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The Ubyssey Oct 31, 1969

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 25,000 march in Montreal to protest Bill 63
MONTREAL (CUP)-Chanting and singing, 25,000
demonstrators—mostly high school and post-secondary
students—marched through the streets of Montreal
Wednesday night in a massive and self-disciplined protest
against the provincial government's Bill 63.
The demonstration was the largest yet against the
Union Nationale government's bilingualism legislation,
now in its second reading in the Quebec National
Assembly—but it will probably be completely dwarfed
today when an anticipated 500,000 demonstrators
march on the Assembly buildings in Quebec city.
Universities, high schools and post-secondary
Colleges D'Enseignement Generales et Profesionnels
across Quebec emptied Wednesday, as student
opposition to Bill 63 continued to grow into a major
factor in the plans of the Front du Quebec Francais, the
broad-front organization with is uniting right,'
left and centre-wings of Quebec political life against the
bill.
Outside of Montreal, student walkouts occurred at
Quebec City, Hull, Trois-Rivieres, Chicoutimi,
Sherbrooke, Rouyn, Thetford Mines, Victoriaville,
Rimouski and Joliette, bringing the French-language
education system to a virtual standstill.
And in Montreal itself, students were joined by
teachers, trade unionists, housewives—the entire
spectrum of working French society—as they marched
through the downtown streets to City Hall in a protest
against Mayor Jean Drapeau's support of Bill 63.
The march was patrolled by members of the Service
d'Order, self-policing unit of the left-wing Front de
Liberation Populaire. Montreal police, standing guard by
the hundreds, took no part in crowd control.
The marshalls only dealt with one incident during
the festive parade, when a group of 100 or so
demonstrators attempted to break ranks and climb
slopes surrounding the Civic Building. They were herded
back without police interference.
Observers termed the parade the greatest-ever
demonstration of French-speaking solidarity, as the
demonstrators hummed and sang their way
good-naturedly through the streets.
As the crowd passed the Renaissance Club,
headquarters of the Union Nationale and target for
10,000 demonstrators Tuesday night they chanted
"Policiers dans la rue," to large squads of riot police
drawn up in anticipation of an assault on the building.
The police did not respond, the marchers moved on.
The demonstration did not stop for long at City
Hall: instead it swung back into the city, where
protesters burned effigies of Drapeau, city executive
committee chairman Lucien Saulnier, Quebec premier
Jean-Jacques Bertrand and provincial justice minister
Remi Paul, all supporters of Bill 63.
The march dispersed, and participants began a
door-to-door campaign to bring a half-million
demonstrators into the streets of Quebec City Friday.
So far, the Union Nationale government appears
determined to continue pushing Bill 63 through the
National Assembly.
The bill gives parents the choice between English
and French as languages of instruction for their children
in Quebec schools, while declaring that French is the
"priority language" in the province.
Opponents to the bill say its passage will legitimize
the eventual destruction of the French language and
culture in Quebec, as increased immigration dilutes the
French-speaking majority in the province.
Under the Covers
Is the student a nigger? Jerry Farber
answers this question on page 2 of
today's Ubyssey.
Stan (now he's legitimate again) Persky
takes us to task on page 4 for our 'bitterness, cynicism and defeatist attitude.'
Page 16 features a report on what's in
store for American authorities in the
way of student uprisings this year.
And on page 3, you can read how
students at the University of Calgary
screwed a newspaper they didn't like.
Injunctions
were breached
says Strand
BURNABY (CUP)-Backed by court injunctions prohibiting
nearly every form of protest, the administration at Simon Fraser
University is increasing its efforts to throttle students and faculty
on strike over administration treatment of the department of
political science, sociology and anthropology.
In an open letter to the campus issued Wednesday,
administration president Kenneth Strand said any further
picketting, distribution of literature of mass gatherings would bring
charges of contempt of court under injunctions issued Oct. 24 and
aimed specifically at three PSA profs and 11 students.
According to Strand, the court injunctions have already been
breached twice; on Tuesday, Strand "was informed" that 30 to 50
picketers gathered outside a room on campus, on Wednesday, he
said, the action was repeated.
"Mass gatherings adjacent to academic or service entrances or
exits, unless authorized by the university, are in contempt of the
order of Judge Hinkson (the judge who authorized the
injunctions)," he said.
Among the picketers, Strand said, were "five or six of the
defendants named in the injunction order."
The defendants are professors Louis Feldhammer, John
Leggett and Saghir Ahmad, and students J. Harding, J. Cleveland,
B. Slocock, A. Hollibaugh, C. Hardy, J. Miller, M. Cohen, B.
Enoch, B. Fletcher, B. Plommer and B. Hoffer.
The fourteen are also the defendants in a civil suit launched
by the university administration, charged with causing loss of
university revenue-because the administration has had to
reimburse students who withdrew from classes because of the PSA
strike—unspecified damages and trespassing.
Strand said he now considers 'The university has taken all
reasonable steps to inform" the defendants of the court order, and
declared "Any further breaches of such as the incidents of Oct. 28
or 29 will result in contempt of court proceedings without further
notice."
Lawyers advising strike participants have said he court order
makes violaters liable to six months to one year in jail if they
distribute any literature, picket in any way or address any group on
campus without the administration's grant of a lecture booking.
Strikers have issued no comment on Strand's statement.
THS UBYSSEY
Vol. LI, No. 15
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, OCTOBER 31, 1969     <^&>is-     228-2305
—bruce stout photo
HIS LOPSIDED GRIN and tearful eyes are here again to usher in the Hallowe'en season. But this year
the pumpkin means more than candied apples and gaudy costumes. Everyone is urged to carve Jack up
into a peace symbol. -moshe curtis pumpkin
U of Ottawa students voice dissent
over government bilingualism bill
OTTAWA    (CUP)-Approximately    500
students at the university of Ottawa turned out
Thursday to add their voices to dissent against Bill.
63,    the    Quebec    government's  bilingualism
legislation.
The-students were told by U of O political
science professor Paul-Andre Comeau the timing
and content of the language bill, now in its second
reading in the Quebec National Assembly, was
motivated mostly by political considerations and a
serious deficit in the Union Nationale party's
election fund.
Many Quebecers, he said, find it hard to
understand why premier Jean-Jacques Bertrand
introduced the legislation while the province's
Gendron commission on the status of the French
language in Quebec is still holding hearings on the
problem.
Many of the Ottawa students intend to travel
to Quebec city today to take part in the massive
protest scheduled in front of the National
Assembly buildings.
The University of Ottawa is a bilingual
university. Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 31,  1969
'Reservoir of power in schools useful
in fighting against socialism/ says Farber
Jerry Farber was the subject of
questions, criticism, and a lot of
human soul-searching as he spoke
to almost a hundred people
Thursday noon.
I've been talking to a lot of
people lately, and what I've been
hearing sounds good. I'm not here
to talk to you about how students
are oppressed, but to consider the
fact that students are not free on
another level," Farber said.
While Farber invited questions,
he had little idea of just what he
was getting himself into.
When asked if he had changed
his mind about things since he
wrote the controversial essay
Student As Nigger, Farber replied,
"I've changed my mind
somewhat. When I wrote that I
was very angry, and I've had time
to think about things now.
"I've realized the inescapable
interrelation between school and
society, and the futility of anger
at teachers and cops when they
are only being paid to do a job.
"When it comes to the
assumption that only the elite get
to go on in this institution, I tend
to question the whole assumption.
"School should be a place to
go when you want to learn
something, and what gets you into
school should be your desire to
learn, not money or grades.
"The only thing that gives
students identity is their
exploitation in this way."
When asked to define
exploitation, he said, "that is
when students give up their
fantastic adaptability, and do just
what they (society) want them to.
It is when the power of this dying
society takes students, takes
people, and uses them as material
for their machines."
"If we're taught not to think,
what about the Chinese who arc
taught to serve the people," asked
one student.
"Yes, that's true, but I feel
there is a conformity that is
compatible with individualism,"
Farber replied. He explained that
just the seating in a room brings
out the individualism in a student,
but what goes on in that room has
to conform to something.
A student then asked about the
so-called student revolution, and
protested   the   fact   that   Farber
Freud lives
A leading sociologist from the
University of Pennsylvania will
speak on "The Triumph of the
Therapeutic" at noon today in
SUBallroom.
Philip Rieff, author of "Freud:
The Mind of the Moralist", is
considered one of the foremost
interpreters of modern culture
and its revolutionizers, including
Freud, Jung, Reich and Lawrence.
The AMS speakers committee
will be responsible for whatever
happens.
—bruce stout photo
FARBER ... "futility of anger at teachers and cops"
didn't seem to be doing anything
about it.
"I'm not in the category you
seem to think," he said. "We can't
change schools if society stays the
same. What I'm trying to say is
just this, one road to change
overall society is in the schools.
"When you get involved in the
educational system, you can't
help but come up against the
capitalistic ruling class. The
movement for educational change
has another signficance from
direction."
He spoke again of the
exploitation of the student, and
added that, "school is not just an
effect, its a cause."
"We learn To decide between
Nixon Humphrey, and that we
have to make decisions for
ourselves. Socialism scares the shit
out of me. It involves a fantastic
reservoir of power in centralized
hands. What do we have to work
against this power, if it isn't
schooling?"
Asked another student: "But
what happens if we're for the
institution as a whole, but have a
prof or someone that is just too
much to tolerate."
Said Farber: "I can't tell you
how to mess up your classes. Why
should I have to? But wouldn't it
be funny if everybody turned in a
neatly typed copy of the same
term paper, just for spite?"
He said when a person is
constantly being put down for
little things, like term papers, or
long hair, and takes if, he doesn't
have to worry about living in a
concentration camp, because he
already is.
Farber said he is now at San
Diego State College, doing
whatever he feels is the right thing
to be doing.
SMU debates senate seats
HALIFAX (CUP)-Students at St. Mary's university have been
offered two seats on their 2l-member senate-but they can't decide
whether to take them.
After a three-hour meeting October 8, the student council was
dead-locked 5-5 on acceptance of the seats, and a student assembly
October 15 failed to attract a quorum.
External affairs representative Denny Mullally told students
they shouldn't accept the seats because "token membership on bodies
with closed meetings is ridiculous."
NO
SUPER-SAINTS'
DAY
Sunday, 9:30 a.m.
Christian   Growth   College.
Look at Sin, Sin, Sin.
10:30 a.m.
Contemporary Worship
A day for holy ones but not
wholly,   holy   ones.
LUTHERAN   CAMPUS   CENTRE
5885  University  Blvd.
Across from  Administration
Bldg.,   near   "The   Village"
7  p.m.—Yoga:
History,  doctrine, and
practice.  Demonstration.
L.S.M.
He is now a father, but hasn't
had enough experience at it yet to
say very much about child-rearing.
He added that to fight for
freedom, a person has to be
willing to be shot down. "The
most important thing is to be sure
that its freedom that's in your
head," he said.
"The greatest battle is not with'
Mr. Charlie, but with what Mr.
Charlie has done to your minds."
fe   ^f.
'THE
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Without this luM    idtf^ *-£3   it is not a -.-emiine KITTEN.       ^ Friday, October 31, 1969
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
—andy f-prnar photo
ONE TOKE and I started to see all these lights and flares and stuff, but the Royal Commission will
never believe me.
U of Calgary withdraws aid
in attempt to stifle newspaper
CALGARY (CUP)-Students at the University
of Calgary Monday voted by a narrow margin to
withdraw financial support from the campus
newspaper, The Gauntlet, in an attempt to quash
the paper's left-wing editorial policy.
But   the   Calgary   student  council  took  the
75 haven't paid yet
BURNABY (Staff)-About 75 Simon Fraser
University students are in danger of being jailed for
two months.
The students were given fines of $250 or two
months in jail for their part in the occupation of the
SFU administration building last November.
The 107 who were given the sentence asked to
be given a time extension in order to be able to pay
their fines. The limit runs out Saturday, and bench
warrants for the arrest of those unable to pay the
fine are expected to be issued Monday morning.
It is believed only about 30 students will be
able to pay the fines. ,
students' mandate a step further, and prevented
publication of the Gauntlet's last publicly-financed
issue, which was scheduled to appear on the campus
Wednesday.
In a referendum ballot Monday, the Calgary
students voted 1,288 to 1,236 to cease financing
the Gauntlet, which has editorially taken a
militantly anti-capitalist stance under editor-in-chief
Jim Rudy. Rudy officially resigned as editor
following the council's decision to prevent
publication.
The referendum was instigated Sept. 24 after
the paper ran a front-page story under the headline
"Three Capitalists Appointed to Ruling Body"-an
analysis of the financial backgrounds of three recent
appointees to the Calgary board of governors.
"I want the paper stopped," said Lee
Richardson, council vice-president. "You know the
kind of things they're going to write now for
Wednesday. I don't want that paper to appear on
this campus."
'We don't have to ask you
if you want to join BCUS'
By LESLIE PLOMMER
According to treasurer Chuck Campbell, the
Alma Mater Society is not acting unconstitutionally
in allocating $3,650 in non-discretionary funds to
the B.C. Union of Students.
Campbell said he does not interpret the
constitution to mean that grants of this type must
be passed by a vote of the students.
He said this only applied to non-discretionary
expenditures on "capital projects" such as SUB, but
not to BCUS.
The AMS has promised to pay BCUS
membership fees until Christmas, at which time the
situation will be reviewed.
BCUS membership fees are set at 10 cents per
student each term, but this applies only to full
fee-paying students.
"The test of BCUS will be over the next three
months," said AMS external affairs officer Mike
Doyle.
Both Campbell and Doyle expect a review of
BCUS activities will result in a membership
referendum in the spring.
Doyle said not enough is known about BCUS
for students to vote on the issue at the present time.
He said BCUS will have a new executive
secretary by thristmas, and the activities of the
organization will be co-ordinated.
The emphasis in BCUS will be on task forces,
working mainly in the areas of student housing,
unemployment and civil liberties.
Should there be
a PSA at UBC?
By MURRAY KENNEDY
and CHRISTINE KRAWCZYK
Lo and behold, two more course unions are alive and kicking on
the UBC campus. •
Students in the political science and Asian studies departments
recently held organizational meetings.
About 50 interested students attended the first meeting of the
political science union Thursday.
Arts undergrad society president Dick Betts attended the
meeting in an advisory capacity. He discussed the role of course
unions and, in particular, the role of political science students in
course unions.
He suggested that the political science union should work to
satisfy the interests of all thinking students.
"Perhaps one field of endeavor would be to work towards
amalgamation with the anthropology and sociology department along
the same lines as at Simon Fraser University," he said.
Organizational matters took priority at the first meeting. Grant
Taylor, arts 4, was elected chairman and preparations for a newsletter
were made.
Taylor said the immediate goals of the union should be to
encourage dialogue within the department. "We must start by
analysing the courses and work out a set of concrete demands before
we approach the administration," he said.
Measures are being taken to publicize the activities of the union
in all political science classes. The long range goal is to coordinate a
system of class reps to improve communications in the department.
The Asian studies union was formed as a coalition between the
various language groups within the department.
Students majoring in Chinese were organizing to overcome
problems peculiar to their area of studies. They expanded to take in
students in other Asian languages as well.
Students in other Asian studies classes taught in English have
been since invited to join. So now the union is open to all students
taking any course in Asian studies.
Roger Ames, a member of the union's steering committee, said
the purpose of the union is to provide a channel for communication
between students and faculty.
"Our goal is to give students meaningful and effective
representation in departmental decision making," he said. "Right now
we are attempting to define exactly what meaningful and effective
representation means."
To date, the union has succeeded in setting up a grievance
committee consisting of three students and three faculty members.
Through this committee the union hopes to attain full representation
on all other departmental committees.
Foreign students
find prejudice
By FRAN McGRATH
According to officials, foreign students at UBC meet no
prejudice.
But several students at International House said Monday
they have experienced incidents of obvious discrimination.
A group of black and Indian students feel a great deal of
covert prejudice in Vancouver that is more lethal because of its
subtlety.
"When you go to see an apartment the manager tells you
that you can't afford it before you say anything," one woman
said.
She also told a tale of job discrimination by a local theatre.
When she asked why she didn't get the job, the manager blurted
out, "I hope you don't think I'm prejudiced."
A man in his early twenties claimed a Canada Manpower
counsellor would not let him in an apprenticeship program, but
gave no good reason for his action.
However, C. I. Mathew, Indian students' rep at IH, said he
only came across one incident of discrimination this year.
He said he made an appointment by phone to view an
apartment and, when he went to the place, was told it was taken.
IH director Dave Roxburgh said foreign students are easy to
place in off campus housing.
"Most foreign students at UBC are graduate students,"
Roxburgh said. "They are sophisticated and studious, not the
radical element.
"We placed all the foreign students this year except for
married couples with children who have trouble in any event.
Roxburgh said acts of real discrimination in Vancouver are
getting fewer and further between due to the dispersion of ethnic
groups through the city.
The only incidents that occured to him were isolated cases
involving expensive high rises.
"But then, most of the people we meet here are going out
of their way to be friendly," he said.
"Some people get more hung up about prejudice than
others," said one student.
"They go out looking for things to feel bitter about. Page 4
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, October 31,  1969
THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial
opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS or the
university administration. Member, Canadian University Press.
The Ubyssey subscribes to the press services of Pacific Student
Press, of which it is a founding member. Ubyssey News Service
supports one foreign correspondent in Pango-Pango. The Ubyssey
publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City
editor, 228-2305; editor, 228-2301; Page Friday, 228-2309;
sports 228-2308; advertising, 228-3977.
OCTOBER 31, 1969
mmb\ a-
M\\
4^:
Guest ramblings
Every once in awhile, I get to thinking about
where it's really at. From my last observations, I have
decided that there are many indications of the direction
in which our society, our university, and ourselves are
going.
About 400,000 people attended the Woodstock
Festival while the Alma Mater Society's conference on
the future of student government at UBC drew 11
persons.
The vice-president of the United States, Spiro
Agnew, said the Vietnam moratorium was ineffectual
and attracted only the "effete snobs and
pseudo-intellectuals".
Big breasts are now so much a liability that several
manufacturers are putting out bras that "make you look
inches smaller and years younger". There must be some
positive correlation between old age and big boobs.
Police chief Peter Fish of Bethlehem, New York
said, "there is a communist consipracy behind illicit
drug traffic and sex-education courses."
U.S. congressman James B. Utt said, "The Beatles
and their mimicking rock-'n'-rollers use the Pavlovian
technique to produce artificial neuroses in our young
people. Communists also used hypnotic, rhythmic music
to assist in gaining acceptance of their evil programs."
You can buy text books through the mail at a
cheaper rate than at the supposedly non-profit UBC
bookstore. Professors, however, get their books free
from the bookstore.
In an era of so-called meaningful popular music,
Sugar Sugar by the Archies remained number one on the
fave tough boss chart for three weeks. Meanwhile, the
"survey" has shrunk to thirty big songs.
UBC students face an annual housing crisis while
house-keeping suites in the Point Grey district remain
illegal.
Canada spent 307 million dollars on foreign aid
while one-quarter of Canadians are officially below the
"poverty level".
T.V. is currently flooded with situation comedies
and reruns of the calibre of I Love Lucy and The
Beverly Hillbillies while programs like the Smothers
Brothers and This Hour has Seven Days have been
cancelled because they were too controversial, Dick
Cavett because he was too intelligent and Don Rickles
because his comedy was too biting.
The minimum for selling marijuana in Michigan is
twenty years. Larry L. Belcher is currently serving a 20
to 30 year sentence in the State Prison of Southern
Michigan for selling five dollars worth of marijuana
seeds and stems to an informer.
The "radicals" who say "let us be rational" are the
same ones that over and over again resort to cries of pig!
and fascist! for anyone in disagreement with them.
Ubyssey editor Michael Finlay was laughed at
when he asked AMS council for $8,000 so that The
Ubyssey would not have to resort to printing only one
paper per week. AMS president Fraser Hodge laughed
the loudest. Hodge receives $3,600 from the AMS.
Action
-JIM DAVIES
Who says nobody listens to Ubyssey editorials?
Following our exhortations of a couple of weeks
ago, lamenting the egregiousness of food services teapots,
we were pleased to see one square silver pot in the SUB
cafeteria, almost lost among all those evil green ones.
It works like a charm. No fuss, no muss. About
800 more would fill the bill nicely. -P.K.
SoflM   Istfi-W
Is the AMS legal?
The Ubyssey poisons us
with its bitter cynicism
The following is another installment of The
Ubyssey '** wonderful world of opinion, brought to
you free by the open minds that put out this paper.
By STAN PERSKY
A hundred and twenty-five rabid, pipe-smoking,
tweed jacketed grad students rushed to the
plush-carpeted Spiro Agnew Graduate Centre (that's
located just adjacent to the Dwight David
Eisenhower Faculty Club, lady) and elected me
senator Wednesday. Yes m'am, 125 of them out of
3000. The rest? Oh, they were busy imitating
professors, and applying for grants and writing that
umpty-umpth fake thesis about D. H. Lawrence.
I'm trying to figure out what's gone wrong.
How have the students who might be most
concerned with what happens here so thoroughly
turned to their private interests?
It's hard to know where to start with the
analysis. There's a story in Plato about how the
philosopher's relationship to the city is like that of a
stinging fly to a big sleepy horse. Maybe that's The
Ubyssey's relationship to the student body. But I've
become worried that the fly isn't waking the horse
up, but helping to poison it with its little barbs.
The pitiful political situation at iUBC, 1969
version, finds its clearest expression in The Ubyssey
newspaper. I'm not saying that the paper is the
cause, I'm saying it's an expression. Maybe I
shouldn't say it's just a "political" situation,
because the malaise seems wider than that; it's social
and psychological too. And spiritual, in the broad
sense. There's an atmoshpere of lostness here that I
haven't seen before. (And yet, my mind says, what
about the thousands who demonstrated against
the Amchitka blast? Yes, but.. .).
The main sense I have of The Ubyssey is that
it's defeatist. Its characteristic irreverence in the
face of the idiocy of bureaucracy, student
government, pompous politicos, etc., has given way
this year to mere bitterness and cynicism. It helps
promote the apathy that it regularly beats the
students over the head with.
What's gone wrong with The Ubyssey? That's
become one of my first questions.
For one thing, I don't think The Ubyssey has
ever come to terms with the phenomenon of the
underground newspaper and its new style. A few
years ago The Ubyssey and its Page Friday (or
whatever it was called in those
good-old-bad-old-days) was far-out and there wasn't
any competition. But things have changed. This
week's Georgia Straight, despite its hippie
planned-inefficiency, sloppy technique, and hysteria
or however you view its line, is about 10 times more
interesting than the student rag. Instead of moving
with it, The Ubyssey has been as resistant to change
as The Vancouver Slum or The Moscow Pravda.
Secondly, The Ubyssey hasn't figured out how
to respond to the passing phenomenon of student
power. (The paper isn't as bright as an ex-culture
hero even.) There's a real political life in the
university for students, but it might be wise to see
the recent student power boom as a kind of fad, like
panty raids or swallowing goldfish, except this time
the content of the fashion was politics.
So The Ubyssey reflects the letdown.
Post-coital depression. Last year teachers were
walking around asking student leaders, "What's
going to happen now?" because those radical leaders
were what was happening. The Ubyssey hasn't
figured out how to raise the issues intelligently now
that it's no longer easy, or fashionable, now that
there aren't any student-charisma-leaders or masses
cooking up strikes and demands. So everybody has
long hair, mustaches, and sideburns now. So what?
Thirdly,. The Ubyssey doesn't have the
confidence to create reality. In a heavy-handed
editorial the paper announced that it'll print what it
likes and screw you. Behind that unsophisticated
stupidity was the serious matter that how the news
appears, what is made important as facts, are
editorial questions essentially. There ain't no
objective news. But after that editorial it's
dismaying to hear the whine, carping and slickness
that masks an underlying confusion.
Look you guys, I'm not talking from some
fancy removed position. I'm right here. Politics
always did begin on the other side of despair. It's
after you feel the weight—after the thing inside you
says, "No way—it's hopeless—this crap will always
stay ciap"—that you find the confidence to propose
what to do. (Fer gawdsakes, I feel like a football
coach trying to pep up a team that's losing 35-0 at
halftime.)
THE JOB OF THE NEWSPAPER IS TO
IMAGINE A READERSHIP WORTH TALKING
TO. If you haven't got some way you think we
should do it, then the repeated criticism becomes
empty. You only contribute to the feeling of
meaninglessness.
Stop telling me about those damn petty
scandals of AMS. They're a bore. Stop pretending
that a couple very miniscule weak course unions are
all there is that's worth doing.
And if you're asking, Well, what is there, then I
say (and you won't like it cause it's not sensational),
you've got to start with some idea of what the
university is/ought to be that isn't a cliche, and
present some programs that you stand for that come
out of your understanding. By understanding and
programs, I don't mean boring jargonish old
Leftover analysis.
How do we, for example, make the problem of
overcrowding (that so depersonalizes and destroys
the so-called learning situation) both a) a public
issue and b) something that can be dealt with here
and now? Impossible? I don't think so. I don't think
so, because, for example, I can make an argument
about how to do it. (no, not right now. Our
problem right now is to see what's wrong with the
paper.)
And finally, stop being afraid to disorder this
overly-neat newspaper. If you can figure out that
what I'm saying to you(which is NOT a putdown) is
your first priority problem, then this ought to be on
the front page. Friday, October 31,  1969
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
The end
A global nothing
By PETER LADNER
Last of a series
If you can believe it, after 104 pages of long
discourses on the nature of this and that, the
Belshaw report on long-range objectives still has a
few leftovers for any appetites that crave more
recommendations.
So what else should be new?
The lengthiest ramblings in this last chapeter
examine UBC's failure to live up to its
responsiblities in international affairs.
More specifically, the report laments our
neglect in educating foreigners and attracting them
to our campus.
AMERICANIZATION?
Up pops the question of the Americanization of
Canadian campuses. The answer? "Increase support
for the best grad schools in the humanities and
social sciences in Canada."
This in turn implies creating a cosmopolitan
environment to attract other foreigners to balance
U.S. predominance.
The report describes the fizzling out of UBC's
aid programs and technical assistance to
underdeveloped countries as "little short of tragic."
It wants a UBC international co-ordination
bureau to fix up the mess. It would give
international aid and research programs a kick in the
ass, represent UBC in international university affairs
and co-ordinate all overseas aid and research
programs as well as recruiting foreign students.
FIXING UP GRAD STUDIES
The report then steers over to grad studies in
general and recommengs implementation of a 1966
study to fix up grad studies.
Another problem they mull over is education of
old folks and other non-stereotype regular students.
Statistics  show  there  were  more than 8,300
students taking extra-sessional, evening and daytime
non-credit courses last year. To handle their growing
numbers, the report urges creation of a faculty of
continuing education to replace the existing
extension department.
WHY NOT TRIMESTERS?
In addition, they want students over 35 to be
able to get into undergrad studies in majois and
honois piograms without the usual prerequisites. If
they graduate with a first class or high second-class
marks, the diploma (not degree) they earn will be
valid as a passport into grad studies.
In a similar field, the report wants a summer
term to be introduced in addition to the existing
summer session. The summer session would be
phased out over five yeais, to be replaced by the
13-week term where a student could take a
maximum of TA units.
The obvious question here is "Why not try a
full trimester system? Nix to that, says the report. It
would be academically inferior, they argue, and it's
doubtful if it would save money in the long run.
HERE WE GO AGAIN
The committee also takes a look at Christmas
exams and comes out for continuing the present
trend away from them. They want fewer
registrar-administered Christmas exams, without the
existing requirement of formal exams at Christmas.
Students would still be assessed for their first
term's work at UBC, but the mark would come
from term assignments and tests.
Academic planner Robert Clark dissents here,
writing a minority opinion in favor of the present
exam system.
At the end of this mammoth creation, the
123nd page climaxes on recommendation number
39: establish a standing long range objectives
committee to publish more reports.
Omygawd.
Stray animals in holding centre
used for science experiments
By COLLEEN HAMMOND
Have you heard any strange animal sounds
coming from the barn at the far corner of darkest
"B" lot?
Howard Kaufman, arts 7, has. Kaufman was in
the barn with a friend who had lost a cat.
They had gone there after the SPCA had given
them the number of the animal holding centre.
He said when they phoned the place they
encountered difficulty trying to find out where it
was.
Upon reaching the place Kaufman heard what
he described as "hardly pleasant sounds".
Drug commission
holds hearing
The federal commission of inquiry wants to
know about the non-medical use of drugs.
A special hearing will be held in the SUB
ballroom extension at noon today so the
commission can hear students' opinions about
drugs.
The Commission will consider all points of view
when it makes its recommendations to the federal
government.
People testifying before the commission will be
protected by the Canada Evidence Act.
Once inside, he said he noticed "a wall of cages
containing confused and scared looking cats."
Kaufman said he knows this sort of thing goes
on everywhere, implying that the Animal Holding
Unit picks up stray animals and then proceeds to
mistreat them and use them for experimental
purposes.
Upon hearing this, Dr. J. C. Bankier, one ofthe
men in charge of the animal holding centre, said this
was a fallacy.
The animals kept there, everything from dogs
to hamsters and rats, appear to be healthy and in
good condition.
The dogs bark and whine, mostly when
someone appears outside the pens and does not pay
any attention to them.
Bankier said the animals are, in fact, used for
experimental purposes. He said many of the rats are
used in cancer research.
The centre obtains the animals through owners
who no longer want them and sign a declaration
that the animal is their own, Bankier said.
Many other people are concerned about the use
of these animals in experimentation. One woman
talked to Bankier concerning this and was told that
most of the animals were only going to die anyway.
"In using these animals for experimental
purpose many human medical and phychological are
solved," Bankier said.
Editor: Michael Finlay
News Paul Knox
City   Nate Smith
Managing    Moshe Curtis
Photo    Bruce Stout
Wire   Irene Wasilewski
Sports Jim Maddin
Senior   John Twigg
Ass't News    Maurice Bridge
Page Friday Fred Cawsey
Norbert Ruebsaat
Once more, in five-part harmony
with feeling: "Will we see you in
November or lose you to the library
stacks."
As midterms approach and staffers
claim to be students, only a hardy few
remain to get the old rag out (barely).
These include John Andersen, Dave
Keillor, Peter Ladner, Sandy Kass,
Christine Krawczyk, Dave Sigmund
and Jan O'Brien.
Brian McWatters was Curtis' partner
in pumpkin pilferage. The pumpkin
was carved into the image of senator
Scoop Davies, who was busy telling
political never-was Murray Kennedy he
could always run for dog catcher.
Leslie Plommer did her thing (Wow,
how's that for far-out boss groovy talk)
much to the shock of Robert Bennett,
Robin Burgess, Colleen Hammond and
Bernard Bischoff.
It will be a standard sports
department wedding (black jock strap
and sneakers) for Rik Nyland. Tony
Gallagher, Jim Stevenson, Steve Millard
and Dick Button will be flower
children.
The motley darkroom crew included
Richard Sullivan, Dave Enns, John
Kurtz, Andy Garner and David
Bowerman.
"Great Coups of History" premiered
last night. A good time was had by all
at the gala affair.
J**p"t**-lt*9flWv^[-*f-|1ff*<*f'i **■*■■ **l*^*4*'
OBJECTIVE: CAREER
The Regular Officer Training Plan is for bright
young men looking for a meaningful career. You
undertake a complete university education with
a degree in arts, sciences, or engineering plus
full military training. Result: you graduate as a
complete man: well-educated, with an officer's
commission in the Canadian Armed Forces. Act
now because we begin selecting candidates early
in the New Year. For full information, visit:
CANADIAN ARMED FORCES^
RECRUITING CENTRE
545 Seymour St., Vancouver — 666-3136
THE REGULAR OFFICER TRAINING PLAN
Give If Some Thought'.
V
Chevron Standard
Limited
CALGARY, ALBERTA
offers careers in
PETROLEUM EXPLORATION
and will conduct
campus interviews on
November 4 and 5
Post Graduates — Graduates
Undergraduates
in
Honours Geology
Geological  Engineering
(Options 1, 2, 3)
Geophysics
Physics and Geology
Mathematics and Physics
Honours Physics
Engineering Physics
-Permanent and summer
employment in geology.
-Permanent   and'   summer
employment in geology
and/or geophysics.
-Permanent and  summer
employment in geophysics.
-Permanent and summer
employment in geology
and/or geophysics.
-Permanent  employment
in geophysics.
-Permanent employment
in geophysics.
-Permanent  employment
in geophysics.
Arrangements for Personal Interviews
may be made through the
UNIVERSITY'S PLACEMENT OFFICE Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 31,  1969
He has ideas on
hermaphrodites
By JAN O'BRIEN
Lambert T. Dolphin has
this theory about
hermaphrodites.
"Human sexuality, the
perennial urge to merge, has
produced a man that is half
male and half female," said
Dolphin in a talk to 500
students in SUB ballroom
Thursday noon.
Dolphin is a former
nuclear physicist from
Stanford Research Institute.
He was billed as having spent
12 years searching for the
inner light.
In referring to the Kinsey
report on sexual response,
Dolphin said that 95 per cent
of male and 60 per cent of
female university students
masturbate. "This is
self-centered sex, a longing
for the woman or man of
your dreams," he said.
"Homosexuals think they
have found something unique
but it is still a male-female
attraction, only it has been
inverted," said Dolphin.
"Marriage is four people
(two people, each with two
sexes) learning to live
together. Sex outside
marriage is a no-no."
"Free love is terribly
harmful, a fornicator sins
against his own body and will
never find a partner to
project himself on," he said.
Dolphin said the answer to
the conflict of two sexes in
each person was finding Jesus
Christ. Christians belong to a
new human race in which
there is a dualism of sex.
Dolphin thought the tragic
dilemna of man is brought
about by society. He sees
society as a sinister, seducing
harlot.
"When society deteriorates
it takes on the quality of
adultered woman; if the
flashy neon signs of society
are followed it will destroy
you," said Dolphin.
Dolphin   felt   that   young
DOLPHIN j 'free love harmful'
people were turning to
eastern philosophy because the
western philosophy was too
scientific, rational and
intellectual. What did
students think of Lambert?
"Different analysis of
society," said Anka Troelstra,
science 3.
"Interesting model of man
and woman but nothing
more," said Bill De Waal, grad
studies 9.
CUS will phase out
by end of November
- OTTAWA (CUP) - The Canadian Union of Students will phase
itself out of existence by the end of November, meeting all of its
debts and possibly even showing a surplus before it finally disappears.
Members of the CUS national council met Monday to assess the
position of the union and chose the phase-out over two other
alternatives: continuing operations in a reduced capacity in line with
reduced revenue, and continuation as a voluntary union.
In a press release Tuesday the council said that an assessment of
the union's finances had revealed CUS was "in a sound financial
position and could meet all of its obligations and have a surplus."
The surplus, which members said was still only a possibility
based on payment of all outstanding fees from member or
former-member student councils, would be divided pro rata among
the remaining less-than-a-dozen members of the union.
Students at the University of Toronto finally broke the back of
CUS, which has been fighting for survival for the past 14 months,
when they voted to withdraw-along with their $20,000-from the
union Oct. 22.
Without Toronto, national council members decided that
continuation of CUS would be impractical if not impossible, as
operations would have to be brought to a virtual standstill to remain
financially above water.
The national council also announced that arrangements would
be made to insure the continuation of the CUS travel plan, which
provides low-priced overseas flights for students.
f»iJ£»T£ "'•
'00|.
^^^F   ^***^WP^ dk^B
"YEP, IT'S WORTH ONE CLAM, and it's officially endorsed by the Great Pumpkin, so cash it or
pumpkin blight will descend on your money vaults."
SCIENTIFIC GRAPHICS
Production of all kinds of Graphs,
Charts, Maps, Illustrations and
Formulations, Scientific Displays
and   Advertisements.
Phone  733-4506 (evenings)
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With orgasmic orange
rumblings (sounds like another
artsy-fartsy masthead, eh gang?)
the mean ol' pussycat above and
Blanche the Super-Pelican
between rear their ugly heads and
head their ugly rears out of the
cotton-pickin pumpkin patch to
shine mysterious moonliness on
the thousands of jolly little elfins
and goblins tricksing and treatsing
their way through the ephemeral
erogenous ectoplasm with hopes
of receiving in their pillowcase
sacks a treasure or two of sweet
sticky something or even an apple
with a razor blade in its middle.
By way of simple explanation
to the layman (which is a polite
-■V-1--1-•"■•■■*-i.'i •»•»»■■ •»•»•»- *»»»•*« •«•.■■«•■>•.
IT'S BLANCHE, THE SUPER-PELICAN!!!
way of saying clot-head), another
exciting issue of Page Friday has
descended just in time for
Hallowe'en, that fun time of year
when one gets to throw rotten
eggs at passing cars, tip over
garbage garages, yell obscenities
and other spiffy things so relevant
to our peace-lovin' culture.
(Quick, make with the V-sign!)
If you can't afford a pumpkin
tonight, then cut a hole in the top
of this week's pf, remove the
seeds with care (after carefully
reading same), cut eyes, nose, and
mouth in this here very first page,
and then ignite the insides. A fun
time guaranteed for all!
llllllXl-lllllllTlllllltllllllllllllllll-11
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Upper Tenth Barber
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FOR APPOINTMENT TELEPHONE 224-6622
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Government Certified Mechanics
33 Years at This Location
10th AVE. AT BLANCA 224-7424
YOUR OFFICIAL TRAVEL AGENTS
ON THE CAMPUS
For Your Travel Requirements
5700 University Boulevard - 224-4391
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|Ha Page Friday Ha Gets Ha Ha Humorous
THE SINCLAIR-DICKIN REPORT
ON POST-SECONDARY EDUCATION
Post-Secondary education in B.C. is totally
absurd. We do not believe that education has its
place in society. Liberally educating a large
number of people leads only to a liberal
education for a large number of people. Thus,
this is prejudicial to the conservative minority
who wish to remain ossified in their secret little
crypts.
It is obvious, and can be easily deduced from
the evidence around us, that the creation of
institutes of higher education results not only
in higher taxation but also in a desire of the
populace to procreate, so that they may take
advantage of these facilities for which they are
paying.
This leads to an overcrowding of the
provided facilities and the necessity to raise
taxes to construct more institutions for the
tax-weary populace to utilize, leading to an
increase in the sales of beds and mattresses.
Thus, it can be shown that the forces
backing post-secondary education consist solely
of the Posturepedic Corporation.
What can we do? Obviously we cannot
immediately eliminate higher education since
this would leave thousands of students
unemployed, yet it is apparent that unless the
forces of bedlam are defeated the
tax-knowledge ratio will remain constant while
each of the individual components of the ratio
is increasing and thus causing inflation.
What we must do, considering the recent
anti-war movements, is convert our major
universities to military academies.
Thus, only those interested in violence, (i.e.
the present student population) will be allowed
to increase their knowledge, while at the same
time we do not get any increase in the student
population —since the bubble-smoking,
pot-chewing secondary students will have
turned away from the rigor promised in a
military academy. This, of course, is only a
temporary solution.
In the end, of course, we hope to get rid of
society, beds, mattresses, procreation, and
universities.
Then we will all be free.
By SINCLAIR-DICKIN
^m   ^^ ih wm mu ^bI
j       , *15   Herb
t    * £ I „J|   Gilbert
% XraJnJM   wears
his glasses
The Festival of
Contemporary Arts has started:
NOW!
It has started in the heads of
some two dozen students and
faculty. This year, instead of
lasting for about ten days at the
end of January and the
beginning of February, the
Festival will be happening
continually throughout the
Spring Term-from January
through March.
Festival events may happen at
dawn, at mid-day, at dusk, at
night. They may happen on the
campus, on the beach, in the
city, in the sky. There may be
one person all alone, or a
thousand people. Some events
may happen every day for a
month, others may be (literally)
a single blaze of glory. Some of
SUB FILMS PRESENTS:
\\
PETULIA
Starting
JULIE CHRISTIE - GEO. C. SCOTT
Dir. by RICHARD LESTER
SUB AUDITORIUM, 75c
tl
ART NOW
them will disappear in a
moment, others may endure for
ages. They will come in many
different shapes and forms and
sizes. And all this has started:
NOW!
A committee has been
formed (see below) to consider
possible events performances,
non-events, non-performances,
displays, participations, etc., etc.
Many things will happen of
which as yet we have no idea,
and will have no idea until after
everything has started. But we
want submissions, suggestions,
ideas. We especially want
anybody who has any event,
project, peformance, display,
non-event, non-performance,
happening—whatever it is—which
he or she wants to do, or would
like to see occur as part of the
Festival, to let us know about it:
NOW!
We have a budget and we will
be using it, both to support
events and projects that
people wish to put on as part of
the Festival, and to initiate such
events. The criteria are:
CONTEMPORARY arts and
performance-event-participation.
(Enough of lectures and
seminars and discussion groups!
Away with them for the purpose
of this Festival!)
Let us hear from you—NOW!
And watch Page Friday next
week for full and further details.
The    Committee    for    the
Festival 1970 is:
George Rosenberg (Fine Arts)
Alvin    Balkind   (Fine   Arts
Gallery)
Helen Goodwin (Dance)
Herb Gilbert (Fine Arts)
Doug    Bankson    (Creative
Writing)
Ian Wallace (Fine Arts)
Warren Tallman (English)
Nicholas Kendall (Theatre)
Doug Needley (Music)
Chris Dikeakos (Fine Arts)
Ron     Lane — Smith
(Architecture)
-GEORGE ROSENBERG
Dave Whetter's "Posidron" in
action at last year's Festival.
pf 2wo
OCTOBER 30-12:30 - 31-7:00,9:30
NOVEMBER 1-8:00 - 2-7:00
THE      UBYSSEY
mRY       UK)     DAY ATMR'
DAY IS      if W4 MIKE'S
CHARBROILED STEAKS
4489 W.  10th at Sasamat
Open to 12:30 week nights
8:00 on Sundays
Friday, October 31,  1969 Quig
Tells
A11!
(scandalous
mumblings)
By MICHAEL QUIGLEY
• The mini-orgy following the Little Richard—Bo Diddley—Albert
Collins Agrodome show last Saturday night was in the best tradition
of the Hollywood-Las Vegas well-let's-throw-a-party-for-the-press
tradition.
Celebrities in attendance included Little Richard (for about ten
minutes), Collins, promoters, plus local socialites such as Jurgen
Hesse of The Sun, Dan McLeod of the Georgia Straight, Rick McGrath
of The Peak, and CKLG Boss types Daryl Burlingham, Rick Honey
and Tim Berge.
Somewhat conspicuous by their absence was anyone from The
Province. One of the promoters offered a possible explanation when
he said that someone from that paper had showed up at the box office
and demanded "eight tickets" for various people with him. When the
promoter informed the particular individual that the idea of gratis
admission for the press wasn't meant to be interpreted as a free-for-all,
he left in a huff promising great deprication on the show. Strangely
enough, no review of the concert appeared in The Province Monday
morning.
Inside, a gaggle of what Hesse called "lacquered damsels"
mingled with the crowds, offering drinks and little else. One of them
gushed with all the sincerity of a Vogue Magazine ad when she found
out who I was, demanding to know what I was going to write about
the concert.
All in all, it was a fairly good bash, aside from the diminutive
liquor supply. I had an interesting talk with Boss type Rick Honey
about the evils of AM radio and the potentials of "Sugar Sugar". (We
both agreed it was shit.)
And after all that, it was a nice walk fifty blocks to my house.
(There aren't any buses at four in the morning.)
When I phoned up Georgia
Straight pop critic Al Sorenson
last week, he ravidly insisted that
I say something about Laura Nyro
who I'd known for some time. A
good point, since most others
(especially in Canada) don't know
about her, just like they don't
know about Van Dyke Parks,
Nilsson, Ars Nova, and a lot of
other good musical things which
are better for them than their
massive overdoses of Lennon and
McCartney and LG-AM trivia.
OK, so what do I know about
Laura Nyro? Not much, except
she's a chick who lives in New
York. She's also written some
songs which have been
popularized, mainly by the Fifth
Dimension, songs like Stoned
Soul Picnic, Sweet Blindness, and
Save the Country, plus others like
Wedding Bells Blues which make
occasional appearances on the
airwaves.
Now you probably know about
all those other recordings, but the
anazing thing is that Laura has a
couple of records of her own. She
sings the same pieces, but she
sings them just as well, if not
better. Through double-tracking
she does several voices at once,
and also plays piano.
The results may not be as
polished as The Fifth Dimension,
but they certainly aren't lacking
in any soul. In fact, the two
albums—More than a New
Discovery (Verve Forecast
FTS-3020)i>Eli and the Thirteenth
Confession (Columbia CS
9626)—are great to put on after
having a drink or two (or
something else) and let yourself
be overwhelmed by Laura's
presence.
LAURA NYRO
So if you haven't heard of her,
then do something, since you
might be missing out on
a good experience. By the way,
coming from Columbia is yet
another Laura Nyro album which
has already drawn raves according
to Billboard Magazine. It's about
time that people woke up.
Piano
langsamrr
Old friend Ray OToole of the Northwest Company phoned the
other day to say that his group would be playing at the Village Bistro
this weekend.
However, this is meant to be more than a plug. Apparently also
at the Bistro along with the NWCo. this Friday night at 7:30 p.m. to
10:00 p.m. is "an informal, unstructured session" ofthe Commission
of Inquiry into the Non-Medical use of Drugs, holding hearings in
Vancouver yesterday and today. (They're in the SUBBallroom today
from noon till 1:30.)
So drop around to The Bistro tonight and see what
materializes...
'VV»>i»*^J>*****>*V>>>***i'*»'fc******K'*»'****V'KV».V^.'^^
Do you have to look away when you pass by the diner
Where the squad car stops for coffee
Don't you wish that you were anyplace else but here.
And don't you feel kinda funny when a man in a suit says,
"Man do you know where I can get high?"
Don't you wish that you were anyplace else but here.
Take a walk down any street that you choose
Yeh and you'll wind up with the Fairfax Street
Mid-morning paranoia blues.
Do you grab  a cigarette when a man in an unmarked
Plymouth pulls you over just to say "hi?"
Don't you wish that you were anyplace else but here.
And do you fumble in your wallet while you're looking for
your license
And he tells you not to talk talk with your mouth full?
Don't you wish that you were anyplace else but here.
BILL MARTIN (Sung by Nilsson on Harry)
Copyright by Grosvenor Music/Tickson Music Co.
Henry Mancini's latest album, Debut!(RCA Victor LSC-3106) is
a let-down, the first of his albums to have such an effect on me. For
an orchestra Mancini has The Philadelphia Orchestra Pops, which is
actually members of the Philadelphia Orchestra itself. (RCA is making
this move because they're losing the Boston Symphony and the
Boston Pops to the German record company Deutsche Grammophon
next fall.)
As expected, the orchestra sounds lushly beautiful, just like all
those Eugene Ormandy Spectaculai albums once issued on Columbia.
But that seems to be the main reason the album was made, to show up
the excellence of the orchestra. None of these pieces are from films or
television shows, makine this fl think) Mancini's first album of
entirely original non-mass media music.
Side two of the album, consisting of six pieces, is, as Mancini
himself says, "excursions into the various sections of the orchestra"
The results range from superbly mellow ("Dream of a Lifetime") to
sonically silly ("Drummer's Delight"). Though Mancini's composition
skill wanes a bit at times ("Drummer's Delight", starts out like
'Timothy" from More Music from 'Peter Gunn'.) his arrangements
make up for this loss.
Side one of the album, however, makes this a disappointing
release. It consists of a three-movement, fifteen-minute long suite
called "Beaver Valley—'37", supposedly about Mancini's childhood. I
wish he would have avoided giving us these musical memories.
Most of the suite sounds like a movie background score from
the 1940's, which may have been the composer's intent. However,
Mancini is a master of writing contemporary film scores as well,
something which I hope he'll stick to in the future, and maybe the
next Philadelphia Pops Orchestra album under his direction will have a
bit more life and length than this one.
"ti; \\i' i
m
1
is
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&m
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pS Shvee
122
5
M
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Friday, October 31,  1969
THE     UBYSSEY ■WBHWa
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SEX...GOD...
AND PASOLINI!
TEOREMA has so many interpretations that we
have been tempted to ask Mr. Pasolini to return
to New York and answer some of the questions
put to us by our audiences.
Mr. Vincent Canby of The New York Times
places TEOREMA above the prize-winning THE.
GOSPEL ACCORDING TO ST. MATTHEW among
Pasolini's accomplishments. This story of a
young man who visits a family and permits
himself to be seduced by the mother, the father,
the son, the daughter and the maid was described by him as "fascinating," and he believes
that TEOREMA "should be seen at least twice."
Miss Kathleen Carroll of The Daily News feels
that "Pasolini could be saying that human sexuality is the last avenue of communication in
modern society."
Mr. Joseph Gelmis of Newsday added that
"'Teorema' mixes piety and profanity, sex and
spiritualism, perversion and exhaltation with a
genius that straddles reverence and sacrilege."
A FILM BY
PIER PAOLO PASOLINI.
STARRING
TERENCE STAMP
SILVANA MANGANO
Showings: 7:30, 9:30
Sundays: 3:30, 5:30,
7:30, 9:30
Varsity
4375 W. 10th    22J^730
Students With Card—$1.50
•ffHWJWffiSrf
Daisy Blossoms
Something happened at the Daisy nightspot last weekend.
The music blended with the lights to produce an effect of
bourgeois sensual richness. There was no howling negro blues
singer with peanut butter and crackers in his throat; instead, the
Spectre played alternately heavy and light songs highlighted by
some of their own compositions. The songs were on the verge of
well known, but not over played.
The music was easy to dance to, and the light show was
good-even if images of the daisy flower did predominate in a
kind of a brain washing fashion. The Daisy is a copy of those
numerous highly successful youth oriented nightclubs that have
blossomed all over North America from the strip in L.A. to
Montreal.
The people behind the Daisy have spent a lot of money to
create a light atmospheie, and they seem to have lit upon the
right formula for a succesful night club. The Daisy isn't phony,
there is no pretense of it being anything but a pleasantly
decorated warehouse under the Granville Street bridge, where
young people who like to dance can go and really enjoy
themselves. It's crowded on the weekend, so if your territorial
imperative quotient is high, then you should try it during the
week.
-TIM WILSON
Prism Spirits
Dewain Valentine is the unpretentious artist who created the
transluscent forms that are on display in the Fine Arts gallery
under the Main Library. Some of the forms are made of clear
polyester, while others are smoky and almost opaque. They
somehow capture space, condense it for a moment and then
release it in brilliant phantom images as you walk around them.
Or, almost, through them. This condensing of space creates a
slow-down of time for the viewer-like an ant which experiences
our hours as yeais, in his miniature world of space, distance, and
time.
The prismatic forms create other effects related to the
time-drag, through consensed space. As you put your hand into
what looks like a sphere you find instead a concave lens that
completely confuses your sense of touch in relation to sight and
this confusion of the senses becomes part of the magic of leaving
human spatial reality.
Aesthetic judgments are necessarily limited to the cultural
and experiential bakground of the viewer, so all I can say, is that
the forms are like spatial fantasie that appeal to me. Go in and
see them, if only to be able to say that you saw them.
-TIM WILSON
"Where's that little Linus creep?"
Pf's Keen Kulture I
recent events on the
advantages of animal
Space
pf 4our'
B>
In a throwaway line
space control centre off
secretary: "Nothing excitin
And with that, ladles ai
think, click, here comes th
excitement. Well, in this <
right because the movie is
pooper of the year.
Don't get the idea .'
because I laughed, chortle*
it with great glee.
It is without doubt th
ever encountered and ali
screens in a long time, fl
Woman, a Danish sex movi
such saving grace.)
Because of its lack
description, however, this
years from now when t
definitely be a classic.
Miniature photograph
ocean scenes etc. in filras.
great sailing ships in pirate
war movies the whole see
pool and shot with super c
Most moviemakers, 1
have small models made
GREEN SLIME, on the t
made as space cars and r
quite obviously right oat
modifications made.
But this is great. Dir
done   this  purposely.  E\
space vehicles were clearly
What Fukasaku has d
camp retrospective of sci
phoniness and has turned*;
With a magnificent gr
has produced a film wit
errors that he has given
chance to flex the percept
And lo, with one si
generations of film-maker
created audience particip;
do not just sit back and 1
you boo, you point out
real moon-men on TV, yc
anticipate the plot, of whi
Magnificently McLur
an intelligent understand
audiences. As you will i
that TV invites participa'
hot, while the medium o
cold.
But  Fukasaku has
McLuhanism and tiadleu
produce a fantastic work (
What appears, on thi
film, is therefore a master
So, patrons of the
sensitive  enough  may e
master.
jnmBUF' •jr'ti^w* *.*nti*r\v'iiiP'<^MK-^
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, October 31,  1969 ind critically surveys
sne and considers the
n.
Slime
ON
nant with irony, the ersatz
says to the busty blond
:r happens here."
lybeans, we are supposed to
ring suspense and dangerous
the guy just happens to be
!EN SLIME which has to be
n't like the film, though,
. exhorted my way through
niest waste of money I have
e  worst movie to hit the
ear's loser was   Suddenly A
hout any tit, beaver or any
cinematic quality of any
has got to be seen because
things are decided, it will
; long been used to show
means when you see those
:s and battleships sinking in
:aking place in a swimming
p lenses.
;r, go to great lengths to
ale and intricate detail. In
land, no such attempt was
and landing vehicles were
lattel toy space set with no
Kinji Fukasaku must have
e strings holding up the
lence in some scenes,
nowingly or not, is made a
ction movies with all their
a critical work of art.
irony and put-on Fukasaku
nany elementary technical
sophisticated audiences a
.scles.
->P- he has achieved what
been unable to do. He has
film. During this flick you
- even leave, you take part,
necause you have watched
ip your feet and you even
i is very little.
e, GREEN SLIME shows
hot and cold reactions in
er, McLuhan pointed out
3motions and is therefore
does not and is therefore
over  this great  wall of
he very medium itself to
y-making art.
;, to be an incredibly bad
) and admire, and those
luflect at Fukasaku, the
<mK3smmmmm%mmma&
I
wnsMffiP
Ruebsaat reconsiders and becomes amazingly serious,
considering.
We are at the Arts Club Theatre on Seymour Street. We are
viewing the Playhouse Theatre's Playhouse 2 first production of
the season: Charles Dyer's Staircase, directed by Jack Creley and
starring Ted Stidder and David Glyn-Jones.
Preliminary Comments by People With me at the Play:
"This play would have been slightly controversial and
relevant at about the turn of the century."
"This play reminds me of those which I saw, and took very
Fairy Play
seriously in my school days—when I was first discovering theatre
and all that."
(And I agreed.)
And thats the whole point. On Tuesday night, the 28th of
October we saw a nice-evening(s)-of-entertainment play. We saw a
play which was tightly-constructed, thoroughly-written, and
psychologically quite complete.
The drama surrounds two aging, fag barbers, who, after
twenty years of common-law living, still constantly re-enact the
ritual of love-hate: the self-delusion and ego-building; the
image-making; the image-shattering; the "stints" of
intercommunication; and the constant, gnawing fear—of life.
And, agreeably, I have no basic gripe with Creley's
production. It was professionally handled, well acted by Stidder
and Glyn-Jones . . . and the jokes flowed smoothly, and the
audience was entertained.
But again, that's the whole point. We have seen all this
before; we have been shown by every second dramatist what a
psychological holocast the twentieth century is, in terms of the
individual and his interrelationships. We have been told often,
amid much excess verbiage, how insatiable and cruel our egos are.
This sort of psychological heavy drama has become, is invariably
now, smoothly—and commercially, glossy—it has become the
happy entertainment of the enlightened, educated, glamorously
liberal masses. People go down, make the scene at the club, are
conversationally adept in many fields, are told what idiots the)
are-and they dig it cause they're Arty.
Ted Stidder  (right) and David Glyn-Jones
as Charlie and Harry in Dyer's "Staircase".
The Playhouse 2 stage is billed as 'The Pulse-beat of the
Contemporary Theatre". Wow! So what then is its initial
justification for staging a play which has made it on Broadway,
which is a financial success par excellence, and which has already
been made into a film—which is, to top it off-currently running
here in town?
In addition to good acting and good production, our
theatre also—it seems to me-has some kind of responsibility to
present its public with something that it can defend on the purely
philosophysical level. What I mean is: we need more than to be
slickly entertained and masochistically tittilated in our bourgeois
minds. We must expect something which involves new vision,
something which forces us to rethink what we have naively
established as truth—or something.
This whole thing of course leads-and it seems to be
happening Very quickly in this article-generally into the whole
question of the choosing of a repertoire, the commercialization of
the arts in a paranoically self-conscious society, and the whole
political (in its widest sense) responsibility of art generally. All of
which could go on into lengthy discussions. But these questions
are direly in need of reconsideration—and will be dealt with again
in future editions of this column.
In the meantime—if you want the kind of entertainment
TV would be presenting if it weren't already two epochs behind
the present-go see Staircase at the Arts Club on Seymour. The
evening will glitter with intensely professional theatre. Grrrrrrr!
SUB FILMS, THE UNIVERSITY OF B.C.
AND THE FRENCH DEPARTMENT PRESENT:
—A  Canadian  film   by Jean-Pierre  Lefebvre—
Introduced by Jacques Godbout, director of
the   National   Film   Board's   French   division.
SUB AUDITORIUM - THURS., NOV. 6 - 7:30
FREE English  Subtitles FREE
VANCOUVER MUSEUMS ASSOCIATION MEMBERSHIP
$10  Family
$ 6  Individual
$ 2 STUDENT (full-time student)
One Year Membership Gives You:
• Free Admission to Centennial and
Maritime Museums
• Six  Free  Planetarium  Vouchers
• Free Admission to Museum Lectures
• Participation in Interest Groups
• Use of Members' Lounge
• Regular Newsletter
(Membership Application  Available at
Museum - Planetarium  or Phone 736-4431)
SOCIETY  -    Ermpfiness, WeaCth, p-ovtrty,   wii-
Wheve   are   **-* e   Qo\ng 7
SCIENCE.  - WHtve is \t <**e.tU*\C;   os1
•*lh»tr dots   it  jai-ove?
.SlN     - Am   X    reS"*-oi\sib(e ?
What"   is   good ?
5EY*.      - What   is    *KbL    (.OM-*.7.
How can X t\r\<i   4urtiUr\en-t in sex?
SOUND   -      A happening   eacK weeK -
G*u'*t*»rs.  9<j*t  bucKets .   singers
SOUL      -      How car* I have peace  and -"freedom?
Wh»t is  the  me-ihiirM-j   ot    iift?
SOARING -    What about afcohol. grass, -trips?
War*/-.*!
rhr »p.r   dft-'ci-i***"*";***'.    ts    iwt»^£^u.tt     -   you   -*-*-.-JTt£ ****p**H*e*»c»    +1Ht Adhd	
im-muM
DISCUSSIONS  IN   LIVING-    TUNE IN  To RfAUTIES
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LWma. V "(Wdjito.  by atursqtmerit)
It's  -free/
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EACH    StfNDM
No\/ 2^-bee lV
3 pm.
fof -mow scoop  asli 261-490ft
Friday, October 31, 1969
THE     UBYSSEY Edit
Edit
eaam«R
PANDO COMPANY in association with
RAYBERT PRODUCTIONS presents
starring
PETER    DENNIS
FONDA   HOPPER
COLOR
JACK
NICHOLSON
Coronet
851   GRANVILLE
685-6828
Adult Entertainment
Showtimes: 12:35, 2:25,
4:20,6:10, 8:05, 10:00
ALEXANDER
-AXELSON
APPLIANCES LTD.
A Special Clearance of
R.C.A. Classical Recordings
VICTROLA - CAMDEN CLASSICS
Reg. 2.98      -      Special 1.49
A Few Sample Titles:—
Delibes - Sylvia  & Coppelia  Ballet Suites
Beethoven - Symphony #6 (Pastoral)
Tchaikovsky -  Swan  Lake  Ballet excerpts
R.C.A. CLASSICAL - OPERA HIGHLIGHTS
Reg. 6.29      -      Special 1.99
A Few Sample Titles:—
Norma Highlights - Sutherland
Tosca  Highlights - Leontyne  Price
Marriage of Figaro - Tozzi, Peters and London
R.C.A. CLASSICAL SELECTIONS OF SYMPHONIES,
CONCERTOS,  CHAMBER MUSIC,  Etc.
Reg. to 6.29      —      Special 2.49
R.C.A.  NEW AND CURRENT RELEASES
A  Good  Variety  of Classics
Reg. to 6.29      —      Special 2.99
Some of These Records Are Discontinued Items
Some Are Overstock of Current Releases
SHOP EARLY FOR BEST SELECTIONS
USE   YOUR CHARGEX   CARD
4512 W. 10th Ave. 228-9088
Vancouver's
BLACK
BLACK
SOUL SOUND
TONIGHT
Midnight
Plus 10
Little Brother SauVs
Solid
SoulShou
Poetry Reading Entertains
Miller Williams is a widely
acclaimed New Orleans poet.
And Tuesday night,
Williams captivated a crowd
of more than 100 in
Buchanan 106, proving that
he is not only good, but
entertaining as well.
Williams, unlike many
poets, is a good reader of
poems, and his easy delivery
coupled with the almost
conversational style of his
poems helped him
communicate his thoughts to
the audience.
The New York Times
Book Review says of
Williams: "Reading a good
Williams poem ... is like
finding a new animal in the
snow."
The same could be said,
one supposes, of hearing a
Williams poem. And there
were at least a couple of
animals found by Tuesday
night's crowd.
Williams teaches English at
Loyola University in New
Orleans and is editor of New
Orleans Review.
His poems, often amusing,
reflect this background and
he punctuated his reading
with equally amusing
anecdotes    about   how   the
poems were written.
His poems are also like
anecdotes in a way, in that he
clearly reveals his ideas and
feelings in a strong but simple
language.
He tells us about his
five-year-old son asking him
metaphysical questions he
can't answer about sex
organs, or about his feelings
Miller Williams
■pS 6ixH
after viewing a carnival freak
show.
Contrasted with those
serious emotions is the levity
of How the Elephant Got Its
Hump, an incredibly funny
tale about olives and the King
of the Middle East, or
something. At any rate,
Williams insists the title has
nothing to do with the poem.
Needless to say, the
audience Tuesday night was
wild about Williams' poems
and the reading.
It was a good start for this
year's series of poetry
readings sponsored by the
UBC Creative Writing
department. The series this
year promises to be a good
one.
Next is a reading by
Robert Sward, poet in
residence in the English
department at the University
of Victoria.
Sward has been published
in many journals including
the prestigious Poetry
Chicago and Transatlantic
Review. He has four books of
poetry published and is
currently working on a long
poem and a novel for
publication next year.
-ROON
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, October 31, 1969 Goblin
Ghoulies
By NICK ORCHARD
Once upon a time, not so long ago, there lived a handsome
pervert named Peter Pumpkin Eater.
Peter, agriculture 4, had pumpkin on the brain. He could
always be found in his modest backyard patch covering 415 acres,
goblin some pumpkin pie. (A little Hallowe'en jest).
However, one fateful day, his supply ran out. "My supply has
run out," moaned Peter, who had read the book and seen the
movie twice, so he knew.
"Grief and despair," he wailed, quaking and twitching from
heads to feet.
Not soon after, Peter lost his head. However, he never let
■- that get in the way of his pumpkin stealing. Forced into crime by
his insane desire for pumpkin, he lurked and slunk from one
back yard to another. Spotting a pumpkin he would slip out of the
shadows.' Fortunately never hurting himself, he would get up no
worse for the better.
So much did Peter lurk and slink that he finally caught a
nasty cold. Aunt Matilda bundled him into bed and wouldn't let
him out of the house.
"Coughs and sneezes spread diseases," she quipped. "A bird
in hand is worth 318 feathers," Peter replied, and went into a
pumpkin fit. "A stitch in time saves nine." laughed Aunt Matilda,
and sewed up his nose.
Now more than ever Peter suffered from his lack of
pumpkin. He would have little shaking spells and froth at the
mouth. Peter poured pills down his throat but to no avail.
•Hallowe'en was nigh, (that means near), and he had to have some
pumpkin.
"Shiver my timbers and sock it to me," screamed Peter on
Halloween night, and Aunt Matilda ran to get the doctor. Quick as
a flash and a yo-ho-ho, Peter was out the window.
Once on the ground, Peter was off with his pink pajamas and
a broken foot. Halloween night and his greatest search of all-The
Great Pumpkin.
"My greatest search of all," he muttered under his breath,
forgetting about his jungle mouth.
"I wonder, I wonder, where can the Great Pumpkin be?" So
saying he ran around and around in circles insight and a headache.
"A tisket, a tasket, a green and yellow eggplant," he chanted,
and suddenly it came to him. Wiping the eggplant off his face, he
left to find the most sincere pumpkin patch. Luckily it took no
time at all, for nary two blocks away he spotted a large neon sign
proclaiming Most Sincere Pumpkin Patch'.
Silently Peter slid through the back fence, swallowed his
little liver pills, and there before him was the Great Pumpkin
himself.
For Peter, this was indeed a sight for sore eyes, and they
were. The Great Pumpkin cast a suspicious glance in Peter's
direction, but Peter ducked and it flew right over his head.
Trembling, he started to run after the pumpkin, a wild
look in his ear. Running faster and faster he ran, tripping and
stumbling, but the Great Pumpkin was too fast for him. In one last
desperate dive, Peter dove.
The pumpkin slipped through his fingers and disappeared
into the night, laughing. (Or whatever pumpkins do). Peter lay still,
Tace down in the mud, rain trickling down his nose—a victim ot
pumpkin and the common cold.
That was the way they found Peter Pumpkin Eater next day,
put him in a pumpkin shell and there they kept him very well.
3261 W. Broadway     736-7788
Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. & Sat. 3 a.m.
pf 7eveni
BETTER BUY BOOKS
UNIVERSITY TEXT BOOKS
BOUGHT AND SOLD
NON-FICTION PAPERBACKS
Specializing in Review Notes
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4393 W. 10th Ave. 224-4144
ri
ATTENTION — Students of English 100
U.B.C. FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE PRESENTS
THE  CRUCIBLE
by Arthur Miller
(Gripping Drama of Salem Witchcraft Trials)
NOVEMBER 7-15
DIRECTED BY STANLEY WEESE
STUDENT TICKETS - $1.00 (available for all performances)
SPECIAL STUDENT PERFORMANCES
^
Monday, Nov. 10, 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 13, 12:30 p.m. Matinee
Tickets:      The Frederic Wood Theatre      Room 207
SUPPORT YOUR CAMPUS THEATRE
\ * ■*■
**-W*S<
The Campusbank closes in
5 minutes and this idiot's got to
prove himself!
True Chequing Accounts.
True Savings Accounts. Complete banking
services for students and faculty.
Visit your Campusbank
Administration Building Branch
G. F. Peirson, Manager
tt
Bank of Montreal
Canada's First Bank
Student Union Building Branch
J. M. S. Pouliot, Manager
:riday, October 31, 1969
THE     UBYSSEY oHot
Poop
The Village Bistro is alive
and well, thank you and
appearing this week, tonight
through Sunday is
Vancouver's very own
NORTHWEST COMPANY.
Next week is better, even,
with the Friendly Cactus
appearing Friday through
Sunday. Fantastic Lynn
Brooks, who used to do her
thing at the Cave Heartburn
Club is the feature to watch
in this group. Like nice.
• •       •
Don't forget the grand
opening tonight of Heaven
and Hell at Tenth and Alma.
It's a new place for UBC
students who want a place to
go nights. The grand opening
is a masquerade ball as regular
PF readers know and all those
who show up in costume will
get free pizza courtesy of the
management. Tomorrow's
Eyes will provide the music
and a large dance floor is
available for the movers and
groovers in the crowd.
If you can't get a chick,
bring a pumpkin.
• *      •
• *      *
Print freaks will probably
dig.**the Fifth Burnaby Print
Show starting Nov. 6 at the
Burnaby Art Gallery, 6450
Gilpin. The gallery is open
Tuesday through Sunday,
1-if p.m. arid Wednesday and
Friday evenings 7-9. Closed
Monday. The show continues
to Dec. 7. For further
information phone 291-2717
etc.
* *      •
THE BEARD by Michael
McClure is currently in
performance nightly at
Ronnie's Riverqueen, 1043
Davie, despite the lack of
clamoring crowds. Admission
is $2.50 with student rates of
$1.50 on Monday, Tuesday
and Wednesdays. Call
688-2636 for reservations.
Now is the chance for
students out of town for the
summer to see this play.
Forum
this week by
By JACQUES KHOURI
Who you
calling
inferior,
White
Boy?
"It's hard to tell what the racial situation is like in some parts
of the state although there is a distinct difference between northern
and southern California. I can't draw conclusions because I haven't
done research on it.
"Anyway," the letter goes on, "when we reached LA I picked
up a paper whose headline referred to a high school racial disruption
in San Bernadino. While in San Francisco or further north nothing
like this happened. Oh no—just a minute. We did stay overnight at
one guy's place in the Santa Cruz mountains. He was an old man,
about sixty-five, and appeared very humane. He was, actually. He
treated us well and cared about wildlife. But he felt that the problem
in the States was the 'nigger-problem.'
"Well, when he said this he shook me quite a bit. It wasn't
what I had expected. But he said things like, 'This guy (Jensen) has
written an article and he knows what he's talking about. He says that
if the niggers were given the opportunity or were confronted with
the situation, then they would readily revert to their witchcraft
activities and so on.' "
The above is part of a letter Alec Lee (UBC class of '69) sent
me while on tour of the U.S. Before he left Vancouver four weeks
ago, we sat for hours discussing Arthur Jensen's research into
increasing human intelligence.
(Jensen, a psychologist at the University of California at
Berkeley, contends that the native intelligence of Negroes is inferior
to that of whites by 15 IQ points; consequently it is useless in trying
to raise the intelligence of Negroes with education beyond a certain
limit dictated by their genetic make-up.)
Alec sent me a clipping from the October 12 issue ofthe Los
Angeles Times of a story entitled, "Black School Highest in IQ—Is
Affluence the Reason?" The article is about the sixth grade class of
the Windsor Hills Elementary School, whose average IQ of 115
exceeded all the other 435 elementary schools in the district,
including all the high-achieving predominantly white schools. (Eat
your watermelon, Jenson . ..)
Here's a summary of the story.
"Most of Windsor Hills School's pupils are just as black as the
youngsters in Watts down below. The difference is that the smarter
ones come from wealthy homes and the others come from much
poorer homes.
"The Negro students at Windsor Hills enjoy material, physical
and psychological advantages that overshadow the opportunities of
many white middle class children, much less the deprived youngsters
from low income minority families.
"Their parents are doctors, lawyers and other professional
people. The pupils do not have to worry about the necessities of
life—they can think completely about learning at school.
A proud Negro parent exclaims in the article, " 'That Jensen
paper just reinforced what people wanted to believe about Negroes.
This IQ scoie is a refutation that Negroes score 15 points below the
white population average of 100.' "
As a contrast to Windsor Hills families, the president of the
school's PTA, Mrs. Lorraine Paul, is quoted, "Life in the ghetto is
cramped with three to four in a bedroom and no place to study even
if parents did push their children."
Mrs. Brown, the articulate Negro wife of a physician, says
bluntly in the article, "Many white liberals, including teachers, still
can't help but think that Negro children are inferior in intelligence.
In Watts, no one teaches the children."
All agree that optimum conditions in the ghetto schools could
go a long way toward bringing black students up to average
achievement levels.
Critics of public schools maintain that nothing is done to
change the environmental influence which accompanies a child to
school. Thus if he is poor, he will do poorly. Well off, he will do
well. If average, he may have a 50-50 chance.
"The stimulation, the challenge and the motivation come from
outside the school-in the home and in the real world."
Who knows, if the black man were given a chance, the white
race might end up as the black man's burden at some point in the
future.
Then we'll start all over again.
p£ Sight
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THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 31,  196 Friday, October 31,  1969
THE      UBYSSEY
Page  15
Beer pit members
aren't guzzling
By JIM DAVIES
Why is nobody drinking beer in the Pit?
That is the question Pit manager Erwin Epp is asking himself over
and over again.
Last year there were over 1,200 members of the Pit, the first
on-campus pub open to all students over 21 years of age.
This year there are slightly over 500 members and it appears
many of these have never used their membership.
The Pit is open twice weekly, on Tuesdays and Thursdays.
Last Tuesday, there were about 50 beer guzzlers in attendance.
"This is our average crowd," said Epp.
The Pit has tried different gimmicks to try to draw a larger
membership, but has failed. The Pit has advertised on CYVR radio
and in The Ubyssey, and several members of the UBC folk-singing
club have donated their services.
> "Most of the folk singers were terrible," said Epp.
Said Pit member Larry Musser, science 4: "Those folk-singing
creeps had to be the worst thing I have ever heard since Stardust by
Hoagy Carmichael."
There have been other complaints about the Pit, the most
frequent one being the $2.50 membership fee.
Of 15 eligible students interviewed, 11 gave the cost of
membership as their reason for not joining, three said they didn't even
know the Pit existed and one said he was a member.
"The membership cost is too damn high. It isn't worth $2.50 to
me to drink three beer for a dollar," said Bruce Stout, comm. 4, a
member of last year's Pit management committee.
Grad student association president Art Smolensky said: "I
understand why they charge $2.50, but maybe they should try to
work on the law."
The provincial governmenf requires a minimum $2.50
membership fee in order for a club to have a liquor licence.
"A lot of members are pissed off seeing Alma Mater Society
councillors walking out of the Pit with cases of beer under their
arms," Stout said.
The other common complaint of Pit members is that the place
has no atmosphere.
"It sure is neat to pay 35 cents for a beer and then sit and drink it
in an atmosphere that only rivals a hospital for sterility," said Pit
member Bud Kadin, educ. 2.
The Pit management committee will be approaching the AMS
v. council for a $250,000 grant for new facilities in the SUB basement.
On hearing this, Musser said: "$250,000 for a room in SUB? With
no draft beer, no entertainment and open only twice a week, they
should change their name from Pit to Shit."
Indians speak on Red Power
Henry Jack and Angee Todd, two native Indians, will speak at
noon today in Bu. 106 on what Canadian Indians are doing today.
Jack, a member of the Native Alliance for Red Power, and Todd,
a teacher from Fort St. James, are being presented by the Campus
Left Action Movement and the Speakers Committee.
A discussion will follow at 8 p.m. in the club's lounge.
Employment Interviews
Cominco Ltd. invites applications for permanent employment from graduating students in civil, electrical and
mechanical engineering;
and from graduates and post graduates in geological
chemical, metallurgical and mining engineering, in
honours geology and  honours chemistry.
Graduates and post graduates in geology and Class
of 1971 students in chemical, geological, metallurgical, civil, mechanical and mining engineering
and honours geology will be considered for summer  employment.
Interviews with Cominco representatives:
NOVEMBER 4, 5, 6
and 7, 1969
Further  details available
from  Student   Placement  Office.
Tcominco
John DeWolf
British Columbia's
Progressive Conservative
Leader
UNIVERSITY AND
SOCIETY
THE RELEVANCE?
Friday, Oct. 31
Bu. 100 12:30
CARIBBEAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION
HALLOWEEN   DANCE
LEGION AUDITORIUM
2207 Commercial Drive at 6th Ave.
Friday 31st October at 8:30 p.m.
Admission  $2.00 per  person
Music by Trinidad Moonlighters Steel Band
B. Y. O. B.
ENGINEERS
GEOLOGISTS
GEOPHYSICISTS
HUDSON'S BAY OIL & GAS
WILL HAVE REPRESENTATIVES
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NOVEMBER 4, 5,6, 7
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GEOLOGY AND GEOPHYSICS
Hudson's Bay Oil and Gas
320 SEVENTH AVENUE S.W. CALGARY, ALBERTA, CANADA
4 Page   16
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday,  October 31,  1969
DOWN SOUTH:
good year
for the
button
salesman
By JIM HECK
(Special to Canadian
University Press)
BERKELEY, Calif.
(CUP-CPS)-Contrary to the
prophecies of Richard Nixon,
widespread demonstrations broke
out at U.S. college campuses this
September as the States braced
for what could be a very
tumultuous year.
In Ann Arbor, Mich., more
than 1,500 students turned back
police who came to evict 200
occupiers of the literature, science
and arts building at the University
of Michigan. But after 14 hours of
demands that students and faculty
be given charge of a proposed
university bookstore, more than
400 police reinforcements from
the state highway patrol broke
through the crowd.
More than 25 demonstrators
were injured —one girl,
seriously—and 123 students were
arrested.
At Madison, Wis., more than
2,000 protesters led by radical
Catholic priest James Groppi took
over the state legislature Sept. 29,
demanding higher welfare
payments for the unemployed.
The crowd burst through locked
assembly doors and crowded the
assembly chambers.
Governor Warren Knowles
activated 1,000 national
guardsmen and after conferences
with the state attorney general,
Father Groppi pulled his forces
out.
And in Los Angeles, the UCLA
campus was tense for a while as
the regents of the eight-campus
University of California fired
black philosophy professor Angela
Davis, after she admitted being a
member of the American
Communist Party. Miss Davis
quieted militant students,
however, announcing she would
take the matter to the courts.
But the demonstrations lack
any substance: at Ann Arbor,
students have been demanding a
university-subsidized bookstore
for many years to counter the
high prices from commercial
establishments.
Father Groppi had begun a
march with 40 people from
Milwaukee, 90 miles away to
emphasize their demands. As they
gathered in the library mall on the
University of Wisconsin campus,
students wandered out and soon
the crowd was 2,000-strong. The
march gained momentum and
Father Groppi piously screamed,
"So let's take it!"
But there was question as to
whether the students knew what
they were taking, and why they
were taking it.
Only the UCLA campus has a
viable issue: whether political
beliefs should prohibit professors
from teaching. Miss Davis
contends her firing is based on
racial prejudice, but this seems
simply an histonic gesture to
infuriate conservative regents.
The regents fired Miss Davis
after the longest secret executive
session held since they decided to
fire Clark Kerr, the mastermind of
mass education, back in 1966.
Governor Ronald Reagan openly
called for her dismissal in several
recent public speeches after she
announced to the press she was a
member of the CP.
Reagan is a member of the
board of regents; the other
members are elected or appointed
by the governor.
The action confused many
political observers for two
reasons: first, the same thing
happened last year when Reagan,
who also sits as a trustee on the
board of California's State
College, engineered the firing of
Black Panther George Murray.
Murray, in an amazingly
parallel situation, avowed his
political beliefs and was fired. The
Black Students Union began
demonstrations, tearing up the
student newspaper offices and
roughing up several professors.
The faculty eventually called for a
strike and before the year ended
classes had been closed down for
six weeks, 236 people were
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If you ever become bored
it's your own fault.w
"I may work with pencil and paper, but more important,
I work with ideas," says Tom Grayson, a 1968 B.Sc. graduate
in mathematics from the University of Windsor. Tom is
a member of the information systems programming team at
London Life. He first became interested in a career in
information systems when he took a computer science
course at university. He felt he could reach his goals with
London Life. "You can use the major computer languages here
because you've got the equipment to do it," he says. "It's
satisfying to work with a team, yet be recognized for
your individual effort."
There's a challenge waiting for you too, at London Life.
For further information consult your placement officer,
or write to the Personnel Dept., Station 160A,
LONDON LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY
London, Ontario Friday, October 31, 1969
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 17
Guelph
workers
strike
GUELPH (CUP)-Campus workers at the University of
Guelph-900 in all-began a strike Oct. 24 in support of demands
for union security and better wages.
Represented by the Civil Service Association of Ontario
(CSAO), the workers—technicians, tradesmen, secretaries,
caretakers, housekeepers, porters and drivers—voted 92 per cent
in favor of the strike action Oct. 3, after six months of
negotiations with the university broke down.
All services on the campus with the exception of food
services have either stopped or are operating at a minimum.
Employees of Versafood Services, caterers for university food
services, initially refused to cross the workers' picket lines, but on
Monday a cavalcade of Versafood cars, escorted by police,
crossed into the campus.
Currently membership in local branch 10 of the CSAO on
the campus is voluntary. Union officials are demanding voluntary
membership and compulsory dues for the workers as well as
increased wages.
According to the CSAO, wages at the university "have
fallen below the civil service rates (for comparable employment)
and the conditions of employment have seriously deteriorated."
A union official estimated that wages for campus workers
are "21 to 80 per cent below civil service rates"-clerical workers
on the campus earn $54.50 per week with a grade 12 education,
while civil servants in the same position receive $66 per week
with only a grade 10 education.
The university has offered clerical workers a raise to
$57.50-bringing take-home pay to approximately $48.
The university is reportedly hiring students as "scab labor"
to combat the strike, while residence directors are organizing
student work gangs. Students are also reportedly working in the
university cafeteria.
Neither the Guelph student union nor the faculty
association have yet made a statement on the strike.
Token vote for token senators
Less than five per cent of UBC
students elected four more
student senators Wednesday.
The election of Dorothy Jean
O'Donnell, arts 2, Stan Persky,
arts 7, Drina Allen, science 3, and
Bob Jacobs, commerce 3,
completes the 12-member student
delegation on senate.
Anything to say
If you have 1,000 words or
more to say about mental health,
we have just the magazine for
you.
Community 1, a new
interdisciplinary journal, is being
published by a group of social
work students
The first edition will deal with
mental health. Manuscripts will be
accepted from any interested
faculty member, student, or blorg.
The deadline is Nov. 10 and
contributions should be mailed to
Mjs. Novia Carter, School of
Social Work, UBC, (campus mail.
Miss O'Donnell won the arts
constituency seat with 143 votes.
'Murray Kennedy, arts 4, received
102 votes.
In the grad studies
constituency, Persky received an
overwhelming 76 votes to
Nicholas Collins' 49.
The science constituency gave
152 votes to Miss Allen and 134
to Bruce Wood, science 3.
Jacobs defeated Dennis
Tokarek, law 1, 143 votes to 98,
for the commerce-law seat.
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One thing will  never change,  however, and that  is our ability to offer
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We will be visiting your Campus and look forward
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November 4 and 5
ENGINEERING
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All  Engineering  Disciplines
Geophysics,   Physics,  Mathematics.
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Students who are candidates for Bachelor,
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FOR FURTHER DETAILS VISIT YOUR
STUDENT PLACEMENT OFFICE Page  18
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, October 31, 1969
U.S. fascism rears
ugly, ugly head
From page 16
seriously injured and more than
300 arrests were made.
Few doubted that this would
occur at UCLA if Miss Davis'
Xing was upheld.
Secondly, at their last previous
meeting, the regents passed a
resolution, sponsored by Reagan,
declaring faculty political beliefs
would have nothing to do with
iheir tenure potential.
Reagan now pooh-poohs this,
...aiming American CP members
yre subversive. They are
"'communists with a Big C" he
explains; communists with a little
"C" are simply philosophical. But
Big "C" communists "obviously
have allegiance to another country
and therefore are dangerous and
not qualified to teach on our
campuses."
But the Davis scene is a good
indication of the growing
conservatism and fear of
communist takeover across the
country.
The new president of Columbia
University went before a
McClellan subversives
sub-committee this summer and
read into the record the names of
everyone arrested at Columbia
during last year, because "this is
obviously a national plot to
overthrow the government."
McClellan smiled and invited
several other big university
presidents to do the same:
Harvard, Michigan, Stanford and
Berkeley among them.
San Francisco State president
S. I. Hayakawa, who will
undoubtedly run for either
senator of governor before the
year is out, has railroaded through
a student government with designs
for "ousting subversives". The
government, which is banned tc
nil activists, supports Haykawa
und approved suspensions foi
-yone ever arrested and anyone
■■;: ■* he wants to prohibit.
The   student   newspaper,  last
stige   of   opposition   to
v akawa, has been banned by
government,   though  it still
-.lishes  off-campus.  Hayakawa
!   ci   the   student   government
-"•tion—which  was  worse than
i* y    Mayor    Daley      ever
n  mipulated   in   Chicago—sanc-
ik-iied   by   the   San   Francisco
iXeral courts.
And then there is the Judge J.
J. Hoffman conspiracy trial in
Chicago. It is masqueraded justice
anil quite funny to observe.
Yippie leader Abbie Hoffman is
rumored the director of the
"I virig Theatre" the r urtroom
has turned into.
Bui all humor ;. ;de, the
malicious intent of the
jurisprudence in Chicago is
obvious and has definit. fascistic
we; tones. It could mosi easily be
compaied to the purg<- trials of
several communist nations this
government seems so to  * ar.
Xui the America, student
Tiv veinent isn't movinu it seems
uv j visible manife ition of
•lustration that at the riost has
managed to create a nc lifestyle
u; the iuppy genre.
Pas; ing  through Spi - il Plaza
•_»■ the infamous Berkeley campus
-ie meets a Kentucky evengelist
kiiming that unless you embrace
Christ you will die in a car
:-, cident. Further on, members of
ihe   Weatherman   faction   of
Students for a Democratic Society
pass out-well, force
out—literature.
The Scientology Forever, Inc.
Student Group marches in
Buddha-like draperies and haircuts
each day, singing Hare Krishna,
Hare Hrishna.
And the only one who seems'
to benefit from this is the official
Sproul Plaza button salesman
(700 buttons: if you don't see.
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See your Placement Officer for interview arrangements and further details Friday, October 31,  1969
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 19
X'
SPORTS
Hockey
opener
By RIK NYLAND
The Thunderbird ice hockey
team takes to the ice for its first
home games of the season in a
pair of exhibition games against
the Vanderhoof Bears Saturday
evening and Sunday afternoon.
The Bears should prove little
more than a good practice for the
young, hustling UBC team.
Vanderhoof split a pair of
games with Williams Lake, a team
which the Birds handled easily.
This year's edition of the Birds
are a much younger club than last
year with many of Andy
Backogeorge's jv's moving up to
fill in the vacancies.
With three well-balanced lines
and some pre-season experience
the Birds should fare well in their
intercollegiate league.
For this weekend series Coach
Bob Hindmarch has called up
Gerry Swaney, Rod Silver and
Steve Fera from the    jv's.
Fera may fill in vacancy in the
defence while goalie Rod Silver
may see action in the nets in one
of the games.
In last week's games returnees
Barry Wilcox and Wayne Schaab
proved they were up to their usual
standard as they accounted for
much of the Birds' scoring punch.
With Rick Bardal back in the
nets and rugged Jack Moores and
Laurie Vanzella on defence the
Birds appear basically strong in all
positions.
The addition of Andy
Backogeorge to the Birds coaching
staff will definitely be of great
benefit to the club.
Game times are 8 p.m.
Saturday while Sunday's game
starts at 2:45 p.m.
—dick button photo
JACK MOORES, BIRDS' CAPTAIN and 5th year veteran
defenceman shows the style he expects to retain his berth on the
WCIAA all star team. Moores and the Birds show their style for
campus hockey fans this Saturday at 8:00 p.m. and Sunday at
2:45 with an exhibtion series against the Vanderhoof Bears.
Intramurals
SCHEDULE
CURLING—Nov. 3, 5:00: Com vs. Ed
(Rk 1); St. Marks vs. Kappa Sigma (Rk
2); St. Andrews vs. Arts (Rk 3); AD vs.
Law (Rk 4); St. Marks II vs. Aggies II
(Rk 5); Eng III vs.  Phi Delta (Rk 6).
FOOTBALL—Oct. 31, 12:00: Aggies vs.
Sigma Chi; SAM vs. Union; Eng II vs.
Com II; Kappa Sigma pledges vs. Union
III (4:30); Beta pledges vs. Carey Hall
(4:30).
SOCCER—Divisionl Semi-Finals—Nov.
3, 12:30: Eng I vs. Phi Gamma (field
6); Forestry vs. (winner to be decided
on Oct.   30)—check Intramural office.
Division II Semi-Finals—Nov. 3, 12:30:
Kappa Sigma H vs. PE II (field 9).
League A please check with Intramural
office.
Football types meet
Boxers this weekend
By STEVE MILLARD
This Saturday, UBC plays their second last home game of the
year. The opposition will be provided by the Pacific University Boxers
fr~*m Forest Grove, Oregon.
Details on Pacific are rather sketchy, "But they have to be tough,
because we don't have a soft touch on our schedule," says Coach
Gnup.
UBC and Pacific University have both played Pacific Lutheran
and College of Idaho. Pacific U. lost to PLU 13-0; UBC lost 47-12 to
the same team. College of Idaho beat UBC 20-0 and stopped Pacific
U. 18-13.
Pacific has won two games and lost four so far this year, while
UBC's record is one win, four losses and a tie.
Injuries could bother the Birds as Rick Peck is out for sure, while
Dave Rice is also a doubtful starter. Ron Fowler and Ian Jukes are
also limping with charley horses but should be able to play.
Coach Gnup promises a 100 per cent effort from the Birds this
week. "At least we have time to prepare for this game," said Gnup,
referring to last week, when the Birds had only three practices to
prepare for Western Washington.
The coach commented "if only we can hit as hard on Saturday as
we do Wednesday we'll give them a hell of a game." He also added,
"We had better hit, because our reports say that they sure hit."
Game time on Saturday is 2 p.m. at Thunderbird Stadium.
Thunderbird rugby team
must solve big problems
new group of players, team spirit
is bound to be low. It takes time
for the players to develop it."
Time is up Thunderbirds.
The blame could be placed on
the coach for not getting his
players up for the game, but it is
probably the fault of the players
themselves.
If they don't have enough
pride in their own abilities, then
they shouldn't be playing at all.
Another problem is finishing
off their plays.
They have no trouble getting
the ball moving, but the play just
seems to fizzle and the players
end up in the mud.
UVic certainly showed that the
teams in UBC's league are no
match for them.
New coach Jackie Parker was
able to instil] some kind of
confidence in his team.
Can you Coach Spence?
By SCOTT* McCLOY
What are the reasons for the
dismal performances displayed by
the Thunderbird Rugby team this
year?
In their seven outings to date,
they have come off with but two
wins and one of those in a
tournament.
At times it seems they could
lose to nobody while at others
they have looked grossly inept.
The team started slowly this
year, which was to be expected as
many have little rugby experience.
Two weeks ago the Birds
finally played as a team and beat
Rowing Club. But last week
UVic's Vikings travelled to the
UBC campus and soundly beat the
Birds. The Birds' general play was
sloppy and lacking in spirit.
Earlier in the season, Coach
Spence said, "Whenever you get a
VOC AUCTION S=N°?R
NOON, NOV. 6 — SUB BALLROOM EXT.
EQUIPMENT TO SELL? BRING DOWN TO CLUBS LOUNGE
BY NOV. 5. INSPECTION OF SALEABLE ITEMS NOV. 3, 4
& 5, CLUBS LOUNGS AT NOONS.
Further Info    -    228-8802 or 228-3691
U.B.C. THUNDERBIRD
WINTER SPORTS CENTRE
228-3197
GROUP SKATING PARTIES
Some Dates Are Still Available.
CURLING
Casual Games may be arranged, also
some League openings.
HOCKEY
Saturday, Nov.   1—8 p.m. —
UBC Thunderbirds vs. Vanderhoof
Sunday, Nov. 2—2:45 p.m. —
UBC Thunderbirds vs. Vanderhoof
Saturday, Nov.  8—8 p.m. —
UBC Thunderbirds vs. Williams Lake
Sunday, Nov. 9—2:45 p.m. —
UBC Thunderbirds vs. Williams Lake
Friday, Nov. 14—8 p.m. —
UBC Thunderbirds vs. Maillardville Carlings
NOTE: FREE ADMISSION to UBC STUDENTS to all
THUNDERBIRDS  and  BRAVES   Home   Games
VARSITY SPORTS CENTRE
"Your Varsity Ski Shop"
*
WE ARE NOW FULLY STOCKED
WITH OUR NEW LINE OF
ROSSIGNOL SKIS
STRAT0    -    ALLAIS MAJOR
CONCORDE    -    ELITE G.P.
FULL RANGE OF SIZES
SPECIAL BEGINNERS SETS
SKIS - HARNESS - POLES from 35.00
*
New in Western Canada - La Dolomite Plastic Ski Boots
6 BUCKLES - HAND FINISHED INSIDE - 99.50
SPECIAL!
CORTINA BUCKLE BOOTS - Reg  65.00 - Now 55.00
BINDINGS
4510 W. 10th Ave.
MARKER - SALOMON - TYROLIA
224-6414 Page 20
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday,  October 31,  1969
FRIDAY
EUS
Hallow'en   mixer,    Lions   Gate    Hall.
2611 West 4th,  9 p.m.
UBC   COMMITTEE   ON    VIETNAM
Organizational meeting for people interested  in   organizing  Nov.   15  Vietnam   moratorium,noon,   SUB   119.
THUNDERBIRD   WAR6AMERS   CLUB
Organizational    meeting    for    anyone
interested  in  wargames,   Room  105B,
north end  of SUB  caf,  noon.
LEGAL   AID
Free    legal    advice    given,   SUB    237,
Monday, Wednesday and Friday noon.
CLAM
Discussion, Indians in B.C.  SUB clubs
lounge, SUB
CLAM
Henry   Jack   and   Angie   Todd:   Red
Power.   12:30,   Bu.   106.
SUB   FILMS
"Petulia", stars Julie Christie, George
C.  Scott,  directed by Richard  Lester.
Friday   7,   9   p.m.;   Saturday   8   p.m.;
Sunday 7 p.m.  SUB Theatre.
ALLIANCE   FRANCAISE
Meeting,     12:30.    IH    upper    lounge.
Halloween   surprises !
LIBERAL   CLUB
Coffee party with Pat McGeer,   noon,
SUB  212.
CHRISTIAN   PERSPECTIVES
Dr.   B.   Zylstra,   a  critical  analysis   of
Herbert Marcuse,   SUB 207-209,  noon.
UBC   NDP
Open executive meeting, SUB 113,
noon.
PROGRESSIVE   CONSERVATIVES
Meeting, Bu. 100. Guest speaker John
De Wolf, Prov. leader.
PRE-LIBRARIAN    SOCIETY
Tour of UBC acquisitions division.
12:00, meet at library card catalogue
CIASP
Meeting, noon, SUB 117. Important
meeting to plan training schedules.
CHINESE   OVERSEAS  STUDENTS
ASSOCIATION
Skating party, dance to follow, skating at Thunderbird Arena, 7:30 p.m.,
dance   at   International   House   after.
SPEAKERS   COMMITTEE
Dr. Philip Rieff on crisis and cultural revolution, SUB ballroom, noon.
Admission,  50 cents.
ANTHROSOC
Dr. A. Subbiah on "The Tamil culture of south Indian, some distinctive
features." Bu.   216,  noon.
'tween
classes
SATURDAY
CANOE   CLUB
Rolling    and    rescue    practice,    9:30
a.m.,   Empire   Pool.
SUNDAY
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
"Yoga:   finding the inner self", Lutheran  Campus  Centre,   7  p.m.
UNION COLLEGE RESIDENTS ASSOC.
Mrs. Leo Tarrant speaks "The Crisis
Center,*' 7 p.m. Recreation room,
Union   College.
UBC   CURLING   CLUB
Needs 10 male curlers, 7:15 p m   Call
224-6534.
MONDAY
SCIENCE   FICTION   CLUB
Informal discussion,  SUB clubs workroom, 7 p.m.
PROGRESSIVE    CONSERVATIVES
Executive meeting,   noon,   SUB  211.
HELLENIC   CULTURAL   SOCIETY
Meeting,     International    House,     7:30
P.m.
TUESDAY
ED.   US
Narcotics and drug foundation,  noon,
Ed.   100.
INTER-PROFESSIONAL    EDUCATION
Come and see IPE in action, "Reach**
centre—1144 Commercial Ave. 7 p.m.
WEDNESDAY
COMMERCE   US
General meeting, noon,  Henry Angus
407.
ED.   US
Come   and   find  out what  Inner  City
is, noon, Ed. 100.
PRESOCIAL  WORK  CLUB
Meeting   and   sign-up   for   Willingdon
tour  on Thursday,   SUB   119,   noon.
SAILING CLUB
Meeting    arrangements    at    Kitsilano
discussed,   noon,   Bu.   104.
PSYCH   CLUB
Dr.   David   on  Institute   for   retarded
children, noon,  Ang. 24.
mm
•EAT IN .TAKEOUT* DELIVERY-
3261 W. Broadway   736-7788
Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. & Sat. 3 a.m.
CLASSIFIED
Rate:s Students. Faculty & Club—-3 lines, 1 day 75* 3 days $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00; additional lines 25-e;
4 days price of 3.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and
are payable in advance.
Closing Deadline is 11:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications Office, STUDENT UNION BLDG., Univ. of B.C.,
Vancouver 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
THK SEEDS OI*' TIME AHE OOM-
ing Uj Place Vanier, Saturday,
9-1.    Dance    yourself   stoned.
Greetings
12
Wanted Information
13
Lost & Found
14
L.OST:   WATCH,   OUTSIDE   LIBRA-
ry   area.    Reward.    Upturn    Lo    SLB
216A.	
LOST: TAKEN BY MISTAKE
from undercut green cruisers
jacket witii lour i'ronl pockets.
i.eave   Lost   ii.fid   Found.	
FOI  NIT      NEA It     BROCK      HALL.
, Box containing 14 books, hardbound. Claim at SUB Lost and
Found.
LOST, "WASH BOOM MAJN FLOOR
S.U.I;. Brown briefcase with
hooks, rioasc return to Li. Lebe-
dovich,     588-3258.
Rides & Car Pools
15
MOBILITY   FREEDOM
$18.00    per   month,    including   insurance. See tiie volume dealer in "Two
Wheel     Freedom"     for   details.      Hi
Performance    Honda,   3712    W.    10th
al   Alma.   Phono   228-0077	
KIDI*; WANTED FOI I 8:30s. ALSO
occasional ride home. 19th and
Maple (one block East ol Arbutus)   733-8976   after   10   p.m.
Special Notices
16
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance rate if you are 20 years or
over and have good driving record you may qualify. Phone Ted
Elliott,   299-9422.
WANTED TO BUY . . .A KDM-
her of second-hand copies of the
text Inside Today's Home by
Faulkner.    Phono    085-7303,	
SUE JULIE CHRISTIE, GEO. C.
Scott in "Petulia" Oct. 31, Nov.
1, 2, Fri. 7:00, 9:30. Sat. 8:00.
Sun.   7:00.   SUI!   AUD.   75c.	
NIGHT DIVIO TONIGHT HOOT
after. Phone Edie, 682-9320 or Al
224-01141'.    Dive    Lost   Lagoon.
TODAY 12:110, ISU 100, JOHN DE-
Wolf speaks on the relevance of
Hie   university   to   society.
GERTRUDE! THAT BEAUTIFUL
artsman is going to be in I'lace
Vanier Saturday night!
~S A V K ON BLANK CASETTE
tape C-90, Wehco lifetime guarantee, $2.95 each; C-60 B.A.S.F.,
$1.95 each. Plastic box included.
Call or see Peter Lion, 224-9(162
or   320   Okanagan.	
GIRL WANTED, WHO ~G EN I MN E-
ly likes class, music lo gu to
V.S.O. concerns) with grad. engineer.    Paul,    683-175 1.
MUS. LEO TA RRANT SPEAKS
on "The Crisis Center" Union
College, 7:00 p.m., Sunday, Nov.
2. Coffee and discussion following.
BOB DYLANS PREVIOUSLY I'N-
published Tarantula now nvail-
ahki    I* IIP    Bookstore.	
WEAR. A PUMPKIN, BRING A
costume lo Lions Gate Hall tonite. Horror shows "will start
long before the witching wenching hour. Knginoers $1:00: wenches   25e.
WANTKD* 'DKCKNT LOOKING
Blonde', fluent in Spanish. Polish. English, French, German
(?). to have faith in ex-maiiag-
ing editor. Apply PRO TEM,
Glendon    College,    Toronto    12.
Travel Opportunities
17
THURSDAY
FRENCH
DEPT.
Lecture
Prof
Jacques
Godbout   —
Trends
on
contemporary
Quebec*
cinema,
SUB
auditorium
7:30
P.m.
COME FLY WITH JOHN UK-
Wolf! Today 12:;ill, HU 100. Get
a high view of the University
and   Society.	
STUDENTS INTERESTED IN
filling out a charter to Europe,
leaving approximately Jan. 1,
1970, returning approximately
May 1. One-way or return. Contact, Raven Committee. School
of Architecture.   U.B.C.	
EUROPE, $27n RETURN. VAGA-
hond**   International.   922-27(51
AN AllCSEC TRA1NEESH1I' IS AN
unforgetable work - travel experience!   Angus    115,   Friday   noon.
Wanxed-Miscellaneous
18
WANTED TO BUY "AN ESSEX-
tial course in modern Portuguese"    by   Willis.    Call   6S5-9S37.
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale
21
'68 TR SPITFIRE MARK III. RA-
dio, new tires, ski rack, stereo,
$1750.    Ph.   531-3987
'02   STUDEBAKER,   GOOD   COXD.,
4   door,   radio,   heater.   Only   S450.
-531-4433   after   6:00   p.m.	
'55 CHIOV. 2 DR. SUN., 410 H.P.,
327 cu. in Contact Vic at 874-0117
after 6.   Mail  5760,   Toronto  Rd.
195S STUDEBAKER LARK VI . . .
brand new clutch. Good condition,
S200. Phone Andy at 922-9806
after  6 p.m.	
1966 COMET CALIENTE, 2 DR.
H.T., 289 Automatic, new tires.
Excellent condition. Call Rudy,
434-1976	
196(1 VOLVO 544, GOOD CONDI-
tion, $600. Phone 738-6784. Back
ol    2315   W.   8th.
195(1 AUSTIN A 50, GOOT) Rl'N-
ning condition. Good tires. Any
reasonable offer. Phone 921-7538
after   5   p.m.       	
1955 PORT) 4-DR. AUTO. TRANS.
Well eared for. Good condition.
Phone   731-2044.	
1966 AUSTIN 850 VAN, EXCEL,
cond.      738-1911,      4:30-6:30      p.m.
Mon. -Fri. __
"T62 VW\ MECHANICALLY O.K.,
$350.00 or best offer. Phone 228-
2673,   between   11   a.m.   -   5   p.m.
767 HONDA CONV'T SPORTS
car. Great shape, low insurance
rates 20,000 mi. Phone AM 3-
7327.	
1959 VOLKS, GOOD CONDITION,
radio, snow (ires, etc. Phone
224-7288.   	
~*«0 INVICTA, GOOD CONDTTTON,
T B and P.S. 4-door H.T. $600.
or    offers.    2fi6-683d,	
Xi STMCA. GOOD CONDITION.
Can be seen at Apt. No. 2, 3837
W.   9th    Ave.
Automobiles—Wanted
22
Automobiles—Parts
23
AUSTIN HEALY SPRITE HARD-
top. should fit any model 1961-
1969,   $75.   phono   261-7466.
Automobiles—Repairs
24
Motorcycles
25
'BS HONDA 911 AND HELMET,
1900 mi. Recent tune-up. $190.
or   best   offer.   682-2410.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Dance Bands
31
DIRT CHEAP ROCK BAND —
Rock Band Dirt Cheap — Band
Cheap Dirt Rock — Any way
you   want   it.    985-5727,   Dave.
Duplicating  &  Copying
32
Miscellaneous
33
RIOI.IAHLI*' DOMESTIC HELP.
Walls washed, rug and upholstery
eleaning. Fully experienced personalized s e r v ice. Executive
Home    Maids'    Ltd.    922-4568.
Photography
34
35
36
37
Repairing—All Kinds
Rentals—Miscellaneous
Scandals
DIRT CHEAP ROCK BAND —
Rock Band Dirt Cheap — Band
Cheap Dirt Rock — Any way you
want    it.     985-5727.   Dave	
CRAIG, BOB, AND GEORGE
have   Moudo   Maria.	
YES! YES! YOU CRAZY DANO-
ing kissing fool. I'll meet you in
Place Vanier Saturday night a
The   Seeds   ol   Time    Dance.
-MINKS, BUNNIES, AND OTHER
proliferate costumes are more
than welcome at tonight's Engineers' mixer at Lions Grate Hall,
2611 West 4th. Nurses, Home-Ec,
Education. Rehab, lied., etc. girls
only   25c:   engineers   $1.00.
Sewing & Alterations
38
Typewriters & Repairs
39
Typing
40
EXPERIENCED ELKCTRIC HOME
typing. Essays, theses, etc. Neat,
accurate work, reasonable, rates.
Phone   321-2102.
Typing—Cont'd
40
EXPERT TYPING—THESIS 35c/
page, Essays 30c page — 5c per
copy. For an efficient service,
phone    325-0545.
TYPING—PHONE 731-7511 - 9:00 -
5:00.   266-6662   after   6:00.
HOME TYPING —ELECTRIC Experience. Reasonable rates. Phone
738-7881.	
NORTH SHORE TYPIST, ESSAYS
— notes, paper:) at reasonable
rates. Five years experience.
Phone   988-6798.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Female
51
GIRLS: EARN EXTRA SKI
money in pleasant part-time work.
Remuneration   open   for  ambitious
—987-1772	
JON'S PIZZARAMA RESTAUR-
ants requires part and full-time
wairesses. Attractive girls, 18-25.
Apply in person only, 2676 West
Broadway. Shifts available at all
four    restaurants.
Help Wanted—Male
52
INTERESTED IN SELLING
Then why not be an advertising
salesman for The Ubyssey? This is
an excellent opportunity to gain experience and to earn worthw-hile
commissions for part-time work.
Reliable 2nd and 3rd year business-
minded student who will work hard
for 10 or 12 hours weekly is needed. If interested apply to the Publications Office, Rm. 241, SUB,
(afternoons). 	
JON'S PIZZARAMA RESTAUR-
ants require young men with
cars for part-time general kitchen work. Apply in person only,
2676 West    Broadway.
Male or Female
53
OPERATE YOUR OWN " ON
campus" stationery - office supplies business. Special programs
add to vour inventive sales skills.
Phone  879-046:1	
SUBSTDTZE YOUR INCOME BY
earning money in your spare
time, retailing Holiday Magic
Cosmetics on campus. No. 6 —
1557   W.   Broadway.   733-6316.
NEED MONEY? W*E'LL TRAIN
you to sell and earn money?
526-6325.
Work Wanted
54
INSTRUCTION
Instruction Wanted
61
WANTED: 1st YEAR MATH. TU-
dor, New West.-Surrey area.
732-7894.
Language Instruction
61A
QUALITY   LANGUAGE   TUTORING
and
CERTIFIED    TRANSLATIONS
CONVERSA-SCHOOL    OF
LANGLTAGES
1603   W.   4th   at   Fir   —  736-5401
Chargex  Cards  Accepted
Music
62
MIOLA PHONE HORN IN "F". Excellent condition. Asking $125.00.
Phone    526-5086.
Special Classes
63
Tutoring
64
TUTORING  IN   MATH-PHYS.   FOR
undergrad    bv   instructor.    (Ph.D.)
85.00   hr.   Ph.   733-6037   eves.
FLAMENCO     GUITAR      -TUITION.
Michael   Kocia],   tel.   224-7762.
FRENCH   LESSONS   —   PARISIAN
teacher—20 yrs. of experience. Mr.
Alain    Neumand     (1102)    4665    W.
10th    Ave.    Call   224-4434    after   4
p.m.   or   weekend.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
BIRD CALLS
Your   Student   Telephone
Directory
NOW AVAILABLE — $1.00
al  the Bookstore,
AMS   Publications  Office
and Thunderbird  Shop
Mis.   For   Sale—Cont'd
71
JUST ARRIVED! BEAUTIFULLY
embroidered Afghan coats. Sheepskin linings. Reasonably priced.
Leatherbox, 2645 West 4th, The
Mews,   3257   West   Broadway.
KNESSIL WHITE STAR RSE 215;
Head competition GS, 215; Stroltz
deluxe racer boot, No. 9; Le-
trappeur Elite pro boots, No. 9%.
All in excellent condition. Call
263-9188   after   five.	
NEW YAMAHA 215 HI - FLEX
skis.   Best  offer,   985-6930   after   6.
ST. GEORGE SOLID-BODY EL.
guitar. Wide neck, $52. Toledo
semi-acoustic, $58. Evenings ,ph.
988-4564.	
CLEANUP — CHOICE CLOTHING
— dishes — sewing model — etc.
Bargains galore—Sunday only —
9   to   9.   6650   Wiltshire.	
FOR SALE -— KOSLACH FIBER-
glass ski boots, size 11%M, 5
buckle,   $80.   Call   Ross,   266-9268.
CASSETTE TAPE RECORDER —
near   new.   266-9268.   $29.	
GOOD USED ELECTRIC STOVE
for sale, only $25.00 or offer.
Dave   (325-3908)   after   6   p.m.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
LIVE CHEAPLY ON CAMPUS.
Rooms for male students at $50
mo. with kitchen privileges! Large
study room and lounge. Board
available for $45. Weekly linen.
Come to 5760 Toronto Road or
phone    Ron    at   224-0327	
GIRL WANTED TO SHARE FUR-
nished room, $30 per person, TV.
3913 W. 19th Ave. Good company
wanted. No dull type. Phone 224-
6696.	
ACCOMMODATION AVAILABLE
for two male students. Close to'
I'.B.C.   Tel.   224-4294.	
FREE BED - SITTING ROOM,
bathroom en suite in lovely South'
Granville home for responsible
conscientious student; on bus line,
no kitchen privileges. Ph. 224-
6090.	
WARM NEW L-H-K ROOM, PRI-
vate entrance and bathroom. 25th
and MacDonald, close to bus. 738-
5603.	
QUIET, CLEAN ROOM & KIT-
chenette, fridge, gas stove, sink,
$12. week. Serious student, girl
preferred.    738-7049.	
ROOM AVAILABLE IN HOME
near UBC gates. Board if desired. Please phone CA 4-6006 after
5  p.m.	
ROOM AVAILABLE FOR MALE
student, Nov. 2. Priv. entrance,
bath    and   shower.    RE   8-6992.
ROOM FOR THREE GUYS. ALL
furnishings, heat, light & phone.
3rd & Burrard. Available now.
Ph.   738-0784. __
MALES, LARGE DOUBLE OCCU-
pancy sleeping room; new twin
beds, furn., and carpet; quiet.
Near    U.B.C.    228-8040.	
ROOM AND BOARD AVAILABLE
at Psi Upsilon, $95 month. Cal]
228-9438    for   Jamie.
Room & Board
82
room: and board,  delta
Kappa Epsilon, 5765 Agronomy
Road.    224-9691	
SIGMA CHI HOUSE—LARGEST
rooms on Campus, two lounges
and dining hall. Free room cleaning service, laundry, color TV.
Come out and see us, 5725 Agronomy   Rd.,   224-5530,   evenings.
Furn. Houses & Apts.
83
FURN. SUITE, No. 12, 1396 WEST
11th Ave. Available Nov. 1. Apply
After   6   p.m.   738-7447.	
SENIOR GIRL FOR FURN. WEST
end apt., 26th floor indoor pool,
$80.  Ph.   681-7079
SENIOR STUDENT, FEMALE TO
share semi-furnished West End
suite. No. 41—1454 Pendrell, after
6:30.
Unfurn. Houses  & Apts.
84
HOUSE   TO    SHARE.    OWN    BED-
room.    263-3913	
GIRL   OVER   21   TO   SHARE   PUR-
nished    4-6    bedroom    house   from
Nov.  1 at 3755 W.  8th Ave. Phone
224-0570.    Quiet   place    for    studying.
IT PAYS TO ADVERTISE IN THE UBYSSEY CLASSIFIED SECTION

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