discovered in the
cage area located near the games
room, then occupied by several
clubs. The clubs have vacated the
area while physical plant workers
remove the asbestos, the AMS
storage room is also being stripped
of the fibre.
Redden said physical plant is
searching for other areas in SUB
where the asbestos may be located.
Other areas which have already
been confirmed as containing the
asbestos include an area outside the
Thunderbird Shop, and near the
lower elevator, he said.
The costs of the work will be
covered by physical plant, said Redden.
"Its not finalized yet but we're
looking at about $15,000," said
Bob Higgins, physical plant
superintendent of construction.
Fund examined
By ARNOLD HEDSTROM
About $375,000 allocated for
capital projects in November's Alma
Mater Society referendum will be
allocated on the recommendation of
a student council committee.
At its Wednesday meeting, student council formed a committee to
oversee preparation of proposals for
the projects based on priorities indicated by students on a survey conducted during voting.
The motion easily passed council
and council's selection committee
will now choose seven AMS
members to serve on the projects
committee. The committee's
meetings will be open to all students
and the motion allows for unlimited
numbers of resource people to participate.
AMS president Dave Frank said
that the committee will have to act
fast on a grant to UBC's daycare
commiittee.
Earlier   it   was   reported   that
$50,000 had been given to daycare.
But Frank told council all proposals
will first go to the committee.
*    *   *
Council defeated a motion to
dissolve student court.
Engineering rep Bob Gill told
council the court should be dissolved
because they had not taken their job
seriously in deliberations over the
validity of the administration director by-election.
Gill complained that the wording
of the judgement was frivilous. "If
students don't feel the court is doing
a serious job the court is useless,"
Gill said.
Arts rep Peter Goddard charged,
"Council didn't like the style of the
judgement and other people didn't
like the content. If it so happens that
council doesn't like it and throws out
the court, it makes a mockery of the
independent judicary." But Goddard added council could object to
the style.
Council Briefs
Law rep Laura McGee said the
wording or tone of the judgement
parodied the style of Lord
Denning.a member of the house of
lords, who frequently satirized situations   before   moving   to   serious
discussion.
*    *    *
Board rep and summer employee
Dave Dale answered charges he'd
not performed his duties during
employment with the AMS last summer.
"I'm guilty of putting direct action ahead of writing," said Dale. "I
spent my time on health grants, the
referendum and I spent a lot of time
with the faculty and alumni associations working on ML A days and student aid and tuition."
Dale also said a Ubyssey article erroneously reported that he would
resign if he didn't complete the
report.
UBCstudent gets
Rhodes to riches
B.C.'s 1983 Rhodes scholar Peter
Goddard isn't too worried where
the money for his Oxford education
is coming from.
Cecil Rhodes, after whom the
former country of Rhodesia was
named, made his fortune in the
South African gold and diamond
business. Rhodes formed DeBeers,
the world's largest diamond company. Most of his fortune went to
the trust when he died.
"It's nice that such money can be
used for such good," Goddard,
history 4, said Wednesday.
"(Rhodes) probably realized that
he was engaged in a sordid
business," he added.
Seventy Rhodes scholarships are
provided across the English speaking world, with 11 of them in
Canada.
There were 29 applicants for the
one B.C. scholarship, Rhodes trust
secretary Michael Brown said
Wednesday.
Brown said the scholarship pays
tuition fees at Oxford, plus a 3,480
pounds ($7,000) yearly living
allowance.
Until recently, women were ineligible for the scholarship. An act
of the United Kingdom parliament
was needed to change the terms of
the will to allow women, Brown
said.
Goddard has achieved a first
class mark in every course for the
past three years.
He is involved with the arts
undergraduate society, the environmental interest group, the
public interest research group, and
currently sits on student council as
an arts representative.
Goddard will be seeking a
graduate degree in modern history
starting in September. Eventually
he will return to a Canadian university to teach history. Page 14
THE    UBYSSEY
WUAIC
Phoenix Jazzara: dixieland, Jan. 7 and 11,
Hot Jazz Club.
Dave Roberta Jazz Club Band: dixieland,
Jan. 8, Hot Jazz.
Jim Armatrong Quartet: dixieland, Jan. 12,
Hot Jazz.
Doctor J: not the basketball player, to Jan. 8,
Town Pump.
Brandon  Wolf:   rambunctious  rock,   Jan.
10-12, Town Pump. Downstairs.
Brian and The Liars: no fooling, rock and
roll, Jan. 13-15, Town Pump.
French Letters: rock sock hop, Jan. 7, Soft
Rock Cafe.
Sundance:   local   reggae  masters  with  a
special guest appearance by the ghost of Haile
Selaisse, Jan. 8-9, Soft Rock.
Rural  Delivery:  bluegrasa, Jan.  10,  Soft
Rock.
Frosty Mountain String Band: bluegrass,
Jan. 13, Soft Rock.
Visible   Targeta/Beverley    Sisters:
automotan rock, Jan. 14, Soft Rock.
Elmer QUI: jazz, Jan. 7, 8 p.m. Tickets »2
students. Mount Pleasant Centre, 225 West
8th Ave.
Masterpiece Music: Bach and others, Jan.
9, 2:30 and 8 p.m. Vancouver East Cultural
Centre. Tickets $6.50 students.
Purcell String Quartet: music by a variety of
great composers, Jan. 7-8, 8 p.m., Jan. 9,
2:30 p.m., UBC Recital Hall. Tickets $5
students.
Nigel North: playing flute and early guitar,
Jan. 9, 8 p.m. Recital Hall.
Bruce Clausen: classical guitar, Jan. 14, 8
p.m. Tickets $2 students, Mt. Pleasant Centre.
Sue Characters In Search Of An Author:
the story of a family's quest for reality, Freddy
Wood Theatre, opens Jan. 12.
Reflections On  Crooked Walking:  Ann
Mortrfee's musical fantasy. Arts Club Granville Island. Tues.-Fri.: 8 p.m.;  Sun: 2:30
p.m.; Sat.: 6:30 and 9:30 p.m.
The Gin Game: by D. L. Coburn, Arts Club
Seymour. Mon.-Fri. 8:30 p.m.; Thurs.: 5:30
p.m.; Sat.: 6 and 9 p.m.
Home: story of farmer who discovers soil is
where the heart is. Waterfront Theatre, 8:30
p.m.; Sat. and Sun.: 2:30 p.m.
Mass Appeal: from the sounds of the title,
many will enjoy this play. Queen Elizabeth
Playhouse, opens Jan. 10.
Two and Two Make Sex: hilarious English
comedy, Metro Theatre, 8:30 p.m.
HpVL£6
Ridge Theatre (16th and Arbutus 738-6311)
To Jan. 13: Max Havelaar, only show nightly
at 8 p.m. $5 admission, $4 for students with
AMS card.
Vancouver East Cinema (7th and Commercial, 253-5455) Jan. 7-9: Blade Runner. 7:30
p.m., and Road Warrior. 9:40 p.m. Jan.
10-11: I Never Promised You a Rose
Garden, 7:30 p.m., The Bell Jar, 9:20 p.m.
Jan. 12-13: The Magic Christian, 7:30 p.m.,
and Bedazzled, 9:20 p.m. $4. per double bill.
Savoy Theatre (3321 Main at 8th, 872-2124)
Jan. 7-9: Diva, 7:30 p.m. and Le Magnifi-
que, 9:35 p.m. Jan. 10-11: Rebel without a
Cause. 7:30 p.m.. East of Eden, 9:40 p.m.
Jan. 12-13: Assault on Precinct 13, 7:30
p.m.. Escape from New York. 9:15 p.m. $4.
Pacific Cinematheque (800 Robson,
732-6119) Jan. 13: Elvira Madigan. 7:30 p.m.
My Sister, My Love, 9:30. Separate admissions, $3 each with membership; $5 double
admission with membership card. New
membership only policy.
Family Housing Rim series (SUB Theatre):
Jan. 8: Walt Disney's Robin Hood. Students
with. AMS card and children: $1 admission.
General: $2.
Cinema 16 (SUB theatre) Jan. 10-11 This
Gun for Hire. 7 p.m.. The Blue Dahlia, 8:40
p.m. Admission with membership ($4): $1 per
show/SUBfilms (Sub theatre): On Golden
Pond. Twilight performance.
Vancouver Indian Centre Artists: traditional weavings and and original screen-
prints. Carnegie Gallery. 401 Main. To
Jan. 8.
A Pancanadian Review Of Panoramic
Views: photography by Henri Robideau,
Coburg Gallery, no. 2, 314 Cordova. To Jan
29.
The Works of Emily Carr: new selection of
oil and watercolour paintings, Vancouver Art
Gallery, 1145 West Georgia. To Jan. 30.
The Articulated Man: performed by Ping
Chong and the Fiji Company, Jan. 13, 8 p.m.
SFU Theatre. Tickets $2.50 students
291-3514.
FRIDAY
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Rendezvous, with announcements for activities
this term, noon. International house main
lounge.
GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES
Some problems of geotectonics viewed from the
North Cascades, 3:30 p.m.. Geological Sciences
330A. With P. Misch, University of Washington.
IRANIAN STUDENTS' CLUB
General meeting, 2:30 p.m., SUB 21S.
THUNDERBIRD BASKETBALL
UBC women vs. Critter, a Vancouver Senior A
league teem, 8 p.m.. War Memorial gym.
UNIVERSITIES MODEL PARLIAMENT
See Jeff Kuwica babble blithering nonsense,
Lawrence Kottnikoff spout Marxist philosophy
and Michael Rosborough do Liberal things, 9
a.m.-6 p.m., the legislature, Victoria.
SATURDAY
THUNDERBIRD BASKETBALL
UBC women vs. Trinity Western in a preliminary
game before the men's game, 6:46 p.m.. War
Memorial gym. Non-conference game vs.
Western Washington, 8:30 p.m.. War Memorial
gym.
SUNDAY
LUTHERAN CAMPUS CENTRE
Dietrich Bonhoeffer film, Memoirs and Perspectives, 8 p.m., Lutheran Campus centre.
UNDERWATER HOCKEY
No practice, first practice Jan. 16, Victoria tournament Jan. 22-23, not at 10 p.m., not at the
aquatic centre.
MONDAY
STUDENT COUNCIL FOR
EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN
Executive meeting, noon, SCEC office. Hut 28,
room 1.
FIRST YEAR STUDENTS' COMMITTEE
Election for chairperson and general meeting,
5:30 p.m., SUB 215.
SCIENCE FICTION SOCIETY
Meeting, noon, SUB 215.
TUESDAY
PRE MED SOCIETY
General meeting, new members welcome, noon,
IRC 1.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Four film series, Persian architecture and human
settlements, new life for the Bedouins, Cairo as
none have seen, and Islam, 7:30 p.m.. Gate 4,
International house.
INTRAMURALS
Drop-in badminton, 6:30-8:30 p.m.. Gym A and
B, Osborne centre.
U.B.C. DEPARTMENT
OF STUDENT HOUSING
Invites Applications for
Residence Advisors for 1983-84
These positions are open only to full-time
registered U.B.C. students. Successful applicants
will be required to live in the residences. Application forms and detailed job descriptions are
available at the Ponderosa Housing Office and at
the Front Desk of each single student residence
area: Totem Park, Place Vanier and W. H. Gage.
Applications will be accepted from January 3 to
January 14th, 1983 at the Front Desks of the Single
Student Residences, or at the Ponderosa Housing
Office.
Friday, January 7,1983
CHESS CLUB
General meeting, info on upcoming speed chess
championships and chess club championships,
noon-2:30 p.m., SUB 205.
WEDNESDAY
BRITISH COLUMBIA
HEART FOUNDATION
Cold turkey dey, all day, all over. Quit smoking
today.
THURSDAY
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION
Testimony meeting, 1:30 p.m., SUB 212A.
INSTITUTE OF ASIAN RESEARCH
Film, Trobriand (?) Cricket, noon, Asian centre
auditorium.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration for classes, also registration for
men's dance class, pointe class, and top
workshop Jan. 22-23. Come to SUB 216E for further information, 11:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m.
PRE-DENTAL SOCIETY
No meetings until Jan. 13 which will be a lecture
on Periodontics by K. Lee, noon, IRC 1.
INTRAMURALS
Drop-in volleyball, 7-30-9:30 p.m.. War Memorial
gym.
CHESS CLUB
General meeting, info on upcoming speed chess
championships and chess club championship,
noon-2:30 p.m., SUB 213.
Saturdays 3:30 to 6 p.m. . . . Piaylist Show {countdown of CITR's top albums and singles).
Sundays 8:30 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. . . . Music Of Our
Time {exploring 20th century music, primarily from
the classical tradition).
Sundays 12:46 p.m. to 3:00 a.m. . . . Reggae
Show.
Mondays 9:30 p.m. to 1:00 a.m. . . . Jazz Show.
Public affairs shows
MON.: Political Forum (political analysis by UBC
political clubs).
TUES.: UBC On Tap {dispenses information and
knowledge tapped from UBC for community consumption).
WED.: Sports Unlimited (sports stories, information and interviews).
THUR.: Cross Currents (insight into issues of conflict and confrontation).
FRI.: Dateline International (analysis of international issues).
Every Saturday at 3:00 p.m. . . . Laughing Matters
(a comedy show).
Every Sunday at 12:15 a.m. . . . Sunday Brunch
(literary works and radio plays written by UBC
students).
Every weekday at 11:X a.m. and 6:45 p.m. . . .
Generic   Review   (reviews   movies,   plays,   books,
restaurants, etc.).
Sports
Every Monday and Friday after the 6 p.m. Dinner
report . . . Birds' Eye View: reviewing the past
weekend's UBC sports action on Mondays and
previewing upcoming action on Fridays.
Every weekday at 4:30 p.m. . . . The CITR Afternoon Sports Break.
Every Wednesday at 10:30 a.m. . . . Sports
Unlimited: sports stories, information and interviews.
FM 102 CABLE 100
DISCORDER
A guide to CITR. Now CITR is available in the written word and will be hitting the streets Feb. 1.
WATCH FOR mi III
Broadcast Hours
Monday thru Thursday . . . 7:30 a.m. to 1:00 a.m.
Friday & Saturday . . . 7:30 a.m. to 4:00 a.m. and
beyond.
Sunday . . . 8:30 a.m. to 1:00 a.m.
CITR news menu
Every weekday . . .
8:00 a.m. Wake-Up Report
9:00 a.m. Breakfast Report
1:00 a.m. Lunch Report
3:30 p.m. Afternoon New Break
6:00 p.m. Dinner Report
6:10 p.m. After Dinner Portion:
Tues., Wed. & Thur. . . . Insight (news analysis and
editorials); Fri. . . . UBC Capsule (recaps the week's
UBC news events).
Every Sunday at 6:00 p.m. . . . The Doug Richards
New Magazine.
At UBC Feature
Every weekday at 8:40 a.m.-12:40 p.m., 4:00 p.m.
and 8:40 p.m. Announcements to let you know
what's happening at UBC. If you would like to put
one in, visrt SUB room 233 or call 228-3017 between
9-and-5 on weekdays.
Alternative Music Programming
MINI CONCERTS
A half-hour close-up of music and information from
various artists. Twice daily.
Mon.: Madness 12 p.m.; Dexy's Midnight Runners 8
p.m.
Tues.: The Early Bowie; Joy Division.
Wed.: Modern English; Dave Edmunds.
Thurs.: The Smell Faces; Raincoats.
Fri.: Generation X; 54-40.
Everyday at 11 p.m. . . . Final Vinyl (an album
played in its entirety): Mon. . . . jazz; Tues. &■ Wed...
. new album; Thurs. . . , import album; Fri. . . .
neglected album; Sat. . . . classic album; Sun. . . .
CITR's #1 album.
Saturdays 10 a.m. to 12 noon . . . Folk Show.
FRENCH LANGUAGE TRAINING
January Program
French method - French tutors
BEGINNERS   INTERMEDIATE   ADVANCED
There is a day/night class to fit your schedule
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
The Centre for French Studies
327-0201 - 6161 Cambie Street
North Shore: Ask for our West Van Chapter
BALLET UBC
JAZZ PRESENTS:
Classes in . . .
BALLET!
JAZZ!
TAP!
DANCERCISE!
Beginning January 15, 1983
Further information and Spring Schedule available
in Tuesday's UBYSSEY or at club office (216E
SUB).
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES:      AMS Card Holders — 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional lines.
Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $4.20; additional lines, 63c.
Additional days, $3.80 and 58c.
60c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in advance.
Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room 241, S.U.B., UBC, Vancouver, B.C.   V6T 2A5
h
11
For Sale — Private
35 - Lost
85 — Typing
"10,000 DIFFERENT original movie
posters. Catalogue $2. Mnemonics Ltd.
Dept. L, #302, 1208 - 14 Ave., S.W.,
Calgary, Alta., T3C 0V9."
LOST: Red leather briefcase,
Dec. 14 p.m. main bus stop. If found phone
736-0806 urgent!
15 — Found
40 — Messages
FOUND ON East Mall Jan. 3
woman's watch. Ph. 261-1715 around 6:30
p.m.
20 — Housing
THE       STAR       AND       CRESCENT
rises for the New Year Schlong.
ABS:       Any       time       you       wanna
trash the rules, jis say. (Sigh.) V.
AVAILABLE IMMEDIATELY. On campus.
Full room & board. Shared accommodation. $1,240. per term. Contact Dennis at
224-3606 or 224-9431.
FOR RENT: 1 bdrm. in large
3 bdrm. house for N/S female. Share kitchen, living room, den, .backyard, garage,
own bathroom. Near campus. $2707month,
263-5555.
50 — Rentals
COLOUR TV RENTALS: $25.00
monthly, no minimum. Also discount sales.
Terms, Guar., 732-7021.
COLOUR TV. RENTAL: We rent
& sell T.V.'s, $25 per month. No minimum.
Dekka Sales, 732-7021.
25 — Instruction
65 — Scandals
LEARN TO SAIL: Beginners
Course or Basic Coastal Cruising. 30 ft.
cruiser/racer. Hands on experience.
Registering NOW Feb. Mar. Apr., classes.
Don't be left on the beach. C.Y.A. Certificate 734-1675 after 7. Sailcraft Ltd.
ROOMSI ROOMS! ROOMSI Room and
board in a Fraternity House for only
$1200/term. Call 224-9866. Ask for Mark or
Bob.
70 — Services
30 — Jobs
TYPIST REQUIRED part-time. With
IBM Selectric if possible. Phone in morning. 224-6518.
MODE COLLEGE of Barbering and Hairstyl-
ing. Students $6.50 with I.D. Body wave,
$17 and up. 601 W. Broadway, 874-0633.
RENT TIME on an IBM Word
Processor — theses, essays, etc. $5 hr.
Free instruction. 224-1061.
NEW TO AREA. Adina Typing
Service. Student discounts. 4326 West
10th. Phone 222-2122.
ESSAYS, theses, reports, letters, resumes.
Bilingual. Word Processor. Clemy,
266-6641.
JUDITH FILTNESS, PUBLIC
STENOGRAPHER. Special student rates,
5670 Yew (Kerrisdale). Phone 266-6814.
TYPEWRITING. Minimal notice required.
UBC location. 24 hour phone-in 224-6518.
EXPERT TYPING essays, term
papers, factums, letters, manuscripts,
resumes, theses. IBM Selectric II.
Reasonable rates. Rose, 731-9857.
U-WRITE WE TYPE. 736 1208.
Word Processing Specialists for Theses,
Term Papers, Resumes, Reports, Correspondence, Days, Evenings, Weekends.
MICOM WORD PROCESSING: Thesis,
term papers, equation typing. Rate $10 an
hour. Jeeva, 876-5333.
90 - Wanted
80 — Tutoring
99 — Miscellaneous Friday, January 7,1983
THE   UBYSSEY
Page 15
Committees set to study University Act
By CRAIG BROOKS
UBC administration has created
two committees to study possible
revisions to the University Act and
the Alma Mater Society may soon
follow suit.
Senate created a committee at its
Dec. 15 meeting to study changes to
the Act. The Act outlines the structure and operation of UBC's governing bodies, and is currently under
review by universities minister Pat
McGeer.
Arts senator Jonathan Wisenthal
introduced the motion in senate,
saying the committee should "inquire and find out what changes the
minister wants."
"Senate is the most widely
representative body of the universi
ty," he said. "It's always possible
the revisions may not be minor
housekeeping ones."
Wisenthal said he was concerned
with the relationship between the
Universities Council of B.C. an intermediary funding agency between
the governments and B.C.'s three
public universities.
"We need to avoid certain kinds
of changes."
Changes might also affect the
right of universities to act
academically independently and
autonomously from government,
he added. "We should be prepared
for all eventualities."
Wisenthal said after the meeting
he introduced the motion because
"nobody else had done it."
Wisenthal, who is also faculty
association president, said the
association, in consultation with
Simon Fraser and University of Victoria faculty, will prepare a joint
presentation to McGeer.
Administration president
Douglas Kenny formed a university
committee, composed of various
faculty deans to study the act.
The Alma Mater Society will probably create a committee at the student council meeting on Jan. 19,
president Dave Frank said Thursday.
Frank said the committee was
necessary since McGeer might be
considering   amendments   that
would be detrimental to students
such as entrenching voluntary student fees in the act.
McGeer announced at the
November Social Credit party convention he will be discussing the fee
question with cabinet colleagues
this spring.
Such a change would severely affect the AMS, Frank said.
Changes to student representation might also be introduced,
Frank says. The act was amended in
1974 by the NDP government to include representation. Such
representation could be altered or
even eliminated, said Frank.
"It is something that I should get
to work on," Frank said. "McGeer
could do anything."
King inaugurated
CUP debates politics, business
OTTAWA — Five Ubyssey
staffers travelled to the bureaucrat
capital of Canada during Christmas
break to attend the 45th annual
Canadian University Press conference. There, political and journalistic issues were discussed and
debated.
Delegates from CUP newspapers
discussed topics ranging from the
feasibility of a national advertising
boycott, the McGill Daily's redraft
of CUP's statement of principles
and sexism in the newsroom.
Many student newspapers in
CUP were opposed to the idea of
establishing a national advertising
boycott list to which newspapers
would adhere. They said they
thought that it would nullify
grassroots involvement and make
CUP a more centrist organization.
CUP's wholly owned advertising subsidiary Campus Plus announced a seven per cent increase in
national advertising rates for the
next publishing year. But this windfall will be partially offset by a 12
per cent increase in membership
fees effective at the same time.
The student newspaper at Montreal's McGill university, the Daily,
presented a redraft of CUP's statement of principles which defines the
organization's journalistic ideals.
Although most member papers
thought reexamination of the statement of principles is necessary and
the Daily's attempt to make it more
"reader-friendly" and less
bureaucratic was valid, consensus
was that the issue be considered further and examined at the individual
paper level.
A new position in each region's
executive was created to promote
awareness of women's issues, to
fight sexism in the newsroom and to
organize women student journalists
belonging to CUP.
There was some opposition to
creating the position of women's
rights coordinator but it came
mainly from Ontario papers.
Redcoats invade UBC
The redcoats are coming! The
redcoats are coming!
That's right", about 100 Engineering students from 22 universities
across Canada are in Vancouver for
the fifteenth Congress of Canadian
Engineering Students at the Hotel
Georgia. UBC engineers are hosts
for the four days of meetings and
parties.
The conference began on
Wednesday and runs until Saturday. Delegates will be on campus
today and tomorrow. Referring to
"Geer pranks," conference
organizer Rob Swiniarski said,
"UBC has historically been known
for being a little offbeat at the conference."
At the last Western conference in
Calgary, UBC engineers dressed in
complete punk regalia for the final
banquet and kidnapped the conference organizer as a momento;
they got him as far as Hope before
he escaped.
But for this conference the UBC
engineers plan to be relatively
sedate said Swiniarski. They will
discuss subjects relevant to
Engineering students he said.
"Believe it or not we are concerned about what we will do when we
graduate,"  said Swiniarski.
But engineers from other parts of
Canada are starting to emulate their
UBC counterparts. There will be
bun fights at all of the meals he said
and added "there could be things
missing on campus. I'm sure they'd
like to try something."
By CRAIG BROOKS
All hail King Edward XXV!
After more than 10 years of lobbying by the Alma Mater Society
and various community groups, the
long-awaited King Edward bus is a
reality.
The service, which started Dec.
17, runs along King Edward, Dunbar, Sixteenth, Blanca, and, in rush
hours, to UBC along University
Blvd. The new King was greeted
with the usual pomp and circumstance surrounding a royal
birth.
While not on the scale of
Britain's Prince Bill, Greater Vancouver Regional District transit officials and a few media types travelled the inaugural run Dec. 17.
But to create the new service, cuts
will happen elsewhere in the Vancouver transit system.
Cuts to the tenth and fourty-first
services will be made during peak
times. No new bus routes will be added  according to   former GVRD
transit chair Bob Bose.
"It's just a shuffling of the
deck," he said.
GVRD transit planner Bob
Robertson said Thursday ridership
has been adjusting to the new route
better than expected.
"It's a roaring success," he said.
"People have switched (to the new
route)."
Despite fewer busses on the tenth
to UBC route now, starting March
25, the service to UBC will once
again improve.
The tenth avenue service will run
every 10 minutes instead of the current 12, Robertson said.
The new King Edward service
running east goes to the British Columbia Institute of Technology and
Brentwood mall in Burnaby using
Kingsway, Slocan, 22 avenue and
Willmgdon.
Five of Vancouver's secondary
schools, several private schools and
the new Children's and Grace
hospitals are on the route.
BOOK A
GYM DAY-TERM II
January 12, 1983
9:00 - 3:30
Rm. 203, W.M.G.
NOW FOR 1983
Grouse Mountain
introduces the
UBC SKI PASS
• Ski day & night, 7 days a week for the month of
January.
• Special on hill activities Tuesday & Thursday
evenings.
$35.00
• On sale only at the Intramural Recreational
Sports office Rm. #203 War Memorial Gym.
• All applicants must have a valid university photo
I.D. card.
Grousey    ^
Grouse Mouintajin ski CkAllENqE Ja(\uary27
EXERCISE
TO
MUSIC
ONE FREE EXERCISE CLASS WITH COUPON
SESSION I - Code #152 - Higher Intensity
Mon/Tues/Wed/Thurs  Jan. 17-March 31     7:30- 8:15 AM
Mon/Wed  Jan. 17-March 30 12:30- 1:15 PM
Wed/Thurs  Jan. 19-March 31   4:40- 5:30 PM
Saturday  Jan. 22-March 25 10:00-11:00 AM
S.U.B. Ballroom
War Memorial Gym
Gym B
Gym B
SESSION II - Code #154 • Lower Intensity
Tues/Wed/Thurs Jan. 18-March 31   4:40- 5:30 PM    Gym B
Mon/Wed Jan. 17-March 30 12:30- 1:15 PM    War Memorial Gym
Saturday  Jan. 22-March 25 10:00-11:00 AM    Gym B
COST: $30.00. Choose any of the above times, as many times a week as desired in either sessions at any
location.
REGISTRATION: Jan. 3-Jan. 14 — I.M. & Rec. Sports, War Memorial Gym or at the Exercise class starting week of Jan. 17th.
DROP-IN: $1.00 Any of the above classes any time, any location.
FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL
738-4169
Sponsored by Intramural and Recreational Sports Programs Page 16
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, January 7,1983
"The salient feature of film is the enormous range of its special effects. Film is
unique in its capacity for visual recording
and analysis, in its ability to convey the unique present reality of things, in its ability to
reveal the qualities of lives; but also in its
formal freedom, its capacity for realizing
fantasy and developing abstract forms. In
view of this inexhaustible flexibility of the
medium, it is ludicrous to lay down general
principles as to what is a good film."
— F, E. Sparshott,
Bask Film Aesthetics
Comparable to the "inexhaustible flexibility of the (film) medium" that Sparshott
talks about is the equally limitless and insatiable imagination of the film viewer.
And necessarily, judging what makes a
good film (and what does not) is invariably a personal evaluation that frequently clashes — more so than one thinks
and admits — with what is perceived a
perpetuated as public consensus on the
merits of a particular film.
astonishing, combined with warm, glowing
cinematography, rapid cutting, and the
treatment of a lesbian relationship in
unapologetic terms. Disarmingly stimulating and involving.
3. COCKTAIL MOLOTOV. dir. Diane
Kurys (France). A sequel of sorts to the
same director's Pepppermint Soda,
Cocktail Molotov takes three young people
— two men and a woman, Anne (Elise
Caron) — on a trip to Paris from Venice. It
is May 1968, and a students' revolution is
exploding in Paris. But though the
characters are removed from the city, they
undergo a revolutionary awareness and
comer to realizations that are comparable to
their fellow's students' revolt.
4. A FLIGHT OF RAINBIRDS, dir.
Ate   de   Jong   (Netherlands).   Maarten
undergone a  Beckettian  metamorphoses.
The subtext is the nature of film itself.
7. DIVA, dir. Jean-Jacques Beinex
(France). A clockwork movie with precise,
circular movements. The directorial debut
is sleek and sensational (in the best sense of
the word), with a cracker jacks plot about
a letter carrier whose penchant for recording gets him into trouble — and which
provides Beinex with an excuse to indulge in
all sorts of gimmicks. This is a brand name
movie, in which characters refer to their
material possessions in terms of labels, not
generic descriptions. A materialists' delight
that would turn a Godardian stomach.
The WORST OF 1982
1. THE BEST LITTLE WHOREHOUSE IN
TEXAS. (U.S.) There is nothing good
about   it.
2. PARTNERS (U.S.). A sickeningly
homophobic comedy about two cops —
one gay, the other straight — who invade a
world full of men with pancake make-up on
their faces.
3. THE WOMAN NEXT DOOR (France).
Francois Truffaut's masterfraud about the
Bv SHAFFIN SHARIFF
1982's FILMS:
THE AESTHETIC AND THE ABYSSMAL
Another writer, Annette Michelson, has
said, "the history of Cinema is, like that of
Revolution in our time, a chronicle of
hopes and expectations, aroused and
suspended, tested and deceived." A better
description of one's film viewing experience
in general, let alone of the cinema's history,
does not exist.
1982 did not offer a Cutter's Way or
Blow Out, but it did offer a variety of films
that made the film year a pleasurable experience. Two of the year's best films are
musicals that received little attention at the
box-office; they are Luis Valdez's smashing
version of his own stage play, Zoot Suit,
which takes as part of its base the archetypal cycle of a savior's temptation,
redemption, and sacrifice, and Francis
Coppola's  One from the Heart.
THE BEST OF 1982
1. MAN OF IRON, dir. Andrzej Wajda
(Poland). The year's most impressive film,
bar none, in style and substance. The expert
combination of fiction and non-fiction, the
use of film to blur distinctions between the
narrative and documentary, the complex
yet natural use of flashbacks — all these
result in a film that deals with Solidarity's
rise in Poland and the ironic ending which
foreshadows defeat. The film has an added
bonus: a statement expressed by the central
character who realizes that art and politics
are not mutually exclusive — as Wajda proves the same in a parallel course with the
film's style.
2. PERSONAL BEST, dir. Robert
Towne (U.S.). An unexpectedly good directorial debut from one of North America's
finest writers, about two pentathelenes
(Mariel Hemingway and Patrice Donnelly)
who liecome lovers and remain friends as
they compete for sports honors. The lack of
self-consciousness   in   film   treatment   is
(Jeroen Krabbe), a 32 year old biologist
with a flamboyant alter ego — a bit like
Woody Allen and the Humphrey Bogart
reincarnation in Play it Again, Sam — feels
the need to have sex in seven days or face
death. De Jong's film begins as a sweet-
spirited comedy and then progresses to
become a poignant depiction of a man — a
virgin — struggling to shake the yoke of his
domineering mother who is dying. The film
is Freudian in its analysis but not stultify-
ingly so. Like Wajda's Man of Iron, A
Flight of Rainbirds uses flashbacks, and the
past and the present combine almost
perfectly. A Flight of Rainbirds made a
brief appearance during the 1982 First Annual International film festival at the Ridge
theatre.
5. WRONG IS RIGHT, dir. Richard
Brooks (U.S.). Like Sidney Lumet,
American director Richard Brooks can be
something of a hammerhead, constantly
striving to drive the point home. But unlike
Lumet, Brooks is talented. Whereas
Lumet is merely superficial and clumsy,
Brooks has a style all his own. Ostensibly a
comedy about television, and all media
coverage of events leading up to a possible
World War III, Wrong is Right is an infuriating, maddening, pig-headed, stubborn, and unrelentingly funny satire, that
occasionally lapses into parody. Only
Brooks could carry it off.
6. MY DINNER WITH ANDRE, dir.
Louis Malle (U.S.). Two men who haven't
seen each other in years sit down for a dinner conversation, and talk about life for
more than 100 minutes. The illusion is that
these are real individuals, not actors following a very clever script. Louis Malle's two
camera set-up needs little getting used to, as
the restricted physical space gives away to
fluid cinematic space. During the film, the
characters talk about the role of art (mainly
theatre) and artists, and their personal experiences   as   if  Laurel   and   Hardy  had
8. ZOOT SUIT, dir. Luis Valdez (U.S.).
There has never been a musical quiet like
Zoot Suit—and there may never be another
one for years. From the first moment to the
last, this bold, innovative ethnic musical
blazes its way through a trail of concerns
and issues, all related to the Chicano experience in America. When it is over, you
feel excited, exhilirated, and you know that
you have just seen something good.
9. EATING RAOUL, dir. Paul Band
(U.S.). Paul and Mary Bland, filled with
underwhelming desire to fulfill the
American dream of owning one's own
home and business, conspire to lure a
"world full of millions of sexual perverts"
and treat them to an unexpected dead end.
A tasty — and always tasteful — droll comedy about a right of centre couple whose
only inhibition, ironically, is sex. Like Nick
and Nora Charles of the '30s thin man
mystery-comedies, Paul and Mary may
become the film couple of the '80s. Are you
ready for the sequel? Paul and Mary Go to
Washington.
10. ONE FROM THE HEART, dir.
Francis Coppola (U.S.). Taking all the conventions of MGM musicals, Copolla has
fashioned a musical that is full of cardboard and romantic cliches. Living in what
is a stylized Las Vegas soundstage, two individuals (Teri Garr and Frederic Forrest)
who have been living together split up, and
in a span of 24 hours, live their fantasies
with new partners. The transition from one
part of the soundstage to another is so
smooth in the opening moments, that you
aren't really aware of any cuts; the use of
dissolves and superimpositions convey not
so much a sense of passage of time, but
space.
With the good comes the overwhelmingly
bad:
role of obsessional love in very ordinary
people's lives. Much ado about nothing. As
French-director Jean-Luc Goddard has
said, Truffaut is making films he used to
condemn as a Cahiers du Cinema critic in
the '50s and '60s.
4. SUMMER PARADISE (Sweden). A
family gets together and bares its soul.
Begins in Bergmanesque terms and ends as
a Passolini polemic on the rape of the earth.
Boring and rhetorical.
5. AN OFFICER AND A GENTLEMAN
(U.S.). Militarism and awful '50s cliches
about how men are men and women are
women, are in the vogue again.
6. ROCKY III (U.S.). One more time with
everyone's favorite throwaway kleenex. No
genuine visceral surge and no guts either.
7. TEMPEST (U.S.) Paul Mazursky's
shameful attempt to stage Shakespeare's
The Tempest in modern terms. Where's the
magic?
HALLCWEEN III (U.S.) A deplorable exercise in capitalizing on the popularity of
the original Hallowe'en with a film that has
nothing in common with its parent but the
title. The new plot — about children
becoming instruments and victims of evil
forces — isn't fully developed.
9. GREASE 2 (U.S.). When a musical is
this bad it's no consolation that it is only
slightly less so than The Best Little
Whorehouse in Texas.
10. THE VERDICT (U.S.) Sidney Lumet on
the loose again, this time with a
schizophrenic film that begins as a social
consciousness picture and degenerates into
second-class courtroom melodrama. Full of
pretentious stylish miscalculations that include underlighting everyone and
everything in sight.

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